Paul - Pebworth

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

540-542

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'Paul - Pebworth', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 540-542. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51206 Date accessed: 29 July 2014.


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Paul (St. Paul)

PAUL (St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Penzance, hundred of Penwith, W. division of Cornwall, 2 miles (S. by W.) from Penzance; containing 4664 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the shore of Mount's Bay, comprises 2662 acres, and includes the villages of Mousehole and Newlyn, where extensive pilchard and mackerel fisheries are carried on. About 580 acres are common or waste. A tin-mine, called Wheal Gath, is worked at Ballogas; and a tin smelting-house has been established at Trereife. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 11. 0½., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £380. The church occupies elevated ground, and has a lofty tower, seen at a great distance from sea; it was thoroughly repaired and newly pewed in 1829, at an expense of £600. At Newlyn is a chapel dedicated to St. Peter. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, and Wesleyans. An almshouse for twelve men and women was founded in 1709, by Capt. Stephen Hutchens, who endowed it with £600, invested in land now producing about £100 per annum. At Kerris, in the parish, are remains of a Druidical temple, called the Roundago, near which, in 1723, was discovered a vault eight feet long and six deep, in which was an urn of the finest red clay, containing small brass coins.

Paull (St. Andrew and St. Mary)

PAULL (St. Andrew and St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Patrington, S. division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York; containing, with the township of Thorn-Gumbald, 870 inhabitants, of whom 599 are in Paull township, 2¼ miles (S. W.) from Hedon. The parish is situated on the river Humber, and comprises 5648 acres, of which 3424 are arable, and the rest meadow; the surface is level, but the scenery embraces fine views of part of Lincolnshire, the Humber, and the Wolds. The village is a fishing-place, and noted for shrimps; it formerly contained an extensive dockyard, in which several ships of the line were built during the late war, including one of 74 guns. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 0. 5.; net income, £160; patron, the Archbishop of York: the impropriation belongs to the families of Prickett and Blaydes. Part of the tithes were commuted for land in 1811, and a money payment is made for those in the hamlet of Boreas Hill. The church is a cruciform structure in the later English style, with a tower at the intersection. There is a very ancient chapel of ease, the doorway of which consists of a Norman arch, and at Paull-Holme are the remains of a convent. The Wesleyans have a place of worship.

Pauler's-Pury (St. James)

PAULER'S-PURY (St. James), a parish, in the union of Potter's-Pury, hundred of Cleley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 3 miles (S. E. by S.) from Towcester; containing 1188 inhabitants. The road from Stoney-Stratford to Daventry passes near the village. The parish contains 2961a. 13p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £24. 4. 2.; patrons, the Wardens and Fellows of New College, Oxford. The church contains a curious font. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. William Marriott, in 1721, bequeathed land now producing £11 per annum, applied in aid of a national school. The ancient Watling-street passes through the parish, in which coins of Constantine, Maximian, and other emperors, have been found. Dr. Edward Bernard, a learned astronomer, and Savilian professor at Oxford, was born here in 1638.

Paulton (Holy Trinity)

PAULTON (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Clutton, hundred of Chewton, E. division of Somerset, 9½ miles (S. W.) from Bath; containing 2009 inhabitants, some of whom are employed in raising coal. The living is a perpetual curacy, until recently united to the living of Chewton-Mendip; patron, the Vicar of Chewton-Mendip; net income, £150. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £74. 13., and the impropriate for £40; the glebe comprises 5 acres. The church contains 350 free sittings, the Incorporated Society having granted £200 in aid of the expense. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans.

Pauntley (St. John the Evangelist)

PAUNTLEY (St. John the Evangelist), a parish, in the union of Newent, hundred of Botloe, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 2¾ miles (N. E. by N.) from Newent; containing 280 inhabitants. The parish lies on the high road from Newent (over the river Leadon) to Redmarley-D'Abitot, and comprises about 2000 acres. The surface is in continuous undulations, and the scenery is beautiful, with the Malvern hills to the north, the line of the Cotswold hills to the east, the Herefordshire hills to the west, and May Hill to the south: the lower lands are watered by the Leadon. In 1292, Pauntley was a chapelry to Newent. The living is a vicarage, in the patronage of the Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol; net income, £80. The tithes have been commuted for £450. The church, an ancient edifice, has lately received some improvements at the expense of the vicar: the arch of the tower, and the west window, have been restored, by the removal of a singing-gallery; and the chancel arch, of very beautiful proportions, has been freed from whitewash, and its handsome architrave well developed, but the lower parts of the shafts and their bases are still concealed by unsightly pews, which disfigure the church generally. More recently, a new (open) roof has been put up by the parishioners, and the chancel has been repaired by C. W. Osborne, Esq., of Hawford, the impropriator. The south door is Norman, with a great variety of ornament; the windows and mouldings, and a chantry chapel, are for the most part in the perpendicular style. In the chantry chapel, a handsome window has been blocked up, and a huge monument to Lady Ann Somerset placed against it. With the exception of the improvements just mentioned, the church is in a state of disrepair. The present vicar has also established a provident club, for assuring medicine and medical attendance, and 8s. weekly, during sickness, to day labourers within the parish. Here are some springs similar in character to, but more powerful than, the Cheltenham waters; pigeons resort to them, for the sake, as is said, of the salt obtained from evaporation. The mutilated shaft of a preaching cross was recently dug up, in clearing away the earth from the church walls. The celebrated Wythington, Withington, or Whittington, lord mayor of London; and Joseph Smith, founder of the Mormonites, are said to have been of this parish.

Pavenham (St. Peter)

PAVENHAM (St. Peter), a parish, in the hundred of Willey, union and county of Bedford, 7 miles (N. W.) from Bedford; containing 600 inhabitants. The manor was anciently in the family of Pabenham, from whom it passed by an heiress to the Tyringhams, and afterwards became vested in the Alstons. Stafford bridge here crosses the river Ouse; and the road from Bedford to Harrold passes through the parish. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Felmersham: the tithes were commuted for land in 1769. In the church are tombs of the families of Alston and Franklyn.

Pawlett (St. John the Baptist)

PAWLETT (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Bridgwater, hundred of North Petherton, W. division of Somerset, 5 miles (N.) from Bridgwater; containing 595 inhabitants. The navigable river Parret bounds the parish on the east and south. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 17. 11., and in the patronage of the Crown; impropriator, Lord de Mauley. The great tithes have been commuted for £200, and the vicarial for £349. 10.; the glebe comprises 9 acres. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Paxford

PAXFORD, a hamlet, in the parish of Blockley, union of Shipston-on-Stour, Upper division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, county of Worcester, though locally in the Upper division of the hundred of Kiftsgate, county of Gloucester, 4 miles (N. by W.) from Moreton-in-the-Marsh; containing 225 inhabitants. The hamlet lies north-north-east of the village of Blockley. There is a small place of worship for Baptists.

Paxton, Great (Holy Trinity)

PAXTON, GREAT (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of St. Neot's, hundred of Toseland, county of Huntingdon, 3 miles (N. E. by N.) from the town of St. Neot's; containing 415 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 1331 acres, the soil of which is chiefly a strong clay, and tolerably good wheat land. The surface is hilly between the village and St. Neot's; the meadows are subject to inundation from the river Ouse, which separates the parish on the west from Little Paxton. The living is a vicarage, with the livings of Little Paxton and Toseland annexed, valued in the king's books at £16. 2. 11.; net income, £231; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln. The tithes of Great Paxton were commuted for land and a money payment in 1811: there are 97 acres of glebe in this parish, and 60 in Little Paxton.

Paxton, Little (St. James)

PAXTON, LITTLE (St. James), a parish, in the union of St. Neot's, hundred of Toseland, county of Huntingdon, 1½ mile (N.) from St. Neot's; containing 214 inhabitants. It comprises about 1350 acres; a great portion has a gravelly soil, and the surface is chiefly level. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Great Paxton: the tithes were commuted for land in the year 1812.

Payhembury (St. Mary)

PAYHEMBURY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Honiton, hundred of Hayridge, Cullompton and N. divisions of Devon, 5¼ miles (W. N. W.) from the town of Honiton; containing 545 inhabitants. It comprises 2700 acres, of which 120 are common or waste land. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £18. 4. 2.; patron, the Rev. T. T. Jackson; impropriator, W. Wyndham, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £150, and the vicarial for £137: the glebe comprises 81 acres. The church is a handsome structure, and has a fine wooden screen. At Leyhill is an old mansion, with a chapel; and at Hembury is an ancient intrenchment.

Paythorne

PAYTHORNE, a township, in the parish of Gisburn, union of Clitheroe, W. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 9 miles (S.) from Settle; containing 201 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 2800 acres of land, chiefly the property of Lord Ribblesdale.

Payton, with Adforton.—See Adforton.

PAYTON, with Adforton.—See Adforton.

Peak, with Westbury

PEAK, with Westbury, a hamlet, in the parish of East Meon, union of Petersfield, hundred of MeonStoke, Petersfield and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 10 miles (W. by S.) from Petersfield; containing 56 inhabitants.

Peak Forest

PEAK FOREST, an extra-parochial chapelry, in the union of Chapel-en-le-Frith, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 3½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Tideswell; containing 575 inhabitants. It lies on the road from Tideswell to Chapel-en-le-Frith, and comprises 1360 acres. In the northern part of the liberty, and about a mile distant from the village, is Eldon Hole, a celebrated perpendicular chasm, the mouth of which is ninety feet in length, and thirty in breadth in the widest part, with a strong wall erected round it to prevent accidents. The credulity of travellers has often been imposed upon by tales respecting its immeasurable depth. In the days of Elizabeth, the Earl of Leicester had a man let down into it, who, when drawn up, was speechless, and, it is said, shortly afterwards died. Catcott has noticed the chasm at some length in his treatise on the Deluge, and instanced it as a proof of his theory; Cotton, also, the natural poet of the Peak, has given an elaborate account of it. John Lloyd, Esq., F.R.S., descended in 1770, and reached the bottom 186 feet from the mouth, the light from which was sufficiently strong to permit him to read the smallest print. The interior of the chasm he described as consisting of two parts, communicating with each other by a small arched passage; the one small; the other spacious, in form like the dome of a glass-house, and containing large masses of sparkling stalactite. His account was published in the 61st volume of the Philosophical Transactions, and has been confirmed by several persons who have since descended at different times. In the liberty is a chapel, a small neat structure, dedicated to King Charles the Martyr: the living is a donative; net income, £70; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Devonshire. A school is endowed with £10 a year.

Peakirk (St. Pega)

PEAKIRK (St. Pega), a parish, in the union and soke of Peterborough, N. division of the county of Northampton, 3 miles (S. E.) from Market-Deeping; containing 192 inhabitants. It comprises 551a. 3r. 12p., and is skirted by the river Welland. The living is a rectory, with that of Glinton annexed, valued in the king's books at £18. 3. 11½., and in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Peterborough: the tithes have been commuted for about £600. The church was erected about three centuries since. St. Pega, in 714, settled here in a cell, afterwards converted by Edmund Atheling into a monastery, which, though twice destroyed by the Danes, existed till 1048: there are remains in the parish, now called the Hermitage.

Peals

PEALS, a township, in the parish of Allenton, union of Rothbury, W. division of Coquetdale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 8¼ miles (W. by N.) from Rothbury; containing 87 inhabitants. The hamlet is situated on the north bank of the river Coquet, a mile and a half south-east from Allenton.

Peasemore

PEASEMORE, a parish, in the union of Wantage, hundred of Faircross, county of Berks, 7 miles (N.) from Newbury; containing 309 inhabitants. It comprises 2027a. 2r. 8p.; the soil is generally good, being a rich loam, and the surface is hilly. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 12. 1., and in the gift of Charles Eyre, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £663. 10., and the glebe comprises 65 acres. In the church is a memorial of William Coward, lord of the manor, who, though his income did not exceed £110 per annum, built the tower, and gave the great bell and the communion-plate, besides performing other acts of charity; he died in 1739. The Primitive Methodists have a place of worship.

Peasenhall (St. Michael)

PEASENHALL (St. Michael), a parish, in the union and hundred of Blything, E. division of Suffolk, 2¾ miles (W. by N.) from Yoxford; containing 845 inhabitants, and comprising 1921 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Vicar of Sibton: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £432, those of the vicar for £9. 15., and those of the perpetual curate for £120. The church is a plain edifice. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and two schools are endowed with land producing £27 a year.

Peasmarsh (St. Peter and St. Paul)

PEASMARSH (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union and parliamentary borough of Rye, hundred of Goldspur, rape of Hastings, E. division of Sussex, 3¾ miles (N. W. by W.) from Rye; containing 902 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north by the river Rother, and the road from London to Rye passes through the village; the surface is pleasingly undulated, and from the higher grounds the views are very extensive and picturesque. Good building-stone is obtained. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 9. 2.; net income, £261; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Sidney-Sussex College, Cambridge. The impropriation belongs to the families of Delves and Curteis, whose tithes have been commuted for £714. The church is in the early English style, and surmounted by a spire: the glebe-house has been rebuilt in the Elizabethan style, and is situated in a glebe of 3 acres. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Wm. Pattison, a poet of considerable genius, was born here in 1706.

Peatling Magna (All Saints)

PEATLING MAGNA (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Lutterworth, hundred of Guthlaxton, S. division of the county of Leicester, 6½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Lutterworth; containing 308 inhabitants. It comprises about 2000 acres: the Midland railway passes within two miles. The living is a discharged vicarage, united in 1729 to the rectory of Willoughby-Waterless, and valued in the king's books at £5. 9. 2.: the glebe comprises about 48 acres. In the church are old monuments of the Jarvis family.

Peatling Parva (St. Andrew)

PEATLING PARVA (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Lutterworth, hundred of Guthlaxton, S. division of the county of Leicester, 4¾ miles (N. E. by N.) from Lutterworth; containing 159 inhabitants. It comprises about 300 acres; the soil is in some parts light, in others strong, and the surface elevated, but not hilly. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 14. 7., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £158. The lord of the manor, in 1665, gave land for the poor, which produces £30 per annum. There are some mild chalybeate springs.

Peaton

PEATON, a township, in the parish of Diddlebury, union of Ludlow, hundred of Munslow, S. division of Salop; containing 103 inhabitants.

Pebmarsh (St. John the Baptist)

PEBMARSH (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Halsted, hundred of Hinckford, N. division of Essex, 4 miles (N. E. by E.) from Halsted; containing 614 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2024a. 2r. 27p., of which 1714 acres are arable, 157 meadow land, 90 wood, 26 in gardens, and 36 in roads; the soil is various, but chiefly fertile. The village is pleasantly situated, and intersected by a rivulet, near which a silk-factory has been erected, affording employment to about 300 persons; the straw-bonnet and lint manufactures are likewise carried on. A fair for toys is held on the 24th of June. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the gift of the Earl of Verulam: the tithes have been commuted for £583, and there are 26½ acres of glebe. The church is a handsome edifice in the later English style, with a tower. Its revenues anciently belonged to the abbey at Clare, in Suffolk.

Pebsbury

PEBSBURY, a hamlet, in the parish of HuishEpiscopi, union of Langport, E. division of the hundred of Kingsbury, W. division of the county of Somerset; containing 66 inhabitants.

Pebworth (St. Peter)

PEBWORTH (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Evesham, Upper division of the hundred of Kiftsgate, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 6¼ miles (N. by W.) from Chipping-Campden; containing, with the hamlets of Broad Marston and Ullington, 829 inhabitants, of whom 540 are in the township of Pebworth. The parish comprises about 3000 acres, the soil of which is a strong rich clay; the surface is varied, being in some parts hilly, and in others level. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 1. 2., and has a net income of £98: the patronage and impropriation belong to Thomas Eden, and T. Shekell, Esqrs. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A school is endowed with £15, and a Sunday school with £5, per annum. Several mineral springs rise in the parish, which are said to resemble the Cheltenham waters.