Snailwell - Snydale

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

126-129

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'Snailwell - Snydale', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 126-129. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51285 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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Snailwell (St. Peter)

SNAILWELL (St. Peteb), a parish, in the union of Newmarket, hundred of Staploe, county of Cambridge, 2¾ miles (N.) from Newmarket; containing 273 inhabitants. It comprises 1830a. 2r. 30p., of which about two-thirds are arable, and the remainder pasture and heath. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £27. 11. 0½., and in the gift of J. Thorp, Esq.; the tithes have been commuted for £484, and the glebe comprises 100 acres.

Snainton

SNAINTON, a chapelry, partly in the parish of Ebberston, but chiefly in that of Brompton, union of Scarborough, Pickering lythe, N. riding of York, 9½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Scarborough; containing 687 inhabitants. The township comprises about 4480 acres of land, partly low fertile marshes, which extend southward to the river Derwent; on the north side of the village the land is chiefly high moor. The village is large, and pleasantly situated at the junction of the roads from Scarborough to Malton and to KirkbyMoorside. The chapel, which is subordinate to the vicarage of Brompton, was built in 1836, at a cost of £750, on the site of one erected in 1150; the fine Norman porch of the old chapel now forms an entrance to the churchyard. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Snaith (St. Mary)

SNAITH (St. Mary), a market-town and parish, in the union of Goole, chiefly in the Lower division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, but partly in the Lower division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York; comprising the chapelries of Armin, Carleton, Goole, Hook, and Rawcliffe, and the townships of Balne, Cowick, Gowdall, Heck, Hensall, Pollington, and Snaith; and containing 10,444 inhabitants, of whom 855 are in the town, 23 miles (S. by E.) from York, and 175 (N. by W.) from London. This place is of considerable antiquity, and at a very early period a priory for Benedictine monks was founded here as a cell to the abbey of Selby, to which establishment the church of Snaith had been given by Girard, Archbishop of York, in the year 1106. The priory flourished till the Dissolution, and was granted by Edward VI. to John, Earl of Warwick. The town, which is situated on a gentle declivity, on the south bank of the river Aire, is small, and irregularly built. The houses are chiefly of brick, but a few handsome and substantial dwellings have been lately erected; the streets are lighted with oil, and the inhabitants are supplied with water from wells. The environs abound with pleasing scenery, enlivened by the rivers Don and Went. The Wakefield, Pontefract, and Goole railway runs by the town, and the canal from Knottingley to Goole passes on the south. Flax was formerly cultivated in the neighbourhood to a considerable extent, and conveyed to Leeds by the river Aire; but the quantity has been much diminished, and potatoes are now sent in large quantities. There is a steam-mill for grinding corn. The market is on Thursday; and fairs take place on the last Thursday in April, and August 10th, for cattle, &c.

The parish comprises by computation 35,000 acres of land, the property chiefly of Viscount Downe, the Earl of Mexborough, and N. E. Yarburgh, Esq. The living is a vicarage; net income, £479; patron, Mr. Yarburgh: the great tithes of Snaith and Cowick have been commuted for £768, and the small for £166. The church is a spacious structure in the later English style, with a low square tower surmounted by pinnacles; it contains a splendid monument by Chantrey to the second Viscount Downe, a marble bust to an ancestor of the present Lord Beaumont, and some remnants of ancient armour, with several banners. There are district churches at Rawcliffe, Carleton, Armin, Hook, and Goole. A free grammar school, and some almshouses for six widowers, were founded in 1623, by Nicholas Waller, who bequeathed houses and land for the payment of £28 to the master, £12 to the usher of the school, and £20 per annum to be divided among the almspeople: the school endowment is now applied in aid of a national school. There are almshouses for six persons, founded by the Yarburgh family; and others for six widows, which were rebuilt in 1802, by Viscount Downe. Various bequests have been left for the poor generally.

Snape (St.John the Baptist)

SNAPE (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union and hundred of Plomesgate, E. division of Suffolk, 2¾ miles (S. by E.) from Saxmundham; containing 542 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the south by the Ore, and comprises about 1800 acres, of which the greater portion is arable and upland pasture of good quality, and the remainder, near the river, low and marshy. The Ore, over which is a bridge, forms an estuary for nearly a mile, and near the bridge is a quay for shipping corn. The living is a discharged vicarage, consolidated with that of Friston, and valued in the king's books at £5. 5. 7½. The church contains an hexagonal font, much enriched, in the later English style. A society of Benedictine monks from the abbey of St. John at Colchester, settled here in 1155, and in 1400 were exempted from all subjection to that house, and raised into a distinct priory. The priory was dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, and at its suppression, in 1524, was granted to Cardinal Wolsey towards the endowment of his intended colleges, its revenue being then valued at £99. 1. 11.

Snape

SNAPE, a township, in the parish of Well, union of Bedale, wapentake of Hang-East, N. riding of York, 3 miles (S.) from Bedale; containing 729 inhabitants. The township comprises 4451 acres, of which the greater part is arable land; a portion called SnapeWater, formerly a morass, is now drained and cultivated. The population is chiefly employed in wool-combing for the worsted-spinners. Snape Castle, a large and venerable building, was anciently a seat of the Fitz-Randolph and other families, and was rebuilt by the Latimers in the reign of Henry VII.; it is partially in ruins, but portions of it are in the occupation of tenants of Mark Milbank, Esq., the present owner. Thorpe Perrow, the seat of Mr. Milbank, is a handsome mansion here, surrounded by an extensive park and fine plantations. A chapel which formerly belonged to the castle, has been beautifully fitted up by Mr. Milbank, and divine service is performed in it by the vicar of Well. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and an almshouse for eight aged persons, and free schools for the poor, have been founded and endowed by Lady Neville.

Snareshill-House

SNARESHILL-HOUSE, an extra-parochial district, in the hundred of Guilt-Cross, W. division of Norfolk, 1¾ mile (S.) from Thetford; containing 28 inhabitants, and comprising 2120 acres of land. This place and Thetford Lodge are all that remain of two villages called Great and Little Snareshill. In the vicinity are several tumuli, supposed to cover the remains of the slain in a battle which occurred here between Edmund, King of the East Angles, and the Danes under their leader Inguar.

Snarestone (St. Bartholomew)

SNARESTONE (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 7 miles (N. W.) from Market-Bosworth; containing 404 inhabitants. It comprises about 1200 acres, of which one-third is arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture. The Ashby canal passes through. The living is annexed to the rectory of Swepstone: the tithes of Snarestone have been commuted for £190, and the glebe consists of 31 acres. The church is a small modern building of brick. A free school was founded and endowed by Thomas Charnells, Esq., in 1717; the income is about £50 per annum.

Snarford (St. Lawrence)

SNARFORD (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the wapentake of Lawress, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 7 miles (S. W.) from Market-Rasen; containing 76 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1100 acres; the surface is varied, and the lower grounds are watered by several small streams. Of the ancient Hall, the seat of the Snarford family, only the site and part of the foundations are remaining. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4; net income, £181; patron, the Bishop of Lincoln. The church contains numerous monuments, of which the principal are to members of the St. Poll family.

Snargate (St. Dunstan)

SNARGATE (St. Dunstan), a parish, in the union of Romney-Marsh, and liberties of Romney-Marsh and New Romney, though locally in the hundred of Aloesbridge, lathe of Shepway, E. division of Kent, 5½ miles (N. W. by W.) from New Romney; containing 80 inhabitants. It consists of 1591 acres, of which 43 are marsh land. The living is a rectory, united to the rectory of Snave, and valued in the king's books at £17. 6. 8.

Snave (St. Augustine)

SNAVE (St. Augustine), a parish, in the union and liberty of Romney-Marsh, though locally in the hundreds of Aloesbridge, Ham, and Newchurch, lathe of Shepway, E. division of Kent, 4½ miles (N. W. by N.) from New Romney; containing 91 inhabitants. It comprises by estimation 1455 acres, of which 200 are arable. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 7. 11., with the rectory of Snargate annexed; net income, £244; patron, the Archbishop of Canterbury. The church is a spacious edifice of stone, with a handsome tower.

Sneaton

SNEATON, a parish, in the union of Whitby, liberty of Whitby-Strand, N. riding of York, 2¼ miles (S. by W.) from Whitby; containing 238 inhabitants. The parish is bounded by the river Esk, and the scenery in the neighbourhood presents a succession of hills and dales. Very excellent flagstone is quarried. The Whitby and Pickering railway passes at the foot of the village. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 12. 6., and has a net income of £170, arising from corn-rents assigned in commutation of tithes in 1802; it is at present in the gift of the family of Wilson, to whom, as an equivalent for building the church, two presentations were given by the crown. The church, replacing an old edifice which had been for some time in a dilapidated state, was erected in 1825, at a cost of £720, by the late James Wilson, Esq.; it is a handsome structure in the decorated English style, with a low tower surmounted by a small spire, and the eastern end and the south porch are ornamented with buttresses terminating in richly-crocketed finials, A free school was built by the late Mr. Wilson, who left £10 per annum for a master, to which the parish adds £5.

Snelland (All Saints)

SNELLAND (All Saints), a parish, in the W. division of the wapentake of Wraggoe, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 5 miles (W. N. W.) from Wragby; containing, with the hamlet of Swinethorpe, 97 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 17. 6., and in the gift of Earl Brownlow: the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £248. 12., and the glebe comprises 43 acres.

Snelsmore

SNELSMORE, a tything, in the parish of Chieveley, union of Newbury, hundred of Faircross, county of Berks, 3¾ miles (N.) from Newbury; containing 290 inhabitants. It comprises an area of 869 acres, of which 79 are common or waste land. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £250.

Snelson

SNELSON, a township, in the parish of Rosthern, union and hundred of Macclesfield, N. division of the county of Chester, 5¼ miles (S. E.) from Knutsford; containing 199 inhabitants. The township comprises 334 acres, the soil of which is sand.

Snelston (St. Peter)

SNELSTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 2½ miles (S. W.) from Ashbourn; containing 399 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the west by the river Dove, which here divides the county from Stafford; and contains about 2100 acres of land, chiefly meadow and pasture. The soil on the lower side is a deep rich reddish earth of excellent quality; on the upper side the soil is of an inferior kind. The surface is undulated, and the scenery embellished with extensive plantations, and by a fine park of 390 acres round Snelston Hall, a modern mansion, the seat and property of John Harrison, Esq. There are some limestone-quarries, which are wrought for manure and building purposes. Many of the farmhouses have been lately rebuilt. The living is annexed to the rectory of Norbury: the tithes were commuted for a corn-rent under an inclosure act passed in 1824. The church has an ancient tower; the body and chancel were rebuilt in 1824. Children of this parish are entitled to the benefit of the school at Norbury.

Snenton (St. Stephen)

SNENTON (St. Stephen), a parish, in the union of Radford, S. division of the wapentake of Thurgarton and of the county of Nottingham; containing 7079 inhabitants. This is a populous suburb on the east of the town of Nottingham, and now presents a most respectable appearance, some new streets and many elegant houses having been lately erected. The old village is more than a mile distant from the market-place of Nottingham; it is very romantic, and has a number of handsome villas and pleasant cottages. The parish comprises 843 acres of rich strong clay land. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £227; patron and impropriator, Earl Manvers. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1796. The present church was erected at an expense of £4700, by subscription, aided by a grant of £700 from the Incorporated Society; it was consecrated on the 26th September, 1839, and is a handsome cruciform structure in the early English style, with a lofty tower rising from the intersection. The burial-ground is near the summit of a bold rock commanding extensive prospects over the vales of Trent and Belvoir. The county asylum for lunatics, noticed in the article on Nottingham, is in this parish. In the neighbourhood are some curious excavations in the stone rock, used as dwellings.

Snetterton (St. Andrew and All Saints)

SNETTERTON (St. Andrew and All Saints), a parish, in the union of Wayland, hundred of Shropham, W. division of Norfolk, 3 miles (N.) from East Harling; containing 261 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1840 acres, of which 1540 are arable, 280 pasture, and 20 woodland. The road between Norwich and Thetford passes through it. The living comprises the consolidated rectories of All Saints and St. Andrew the Apostle, united to the rectory of Quiddenham, and valued in the king's books at £12. 17. 1. The tithes of Snetterton have been commuted for £440, and the glebe consists of 67 acres. There are but slight remains of the church of St. Andrew; that of All Saints is a handsome structure in the later English style.

Snettisham (St. Mary)

SNETTISHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Docking, hundred of Smithdon, W. division of Norfolk, 11 miles (N. N. E.) from Lynn; containing 1151 inhabitants. This place, formerly called Snetham, had a market on Friday; and some remains of the ancient market-cross are still to be seen in the village. The parish comprises about 5600 acres, of which 3000 are arable, 1700 pasture and marsh, 100 woodland, and 800 heath and waste. The substratum abounds with carrstone of excellent quality, which is extensively used for building, and, though soft and easily worked when taken from the quarry, becomes hard by exposure to the air. The village, which is on the road from Lynn to Wells, about two miles from the coast, is spacious and well built; petty-sessions for the division are held in it on the second Monday in every month. On the beach adjoining the Lynn channel is a bed of shingle, of which great quantities are sent by vessels into Lincolnshire. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 8.; net income, £110; patron and impropriator, H. L. Styleman L'Estrange, Esq.: the tithes were commuted for land in 1762. The parsonage-house has been enlarged and improved by the incumbent, the Rev. J. Coldham, The church is a cruciform structure in the later English style, with a lofty tower and spire, serving as a landmark for mariners; the chancel and north transept are in ruins. There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans; also a school endowed for twenty boys. Ninety acres of land were allotted to the poor for fuel, on the inclosure. Ancient brass celts have been discovered in the neighbourhood.

Sneyd

SNEYD, a township, in the parish of Burslem, borough of Stoke-upon-Trent, union of Wolstanton and Burslem, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford; containing 1328 inhabitants. This place adjoins the town of Burslem on the east. Extensive coal-works and mines of ironstone are wrought here, and the manufacture of earthenware is largely carried on. The township and part of that of Burslem were constituted an ecclesiastical district in May 1844, under the act 6th and 7th Victoria, cap. 37. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Crown and the Bishop of Lichfield, alternately. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and another dissenting congregation has also a meeting-house.

Snibston

SNIBSTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Packington, union of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, hundred of West Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 4½ miles (S. E.) from Ashby; containing 352 inhabitants. It is detached from the rest of the parish, is situated on the road from Leicester to Ashby, and comprises about 800 acres, in equal portions of arable and pasture. The chapel is dedicated to St. Mary, and appears to have been a much more extensive pile of building, and connected with the convent of Coventry.

Snilesby, or Snilesworth

SNILESBY, or Snilesworth, a township, in the parish of Hawnby, union of Helmsley, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York, 10 miles (N. W.) from Helmsley; containing 116 inhabitants. It is a moorland township, situated on one of the branches of the river Rye, and comprises by computation 2500 acres.

Snitter

SNITTER, a township, in the parish and union of Rothbury, W. division of Coquetdale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 2¾ miles (N. W. by W.) from Rothbury; containing 163 inhabitants. It stands upon a conical mount, between two streams called Wreigh and Lorbottle, which shortly afterwards unite, and join the Coquet river. The lands in the neighbourhood are of the most excellent quality, and the hedgerows are unusually high and vigorous.

Snitterby (St. Nicholas)

SNITTERBY (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Caistor, E. division of the wapentake of Aslacoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 11¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Market-Rasen; containing 235 inhabitants. The living is annexed to the rectory of Wadinghara: the tithes were commuted for land in 1769.

Snitterfield (St. James)

SNITTERFIELD (St. James), a parish, in the union of Stratford-upon-Avon, Snitterfield division of the hundred of Barlichway, S, division of the county of Warwick, 4 miles (N. by E.) from Stratford; containing 822 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 3725 acres, of which two-thirds are arable, and the remainder pasture. The soil is a stiff loam, alternated with gravel; the surface is undulated, and the lower grounds are watered by a copious brook which flows through the whole extent of the parish. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £271; patron, the Bishop of Worcester; impropriator, Mark Philips, Esq., lord of the manor, who has much beautified the village. The principal part of the tithes were commuted for land in 1765; the residue of the great tithes have been commuted for £109. 10., and of the vicarial for £55: the glebe comprises 240 acres. The church, an ancient edifice with a tower, exhibits portions in the early, decorated, and later English styles; it was repewed in 1841–2. The building contains a monument to the Rev. Richard Jago, formerly vicar, and author of a poem called Edge-Hill, and other poems; and a chaste monument by Denman (brother-in-law of Flaxman) to George Lloyd, Esq., high sheriff of the county in 1806, and who died in 1831. There is a national school, conducted in a commodious building.

Snitterton, with Wensley

SNITTERTON, with Wensley, a township, in the parish of Darley, union of Bakewell, hundred of Wirksworth, S. division of the county of Derby, 1½ mile (W. by N.) from Matlock; containing 604 inhabitants, of whom 46 are in the hamlet of Snitterton. At Cross-Green is a church dedicated to St. Mary, to which is attached a chapelry district called South Darley, and comprising this township.

Snittlegarth.—See Bewaldeth.

SNITTLEGARTH.—See Bewaldeth.

Snodland (All Saints)

SNODLAND (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Malling, hundred of Larkfield, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 2½ miles (N. E. by N.) from West Mailing; containing, with the ancient parish of Paddlesworth, 500 inhabitants. It comprises 1880 acres, of which 800 are arable, 150 wood, and 40 hop plantation. The lands are intersected by a stream tributary to the Medway, and on its banks is a paper-mill. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20; net income, £297; patron, the Bishop of Rochester. The church is an ancient structure in the early English style. John May, Esq., in 1800 founded a school.

Snoreham (St. Peter)

SNOREHAM (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Maldon, hundred of Dengie, S. division of Essex, 5 miles (S. S. E.) from Maldon; containing 211 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £3, and in the gift of Lord Rayleigh: the tithes have been commuted for £105. 12., and the glebe comprises 21½ acres. Not a vestige remains of the church; the inhabitants attend that of Latchingdon, with which place the parish is rated for the poor.

Snoring, Great (St. Mary)

SNORING, GREAT (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of North Greenhoe, W. division of Norfolk, 1½ mile (S. S. E.) from Little Walsingham; containing 556 inhabitants. It comprises 1645a. 18p., of which 1405 acres are arable, 191 meadow and pasture, and 25 woodland. The living is a rectory, with that of Thursford annexed, valued in the king's books at £24, and in the gift of St. John's College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted for £539, and the glebe comprises 37 acres, with a house, erected by Sir Richard Shelton. The church is a good structure in the later English style, with a lofty embattled tower, and contains some ancient monuments and brasses to the Shelton and other families; on the south side of the chancel are three sedilia of stone, and a piscina. The union workhouse is in the parish.

Snoring, Little (St. Andrew)

SNORING, LITTLE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of Gallow, W. division of Norfolk, 3¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from Fakenham; containing 293 inhabitants. It comprises 1524a. 3r. 9p., of which 1151 acres are arable, 247 meadow and pasture, and 125 woodland. The living is a rectory, annexed to the vicarage of East Barsham, and valued in the king's books at £12: the tithes have been commuted for £347, and the glebe comprises 60 acres. The church is in the early English style, with a Norman doorway on the south: in the churchyard is a detached circular tower with a Norman entrance, supposed to have belonged to a more ancient church. A house for lepers was founded here in 1380.

Snowshill

SNOWSHILL, a parish, in the union of Winchcomb, Lower division of the hundred of Kiftsgate, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 6 miles (N. E.) from Winchcomb; containing 298 inhabitants. The living is annexed to the rectory of Stanton.

Snydale

SNYDALE, a township, in the parish of Normanton, Lower division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 4 miles (W. by S.) from Pontefract; containing 138 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 1300 acres, and is chiefly the property of James Whitwell Torre, Esq., whose seat, Snydale Hall, is a handsome residence. Rent-charges have been awarded as commutations for the tithes; £108 are payable to Trinity College, Cambridge, £54 to certain impropriators, and £26 to the vicar. There is a glebe of 6½ acres.