Scrafton, West - Scunthorpe

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

34-36

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'Scrafton, West - Scunthorpe', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 34-36. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51260 Date accessed: 18 September 2014.


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Scrafton, West

SCRAFTON, WEST, a township, in the parish of Coverham, union of Leyburn, wapentake of HangWest, N. riding of York, 4½ miles (S. W.) from Middleham; containing 156 inhabitants. At this place the abbot of Coverham held a carucate of land, and pasture for 24 head of cattle: Scrafton Grange, now a farmhouse, was connected with the abbey. The township is situated on the east of the river Cover, and comprises 3040 acres of land, chiefly uncultivated hills. Coal and lead are found.

Scraptoft (All Saints)

SCRAPTOFT (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Billesdon, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 4 miles (E.by N.) from Leicester; containing 89 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 10.; net income, £161; patrons and impropriators, the family of Hartopp. Here is a curious stone cross.

Scratby (All Saints)

SCRATBY (All Saints), a parish, in the East and West Flegg incorporation, hundred of East Flegg, county of Norfolk, 2½ miles (N. by W.) from Caistor; containing 131 inhabitants. It comprises about 300 acres, and commands a fine sea prospect. An act for inclosing the lands was passed in 1842. The living is a discharged vicarage, united in 1548 to that of Ormsby St. Margaret. The church has been long in ruins.

Scrayfield (St. Michael)

SCRAYFIELD (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Horncastle, hundred of Hill, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3 miles (E. by S.) from Horncastle; containing 33 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises about 677 acres, appears, from the remains of various earthworks, to have shared in the hostilities of the parliamentary war. The living is a discharged rectory, united to that of Hameringham, and valued in the king's books at £4. 10. 4½.: the tithes have been commuted for £135, and the glebe comprises 36 acres. The church is in ruins.

Scrayingham (St. Peter)

SCRAYINGHAM (St. Peter), a parish, partly in the union of Pocklington, and partly in that of Malton, wapentake of Buckrose, E. riding of York; containing, with the townships of Howsham and Leppington, 515 inhabitants, of whom 186 are in Scrayingham township, 11 miles (N. E. by E.) from York. This parish was anciently called Skeringham. It is bounded on the west by the navigable river Derwent, and comprises about 4780 acres, of which two-thirds are arable, and the remainder, with the exception of 300 acres of woodland, in meadow and pasture. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 11. 10½.; net income, about £750; patron, the Crown. The tithes were commuted for land, under an act of inclosure, in 1825. The interior of the church was repaired in 1801; its register bears the date of 1648. There is a chapel of ease at Leppington.

Scredington (St. Andrew)

SCREDINGTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Sleaford, wapentake of Aswardhurn, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 4¼ miles (S. E. by S.) from Sleaford; containing 364 inhabitants, and consisting of 2593 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln (the appropriators), valued in the king's books at £6. 15. 4.; net income, £80. The tithes were commuted for land in 1796; the glebe comprises 150 acres. The church is a plain edifice, in a state of partial dilapidation. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. An allotment of land now producing £20 per annum was given to the poor at the time of the inclosure.

Screenwood

SCREENWOOD, a township, in the parish of Alnham, union of Rothbury, N. division of Coquetdale ward and of Northumberland, 8 miles (N. W.) from Rothbury; containing 40 inhabitants. It is situated about a mile south from Alnham, and not far from the river Aln, which has its source in the immediate vicinity. The township comprises about 1000 acres, of which 800 are arable, and 200 pasture; the surface is mountainous, and the soil various, resting upon whinstone. Here are the ruins of an old keep.

Scremby (St. Peter and St. Paul)

SCREMBY (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, Wold division of the wapentake of Candleshoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3½ miles (E. N. E.) from Spilsby; containing, with the hamlet of Grebby, 217 inhabitants. It comprises about 1300 acres. The substratum is principally chalk, which is quarried for dressing the land, and also burnt into lime. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 10. 2½.; net income, £250; patron and incumbent, the Rev. H. Brackenbury: the glebe comprises 36 acres. The church is a neat modern structure.

Scremerston

SCREMERSTON, an ecclesiastical district, in the parochial chapelry of Ancroft, union of Berwickupon-Tweed, Islandshire, N. division of Northumberland, 2½ miles (S. S. E.) from Berwick; containing 692 inhabitants. In 1386, the village was destroyed by the Scots, previously to which time it had been held of the bishops of Durham by the family of Swinhowe. It subsequently belonged to the unfortunate Earl of Derwentwater, and is now the property of Greenwich Hospital, whose tithes here have been commuted for £965. A large colliery is worked. The living is endowed with £100 per annum, and is in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Durham: there is a glebehouse. The church, dedicated to St. Peter, and consecrated 23rd August, 1843, is in the early English style, with a tower and spire, and contains 350 sittings, of which 280 are free. Together with a national schoolroom and a master's house, it occupies a site of two acres given by the Commissioners of Greenwich Hospital, who also contributed the stone for the buildings out of their quarries.

Screveton (St. Winifred)

SCREVETON (St. Winifred), a parish, in the union, and N. division of the wapentake, of Bingham, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 8½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Newark; containing 315 inhabitants. It comprises about 1000 acres. The soil is chiefly clay, alternated with sand; the surface is generally flat, but rises in some parts to a considerable elevation, and the lower grounds are watered by the Car Dyke. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 19. 1.; net income, £252; patrons, the family of Hildyard. The tithes were commuted for land in 1776. The church contains an altar-tomb and effigy to the memory of Gen. Whalley, the supposed executioner of Charles I.; figures of his three wives and twenty-two children are sculptured on the same monument. Dr. Thoroton, the topographer, was born here.

Scrivelsby (St. Benedict)

SCRIVELSBY (St. Benedict), a parish, in the union of Horncastle, S. division of the wapentake of Gartree, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 2½ miles (S.) from Horncastle; containing 130 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 3110 acres. The soil is chiefly a rich sandy loam, alternated with a strong clay; the surface in some parts flat, and in others elevated, but not hilly. The living is a rectory, with that of Dalderby united in the year 1731, valued in the king's books at £12. 17. 6.; net income, £562; patron, Sir Henry Dymoke, Bart. This gentleman's family hold the manor by "the service of grand serjeantry, that, whenever a king of England is to be crowned, the lord for the time being, or, in case of sickness, some one for him, shall come well armed for battle, on a good horse, into the presence of the monarch, at his coronation, and make proclamation that, if any will say that the king has not a title to his kingdom and crown, he shall be ready and prepared to defend the right of the king and his kingdom, and the dignity of his crown, in his own person, against him and any other whatsoever."

Scriven

SCRIVEN, with Tentergate, a township, in the parish of Knaresborough, Lower division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 1 mile (N. by W.) from Knaresborough; containing 1435 inhabitants. The township comprises about 1598 acres, and includes the villages of Scriven and Tentergate, which latter forms part of the town of Knaresborough. Scriven Park is the handsome residence of Sir Charles Slingsley, Bart. The tithes have been commuted for £212. 1. 4., of which £60. 1. 4. are payable to the vicar.

Scrooby (St. Wilfrid)

SCROOBY (St. Wilfrid), a parish, in the union of East Retford, Hatfield division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 1¾ mile (S.) from Bawtry; containing 297 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the river Idle, and comprises an area of 1523a. 3r. 36p., of which the soil is light and sandy: the commons were inclosed in 1775. The living is a discharged vicarage, united to that of Sutton: the church is a small ancient structure. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The parish contains some remains of a palace of the archbishops of York, who had free warren here in the time of Edward II.; in the reign of Henry VIII., the palace was the occasional residence of Wolsey. The small remains are now converted into a farmhouse. In the garden is a mulberry-tree, said to have been planted by the cardinal.

Scropton (St. Paul)

SCROPTON (St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Burton-upon-Trent, hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 11½ miles (W. S. W.) from Derby; containing, with the township of Foston, 523 inhabitants. It comprises about 3280 acres; the surface is flat, and watered by the river Dove. An allotment of Needwood forest in Staffordshire, on which houses have been erected, was awarded to Scropton under an inclosure act. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £49; patron and impropriator, J. Broadhurst, Esq. The glebe comprises 15 acres. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Scruton (St. Radegund)

SCRUTON (St. Radegund), a parish, in the union of Bedale, wapentake of Hang-East, N. riding of York, 4¼ miles (N. E. by N.) from Bedale; containing 410 inhabitants. This parish extends from the river Swale on the east, to the old Roman road, now called Leeming-lane, on the west; and comprises about 1800 acres of land, chiefly the property of Henry Coore, Esq., who is lord of the manor. One-third of the area is meadow and pasture, and the remainder arable; the surface is flat, and the scenery destitute of interest, but the soil is fertile, and the arable lands produce abundant crops. Scrutou Hall, the seat of Mr. Coore, is a handsome spacious mansion, situated in a demesne embellished with plantations. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 0. 5., and in the patronage of Mr. Coore: the tithes have been commuted for £422. 6., and the glebe comprises 81 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the Norman style, with a tower. Thomas Gale, Dean of York, known for his literary and antiquarian researches, was born here in 1636.

Sculcoates (St. Mary)

SCULCOATES (St. Mary), a parish, and the head of a union, in the borough of Hull, locally in the E. riding of York; containing 16,682 inhabitants. Sculcoates is noticed in Domesday book as one of the lordships granted to Ralph de Mortimer, a follower of the Conqueror. Its population, less than a century ago, did not exceed 100; but the southern part of the parish, since the construction of a dock on the western bank of the river Hull, in 1774, has been extensively built upon, and now forms a large and populous part of the environs of Hull. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £295. The parochial church, a small neat structure, was built in the year 1760; and an act was obtained in 1814, for the erection of an additional edifice called Christ-church, which was consecrated in 1822, and is a handsome building of white brick and Roche-abbey stone, erected at a cost of upwards of £7000, partly defrayed by subscription: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Trustees; net income, £169. A church district named St. Paul's was formed in July 1844 by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners; it embraces a population of about 6000. The church, of which the foundation stone was laid in June 1846, is a handsome edifice in the early English style, capable of accommodating 1200 persons, and cost about £5000. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Crown and the Archbishop of York, alternately; net income, £225. The Independents, Wesleyans, and Roman Catholics have places of worship. The union of Sculcoates comprises 18 parishes or places, and contains a population of 36,207.

Sculthorpe (All Saints)

SCULTHORPE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of Gallow, W. division of Norfolk, 2 miles (N. W.) from Fakenham; containing 591 inhabitants. It comprises 2055a. 2r. 34p., of which 1465 acres are arable, 505 meadow and pasture, and 84 woodland: the village is on the road from Fakenham to Norwich. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16, and in the gift of Sir J. T. Jones, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £550, and the glebe comprises 71 acres, with a house, nearly rebuilt by the Rev. Edward Marsham, the incumbent. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower. It was erected by Sir Robert Knollys, K.G., who, from a common soldier, rose to rank and eminence under Edward III., and acquired an immense fortune; he died at the manor-house here, in the 92nd year of bis age. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Scunthorpe

SCUNTHORPE, a township, in the parish of Frodingham, union of Glandford-Brigg, E. division of the wapentake of Manley, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 8½ miles (W. N. W.) from the town of Glandford-Brigg; containing 289 inhabitants.