Rigsby - Ringwood

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

668-671

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'Rigsby - Ringwood', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 668-671. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51238 Date accessed: 01 September 2014.


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Rigsby (St. James)

RIGSBY (St. James), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, Wold division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 1½ mile (W. by S.) from Alford; containing, with the hamlet of Ailby, 103 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1035a. 3r. 12p. Chalk lying under the soil is burnt for agricultural use, and also applied to the repair of the roads. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Alford: the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £223.

Rigton

RIGTON, a township, in the parish of KirkbyOverblows, Upper division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 6¼ miles (N. E.) from Otley; containing 542 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 3000 acres: the village consists of a line of scattered houses, irregularly built. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also a school, built by subscription on the waste land.

Rigton, with Bardsey.—See Bardsey.

RIGTON, with Bardsey.—See Bardsey.

Rillington (St. Andrew)

RILLINGTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Malton, wapentake of Buckrose, E. riding of York; containing, with the chapelry of Scampston, 1051 inhabitants, of whom 800 are in Rillington township, 5 miles (E. N. E.) from Malton. The parish is bounded on the north by the navigable river Derwent, and comprises by admeasurement 4842 acres, of which 2460 are in the township of Rillington; of the latter, more than three-fourths are arable, and the rest pasture. The soil is generally light. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 14. 9½., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £105; impropriator, Dr. Simpson. The church, rebuilt in 1825, is a neat structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower, and comprises 250 sittings. At the village of Scampston is a chapel. There are places of worship for Independents, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans.

Rilston

RILSTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Burnsall, union of Skipton, E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 4½ miles (N. by W.) from Skipton; containing 121 inhabitants. The chapelry comprises 3050 acres, of which 849 are common or waste; and belongs to various proprietors, of whom the Duke of Devonshire is lord of the manor: the soil is rich, and principally in meadow and pasture. Rilston House and Rilston Manor House are both handsome mansions. The chapel, dedicated to St. Peter, is a neat edifice with a square tower. Rentcharges amounting to £72. 10. 8. have been awarded as commutations for the tithes.

Rimmington

RIMMINGTON, a township, in the parish of Gisburn, union of Clitheroe, W. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 5 miles (N. E.) from Clitheroe; containing 722 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 3000 acres of land, chiefly the property of G. L. Fox, Esq., who is lord of the manor. It abounds with minerals; a vein of lead-ore, containing a large proportion of silver, was wrought with success for several years, and calamine was also obtained in considerable quantities.

Rimpton (St. Mary)

RIMPTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Sherborne, hundred of Taunton and Taunton-Dean, W. division of Somerset, 5 miles (N. W. by N.) from Sherborne; containing 223 inhabitants. This parish is situated at the head of the valley of Taunton-Dean, and washed by a small stream tributary to the river Parret. It comprises by computation 1000 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 19. 9½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Winchester: the tithes have been commuted for £209, and there are 48 acres of glebe, and a house. The church is a neat edifice of stone, with a tower.

Rimswell

RIMSWELL, a township, in the parish of Owthorne, union of Patrington, S. division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 16½ miles (E.) from Hull; containing 143 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1085 acres of land. The village is neat, and lies about a mile to the west of Owthorne. There is a place of worship for dissenters.

Ringey, or Ringway

RINGEY, or Ringway, a chapelry, in the parish of Bowdon, union of Altrincham, hundred of Bucklow, N. division of the county of Chester, 3½ miles (S. E.) from Altrincham. The living is a perpetual curacy; income, £112; patron, W. Egerton, Esq.

Ringland (St. Peter)

RINGLAND (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of St. Faith, hundred of Eynsford, E. division of Norfolk, 7½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Norwich; containing 386 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the east by the river Wensum, and comprises 1202a. 2r. 38p., of which about 774 acres are arable, 171 meadow, pasture, and marsh, 174 woodland, and 83 common; the surface is marked with numerous verdant undulations, commanding diversified views of the surrounding country. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £3. 6. 0½.; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Ely. The great tithes have been commuted for £165, and the vicarial for £105; the glebe contains 11½ acres. The church is chiefly in the decorated English style, with a square embattled tower: the chancel is separated from the nave by a carved screen, in the lower compartments of which are representations of the Apostles, painted and gilt; the east window has some ancient stained glass, exhibiting several persons kneeling before a crucifix, and underneath them labels with Latin inscriptions. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and a school is partly supported by an endowment producing £22 per annum.

Ringley

RINGLEY, a chapelry, chiefly in the parish of Prestwich, partly in the union of Bolton and partly in that of Bury, hundred of Salford, S. division of Lancashire, 4 miles (S. E.) from Bolton. This chapelry lies in a populous and rich vale, and has excellent coal-mines and good stone-quarries in operation; also a large paper manufactory, two cotton-mills, some works for calico-printing, and bleach-grounds. The river Irwell, the Manchester, Bolton, and Bury canal, a road between Bury and Bolton, and the East Lancashire railway, all run through the chapelry; and at Stoneclough, half a mile distant, is a station on the Bolton and Manchester railway. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Rectors of Prestwich, Bury, and Middleton; income, £260, with a house. The chapel, dedicated to Our Saviour, was rebuilt in 1826, at a cost of £1300, and is in the early English style, with a tower: it is situated in the hamlet of Outwood and township of Pilkington. A school was built in 1640 by Nathan Walworth (founder of the chapel), who endowed it with land now producing £46 per annum; and £10 per annum were left in 1750 by Mr. Baguley, for the poor.

Ringmer (St. Mary)

RINGMER (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Chailey, hundred of Ringmer, rape of Pevensey, E. division of Sussex, 2½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Lewes; containing 1339 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the west by the river Ouse, and comprises about 4000 acres; the soil is in some parts clay, and in others a chalky marl, and the surface is diversified by some considerable elevations. Broyle, in the parish, was a seat of the archbishops of Canterbury, and had a park of 2000 acres, which is now under cultivation, in pasture. Some artillery barracks were erected during the late war, but they are now disused as such, and a portion occupied as a lunatic asylum. The village is situated on the road from Lewes to Hastings, and that from Lewes to London runs through the parish. The living is a vicarage, in the patronage of the Archbishop, valued in the king's books at £13; net income, £299; impropriator, Lady D'Harcourt. The church is an ancient edifice, partly in the early and partly in the later English style, with two small chapels, and contains several curious monuments; a modern wooden steeple has been erected in lieu of an ancient one which fell into ruins. There is a place of worship for Independents. The dividends on £2000 bank stock, amounting to £230 per annum, were left by Miss Hay, in 1797, to be distributed among the aged and deserving poor.

Ringmore

RINGMORE, a parish, in the union of Kingsbridge, hundred of Ermington, Ermington and Plympton, and S. divisions of Devon, 4 miles (S. by W.) from Modbury; containing 362 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the shore of Bigbury bay, near the mouth of the Avon; and comprises by admeasurement 1168 acres. Fine building-stone, of a slaty kind, is quarried for covering houses. Small vessels come up the Avon, laden chiefly with coal, and take back hides, potatoes, &c., for the London market. There is also a mackerel and pilchard fishery, which, during the season, employs between 60 and 80 men, besides women. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 10. 7½., and in the gift of the incumbent, the Rev. Gilbert Butland: the tithes, including a small portion of the parish of Kingston, and exclusive of the glebe, have been commuted for £235; the glebe contains 100 acres, with a substantial and elegant house, lately built. The church is a plain structure in the later English style.

Ringsfield (All Saints)

RINGSFIELD (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wangford, E. division of Suffolk, 2 miles (S. W. by W.) from Beccles; containing 311 inhabitants. The consolidated parishes of Ringsfield and Redisham Parva lie near the road from Beccles to Halesworth, and comprise about 1700 acres of land, the soil of which is generally heavy, and the surface flat. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12; net income, £488; patron, the Rev. C. Clarkson: the glebe contains about 40 acres. The church is a small building, covered with thatch; the interior is ornamented with paintings and sculpture. Some remains exist of the church of Redisham Parva, and there was anciently a free chapel in Ringsfield belonging to the convent at Norwich, founded in 1174. The dissenters have a place of worship.

Ringshall, with Incomb and Wards

RINGSHALL, with Incomb and Wards, a hamlet, in the parish of Ivinghoe, union of Leighton-Buzzard, hundred of Cottesloe, county of Buckingham; containing 217 inhabitants.

Ringshall

RINGSHALL, a parish, in the union and hundred of Bosmere and Claydon, E. division of Suffolk, 5 miles (W. S. W.) from Needham-Market; containing 356 inhabitants, and comprising 2116a. 2r. 6p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 18. 1½., and in the gift of Pembroke College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £562. 10., including those on the glebe, which contains about 93 acres. The church is partly in the early and partly in the decorated English style, with a square tower, the upper part of which was struck by lightning about 30 years since. A wall and a window, now forming part of a farmhouse, are the remains of a chapel founded here in 1174; and near the farmhouse is the site of a mansion which was occasionally the residence of Sir Thomas Gresham, while making preparations for the erection of the Royal Exchange, London. The frame-work for that structure was made here and in the adjoining parish of Battisford, from timber grown upon his estate in each place, and several of the saw-pits where the wood was cut are still to be seen. Fossils of the Saurian species of animals have been found on the glebe.

Ringstead

RINGSTEAD, a hamlet, in the parish of Osmington, union of Weymouth, hundred of CullifordTree, Dorchester division of the county of Dorset; containing 41 inhabitants.

Ringstead (St. Mary)

RINGSTEAD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Thrapston, hundred of Higham-Ferrers, N. division of the county of Northampton, 3 miles (S. by W.) from Thrapston; containing 640 inhabitants. It comprises 2000 acres, and is situated on the eastern bank of the river Nene. The road from Thrapston, through Raunds, Stanwick, and Higham-Ferrers, to Bedford, crosses the parish; and the Peterborough branch of the London and Birmingham railway has a station here, about midway between the stations at Higham-Ferrers and Thrapston. Stone is quarried in many parts for building, and for repairing the roads. A large portion of the male population is employed in shoemaking, and the females are employed in making lace. An inclosure act was passed in 1839. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Denford; impropriators of Ringstead, the Sackville family. The great tithes have been commuted for £384. 18. 6., and the vicarial for £140; there are also rent-charges of £10. 8. and £9. 13. payable respectively to the rector of Shelton and vicar of Raunds. The church is principally in the early English style, with a tower and spire, and contains a plain ancient font on moulded shafts. Here are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans. About £75, arising from a charity estate, are annually distributed among the poor. At the hamlet of Mill Cotton are the remains of a square Roman camp, consisting of lofty ramparts, defended by a deep moat; and near it is the site of an old town, where fragments and foundations of walls, with a few coins, have been turned up by the plough.

Ringstead, Great

RINGSTEAD, GREAT, a parish, in the union of Docking, hundred of Smithdon, W. division of Norfolk, 16 miles (N. N. E.) from Lynn; containing 526 inhabitants. It comprises 2650a. 3r. 38p., of which 2370 acres are arable, 146 pasture and meadow, 77 plantation, and 58 common, the last appropriated to the poor for fuel. The parishes of St. Andrew and St. Peter have been consolidated, the former a discharged rectory valued in the king's books at £9, and the latter a rectory valued at £11. 6. 8.; patron, H. L'E. Styleman L'Estrange, Esq. The tithes have been commuted for £600, and there are a glebe of 154 acres, and a handsome house considerably improved by the Rev. F. T. W. C. Fitzroy. The parochial church is chiefly in the decorated and later English styles, with a square embattled tower: the church of St. Peter was pulled down in 1771, with the exception of the circular tower.

Ringstead, Little (St. Andrew)

RINGSTEAD, LITTLE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Docking, hundred of Smithdon, W. division of Norfolk, 14½ miles (N. N. E.) from Lynn, comprising 600 acres, nearly all arable. The living is a sinecure rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 6. 8.; net income, £49; patron, H. L'E. Styleman L'Estrange, Esq. The church has been demolished.

Ringswould (St. Nicholas)

RINGSWOULD (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the cinque-port liberty and union of Dovor, though locally in the hundred of Cornilo, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 6 miles (N. N. E.) from Dovor; containing 637 inhabitants. It comprises 1598a. 3r. 18p., of which about 169 acres are down land, 105 acres free down, 88 pasture, and the remainder arable. Kingsdown, in the parish, lies adjacent to the sea-shore, and from its being noticed in ancient charters, appears to have been a place of considerable importance, though it is at present only a small fishing-village. The fishermen wind their boats on shore by means of a capstan. A market and a fair, granted by Edward II. in the 5th year of his reign, have been discontinued. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 12. 6., and in the gift of the Rev. John Monins: the tithes have been commuted for £500, and there are 10 acres of glebe. The churchyard contains two remarkably fine yew-trees, one of which is twenty-one feet in girth. In a valley between two downs in the vicinity are vestiges of an encampment, supposed to be Roman.

Ringway, county of Chester.—See Ringey.

RINGWAY, county of Chester.—See Ringey.

Ringwood (St. Peter and St. Paul)

RINGWOOD (St. Peter and St. Paul), a markettown and parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Ringwood, Ringwood and S. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing, with the tythings of North Ashley, Bistern with Crow, Burley, and Kingston, 3700 inhabitants, of whom 2387 are in the town, 20 miles (W. S. W.) from Southampton, and 91 (S. W. by W.) from London. This place is of great antiquity, having been of some importance during the Saxon times. It was originally named Regnum, or "the town of the Regni," mentioned by Antoninus; and subsequently Rinovid and Regnewood, which, by a Saxon termination, denote "the wood of the Regni." The town is situated on the eastern bank of the navigable river Avon, which, dividing eastward into three branches, over each of which is a stone bridge, afterwards collects its waters into a broad expanse, with an island in the middle, crossed by a causeway. It is well built, and consists principally of four streets; the inhabitants are supplied with good water, and the atmosphere is thought to be very salubrious. The manufacture of woollen cloth and stockings was formerly carried on to a considerable extent, but has declined: here is a large brewery for ale. A railway was completed in 1847, from Southampton, by Ringwood, to Dorchester. The market is on Wednesday: and fairs take place on July 10th and December 11th, mostly for cattle and forest colts. Manorial courts are held twice a year, at one of which a constable is appointed; and petty-sessions for the Ringwood division are holden here. The living is an endowed vicarage, with the parochial chapelry of Harbridge annexed, valued in the king's books at £75. 5. 5.; net income, £960; patrons and impropriators, the Provost and Fellows of King's College, Cambridge. The church is an ancient and spacious structure in the early English style, but its beauty has been almost effaced by modern alterations. At Bistern and Burley are other churches. There are places of worship for Independents and Unitarians. The free grammar school was founded in 1586, by Richard Lyne, who bequeathed a house, and a rent-charge of £13. 6. 8., which, by subsequent bequests, has been increased to £30 per annum; it has an exhibition of £5 per annum for three years to either of the universities, but the institution approximates in character to a national school. The poor-law union of Ringwood comprises five parishes or places, containing a population of 5355.



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