Stapeley - Stapleton

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

192-195

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'Stapeley - Stapleton', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 192-195. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51299 Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


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Stapeley

STAPELEY, a township, in the parish of Wybunbury, union and hundred of Nantwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 1¾ mile (S. E.) from Nantwich; containing 448 inhabitants. It comprises 1200a. 3r. 36p. of land. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £14. 7.; and the appropriate for £90, payable to the Bishop of Lichfield.

Stapeley with Hillside

STAPELEY, with Hillside, a tything, in the parish and hundred of Odiham,union of Hartley-Wintney, Odiham and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2½ miles (S. S. W.) from Hartford-Bridge; containing 411 inhabitants.

Stapenhill (St. Peter)

STAPENHILL (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Burton-upon-Trent, hundred of Repton and Gresley, S. division of the county of Derby, 1 mile (S. E.) from Burton; containing, with the chapelry of Cauldwell, and the township of Stanton with Newhall, 2261 inhabitants. The parish comprises by survey 4620 acres, of which 1656 are in the township of Stapenhill. The soil is chiefly of strong quality, well adapted for wheat and beans, with some portions of good turnip soil; the surface is hilly, and the substratum abounds with coal, of which several extensive mines are in operation. The village is pleasantly situated on the east bank of the Trent. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 0½., and in the patronage of the Marquess of Anglesey: the glebe comprises 80 acres, with a pleasant residence. The church, which had become dilapidated, was taken down and rebuilt in 1839, at the expense of the incumbent, the Rev. John Clay; it is a chaste and handsome structure in the early English style, beautifully situated on an eminence which overhangs the river. There is a chapel of ease at Cauldwell; and at Stanton with Newhall is a separate incumbency. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. A national school has been erected near the church; and some small bequests are appropriated to the poor.

Staple-Fitzpaine (St. Peter)

STAPLE-FITZPAINE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Taunton, hundred of Abdick and Bulstone, W. division of Somerset, 5 miles (S. E. by S.) from Taunton; containing 361 inhabitants. It consists of 2864 acres, of which 627 are common or waste land. The living is a rectory, with the living of Bickenhall annexed, valued in the king's books at £17. 14. 2., and in the gift of Lord Portman. The tithes of Staple-Fitzpaine have been commuted for £383. 10., and the glebe comprises 50 acres.

Staple-next-Wingham (St. James)

STAPLE-next-Wingham (St. James), a parish, in the union of Eastry, hundred of Downhamford, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 1¾ mile (E. by S.) from Wingham; containing 562 inhabitants. This parish, which consists of 1009 acres, is chiefly inhabited by market-gardeners, who supply the watering-places in the Isle of Thanet with vegetables. The living is annexed to the rectory of Adisham: the tithes have been commuted for £599, and there is a glebe of 2 acres. The church contains a very old font, and many handsome monuments to the Lynch family, formerly residing at Grove, an ancient mansion in the parish.

Stapleford (St. Andrew)

STAPLEFORD (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Chesterton, hundred of Thriplow, county of Cambridge, 5¼ miles (S. S. E.) from Cambridge; containing 447 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1673 acres, of which a small portion is meadow and pasture, and the remainder arable. The population is partly employed in the manufacture of straw-plat. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 18. 9.; net income, £181; patrons and appropriates, the Dean and Chapter of Ely. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1812.

Stapleford (St. Mary)

STAPLEFORD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union, hundred, and county of Hertford, 3¼ miles (N. by W.) from Hertford; containing 259 inhabitants. It comprises about 1440 acres of land; the soil is gravelly, and the surface alternated with hill and dale. The small river Bene flows through the lands; and a large watercourse, called the New Cut, has been made at the expense of S. Smith, Esq., to diminish the violence of the floods. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 8. 6½., and in the gift of Mr. Smith: the tithes have been commuted for £250, and the glebe comprises 20 acres. The church is an ancient structure, with some details of the Norman style.

Stapleford (St. Mary Magdalene)

STAPLEFORD (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 4 miles (E. by S.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 184 inhabitants. It comprises 2171a. 6p.: the soil is chiefly clay, and the subsoil principally gravel; the surface is partly hilly, and partly flat. The river Wreake and the Melton-Mowbray and Oakham canal pass through the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, consolidated with the rectory of Saxby, and valued in the king's books at £13. The church was erected in 1783, by Robert, fourth Earl of Harborough, and contains some fine monuments to the Sherard family, among which is one by Rysbrach, in memory of Bennet, first earl. An hospital was founded in 1732, by the first earl, for six persons, and endowed with £48 per annum, subsequently augmented by the fourth earl and Lord Sherard, with £100 per annum, for eight persons.

Stapleford (All Saints)

STAPLEFORD (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Newark, Lower division of the wapentake of Boothby-Graffo, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 6½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Newark; containing 193 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 3. 4.; net income, £68; patron and impropriator, Lord Middleton.

Stapleford (St. Helen)

STAPLEFORD (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Shardlow, S. division of the wapentake of Broxtow, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 5¾ miles (W. S. W.) from Nottingham; containing 1837 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the west and north-west by the river Erewash, comprises by measurement 1200 acres: the soil is chiefly a rich clay; the surface is partly hilly, and the scenery pleasingly diversified. The village is finely situated on the Erewash; the population is partly employed in the stocking manufacture. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Crown, with a net income of £120. The church underwent a thorough repair in 1785. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. In the parish are an obelisk apparently of Saxon construction, and a Druidical monument called the Hemlock Stone. Stapleford Hall was the residence of Sir John Borlase Warren, the distinguished admiral.

Stapleford (St. Mary)

STAPLEFORD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Wilton, hundred of Branch and Dole, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 4½ miles (N. N. W.) from Wilton; containing 296 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £105; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Windsor.

Stapleford, Abbot's (St. Mary)

STAPLEFORD, ABBOT'S (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Ongar, S. division of Essex, 5¾ miles (S. E. by S.) from Epping; containing 498 inhabitants. The parish is separated from TawneyStapleford by the river Roden, over which was a ford that may have given rise to its name; it takes the distinguishing affix Abbot's from having belonged to the monastery of St. Edmondsbury, in the county of Suffolk. The fine old mansion of Albyns, the residence of the Abdy family, built by Inigo Jones, is situated here. The living is a rectory-, valued in the king's books at £16. 15., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £483. The east window of the church has a very ancient figure of Edward the Confessor in stained glass, removed by Dr. Pearce, Bishop of Rochester, from the palace of Havering-atte-Bower. In the church are also monuments to the family of Abdy; to John, Lord Fortescue, one of the justices of the court of common pleas; and his son Dormer, the last lord: in the churchyard is a monument to Sir H. Gould, also a justice of the common pleas. A school is endowed with three old cottages, and £25 a year. Bishop Pearce, and Dr. Godfrey Goodman, Bishop of Gloucester, were rectors of the parish; and John Day, author of Sandford and Merton, resided here.

Stapleford, Bruen

STAPLEFORD, BRUEN, a township, in the parish of Tarvin, union of Great Boughton, Second division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester, 4½ miles (W. N. W.) from Tarporley; containing 165 inhabitants. It comprises 729 acres of land, whereof the soil is a light sand. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £56. 6. 6.; and the appropriate for £98. 15., payable to the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield.

Stapleford, Foulk

STAPLEFORD, FOULK, a township, in the parish of Tarvin, union of Great Boughton, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 5½ miles (W.) from Tarporley; containing 285 inhabitants. It comprises 1321 acres, of which 48 are common or waste. The tithes have been commuted for £61. 19. 10. payable to the vicar, and £80. 2. to the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield.

Stapleford, Tawney (St. Mary)

STAPLEFORD, TAWNEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Ongar, S. division of Essex, 6 miles (S. E. by E.) from Epping; containing 350 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1570 acres, of which 40 are common or waste land: within its limits is Suttons, the residence of the family of Smijth. The living is a rectory, with that of Mount Thoydon united, valued in the king's books at £15. 8. 9., and in the gift of the Rev. Sir E. B. Smijth, Bart.: the tithes of TawneyStapleford have been commuted for £350, and the glebe comprises 127½ acres. The church is a small edifice, with a belfry turret, and a spire of wood.

Staplegate

STAPLEGATE, an extra-parochial district, the northern suburb of the city of Canterbury, in the union of Blean, hundred of Westgate, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent; with 253 inhabitants.

Staplegrove

STAPLEGROVE, a parish, in the union of Taunton, hundred of Taunton and Taunton-Dean, W. division of Somerset, 1¾ mile (N. W.) from Taunton; containing 471 inhabitants. This parish, which was separated from Taunton in 1554, comprises an area of 1059a. 3r. 6p., forming a richly-wooded portion of the picturesque vale of Taunton-Dean. The population is partly employed in the silk manufacture, in which, on an average, about 100 persons are engaged. The Grand Western canal from Bridgwater to Tiverton passes along the southern boundary of the parish, and the Bristol and Exeter railway runs through it, in a line nearly parallel with the canal. Here is a private asylum for insane patients. The living is a rectory, in the gift of the Rev. E. Houlditch: the tithes have been commuted for £205, and there is an excellent glebe-house. The church is an ancient structure, with a square embattled tower; a gallery has been recently built, and the edifice contains a monument to Mr. Southey, uncle of the poet.

Staplehurst (All Saints)

STAPLEHURST (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Maidstone, partly in the hundred of Cranbrooke, and partly in that of Marden, Lower division of the lathe of Scray, W. division of Kent, 4 miles (N. by E.) from Cranbrooke; containing 1591 inhabitants. It comprises 5737 acres, and is situated on the SouthEastern railway, which has a station here, 12 miles from the Tonbridge station, and 14 from that of Ashford. A fair for cattle, corn, and hops, is held on October 11th. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £26. 5. 10., and in the gift of St. John's College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted for £1199. 15., and the glebe comprises one acre. There is a place of worship for Independents. Two schools are supported for about £60 per annum, arising from the bequests of Lancelot Bathurst in 1539, and John Gibson, Esq., in 1707.

Stapleton (St. Mary)

STAPLETON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Longtown, Eskdale ward, E. division of Cumberland; containing, with the townships of Bellbank, Solport, and Trough, 1170 inhabitants, of whom 550 are in Stapleton township, 8 miles (N.) from Brampton. The parish is situated on the river Leven or Line, over which is a neat bridge; and comprises about 13,930 acres, whereof about 50 or 60 are woodland, and the remainder arable and pasture, in nearly equal portions. The soil is generally cold, lying on a retentive clay; the surface is hilly. On the north bank of the river are the remains of Shank Castle; and in the vicinity coal has been found, of which a mine is in operation. An act for dividing and inclosing Wakeyhill common here, was passed in 1842. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £1. 8. 11½.; net income, £98; patron, the Earl of Carlisle. The church was rebuilt in 1829.

Stapleton (Holy Trinity)

STAPLETON (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Clifton, hundred of Barton-Regis, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 2½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Bristol; containing, with the village of Fishponds, 3944 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the north-western angle of the South-Gloucester and Somerset coalfield, and is bounded on the north side by a range of hills from 150 to 200 feet in height, to which elevation the strata of the coal-measures on the south side are lifted up by a mass of millstone-grit. The road from Bristol to Wotton-under-Edge and Gloucester passes through the village of Stapleton; and another from the same city to Sodbury, Cirencester, and Oxford, through the village of Fishponds. The parish comprises by measurement 2465 acres, and is traversed by the river Frome, flowing through a richly-wooded glen occasionally interspersed with precipitous rocks; the soil is a stone brash. The district abounds with valuable Pennant stone, of which considerable quarries are wrought; and there are several coal-mines in operation: the manufacture of hats, formerly extensive, is now on a small scale. The palace of the Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol is situated here. The living is a perpetual curacy, lately endowed by Sir John Smyth, Bart., who is patron and impropriator, with £2000; net income, £224: the tithes have been commuted for £298. 12. The church is a small neat edifice, with a tower crowned by pinnacles. A chapel was built at Fishponds, by subscription, in 1817: the living is a perpetual curacy, net income, £80; patron, the Rev. H. Shute. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans. About half way between Stapleton and Fishponds is an extensive building which was occupied as a depôt for French prisoners of war. Mrs. Hannah More was born in a house in the parish now appropriated as a free school; and John Foster, author of the well-known Essays, resided in the village.

Stapleton

STAPLETON, a township, in the parish of Presteign, union of Knighton, hundred of Wigmore, county of Hereford; containing 155 inhabitants, and comprising an area of 1271 acres.

Stapleton

STAPLETON, a chapelry, in the parish of Barwell, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 3 miles (N. by E.) from Hinckley; containing 245 inhabitants. It comprises 1299a. 1r. 7p. of land, nearly equally divided between arable and pasture; the soil is light. A rent-charge of £240 has been awarded as a commutation for the tithes, and there is a glebe of 53½ acres. The chapel is dedicated to St. Martin.

Stapleton (St. John)

STAPLETON (St. John), a parish, in the union of Atcham, hundred of Condover, S. division of Salop, 6 miles (S. by W.) from Shrewsbury; containing 257 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Shrewsbury to Hereford, and comprises 2432 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 7. 6., and in the patronage of the Hon. H. W. Powys: the tithes have been commuted for £464; there is a glebe-house, and the"glebe comprises 10½ acres. An embankment in the parish is supposed to be Roman.

Stapleton

STAPLETON, a hamlet, in the parish of Martock, union of Yeovil, hundred of Martock, W. division of Somerset; containing 147 inhabitants.

Stapleton

STAPLETON, a township, partly in the parish of Barton, but chiefly in that of Croft, wapentake of Gilling-East, union of Darlington, N. riding of York, 2¼ miles (S. W.) from Darlington; containing 117 inhabitants. It is on the south side of Teesdale, and comprises about 920 acres of land. The village is pleasantly situated on the bank of the Tees; and on the green stands the trunk of a large elm which has weathered the storms of several centuries. The tithes have been commuted for £160 payable to the rector of Croft, and £2. 13. to the vicar of Gilling.

Stapleton

STAPLETON, a township, in the parish of Darrington, Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 4¼ miles (S. E. by E.) from Pontefract; containing 138 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 1760 acres of fertile land in high cultivation. Stapleton Park, the seat of the late John Watson Barton, Esq., was originally the property of Edward Lascelles, Esq., who succeeded to the title of Baron Harewood in 1796, and erected the present spacious and elegant Hall. A portico of the Doric order, which now forms the principal entrance, was added by the Hon. Edward Robert Petre, who in 1833 sold the estate to Mr. Barton. The park is richly wooded, and watered by a rivulet.