Nateby - Nazeing

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

366-368

Citation Show another format:

'Nateby - Nazeing', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 366-368. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51167 Date accessed: 22 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Nateby

NATEBY, a township, in the parish and union of Garstang, hundred of Amounderness, N. division of Lancashire, 1½ mile (N. N. W.) from Garstang; containing 341 inhabitants. This township is said to have been in the tenure of the family of Travers, of Tulketh, so far back as the reign of Henry I.; Laurence Travers, who lived soon after that reign, was succeeded by eleven generations, and Nateby appears in possession of William Travers in the reign of Elizabeth. The greater part of the township now belongs to the Duke of Hamilton; that part not his grace's property was sold, about 1800, by Mr. Hand to various persons. Bower's House, here, was the seat of Richard Green about 1660; his daughter, Dorothy, was married to John Brockholes, Esq., of Claughton. The township comprises 2024 acres of land. There is a place of worship for dissenters.

Nateby

NATEBY, a township, in the parish of KirkbyStephen, East ward and union, county of Westmorland, 1½ mile (S.) from Kirkby-Stephen; containing 108 inhabitants. The township consists of 2075 acres, whereof 1000 are waste or common. It is bounded on the west by the river Eden, which, flowing over a rocky bed, forms one of the greatest natural curiosities in the kingdom, and is here crossed by Stenkrith bridge. About two miles and a half east of the village, is a lofty fell called the Nine Standards, from some stones erected there to mark the boundary of the counties of York and Westmorland.

Nateley-Scures (St. Swithin)

NATELEY-SCURES (St. Swithin), a parish, in the union and hundred of Basingstoke, Basingstoke and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 4½ miles (E.) from Basingstoke; containing 278 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from HartfordBridge to Basingstoke, and comprises 994 acres, of which 544 are arable, 115 pasture, 48 woodland, and the remainder open common; the surface is varied. Facilities of conveyance are afforded by the Basingstoke canal and the South-Western railway. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 10. 10., and in the gift of Lord Dorchester: the tithes have been commuted for £215, and the glebe comprises 12 acres. The church is an ancient structure with a highly-enriched Norman doorway.

Nateley, Up (St. Stephen)

NATELEY, UP (St. Stephen), a parish, in the union and hundred of Basingstoke, Basingstoke and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2½ miles (W. by N.) from Odiham; containing 137 inhabitants. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Basingstoke: the tithes have been commuted for £125 payable to Magdalen College, Oxford, and £85 to the vicar.

Natland

NATLAND, a chapelry, in the parish, union, and ward of Kendal, county of Westmorland, 2¼ miles (S.) from Kendal; containing 251 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1117 acres, of which about 100 are common, and the remainder old inclosures; the lands are nearly in equal portions arable, pasture, and meadow: the lower grounds are watered by the river Kent. The Lancaster canal, and the Lancaster and Carlisle railway, which passes through the whole length of the chapelry, afford facility of conveyance. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £110, with a house; patron, the Vicar of Kendal. The chapel, rebuilt about 1735, was taken down in 1825, and a neat edifice in the early English style, with an embattled tower, erected near its site, at a cost of £550. A school is endowed with £40 a year, arising from Crow Park estate, given by Charles Shipphard in 1779. Water-Crook, a place so called from a bend of the river, was the site of the Roman station Concangium, a square fort, the ramparts of which are still discernible, where foundations of buildings, coins, seals, fragments of altars, statues, and urns, with other relics, have been found. There is also a hill called Helm, a mile and a half from the station, on which are remains of a fort, Castlesteads, the inner and outer vallum being distinctly discernible; this was probably an exploratory camp to Water Crook. It is in sight of the beacon on Warton-Crag, which communicates with Lancaster.

Natton.—See Fiddington.

NATTON.—See Fiddington

Naughton (St. Mary)

NAUGHTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Cosford, W. division of Suffolk, 5 miles (N.) from Hadleigh; containing 137 inhabitants, and comprising 800 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 15.; net income, £190; patron, William Edge, Esq., R.N.

Naunton (St. Andrew)

NAUNTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Stow-on-the-Wold, partly in the hundred of Bradley, but chiefly in the Lower division of that of Slaughter, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 5 miles (W. S. W.) from Stow; containing, with the hamlet of Aylworth and tything of Harford, 523 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 13. 4., and in the gift of the Bishop of Worcester: the tithes have been commuted for £130; there are 53 acres of ancient glebe, and an allotment has been made of 444 acres in addition, worth about 20s. per acre. Here is a place of worship for Baptists.

Naunton-Beauchamp (St. Bartholomew)

NAUNTON-BEAUCHAMP (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union, and Upper division of the hundred, of Pershore, Pershore and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 4¾ miles (N. N. E.) from Pershore; containing 176 inhabitants. The parish is watered by the river Piddle, and comprises 1004 acres, of which 498 are arable, 365 pasture, and about 80 meadow; the soil is a strong clay. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15, and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £96. The glebe comprises about 2 acres: the tithes were commuted for 36 acres of land, with a modus, in 1771. The church, which stands near the centre of the village, was rebuilt in 1776.

Navenby (St. Peter)

NAVENBY (St. Peter), a parish, and formerly a market-town, in the Higher division of the wapentake of Boothby-Graffo, parts of Kesteven, union and county of Lincoln, 9½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Sleaford; containing 942 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 10.; net income, £588; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Christ's College, Cambridge: the tithes were commuted for land in 1770. The church is in the early and decorated English styles. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and a school is aided by an annual payment of £31 from lands allotted to the poor, under the inclosure act, and producing £100 per annum.

Navestock (St. Thomas the Apostle)

NAVESTOCK (St. Thomas the Apostle), a parish, in the union and hundred of Ongar, S. division of Essex, 7 miles (N. N. E.) from Romford; containing 887 inhabitants. The parish comprises 4500 acres of land, diversified with hill and dale; the soil on the hills is generally light and gravelly, and in the low lands wet and heavy. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 3. 9., and in the gift of Trinity College, Oxford: the vicar's tithes have been commuted for £570, and those of the college for a like amount; the glebe comprises 19 acres. The church, a small ancient edifice, is ornamented with a belfry tower of wood surmounted by a shingled spire, and has a north doorway with a semicircular arch of Norman character; many of the Waldegraves have been interred here. A school is supported by Earl Waldegrave, whose family became possessed of the manor nearly 300 years since. On a common are some remains of a fortification, near which is an embankment of considerable height, defended on each side by a moat.

Naworth

NAWORTH, a township, in the parish and union of Brampton, Eskdale ward, E. division of the county of Cumberland, 2¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from Brampton; containing 466 inhabitants. Naworth Castle is described in the article on Brampton.

Nawton

NAWTON, a township, in the parish of Kirkdale, union of Helmsley, wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York, 2¾ miles (E.) from Helmsley; containing 337 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1260 acres. The village, which is on the road from Helmsley to Kirkby-Moorside, adjoins that of Beadlam. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. John Stockton, in 1839, left £15 per annum for the instruction of children.

Nayland (St. Stephen)

NAYLAND (St. Stephen), a parish, and formerly a market-town, in the union of Sudbury, hundred of Babergh, W. division of Suffolk, 6 miles (N. by W.) from Colchester, 16 miles (S. W. by W.) from Ipswich, and 57 (N. E.) from London; containing 1114 inhabitants. The town is situated on the navigable river Stour, in a fertile valley surrounded by hills commanding fine views, and on the road to Hadleigh. It consists of several streets, the principal of which contains some good houses, and has three large flour-mills in the centre; the inhabitants are supplied with water from springs. The trade is chiefly in flour; and a factory, established in 1838, for the purpose of winding and drawing silk, furnishes employment to about 200 women and children. A fair takes place on the second Wednesday in October, for horses, cattle, and toys. A court leet is held on Easter-Monday, at which the steward of the manor presides. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £139; patron, Sir J. R. Rowley, Bart.: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £220, and the incumbent's for £50. 10. The church, situated in the centre of the town, is a fine structure in the later English style, containing a good painting of Our Saviour, and several ancient marble monuments inlaid with brass. There is a place of worship for Independents. A fund, arising from land, is appropriated for the benefit of the clergyman, and various charitable purposes; and a national school is supported by subscription. An ancient building here, erected in the reign of Henry VIII., and now occupied as a private residence, is supposed to have been a religious house. Sir Richard Weston was in 1628 made lord treasurer, and created Baron of Nayland. The Rev. William Jones, the intimate friend of Bishop Horne, and author of some theological works of high reputation, was incumbent of the parish.

Nazeing (All Saints)

NAZEING (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Epping, hundred of Waltham, S. division of Essex, 5¼ miles (N. W.) from Epping; containing 824 inhabitants. The parish is separated from the county of Hertford by the river Lea, and comprises 3890a. 2r. 32p., of which 823 acres are arable, about 80 woodland, and the remainder meadow and pasture. Its surface is undulated, in some parts rising into eminences which command finely-varied prospects. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14. 5. 5., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £255; impropriator, Sir W. Wake, Bart. The church is a spacious structure, with a square embattled tower; the parsonagehouse is a handsome ancient mansion, surrounded with a moat. At the eastern extremity of the parish are vestiges of a fortification called Ambersbank, supposed to be British. The learned Dr. Joseph Hall, Bishop of Norwich, was at one time vicar of the parish; as was subsequently Dr. Thomas Fuller, the church historian.



<--Previous:
Naburn - Nassington