Mungrisdale - Mutford

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

359-362

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'Mungrisdale - Mutford', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 359-362. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51164 Date accessed: 17 September 2014.


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Mungrisdale

MUNGRISDALE, a chapelry, in the parish of Greystock, union of Penrith, Leath ward, E. division of Cumberland, 8½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Keswick; containing 222 inhabitants. There are quarries of blue slate and flagstone within the chapelry. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £57; patron, the Rector of Greystock. The chapel was rebuilt in 1754. John Slee, a distinguished mathematician, who died in 1828, was born here.

Munsley (St. Bartholomew)

MUNSLEY (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Ledbury, hundred of Radlow, county of Hereford, 4 miles (N. W.) from Ledbury; containing 238 inhabitants. It is watered by a branch of the river Leden, and comprises 1215 acres of land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 7. 6.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. William Domville: the tithes have been commuted for £220, and the glebe consists of about 58 acres.

Munslow (St. Michael)

MUNSLOW (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Ludlow, hundred of Munslow, S. division of Salop, 9½ miles (N.) from Ludlow; containing 773 inhabitants, of whom 160 are in the township. This parish is situated on the road from Ludlow to Wenlock, and comprises by measurement 3484 acres; the surface is finely varied. An act was passed in 1838 for inclosing 168 acres of waste land. The mansion of Millichope Park, the seat of the Rev. R. N. Pemberton, is in the pure Grecian style, and commands beautiful views: at a distance from it is a temple. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 15. 2½; net income, £665; patron, the Rev. R. Powell. The church is an ancient structure in the early English style, with a low square tower. The pulpit, and the front of the gallery, are of carved oak: the eastern window, and the three side ones, are of stained glass; the latter have been restored to their original open style of colouring. A chantry chapel, restored, and fitted up with carved oak, is used as a vestry. There is a chapel of ease at Broadstone. Munslow gave the title of Baron to Edward Littleton, lord chief justice of the common pleas, and keeper of the great seal, who was born here in 1589, in a house now used as a school.

Murcot

MURCOT, a hamlet, in the parish of Charltonupon-Otmore, union of Bicester, hundred of Ploughley, county of Oxford, 4½ miles (S.) from the town of Bicester; containing 169 inhabitants.

Murcott

MURCOTT, a hamlet, partly in the parish of LongBuckby, and partly in that of Watford, union of Daventry, hundred of Guilsborough, S. division of the county of Northampton, 5 miles (N. E. by N.) from Daventry; containing 81 inhabitants.

Murrah, with Berrier.—See Berrier.

MURRAH, with Berrier.—See Berrier.

Murrell-Green

MURRELL-GREEN, a tything, in the parish and hundred of Odiham, poor-law union of HartleyWintney, Odiham and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2¾ miles (S. W.) from Hartford-Bridge; containing 554 inhabitants.

Mursley (St. Mary)

MURSLEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Winsloe, hundred of Cottesloe, county of Buckingham, 3¾ miles (E. by N.) from Winslow; containing, with the hamlet of Salden, 479 inhabitants. This place had formerly a market on Thursday, and two fairs, one on the day of the Assumption, and the other on the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin, all of which have been long disused. The parish comprises 2493 acres. Salden House, the seat of the Fortescue family, was erected by Sir John Fortescue, in the reign of Elizabeth, and was visited both by that queen and by James I., to whom Sir John was chancellor; he died in 1607, and was buried at Westminster, but his remains were removed afterwards to Mursley, and deposited in the chancel of the church. The house has been taken down, and only some slight remains of the offices mark out the site. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11, and in the patronage of the Hon. Mrs. Childers; net income, £163. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1814; the glebe altogether comprises 246 acres, with a house. The church contains some monuments to the family of Fortescue.

Murston (All Saints)

MURSTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Milton, Upper division of the lathe of Scray, E. division of Kent, 1 mile (E. S. E.) from Milton; containing 167 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the west and north by the Swale, which separates it from the Isle of Elmeley. It comprises 1317a. 3r. 36½p., whereof 706 acres are arable, 437 pasture, 82 woodland, and 60 orchard-ground. About 93 acres are detached nearly five miles from the rest of the parish, and called the Luddenham portion. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 14. 2., and in the gift of St. John's College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted for £615, and the glebe comprises 20½ acres. The church is in the Norman style, with a square western tower and wooden turret.

Murton, or Moor-Town

MURTON, or Moor-Town, a township, in the parish of Lamplugh, union of Whitehaven, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 8 miles (E. by N.) from Whitehaven; containing 156 inhabitants. The manufacture of spades, shovels, &c., is carried on; and there are several lime-works.

Murton, or Moor-Town

MURTON, or Moor-Town, a township, in the parish and union of Tynemouth, E. division of Castle ward, S. division of Northumberland, 2½ miles (N. W.) from North Shields; containing 438 inhabitants, who are chiefly employed in the coal-mines with which the district abounds. It comprises, exclusively of a moor, 443 acres, of which two-thirds are arable, and the remainder grass-land: there are excellent quarries of freestone. The villages of New York and Philadelphia are in the township. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £135. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A stone coffin, inclosing a perfect skeleton, was found in one of the quarries, in 1790.

Murton

MURTON, a township, in the parish of Bongate, or St. Michael, Appleby, East ward and union, county of Westmorland, 3 miles (E. N. E.) from Appleby; containing 172 inhabitants. This township comprises 5766 acres, whereof 3500 are common, moorland, or waste; it has some veins of lead-ore, which are worked. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £27, payable to the Dean and Chapter of Carlisle. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Murton

MURTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Osbaldwick, union of York, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York, 3 miles (E. by N.) from York; containing 161 inhabitants. The township is on the road from York to Garrowby, and comprises by computation 1060 acres, in equal portions of arable and pasture; the surface is level, and the soil various. The chapel, which is ancient, was built by some individual connected with the place; and lands in the parish were charged by the founder with its repairs, and a small payment to a clergyman to perform the duty; but the lands were so ill defined as to lead to repeated disputes and litigation, and there appears at present no remedy except carrying the case into a court of law. The duty was performed by the incumbent of Osbaldwick, until 1834; a violent storm in that year damaged the roof of the edifice, and rendered it unfit for service, and the person then in possession of the lands supposed to be chargeable with its repairs, resisting the claim, it has since remained in a state of dilapidation.

Murton, East

MURTON, EAST, a township, in the parish of Dalton-le-Dale, union of Easington, N. division of Easington ward and of the county of Durham, 8½ miles (E. N. E.) from Durham; containing 521 inhabitants. The manor and vill were the property of the family of Lumley from an early date to the reign of Elizabeth; the ancient tenure is uniformly described to be by homage and fealty, in free and common socage. The monks of Durham, also, at a remote period received a grant of a small portion of land here from Cendune, son of Walter de Morton. The South Hetton Company opened a valuable mine of coal in the township, in 1843, upon a scale unprecedented in the trade: during the progress of sinking through a quicksand, engine power to the extent of 1500 horses was in operation, and the principal seam of coal was found at a depth of 1476 feet from the surface. The Durham and Sunderland railway passes through the township.

Musbury (St. Michael)

MUSBURY (St. Michael), a parish, in the union and hundred of Axminster, Honiton and S. divisions of Devon, 3 miles (S. W.) from Axminster; containing 495 inhabitants. This place was the residence of the Drake family, from the time of Henry VII., for several generations. The parish comprises 2149 acres, of which 136 are common or waste land. A fair is held at Michaelmas. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 11. 8., and in the gift of W. Payne, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £435. The church is a very ancient structure, with a south aisle added towards the close of the fifteenth century, by the Drake family, to whom it contains some monuments. Ash House, now occupied as a farmhouse, derives interest from having been the birthplace, in 1650, of the renowned Duke of Marlborough, whose mother was then on a visit to her father, Sir John Drake. Within the parish is a fortress of elliptical form, called Musbury Castle, having a double intrenchment inclosing an area of 20 acres.

Musbury

MUSBURY, an ecclesiastical district, in the parishes of Bury and Whalley, union of Haslingden, Higher division of the hundred of Blackburn, N. division of Lancashire, 3 miles (S. W.) from Haslingden; containing 3000 inhabitants, of whom about one-half are in the township of Musbury. From the act of resumption of the crown possessions, passed in the 1st of Henry VII., it appears that a patent office, then existing, of "park-keeper of Musbury," was held by Laurens Maderer, and that his rights and privileges were secured by the act, as were those of various other official persons connected with the county. The ecclesiastical district was constituted in Sept. 1844, under the provisions of the act of 6th and 7th Victoria, cap. 37; its extent is about three miles by two miles, the township of Musbury forming more than half of it. The surface is very uneven; the land chiefly pasture and meadow, being rather unsuitable for growing corn; and the scenery highly picturesque: among the hills and dales flow four streams, sufficiently large to work a number of small manufactories. The Tor, a beautifully-formed hill standing apart from the rest, is 1100 feet above the level of the sea, and is seen at a considerable distance. A coal-mine is in operation; and excellent freestone is abundant, of which quarries have been opened in different places. The Ogden is the most considerable river within the district; the Irwell is the boundary on the north-east. The East Lancashire railway passes through. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Crown and the Bishop of Manchester, alternately. W. Turner, Esq., a resident in the district, is about to erect a church at his own cost. The Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists have places of worship.

Muscliffe

MUSCLIFFE, a tything, in the parish of Holdenhurst, union of Christchurch, liberty of Westover, Ringwood and S. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 68 inhabitants.

Muscoates

MUSCOATES, a township, in the parish of Kirkdale, union of Helmsley, wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York, 5¼ miles (E. S. E.) from the town of Helmsley; containing 71 inhabitants. The township is on the Rical rivulet, and comprises by computation 800 acres: the river Rye passes on the south.

Muscott

MUSCOTT, a hamlet, in the parish of Norton, union of Daventry, hundred of Fawsley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 4¾ miles (E. by N.) from Daventry; containing 40 inhabitants.

Musden Grange

MUSDEN GRANGE, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Uttoxeter, S. division of the hundred of Totmonslow, N. division of the county of Stafford; containing 21 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 610 acres, of which 520 are grass-land, 70 arable, and 20 wood. The church and poor's rates, and assessed taxes, are paid to the parish of Croxden, between eight and nine miles distant.

Musgrave, Great (St. Theobald)

MUSGRAVE, GREAT (St. Theobald), a parish, in East ward and union, county of Westmorland, 2 miles (W. S. W.) from Brough; containing 167 inhabitants. This parish comprises 4080 acres, of which 2400 are common or waste; it is bounded on the southeast by the river Belo, and on the south-west by the Eden, which is crossed by a bridge of two arches, erected in 1826. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 1. 11½.; net income, £149; patron, the Bishop of Carlisle. The Rev. Septimus Collinson, D.D., in 1827 left £1500 three per cent. consols. for the endowment of a free school, which is conducted on the national plan.

Musgrave, Little

MUSGRAVE, LITTLE, a township, in the parish of Crosby-Garret, East ward and union, county of Westmorland, 3 miles (W. S. W.) from Brough; containing 72 inhabitants. The manor, which is co-extensive with the township, is the property of the ancient family of Musgrave.

Muskham, North (St. Wilfrid)

MUSKHAM, NORTH (St. Wilfrid), a parish, in the union of Southwell, N. division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 3 miles (N.) from Newark; containing, with the township of Bathley, 825 inhabitants. This parish is bounded on the east by the river Trent, across which is a ferry to Holme, and comprises by measurement 2900 acres of land, inclosed in 1771; the soil is fertile. The village is pleasantly situated on the great north road. The living is a discharged vicarage, formerly in medieties, the first mediety valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 8., and the second valued at £8. 19. 7.; net income, £173; impropriators, the Duke of Newcastle and others. The tithes were commuted for land under the act of inclosure; the vicarial glebe comprises 91 acres. The church is a handsome structure on the bank of the Trent. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A free grammar school was founded in 1727, by Mrs. Woolhouse and the Disney family, who endowed it with land producing upwards of £50 per annum; it had some exhibitions to Pembroke College, Cambridge, founded by a Mr. Smith, but now lost.

Muskham, South (St. Wilfrid)

MUSKHAM, SOUTH (St. Wilfrid), a parish, in the union of Southwell, N. division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 2¼ miles (N.) from Newark; containing 262 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the east and south by the river Trent, which is crossed by a bridge leading towards Newark; it comprises 2467a. 2r., and the soil is fertile. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4; patron, the Prebendary of South Muskham in the Collegiate Church of Southwell. The great tithes have been commuted for £677. 4. 3., and the vicarial for £139. 10.; the rectorial glebe comprises 141 acres, and the vicarial three. The church is a neat structure in the early English style.

Muston (St. John the Baptist)

MUSTON (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Grantham, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 5½ miles (W. by N.) from Grantham; containing 351 inhabitants. The Grantham canal passes through the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 13. 1½., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £400. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Muston (All Saints)

MUSTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Scarborough, wapentake of Dickering, E. riding of York, 1 mile (N.) from Hunmanby; containing 417 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurment 2225 acres, of which more than two-thirds are arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture, with a very small portion of woodland: the substratum contains stone which is quarried for the roads, and also for building. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 10.; patron and impropriator, B. O. Mitford, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £254. 17. 6., and the incumbent's for £126. 18. 9.; the glebe comprises 10 acres. The church is a small edifice. There are places of worship for Independents and Primitive Methodists.

Mutford (St. Andrew)

MUTFORD (St. Andrew), a parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Mutford and Lothingland, E. division of Suffolk, 3½ miles (E. S. E.) from Beccles; containing 415 inhabitants. This parish, which gives name to the half-hundred of Mutford, comprises by estimation 1500 acres: the soil is good, and well cultivated; the prevailing scenery is pleasing. The living is a discharged vicarage, annexed to the rectories of Barnby and Wheatacre All Saints, and valued in the king's books at £7. 17. 1.: the great tithes of Mutford have been commuted for £245, and the small for £110; there is a vicarial glebe of 29 acres. The church is a handsome structure, chiefly in the decorated English style, with a circular tower surmounted by an octangular turret, and contains some highly-enriched Norman details, among which is a deeply-moulded arch. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.