Rasen, Market - Raunds

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

638-640

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'Rasen, Market - Raunds', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 638-640. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51231 Date accessed: 18 September 2014.


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Rasen, Market (St. Thomas)

RASEN, MARKET (St. Thomas), a market-town and parish, in the union of Caistor, S. division of the hundred of Walshcroft, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 12 miles (N. E.) from Lincoln, and 144 (N.) from London; containing 2022 inhabitants. This parish, which lies on the road from Louth to Lincoln, comprises an area of 725 acres, chiefly in grass; the soil is for the most part a fertile sand, with a great depth of clay underneath, suitable for improving the surface, and for making bricks and tiles, which are the staple commodities of the place. The town is situated near the source of the river Ancholme, on a small stream called the Rase, whence it derives its name; it has a very neat appearance, and the surrounding country is beautiful. An act was passed in 1846 for a railway to Lincoln, 16 miles in length. The market is on Tuesday; and a fair is held on September 25th. The powers of the county debt-court of Market-Rasen, established in 1847, extend over part of the registration-districts of Caistor, Horncastle, Lincoln, and Louth. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £223: impropriators, the Earl of Yarborough and others in trust. The tithes were commuted for land in 1779. The church is built of friable sandstone, and is a commodious edifice, with an embattled tower, the upper windows of which are in the later English style; upon the south side of the tower is a representation of Adam and Eve under a fruit-tree, on the trunk of which is the dart of death. There are places of worship for Independents, Ranters, and Wesleyans; also a Roman Catholic chapel. A national school was erected in 1822, at which period the revenue of the free grammar school, amounting to £25 per annum, was appropriated towards its support. Sir George St. Paul, of Snarford, having bequeathed £40 per annum for the maintenance of eight bachelors or widowers, and £100 towards the erection of an almshouse for them, the design was carried into effect by his widow, afterwards Countess of Warwick.

Rasen, Middle (St. Peter and St. Paul)

RASEN, MIDDLE (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Caistor, S. division of the wapentake of Walshcroft, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 1 mile (W. by N.) from Market-Rasen; containing 831 inhabitants. This parish, which is intersected by the road from Louth to Gainsborough, comprises by measurement 3200 acres. There are two livings, both discharged vicarages: that of Tupholm is valued in the king's books at £2. 10. 10.; net income, £89; patron, the Bishop of Lincoln: and that of Drax is valued at £7. 10. 10.; net income, £170; patron, Earl Brownlow. The tithes of both vicarages were commuted for land at the inclosure. The church of Tupholm has a beautiful Norman entrance; in that of Drax is an ancient altar-tomb of an ecclesiastic. There are places of worship for Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists; also a school with a small endowment. At the inclosure of the parish, an allotment of 19 acres of land was made for the poor, now yielding a rent of £18.

Rasen, West (All Saints)

RASEN, WEST (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Caistor, N. division of the wapentake of Walshcroft, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3 miles (W.) from Market-Rasen; containing 286 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the river Rase, and intersected by the road from Bawtry to Louth. It comprises about 3000 acres, of which two-thirds are arable, and the rest pasture with the exception of a few acres of woodland; the surface is undulated, and the soil partly a rich loam, and partly clay and sand. A fair for horses, cattle, and sheep, is held in November. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 10. 10.; net income, £543; patron and incumbent, the Rev. W. Cooper. The tithes were commuted in 1803 for an allotment of land, which, with the glebe, comprises between 400 and 500 acres; the rectoryhouse has been almost entirely rebuilt by the present incumbent. The church has been rebuilt and enlarged at various times from an early period; the tower has four octagonal turrets, surmounted by castellated coronets of larger diameter.

Raskelf

RASKELF, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Easingwould, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York, 2½ miles (W. N. W.) from Easingwould; containing 548 inhabitants. The chapelry comprises 4157a. 22p., of which 3103 acres are arable, 999 pasture, and 55 woodland. Here is a station on the York and Newcastle railway. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £216; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Chester. The chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, is partly in the early and partly in the decorated English style, with a wooden tower; in the windows of the chancel and north aisle are the arms of Neville, Scrope, Dacre, and Percy, probably commemorating benefactors to the erection.

Rastrick

RASTRICK, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 4½ miles (S. E.) from Halifax; containing 3482 inhabitants. This chapelry is on the road from Huddersfield to Bradford, and is bounded on the north-east by the river Calder. It comprises by measurement 1252 acres, of which 300 are arable, 900 pasture and meadow, and 52 woodland; the substratum abounds with building-stone of excellent quality. Toothill, the seat of Thomas Firth, Esq., is a handsome mansion, beautifully situated; and from a hill in the rear of it, is an extensive panoramic view of the surrounding country, embracing wood and water, hill and dale. The village is pleasant; it stands nearly opposite to Brighouse, and is chiefly inhabited by persons employed in the several manufactories of woollen and fancy goods established here. The Calder and Hebble navigation skirts the chapelry; and the Leeds and Manchester railway passes through it for nearly two miles, the Brighouse station being situated within its boundary. The ancient chapel, dedicated to St. Matthew, was taken down in 1800, and the present erected on its site; it is in the Grecian style, with a cupola, and contains 800 sittings. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £135; patron, the Vicar of Halifax. There are places of worship for the Society of Friends and Independents. A school was founded in 1701, by Mrs. Mary Law, who endowed it with property now producing, with subsequent benefactions, £51 per annum. A school on the system of the British and Foreign School Society was built in 1837, at a cost of £800; and the late John Clay, Esq., endowed it with the interest of £1000. Mrs. Law bequeathed property yielding £18 per annum, for four widows.

Ratby (St. Philip)

RATBY (St. Philip), a parish, in the union of Market-Bosworth, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 5 miles (W. by N.) from Leicester; containing, with the hamlets of Botcheston, Groby, and Newton-Unthank, 1274 inhabitants, of whom 663 are in Ratby township. This place, anciently called Rateby, is supposed by some antiquaries to have been the Ratæ of the Romans, not only from its coincidence in name, but also from its exact agreement with that station in distance from Vernometum and other stations mentioned by early writers. The Roman camp here, occupying about twelve acres, is still in a perfect state, the ditches and breastworks being distinctly marked. The parish is intersected by the road from Leicester to Ashby, and comprises an area of 6100 acres; the soil is partly a strong clay, and partly gravel. Bordering on the parish is Charnwood Forest, of which the hills form a prominent feature in the landscape; and the ancient woodlands mingle in the picturesque scenery on the north. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 5. 10.; net income, £174; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Stamford and Warrington: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1770. The church is a large ancient structure of various dates. At Groby is a chapel of ease.

Ratchwood

RATCHWOOD, a township, in the parish of Bambrough, union of Belford, N. division of Bambrough ward and of Northumberland, 4½ miles (S. E. by S.) from the town of Belford; containing 19 inhabitants. It is situated at a short distance east of the road from Belford to Alnwick.

Ratcliffe

RATCLIFFE, a hamlet, partly in the parish of Limehouse, but chiefly in that of Stepney, union of Stepney, Tower division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex, 1 mile (E.) from London; containing 11,874 inhabitants. The name appears to be a corruption of Redcliff, an appellation probably derived from the red cliff or bank of the Thames, which river flows on the south. In Camden's time this was only a village inhabited principally by seafaring men, but it afterwards much increased in size and population, and the Highway, a broad street formerly planted on each side with elm-trees, at present consists of lines of houses, and extends to Limehouse. The Eastern Institution, in the Commercial-road, for the promotion of literature and science, was established in 1839 by a proprietary of shareholders: the building is of handsome appearance, with a portico of stone, and comprises reading and committee rooms, with a spacious hall for the delivery of lectures, and the performance of concerts. A district church, dedicated to St. James, was erected in 1838 by parliamentary grant; it is a neat building of brick, in the early English style, with a low spire, and contains 1200 sittings, of which 360 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop of London.—See Stepney.

Ratcliffe-Culey

RATCLIFFE-CULEY, a chapelry, in the parish of Sheepy-Magna, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 1½ mile (N. E.) from Atherstone; containing 219 inhabitants. The tithes were commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1766. The chapel is dedicated to All Saints.

Ratcliffe-on-Soar (Holy Trinity)

RATCLIFFE-ON-SOAR (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Shardlow, N. division of the wapentake of Rushcliffe, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 1½ mile (N. by E.) from Kegworth; containing 224 inhabitants. It comprises about 1000 acres of land; the soil is for the most part clay, and the surface level. The navigable river Soar flows through the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 11. 3.; net income, £71; patron and impropriator, Earl Howe. The church has several monuments to the Sacheverell family, who possessed a manor-house here.

Ratcliffe-on-the-Wreak (St. Botolph)

RATCLIFFE-ON-THE-WREAK (St. Botolph), a parish, in the union of Barrow-upon-Soar, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 6¾ miles (N. N. E.) from Leicester; containing 142 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 16. 8., and has a net income of £191; the patronage and impropriation belong to the Crown. The tithes were commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1774. The church is an ancient edifice with a tower and spire. Here is the Roman Catholic college of the Immaculate Conception, situated on a gentle eminence remarkable for its salubrious air, and commanding a view of rich and extensive scenery. The Fosse-road passes through the parish, and the Leicester and MeltonMowbray canal touches upon its eastern boundary.

Ratcliffe-on-Trent (St. Mary)

RATCLIFFE-ON-TRENT (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bingham, S. division of the wapentake of Bingham and of the county of Nottingham, 5½ miles (E. by S.) from Nottingham; containing 1246 inhabitants. This parish, which is intersected by the road from Bingham to Nottingham, comprises by measurement 1824 acres: the soil is partly clay and partly gravel; the surface is hilly in many places, and where level, some of the land is subject to inundation from the river Trent. Here is a wharf belonging to Earl Manvers, chiefly used for coal, and at which the freeholders of Ratcliffe are allowed to land goods wharfage-free. The manufacture of hosiery is carried on. Near the village is a perpendicular cliff of red clay, from which the parish took its name. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 12. 6.; net income, £170; patron and impropriator, Earl Manvers: there are about 60 acres of glebe. The former church was erected about the time of Henry III., and the present, which is a plain building, about 1795. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A school has an endowment of £15 per annum, left by a lady named Parr; and other schools are supported chiefly by the earl.

Rathmell

RATHMELL, a township, in the parish of Giggleswick, union of Settle, W. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 4 miles (S. W. by S.) from Settle; containing 290 inhabitants. This township, of which notice occurs in the Domesday survey under the appellation of Rodemell, comprises about 3070 acres of land, chiefly meadow and pasture. A district church, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, was erected in 1836, at an expense of £800, raised by subscription; it is a neat edifice in the early English style, with an embattled tower, and contains 300 sittings, of which 100 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy endowed with £1000, in the patronage of the Bishop of Ripon. A school was founded in 1716, by George Clarke, who endowed it with land now producing £20 a year.

Ratley (St. Peter)

RATLEY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Banbury, Burton-Dasset division of the hundred of Kington, S. division of the county of Warwick, 4½ miles (S. E.) from Kington, on the road to Banbury; containing 397 inhabitants. Within the parish is Edge Hill, which commands a delightful prospect of a fertile country, including the Vale of Red Horse, which skirts its base: the battle of Edge Hill is noticed in the article on Kington. The parish is situated on the borders of Oxfordshire, and comprises, with Upton, 1663 acres. Stone suitable for flagging and for gravestones is quarried. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 12.; net income, £110; patron, the Crown; impropriators, the family of Starbridge. The tithes were commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1795: there are 40 acres of glebe. The church is a beautiful structure: in the churchyard is a cross, or rather pillar surmounted by a crucifix, unusually perfect. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also a school, partly supported from the poor's land.

Ratlinghope (St. Margaret)

RATLINGHOPE (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Clun, hundred of Purslow, S. division of Salop, 12 miles (S. S. W.) from Shrewsbury; containing 240 inhabitants. It comprises 5456 acres, whereof 3756 are arable and pasture, 200 woodland, and about 1500 common; the surface is hilly, and the soil indifferent, mostly very bad: a thin vein of copper-ore is found, but it is not worked. The road from Shrewsbury to Bishop'sCastle passes through. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £3. 6. 8., and in the patronage of Robert Scott, Esq.; net income, £97. The church is a small plain structure.

Rattery

RATTERY, a parish, in the union of Totnes, hundred of Stanborough, Stanborough and Coleridge, and S. divisions of Devon, 4¼ miles (W. N. W.) from Totnes; containing 485 inhabitants. A vein of lead-ore has been discovered. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14. 10.; net income, £215; patrons and impropriators, the family of Carew. The church has an elegant wooden screen, and a Norman font.

Rattlesden (St. Nicholas)

RATTLESDEN (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Stow, hundred of Thedwastry, W. division of Suffolk, 5 miles (W.) from Stow-Market; containing 1141 inhabitants. The parish comprises 3254 acres, of which 27 are common or waste land. The manor was alienated from the bishopric of Ely in the 4th of Elizabeth, and in the 2nd of James I. was granted to Philip Tyse and William Blake. Here is Clopton Hall, the seat of Captain Parker, moated round on two sides. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 0. 2½., and in the gift of J. Moseley, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £770; the glebe comprises 43 acres. The church is in the decorated style, with a square tower surmounted by an obtuse spire. There is a place of worship for Baptists; and a national school is partly supported by an endowment of £16 per annum. Silver and copper coins have been found. Dr. Bedell, rector of Rattlesden, was collated to an Irish bishopric in the early part of the seventeenth century.

Rauceby, North and South (St. Peter)

RAUCEBY, NORTH and SOUTH (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Sleaford, wapentake of Flaxwell, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 3½ miles (W.) from Sleaford; containing 621 inhabitants, of whom 270 are in North Rauceby. North and South Rauceby are about half a mile apart. There are several quarries of soft freestone applicable for all building purposes. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 1. 0½; net income, £165; patron, Sir J. H. Thorold, Bart.; impropriators, the Marquess of Bristol and others. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1788; there are 60 acres of glebe, and a house. The church was erected about 1320, and contains some fine tracery, and remains of stained glass; the steeple, which is of earlier date than the rest of the building, is visible for several miles round.

Raughton, with Gatesgill

RAUGHTON, with Gatesgill, a township, in the parish of Dalston, union of Carlisle, ward and E. division of Cumberland, 5½ miles (S. by W.) from the city of Carlisle; containing 318 inhabitants.

Raughton-Head

RAUGHTON-HEAD, a chapelry, in the parish of Castle-Sowerby, union of Penrith, Leath ward, E. division of Cumberland, 7½ miles (S. by W.) from Carlisle. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £100; patron, the Vicar of Castle-Sowerby; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Carlisle. The chapel was rebuilt in the year 1678, and enlarged in 1760. A school-house was erected in 1744, by John Head, and rebuilt in 1806.

Raunds (St. Peter)

RAUNDS (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Thrapston, hundred of Higham-Ferrers, N. division of the county of Northampton, 4 miles (N. E.) from Higham-Ferrers; containing 1653 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the river Nene, and intersected by the road from Higham-Ferrers to Thrapston: the Blisworth and Peterborough railway also passes through. It comprises 4278a. 2r. 8p. of land, of which about twothirds are arable; 200 acres are roads, &c.: the soil is chiefly of a clayey quality, but bordering upon the river is lighter and richer, and the surface is undulated. Stone is quarried for building and road-making. Large shoe manufactories employ the principal part of the poor. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 9. 7., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £173. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, under an inclosure act, in 1797; about 215 acres are appropriated to the living, and the vicar receives a rent-charge of £9. 13. out of the tithes of Ringstead. The church is a large handsome edifice, and has a lofty tower and spire, considered the finest specimen of the early English style in the county; similar characteristics predominate in the rest of the building, with some decorated windows, and others of later date. In the churchyard is the base of an ancient cross. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans.