Newton-Rigny - Newton, Wood

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

413-415

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'Newton-Rigny - Newton, Wood', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 413-415. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51179 Date accessed: 24 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Newton-Rigny

NEWTON-RIGNY, a parish, in the union of Penrith, Leath ward, E. division of Cumberland, 3 miles (W. N. W.) from Penrith; containing, with the township of Catterlin, 310 inhabitants, of whom 163 are in the township of Newton-Rigny. The parish comprises 2414a. 29p., of which 2347 acres are arable, and the remainder roads and waste; the soil is a strong clay, the surface flat, and the river Petterel flows through the grounds. The living is a vicarage; net income, £80; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Carlisle.

Newton-Solney (St. Mary)

NEWTON-SOLNEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Burton, hundred of Repton and Gresley, S. division of the county of Derby, 2¼ miles (N. E.) from Burton; containing 311 inhabitants. The manor was held at an early period, under the earls of Chester, by the ancient equestrian family of Solney, whose coheiress married into the Longford family, of whom the property was purchased by the Leighs, about the reign of Henry VIII. The heiress of the Leighs brought it to the Everys; and about 1795 Abraham Hoskins, Esq., purchased the principal estate. The parish is bounded on the west by the river Trent, and comprises 1401 acres, of rich strong land: on the Earl of Chesterfield's property are 120 acres of wood and plantations. The village is pleasant and well built; and there are several good mansions in the parish. On a commanding eminence is a large castellated building, called Hoskins' Folly. The living is a donative; net income, £20; patron and impropriator, Sir Henry Every, Bart. The church consists of a nave, chancel, and aisles, with a low tower and short spire.

Newton, South (St. Andrew)

NEWTON, SOUTH (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Wilton, hundred of Branch and Dole, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 5 miles (N. W.) from Salisbury; containing 692 inhabitants. It is on the road from Bath to Salisbury, and comprises 3370a. 1r. 27p. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 18. 4.; income, £221, with a house; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Pembroke. The church has been repewed.

Newton Stacey

NEWTON STACEY, a tything, in the parish and hundred of Barton-Stacey, union of Andover, Andover and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 6 miles (S. W. by S.) from the town of Whitchurch; containing 85 inhabitants.

Newton-Toney

NEWTON-TONEY, a parish, in the union and hundred of Amesbury, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 4 miles (E. by S.) from Amesbury; containing 324 inhabitants. This parish, which is on the road from Salisbury to Malmesbury, comprises by measurement 2333 acres. The surface is finely varied, and the lower grounds are intersected by a stream, which for some months in the year waters them. The village is situated on the eastern part of Salisbury Plain, bordering upon Hampshire; and the scenery is enlivened by the grounds of Wilbury House, a handsome mansion, the seat of Sir Alexander Malet, Bart., proprietor of nearly all the land in the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 13. 9., and in the gift of Queen's College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted for £433, and the glebe comprises nearly 42 acres. The church has been rebuilt on nearly the same site: the old church was a very ancient structure of flints, with a wood tower; the new edifice was consecrated in Oct. 1844, and is of picturesque and chaste design. Some barrows were opened in 1810, and found to contain amber beads and ashes.

Newton-Tracey (St. Thomas à Becket)

NEWTON-TRACEY (St. Thomas à Becket), a parish, in the union of Barnstaple, hundred of Freemington, Braunton and N. divisions of Devon, 4½ miles (S. S. W.) from the town of Barnstaple; containing 125 inhabitants, and comprising about 350 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 8. 1½., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £67. The glebe comprises 36 acres.

Newton-Underwood

NEWTON-UNDERWOOD, a township, in the parish of Mitford, union of Morpeth, W. division of Morpeth ward, N. division of Northumberland, 3 miles (W.) from Morpeth; containing 92 inhabitants. The Bertrams, Charuns, Eures, Reveleys, and Mitfords occur at various periods among the proprietors of land at this place; and of these, the Eures were owners for several centuries, till the 10th of James I.: the nuns of Hallystone had a grant of common of pasture here, which was confirmed by Henry III. in 1255. The township comprises 832 acres of excellent arable and pasture, and 20 of woodland. The village is seated a little to the north of the road between Elsdon and Morpeth, and has a large neat green in the centre. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £230. 6. 1. Here are the ruins of an ancient tower.

Newton-Unthank

NEWTON-UNTHANK, a hamlet, in the parish of Ratby, poor-law union of Market-Bosworth, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester; containing 532 inhabitants.

Newton-Upon-Derwent

NEWTON-UPON-DERWENT, a township, in the parish of Wilberfoss, union of Pocklington, WiltonBeacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 5½ miles (W.) from Pocklington; containing 229 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1640 acres of land, the property of various families. The village is situated on the eastern acclivity of the vale of the Derwent, and about a mile south-west of Wilberfoss. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Newton-Upon-Ouse

NEWTON-UPON-OUSE, a parish, in the union of Easingwold, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York, 8½ miles (N. W.) from York; containing, with the townships of Benningbrough and Linton, 908 inhabitants, of whom 523 are in the township of Newton. This parish, which is on the left bank of the river Ouse, comprises about 4590 acres. Its soil is generally fertile, and the lands in the township of Newton, consisting of 1490 acres, are rich, and in profitable cultivation. The village is pleasantly situated on the river, and is neatly built; a market-boat sails weekly to York, on Saturday, and the York and Newcastle railway passes through the township. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £100; patron, Viscount Downe. The church was rebuilt, except the tower, at the joint expense of University College, Oxford, and the late Viscount Downe, in 1839. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A sum of £497. 15. 4. three per cent. consols. has been purchased with a bequest of £200 by Mr. and Mrs. Bouchier, £50 by Mr. Lund, £30 by Gabriel Priestman, and £10 by John Robinson; the dividends are distributed among the poor.

Newton-Upon-Trent (St. Peter)

NEWTON-UPON-TRENT (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Gainsborough, wapentake of Well, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 10 miles (W. N. W.) from Lincoln, and 15 miles (N. by E.) from Newark; containing 399 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the river Trent, and comprises 1518a. 3r. 37p., nearly all arable and pasture land, the former producing wheat, barley, beans, and oats; part of the scenery is very pleasing, being close to the Trent, and embracing an extensive view of the surrounding country. The village is on the eastern side of the vale. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4, and in the patronage of the Dowager Lady Kinloch and Mrs. Minster, with a net income of £155; appropriator, the Bishop of Lincoln. The church, a neat plain structure, contains 250 sittings. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Newton-Valence (St. Thomas à Becket)

NEWTON-VALENCE (St. Thomas à Becket), a parish, in the union of Alton, hundred of Selborne, Alton and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 4 miles (S.) from Alton; containing 331 inhabitants. It comprises 2253 acres, of which 341 are common or waste. The living is a vicarage endowed with the rectorial tithes, with the living of Hawkley annexed, and valued in the king's books at £13. 10. 2½.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. T. Snow. The tithes of NewtonValence have been commuted for £495, and the glebe consists of 62 acres.

Newton, Water (St. Remigius)

NEWTON, WATER (St. Remigius), a parish, in the union of Peterborough, hundred of Norman-Cross, county of Huntingdon, 6 miles (N. N. W.) from Stilton; containing 97 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 850 acres, and contains quarries of building-stone, but not at present wrought; the river Nene skirts it. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 9. 2., and in the gift of the Rev. Randolph Richard Knipe: the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £231, and the glebe comprises 25 acres. The church is a neat plain structure. Roman coins and fragments of tessellated pavement have been found.

Newton, Welsh (St. Mary)

NEWTON, WELSH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Monmouth, Lower division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford, 4 miles (N. by W.) from the town of Monmouth; containing 230 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £4. 10.; net income, £47; patron and impropriator, Joseph Bailey, Esq.

Newton, West

NEWTON, WEST, a township, in the parish of Bromfield, union of Wigton, Allerdale ward below Derwent, W. division of the county of Cumberland, 9½ miles (N.) from Cockermouth; containing 335 inhabitants. Here are the remains of a tower which formed part of an ancient castle or hall. In the neighbourhood is a quarry of red freestone.

Newton, West (St. Peter and St. Paul)

NEWTON, WEST (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union and hundred of Freebridge-Lynn, W. division of Norfolk, 7 miles (N. N. E.) from Lynn; containing 242 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1230a. 2r. 9p., of which 460 acres are arable, 130 pasture and meadow, 35 woodland, 277 sheep-walks, and 157 rabbit-warren. The village is on an acclivity, and commands some fine views. There is a considerable brewery. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £160, and the glebe comprises 7 acres. The church is in the early English style, with an embattled tower.

Newton, West

NEWTON, WEST, a township, in the parish of Kirk-Newton, union of Glendale, W. division of Glendale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 5¾ miles (W. by N.) from Wooler; containing 83 inhabitants. It is situated near the border of Scotland, on the road between Wooler and Kelso, and comprises about 1050 acres, of which 450 are arable, 25 plantation, and the rest hill-pasture; the surface is mountainous. The village is separated from that of Kirk-Newton by a small rivulet, near its junction with the Beaumont.

Newton, West

NEWTON, WEST, a township, in the parish of Aldbrough, union of Skirlaugh, Middle division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 9¾ miles (N. E.) from Hull; containing 214 inhabitants. This place is noticed in the Domesday survey, and mention of it again occurs in the reign of Henry II., when a confirmation was given of a grant made to the abbey of Thornton, in Lincolnshire, by William Botiler, of half his tenure here: the manor has long been in the possession of the family of Constable, the present owners. The township comprises about 770 acres of land, divided into several farms, and lying near the Lamwith stream. —See Burton-Constable.

Newton, Wold, or Newton-upon-the-Wolds (All Saints)

NEWTON, WOLD, or Newton-upon-the-Wolds (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Caistor, wapentake of Bradley-Haverstoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 9¼ miles (S. by W.) from Grimsby; containing 146 inhabitants. It is situated on the old road from Grimsby to Louth, and comprises by measurement 1900 acres of land, of which the soil is various, and in some parts chalky. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 10. 10.; net income, £400; patron, the Bishop of Durham. The church is a neat structure, and contains a richly-sculptured font. Here is a large tumulus, in which twenty urns were found in the year 1828.

Newton, Wold

NEWTON, WOLD, a parish, in the union of Bridlington, wapentake of Dickering, E. riding of York, 11½ miles (N. by E.) from Driffield; containing 245 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated in the Wolds, comprises by computation 2000 acres; the soil is light and gravelly. The surface is diversified with hills and dales, presenting a great variety of scenery, and enlivened by a considerable lake, fed by one of those copious springs of water which, during the latter part of the winter and the earlier part of spring, issue from different portions of the Wolds with great force, and are called Gypsey springs. The parish was anciently a chapelry to Hunmanby, where the inhabitants were accustomed to bury till the consecration of their own churchyard in 1828. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 19. 9½.; net income, £130; patron and impropriator, the Hon. Marmaduke Langley, of Wykeham Abbey. The church, an ancient structure repaired in 1839 at an expense of £250, contains 150 sittings. The vicarage-house was erected at the expense of the Rev. J. Skelton, the present incumbent, assisted by a donation of £100 from the patron. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Newton, Wood (St. Mary)

NEWTON, WOOD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Oundle, hundred of Willybrook, N. division of the county of Northampton, 5 miles (S. W.) from Wansford; containing 483 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from King's-Cliffe to Oundle, and comprises by computation 1180 acres, forming a rich and fertile tract of land, peculiarly adapted for the growth of vegetables; the surface is undulated, and the soil various, light and sandy on the north, and stronger on the west. The substratum abounds with oolite of inferior quality, which is raised for building purposes, and most of the houses are built of it. A fine rivulet flows through the parish, and falls into the Nene; a beautiful spring here, called the Willybrook, gives name to the hundred. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop of Peterborough; net income, £80. The church is a neat plain edifice, in good repair. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.