Sinderby - Skelding

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

110-113

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'Sinderby - Skelding', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 110-113. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51279 Date accessed: 02 August 2014.


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Sinderby

SINDERBY, a township, in the parish of Pickhill, union of Thirsk, wapentake of Hallikeld, N. riding of York, 6¼ miles (W.) from Thirsk; containing 103 inhabitants. It comprises an area of 542a. 1r. 20p.: the village is situated near the Leeming-lane, and a short distance from the river Swale, which flows on the east. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £208, payable to Trinity College, Cambridge. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans. In a field called Chapel field, adjoining the village, are indications of there having been a chapel.

Singleborough

SINGLEBOROUGH, a hamlet, in the parish of Great Horwood, poor-law union of Winslow, hundred of Cottesloe, county of Buckingham, 3 miles (N.) from Winslow; containing 113 inhabitants.

Singleton

SINGLETON, a parish, in the union of West Hampnett, hundred of Westbourn and Singleton, rape of Chichester, W. division of Sussex, 6 miles (S.) from Midhurst; containing, with the hamlet of Charlton, 563 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 2200 acres: the village is situated on the road from London to Chichester, by way of Midhurst. The living is a discharged rectory, annexed to the vicarage of West Dean, and valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4. The church is in the later English style, with a square tower. Henry Smith, about 1640, left land to the poor, now producing £60 per annum. St. Roche's or Rook's Hill, which rises 702 feet above the sea, skirts the southern boundary of the parish; and near its summit is an ancient encampment known by the name of the Trundle, a corruption of Roundal, indicating its circular form. It includes an area of about five acres, has a deep fosse, and an outer and inner vallum; the inner vallum is raised to the height of about four feet all round the edge of the inclosure. In the centre are remains of a cell, now level with the ground, the walls of which are composed of flints cemented with mortar so hard as to render them almost immovable; its size is 14 feet by 11.

Singleton-in-the-Fylde

SINGLETON-in-the-Fylde, a chapelry, in the parish of Kirkham, union of the Fylde, hundred of Amounderness, N. division of Lancashire, 3 miles (E. by S.) from Poulton; consisting of Great and Little Singleton, and containing 391 inhabitants. Singleton is mentioned in the Domesday survey, and was once the property of a family of the local name. Edmund Dudley, who was attainted and executed in 1510, possessed Little Singleton; and in the 13th of Henry VIII., Thomas, Earl of Derby, doubtless by grant of the escheat, held that manor of the king. In the last century, the manor of Great Singleton had come to the Fanshaw family, from whom it passed to that of Cunliffe-Shaw; and was sold by William CunlifFe-Shaw, Esq., to Joseph Hornby, Esq., of Ribby Hall. The chapelry is bounded on the north by the river Wyre, and comprises 2538 acres of land, equally divided between arable and pasture. A fair for sheep is held on September 21st. Bank Field, in Little Singleton, is the property of Mrs. Harrison; and Maines Hall, in the same district, the residence of Captain Harrison, late H. E. I. C. S. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Hugh Hornby, Esq., sole proprietor, and lord of the manor, of Great Singleton; net income, £110. The tithes have been commuted for £43. 5. payable to the vicar of Kirkham, and £353. 11. 6. to the Dean and Chapter of Christ-Church, Oxford. The chapel, dedicated to St. Anne, was rebuilt in 1809, by the father of the patron, at a cost of £3000; it is a neat structure with a square tower, and has seven windows of painted glass. There is a Roman Catholic chapel.

Sinnington

SINNINGTON, a parish, in the union of Pickering, partly in Pickering lythe, and partly in the wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York; containing, with the townships of Little Edstone and Marton, 623 inhabitants, of whom 368 are in Sinnington township, 4¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Pickering. The parish is situated on the road from Pickering to Helmsley, and on the river Seven. It comprises 2075a. 33p., whereof 1254 acres are arable, 723 pasture, and 96 woodland; the soil is a rich clayey loam, the surface undulated, and the scenery picturesque. The living is a perpetual curacy; income, £84; patron and impropriator, the Master of Hemsworth school: the tithes were commuted for land and annual money payments in 1786. The church was built from the remains of a monastery, and was beautified in 1841. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Sinwell, with Bradley

SINWELL, with Bradley, a tything, in the parish of Wotton-under-Edge, union of Dursley, Upper division of the hundred of Berkeley, W. division of the county of Gloucester; with 2504 inhabitants.

Sisland (St. Mary)

SISLAND (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Loddon and Clavering, hundred of Loddon, E. division of Norfolk, 1¼ mile (S. W.) from Loddon; containing 64 inhabitants. It comprises 455a. 1r. 6p., of which 340 acres are arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 3. 9.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. William Hobson. The tithes have been commuted for £132. 15., and the glebe comprises 17 acres, with a handsome house, built by the present rector. The church is a neat edifice, with a turret; on the north side are the remains of an ancient chapel.

Siston (St. Anne)

SISTON (St. Anne), a parish, in the union of Keynsham, hundred of Pucklechurch, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 6½ miles (E. by N.) from Bristol; containing 1014 inhabitants, many of whom are employed in making pins. The parish comprises 1826 acres, of which 118 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 14. 4½., and in the gift of the Dickenson family: the tithes have been commuted for £360, and the glebe comprises 14 acres.

Sithney (St. Sithney)

SITHNEY (St. Sithney), a parish, in the union of Helston, hundred of Kerrier, W. division of Cornwall, 2 miles (N. W.) from Helston; containing 3362 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the south-west by Mount's bay, includes the chief part of Porthleven fishing-cove, and nearly the whole of Loe pool. It comprises 5447 acres, of which 311 are common or waste; the substratum abounds in minerals, and there are mines of lead, copper, and tin, of which the two last are at present in operation. Porthleven harbour is capable of floating vessels of 200 tons; coal and timber are the chief imports. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £19. 11. 5½., and in the patronage of the Bishop of Exeter: the impropriator's tithes have been commuted for £522, and those of the vicar for £430; the former has 104, and the latter 19, acres of glebe. The church is an ancient structure, and contains some fine remains of stained glass. A district chapel was consecrated at Porthleven on the 24th of August, 1841, and dedicated to St. Bartholomew; it is a handsome structure in the Norman style, and contains 300 sittings: the living is in the gift of the Vicar, with an income of £120. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans. At Truthal are the remains of an ancient chapel; and the parish also contained an hospital dedicated to St. John, of which no vestiges exist. On Longston Downs is a rude pile of stones, one of which was formerly a logan rock, called Mên-Amber; it is 11 feet long, 6 wide, and 4 thick. Several stone battle-axes were found at Venton Vedna, in 1799.

Sittingbourne (St. Michael)

SITTINGBOURNE (St. Michael), a parish, and formerly a corporate and market town, in the union and hundred of Milton, Upper division of the lathe of Scray, E. division of Kent, 10 miles (E, N. E.) from Maidstone; containing 2352 inhabitants. It is an incident worthy of notice in the ancient history of this town, that Henry V. was entertained at the Red Lion here, by John Northwood, a gentleman resident in the vicinity, at the expense of nine shillings and ninepence. Several other English monarchs have honoured the place with visits. It is situated on the road from Canterbury to London, and consists of one long wide street; in the neighbourhood are a manufactory for oil-cake, and a cement-mill. An act was passed in 1846 for paving the footways, and lighting the town. A weekly market and two annual fairs were bestowed by charter of Elizabeth; the latter are held on Whit-Monday and October 10th, for linen and woollen goods, hardware, &c. There is a great market every three months. By the same grant, the inhabitants were incorporated, under the style of "Guardian and Free Tenants," which was subsequently changed by another charter into that of "Mayor and Jurats;" they had the privilege of sending two members to parliament, but this, it seems, was never exercised. The powers of the county debt-court of Sittingbourne, established in 1847, extend over nearly the whole of the registration-district of Milton.

The parish comprises 977a. 3r. 27p., of which 592 acres are arable, 84 pasture, 64 woodland, 101 orchard and garden ground, and about 8 hop plantation. The Milton creek, which bounds the parish on the north, is navigable at Crown Quay, and hoys sail thence to London. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10: the appropriate tithes, belonging to the Archbishop of Canterbury, who is patron, have been commuted for £345, and the vicarial tithes for £192, to which his grace has added £40 per annum; the glebe comprises 2 acres. The church, with the exception of the walls, was destroyed by fire in 1762; the present edifice exhibits specimens in the decorated and later English styles, and contains an enriched octagonal font, and some curious monuments. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. In digging for clay within the last few years, several bodies were discovered, which appear to have been buried here after some sanguinary conflict, as swords, javelins, and other weapons were found near them, with urns containing beads and ashes; several fibulæ were also dug up, adorned with precious stones. About a quarter of a mile from the field are the remains of the ancient castle of Bayford, erected for the protection of the adjoining country.

Six-Hills (All Saints)

SIX-HILLS (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Caistor, E. division of the wapentake of Wraggoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (E. S. E.) from Market-Rasen; containing 205 inhabitants. A Gilbertine priory of nuns and canons, in honour of the Blessed Virgin, was founded here by one Grella or Greslei, and at the Dissolution had a revenue of £170. 8. 9.; the site was granted to Sir Thomas Heneage. The parish comprises an area of about 1500 acres, of which the soil is partly marl, and partly clay, with sand; the substratum contains limestone, which is quarried for burning into lime, and also for building. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6; net income, £67, with a small glebe and house; patron and impropriator, George F. Heneage, Esq. The church is a neat plain structure.

Sizewell

SIZEWELL, a hamlet, in the parish of Leiston, union and hundred of Blything, E. division of Suffolk, 4¼ miles (N. by E.) from Aldborough; containing 66 inhabitants. Here was formerly a chapel dedicated to St. Nicholas. Sizewell Gap, a small bay on the coast, was at one time a notorious place for smuggling.

Skeckling, York.—See Burstwick.

SKECKLING, York.—See Burstwick.

Skeeby

SKEEBY, a township, in the parish of Easby, union of Richmond, wapentake of Gilling-West, N. riding of York, 2¼ miles (E. N. E.) from Richmond; containing 175 inhabitants. It comprises 770 acres of land, aud is on the road from Richmond to Middleton-Tyas. A school, built in 1839, serves as a chapel of ease.

Skeffington (St. Thomas à Becket)

SKEFFINGTON (St. Thomas à Becket), a parish, in the union of Billesdon, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 10 miles (E. by S.) from Leicester; containing 187 inhabitants. The parish is situated in the eastern part of the county, and intersected by the road from Leicester to Uppingham and Stamford. It comprises by measurement 2127 acres, principally pasture and woodland, the latter consisting chiefly of oak, elm, and ash. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 13. 9.; net income, £446, arising from 236 acres of land; patron, T. R. Davenport, Esq. The church is ancient, and capable of holding many hundred persons.

Skeffling (St. Helen)

SKEFFLING (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Patrington, S. division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 4½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Patrington; containing 200 inhabitants. It comprises 1613a. 1r. 25p., of which 244 acres are meadow and pasture, and the remainder arable land: the soil is of a productive quality; the surface is level and uninteresting. The village is situated about half a mile from the Humber, and three miles from the sea. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £5; income, £53; patron and impropriator, the Rev. H. T. Holme. The church is principally in the later English style. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Skegby

SKEGBY, a parish, in the union of Mansfield, N. division of the wapentake of Broxtow and of the county of Nottingham, 3 miles (W.) from Mansfield; containing 775 inhabitants. It comprises 1425 acres, of which 50 are plantation, and the remainder arable and pasture. The substratum contains coal, of which some mines are in operation, and limestone, which is quarried for burning into lime. The Skegby lime, recently discovered, is equal to cement for the erection of bridges, constructing pit-works, lining water-cisterns, &c.; it was used for the bridges, tunnels, &c, of the North Midland railway. John Dodsley, Esq., lord of the manor, resides at the Hall, and occasionally holds a court. The village is pleasantly situated on the opposite acclivities of a deep valley, near the source of the river Meden; the inhabitants are partly employed in frame-work knitting. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £78; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Portland, as lessee under the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln. The church is a small stone edifice with a tower, on an eminence some distance from the village; it contains monuments to the Lindley family. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. A Sunday school has been established.

Skegness (St. Clement)

SKEGNESS (St. Clement), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, Marsh division of the wapentake of Candleshoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3¾ miles (E. by S.) from Burgh; containing 316 inhabitants. Here was once a considerable town, having a haven and a castle, and surrounded by walls; it was swallowed up by the sea. From its situation on an advantageous part of the coast, the place is resorted to by visiters for sea-bathing, and is also a coast-guard station, of which the head-quarters are at Grimsby. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 6. 8.; income, £103; patron, the Earl of Scarborough.

Skelbrooke

SKELBROOKE, a chapelry, in the parish of South Kirby, Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 7¼ miles (N. W. by N.) from Doncaster; containing 104 inhabitants. This place is memorable for a meeting in 1541, between Henry VIII. and the clergy of York headed by their archbishop, who presented that monarch with the sum of £600. The chapelry includes part of the ancient forest of Barnsdale, the celebrated haunt of Robin Hood; and comprises by computation 1200 acres of land, the property of John P. Nevile, Esq., who is lord of the manor. The village is situated on the north bank of the small river Skell, from which it takes its name; and the surrounding scenery is pleasing. The chapel, dedicated to St. Michael, is a small ancient structure, repaired a few years since: the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £60; patron and impropriator, Mr. Nevile.

Skelding

SKELDING, a township, in the parish of Ripon, Lower division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 6½ miles (W. by S.) from Ripon; containing 48 inhabitants. The township comprises 963 acres, including 180 waste land or common. The village is situated on the north bank of the small river Skell.