Starbotton - Staythorpe

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

195-198

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'Starbotton - Staythorpe', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 195-198. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51300 Date accessed: 26 July 2014.


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Starbotton

STARBOTTON, a township, in the parish of Kettlewell, union of Skipton, E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 17 miles (N. E. by N.) from Settle; containing 192 inhabitants. It comprises by computation an area of 2520 acres, situated in the deep and narrow part of Wharfdale: the village is north of Kettlewell, about two miles higher up the dale.

Starcross

STARCROSS, a port and ecclesiastical district, in the parishes of Kenton and Dawlish, unions of St. Thomas and Newton-Abbott, hundred of Exminster, Wonford and S. divisions of Devon, 1½ mile (W. by N.) from Exmouth; containing 936 inhabitants. This place is situated on the western bank of the river Exe, near its influx into the English Channel. The surrounding country is richly diversified; and on an eminence is a conspicuous landmark called Belvidere, erected in 1773 by the Earl of Devon, and consisting of a lofty triangular tower, with an hexagonal turret rising from each of the angles. From the advantages of its situation, and the beauty of the scenery, Starcross is much frequented as a bathing-place; it is spacious and well built, and intersected by the road between Exeter and Teignmouth. A pleasure-fair is held on the Wednesday in Whitsunweek. The trade consists principally in the importation of coal and timber, for landing which a convenient quay has been constructed. Here is a station of the South Devon railway. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £120; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Exeter, and Dean and Chapter of Salisbury. The church, which was consecrated on the 4th of February 1828, is a neat substantial structure containing 680 sittings. An ancient chapel at Cofton, originally founded in the 14th century, and which had for nearly eighty years been in a state of dilapidation, was restored by the Earl of Devon to its pristine elegance, and opened for divine service on the 9th of January, 1839.

Starston (St. Margaret)

STARSTON (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Depwade, hundred of Earsham, E. division of Norfolk, 1¼ mile (N. N. W.) from Harleston; containing 482 inhabitants. It comprises 2198a. 2r. 30p., of which 1703 acres are arable, 368 meadow and pasture, and 28 woodland. The village is pleasantly situated on the road from Harleston to Norwich, and has many handsome houses. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15, and in the patronage of Trustees, who must present a Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted for £651, and the glebe comprises 47½ acres, with a house, greatly improved by the late rector. The church is an ancient structure in the early and later English styles, with a square embattled tower, and contains several interesting monuments.

Startforth (Holy Trinity)

STARTFORTH (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Teesdale, wapentake of Gilling-West, N. riding of York, ¾ of a mile (W. S. W.) from the town of Barnard-Castle; containing, with the townships of Boldron and Eggleston-Abbey, 782 inhabitants. The township of Startforth is bounded by the river Tees, which separates it from the county of Durham; it comprises 1070 acres, of which two-thirds are pasture, and the rest meadow, with about 30 acres of wood. The surface is undulated, the soil along the river side of a good quality, and the scenery embraces a fine view of Barnard-Castle and its fortress with the hills above the town. The Tees is crossed by a stone bridge of two arches; and there is abridge of one arch leading into the township of Westwick. A shoe-thread mill employs about 300 hands. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 0. 10., and in the patronage of the family of Lowther: the great tithes have been commuted for £66. 16., and the vicarial for £112. 5.; the glebe comprises 22 acres. The church is of great antiquity, and was much improved in 1844, when the communion-table, seats, and pulpit were rearranged; the east window is of brilliant stained glass, presented by R. Harvey, Esq. In the churchyard is a monument to the memory of Hannah Latham, who was murdered in 1813.

Statfold

STATFOLD, a parish, in the union of Tamworth, N. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 3¼ miles (N. E.) from Tamworth; containing 45 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 450 acres of land, the property of Stanley Pipe Wolferstan, Esq., lord of the manor. Nearly two-thirds of the surface are arable, and the remainder pasture, with a moderate portion of ornamental plantation; the soil is generally a red clay. The church, now used only as a chapel for interment, for which purpose it is kept in repair by the proprietor, contains some ancient monuments. This place, under its old name, Stotfold, was one of the prebends in the cathedral of Lichfield; but the revenue, with that of three other prebends, has been formed by act of parliament into a Fabric Fund, for repairs, &c. The late proprietor, Samuel Pipe Wolferstan, who died in June 1820, was distinguished by his antiquarian researches, and as a friend assisted Shaw in his history of the county.

Stathe

STATHE, a tything, in the parish of Stoke St. Gregory, union of Taunton, hundred of North Curry, W. division of the county of Somerset; containing 629 inhabitants.

Stathern (St. Guthlake)

STATHERN (St. Guthlake), a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 8¾ miles (N. by E.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 549 inhabitants. This parish, of which the greater part is in the vale of Belvoir, comprises 2043 acres, whereof 120 are woodland, chiefly plantations. Of the remainder of the area, two-thirds are meadow and pasture, and one-third arable; the soil is well adapted for wheat, barley, oats, and beans. The Grantham canal passes through the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 3. 1½.; net income, £566; patrons, the Master and Fellows of St. Peter's College, Cambridge: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1792. The church is an ancient structure, containing numerous handsome monuments.

Staughton, Great (St. Andrew)

STAUGHTON, GREAT (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of St. Neot's, hundred of Toseland, county of Huntingdon, 3¼ miles (S. E. by S.) from Kimbolton; containing 1285 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £20; net income, £545; patrons, the President and Fellows of St. John's College, Oxford; impropriator, D. Onslow, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents, under acts of inclosure, in 1804 and 1807. A school is endowed with £18. 10. per annum; and an allotment of 24 acres of the town field, awarded for other parcels of land bequeathed for charitable uses, produces £50 yearly.

Staughton, Little (All Saints)

STAUGHTON, LITTLE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of St. Neot's, hundred of Stodden, county of Bedford, 4 miles (S. by E.) from Kimbolton; containing 485 inhabitants. It comprises about 1200 acres, of* which 800 are arable. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 8. 4.; net income, £200; patrons, the President and Fellows of Corpus Christi College, Oxford. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1801. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Staunton (All Saints)

STAUNTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Monmouth, hundred of St. Briavell's, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 3 miles (E. by N.) from Monmouth; containing 188 inhabitants. This place derives its name from Staenton (Saxon), "the stony town," or "town of stones;" and in Domesday book mention is made of a castle here belonging to Roger de Stanton, the foundations of which were cleared away a few years since. The parish is bounded on the north by the river Wye, and situated on the road from Coleford to Monmouth; and comprises about 1500 acres, of which 1000 are wood. It abounds in limestone and red-sandstone, and mines were formerly in operation. On a wellwooded hill, from which are beautiful views, is the remarkable rocking-stone called the Buckstone, 24 feet high, 57 feet in circumference at the upper surface, and 3 feet 3 inches at the base. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7, and in the patronage of E. Machen, Esq., with a net income of £241, and a good parsonage-house; the glebe consists of about 12 acres. The church is a cruciform structure, chiefly in the Norman and early English styles, with aisles, and a square embattled tower; it contains a curious stone pulpit, a piscina of beautiful design in the north aisle, and a finely-sculptured font. An almshouse for three persons was founded in 1680, and endowed with £30 per annum by Benedict Hall, Esq.

Staunton (St. Mary)

STAUNTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Newark, S. division of the wapentake of Newark and of the county of Nottingham, 6¾ miles (S.) from Newark; containing, with the chapelry of Flawborough, 172 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, with that of Kilvington consolidated in 1826, valued in the king's books at £16. 13. 11½.; net income, £322; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Dr. Staunton. The tithes were commuted for land in 1759. The church was much mutilated by the soldiers of Cromwell, who converted the edifice into stabling for their horses; it contains several interesting monuments. There is a chapel of ease at Flawborough.

Staunton

STAUNTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Dunster, union of Williton, hundred of Carhampton, W. division of Somerset; containing 30 inhabitants.

Staunton (St. James)

STAUNTON (St. James), a parish, in the union of Newent, Lower division of the hundred of Pershore, Upton and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 8 miles (N. by W.) from Gloucester; containing 402 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 1447 acres, of which about two-thirds are arable, and 22 acres woodland; the soil is generally gravel, alternated with loam, and the chief produce wheat, barley, and beans. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 5., and in the patronage of the Rev. Thomas Hill: the tithes have been commuted for £375, and there are 50 acres of glebe. The church is partly in the decorated and partly in the later English style, with a tower and spire. A rental of £30, the produce of several benefactions, is appropriated to the poor.

Staunton-Harrold

STAUNTON-HARROLD, a township, in the parish of Breedon, union of Ashby, hundred of West Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 3½ miles (N. N. E.) from Ashby; containing 389 inhabitants. It comprises 1821a. 3r. 6p. of land, and contains limestone, ironstone, and some veins of lead-ore. A railway connects the township with Ashby, and with the Leicester and Swannington line, which also communicates with the neighbouring lime-works of Ticknall, in Derbyshire. In the hamlet of Lount is a wood of 140 acres, and a colliery with a seam of coal four feet in thickness. The village is small, and situated near the Derbyshire border. The manor passed to the Shirleys by marriage with the Staunton family, in 1423, and is now the property of the Earl Ferrers, whose seat here, StauntonHarrold Hall, is a large and handsome mansion of brick and stone, built and designed by the fifth earl in 1770, and standing in a park of about 150 acres, in a beautiful valley called Rekdale. The south-east front is in the style of Palladio, with a pediment surmounted by three stone figures, and supported by Ionic pillars which are upheld by Doric columns. The south-west front is very extensive, and its centre is surmounted by the figure of a lion. The park is stocked with deer, and was formerly very considerable; it is embellished with a fine sheet of water covering from twenty to thirty acres, crossed at the lower end by a bridge. On the verge of the lake is a beautiful chapel in the pointed style, with a well-proportioned tower containing eight bells. This edifice, which is dedicated to the Trinity, was erected in 1653, by the celebrated Sir Robert Shirley, "who did the best things in the worst of times, and hoped them in the most calamitous." It contains several marble monuments to the Shirley family, and in the gallery is an organ built by Schmidt; the chancel is paved with fine marble, the communion-plate is of the most costly description, and the furniture purplevelvet enriched with gold lace and embroidery. The living is in the gift of the earl.

Staunton-Upon-Wye (St. Mary)

STAUNTON-UPON-WYE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Weobley, hundred of Grimsworth, county of Hereford, 8¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Hereford; containing 548 inhabitants. The parish consists of 2300 acres, and is intersected by the road from Hereford to Kington. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 13. 4.; net income, £340; patrons, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. The tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1783. George Jarvis, Esq., of Thames-Ditton, in 1790 bequeathed £30,000 to the parishes of Staunton, Bredwardine, and Letton; the sum was invested in the three per cent, consols., and had accumulated in 1822 to £92,496. From the proceeds, £1250 are yearly appropriated to this parish for educating children, and providing clothing and fuel for the poor; the total income is upwards of £3000.

Staveley (St. John the Baptist)

STAVELEY (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Chesterfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 4¾ miles (N. E. by E.) from Chesterfield; containing, with the chapelry of Barlow, 3315 inhabitants, of whom 2688 are in Staveley township. This place was for many generations the seat of the Frecheville family, of whom Sir John, an active royalist in the reign of Charles I., strongly fortified his mansion, and, having raised a battery of twelve pieces of cannon, held it against the parliamentarian forces for a considerable time, but in August 1644 was obliged to surrender by capitulation. The parish comprises 6827 acres. The soil is chiefly a loamy clay, with some earth of lighter quality in the higher land; the substratum abounds with ironstone and coal, of the former of which much is smelted. The village is pleasantly situated on the east bank of the river Rother; the Chesterfield canal runs through the village, and several tramroads have been formed in connexion with the various collieries in the parish. The Staveley station of the Midland railway is 3½ miles from the Chesterfield station, and 2¾ from that of Eckington. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 7. 6., and in the patronage of the Duke of Devonshire; the tithes have been commuted for two rent-charges each of £605. 9. 7., payable respectively to the rector and the Duke of Devonshire; the glebe consists of about 90 acres, and there is a good glebe-house. The church is an ancient structure, containing monuments of the Frecheville family; the east window exhibits some stained glass, presented by Lord Frecheville in 1676. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. A free grammar school was founded at Netherthorp, in 1537, by Judge Rodes; in support of which, and of two scholarships in St. John's College, Cambridge, he bequeathed £20 per annum, since augmented to £30. Excellent schools have been lately built at a considerable expense by the duke; and a chapel of ease and school house have been erected at Handley, in the parish, about three miles distant from the village. An hospital for four aged persons of each sex was erected at Woodthorpe, in 1632, by Sir Peter Frecheville, who assigned £4 per annum to each inmate; and Richard Robinson, in 1777, augmented the endowment with £18 per annum.—See Barlow.

Staveley

STAVELEY, a chapelry, in the parish of Cartmel, union of Ulverston, hundred of Lonsdale north of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 9 miles (N. E.) from Ulverston; containing 382 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £108; patron, the Earl of Burlington.

Staveley (All Saints)

STAVELEY (All Saints), a parish, in the Lower division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 4 miles (N. by E.) from Knaresborough; containing 347 inhabitants. It comprises 1378a. 1r. 15p., of which about two-thirds are arable, and the remainder pasture and meadow, with a moderate portion of wood; the surface is boldly undulated, and the scenery is pleasing. There is a limestone-quarry, but it has not been wrought for many years; and a mill for spinning flax and grinding corn employs about fifty hands. On the north of tbe parish is a rivulet which separates it from the parish of Copgrove and the township of Rocliffe. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 17. 11.; net income, £354; patron, the Rev. Richard Hartley. The tithes were commuted for land in 1801; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe altogether contains 235 acres. The church was rebuilt in 1831, at a cost of £1000. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Staveley, Nether

STAVELEY, NETHER, a township, in the parish, union, and ward of Kendal, county of Westmorland, 4¾ miles (N. W. by N.) from Kendal; containing 201 inhabitants. It comprises 2540 acres of land, arable, pasture, and woodland. The Kendal and Windermere railway passes through the township, and approaches near the village of Staveley. Fairs for cattle and sheep are held on the Wednesday before Easter, and on the 7th of October. The tithes were commuted in 1847 for a corn-rent of £77. 11. 3.

Staveley, Over

STAVELEY, OVER, a township and chapelry, in the parish, union, and ward of Kendal, county of Westmorland, 5 miles (N. W. by N.) from the town of Kendal; the township containing 527 inhabitants. Over Staveley is a beautiful and picturesque township, adjoining Nether Staveley, and comprising 1230 acres of arable, pasture, and woodland, and about 1400 acres of uninclosed common. On Staveley-Head fell are veins of lead-ore, but so small is the lead in quantity that it cannot be obtained at a remunerating profit. The village of Staveley is chiefly in this township, and is an increasing and flourishing place, seated at the confluence of the Kent and the Gowen, on the ro'ad between Kendal and Ambleside. In the immediate neighbourhood are two woollen manufactories and three bobbin-mills, which give employment to a great number of the population. In the 2nd of Edward III. a charter was granted for a market on Friday, weekly, and a fair, annually, on the eve, day, and morrow of St. Luke; but the market has long been discontinued, and fairs on other days are now held in that part of the village which is in Nether Staveley. The chapelry includes the greater part of Nether Staveley and of Hugil: the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £120; patron, the Vicar of Kendal; impropriators, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge. The tithes of the township have been commuted for £53. 5. 11. The chapel is an ancient edifice with a plain tower. There are places of worship for Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists. George Jopson, in I696, assigned two tenements, now let for about £80 per annum, to the minister, provided he gave instruction to the children of the chapelry, as schoolmaster.

Staverton (St. George)

STAVERTON (St. George), a parish, in the union of Totnes, hundred of Haytor, Teignbridge and S. divisions of Devon, 3¼ miles (N. by W.) from Totnes; containing 1069 inhabitants. It is bounded on the south and south-west by the river Dart, and comprises 4820 acres, of which 50 are common or waste land. The soil is various, and the surface hilly. The substratum abounds with blue and grey slate, and marble of the same colours is found, of which there are some valuable quarries; a brown freestone of soft quality occurs in those parts of the parish where the superincumbent soil is most fertile, and good limestone is quarried for manure. The living is a vicarage, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Exeter (the appropriators), valued in the king's books at £32. 14. 9½.; net income, £366. The church contains some screen-work.

Staverton (St. John the Baptist)

STAVERTON (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Cheltenham, Lower division of the hundred of Deerhurst, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 4¾ miles (W. by N.) from Cheltenham; containing 296 inhabitants, and comprising 758 acres. The Gloucester and Cheltenham railroad passes through the parish. The living is a vicarage, with Boddington annexed, valued in the king's books at £12; net income, £436; patron, R. Purnell, Esq.

Staverton (St. Mary)

STAVERTON (St.Mary), a parish, in the union of Daventry, hundred of Fawsley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 2 miles (W. S. W.) from Daventry; containing 503 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the Warwick and Northampton road, comprises by measurement 2400 acres: the soil is various; the surface is elevated and hilly, and the surrounding scenery interesting. The river Nene has its source in the parish, and the Leam separates it from the county of Warwick. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes: net income, £549; patrons, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. The tithes were commuted for 276 acres of land, under an act of inclosure, in 1774; and there are 74 acres of old glebe. The church is a handsome structure in the decorated and later English styles, with a lofty square embattled tower. The Rev. Francis Baker, in 1767, endowed a school with some land which, at the inclosure, was exchanged for 27a. 1r., now producing £52 per annum. The Rev. Sir John Knightley subsequently gave £200 for a Sunday school. Dr. Fanshaw, regius professor of divinity at Oxford, was incumbent of the parish.

Staverton

STAVERTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Trowbridge, union and hundred of Melksham, Westbury and N. divisions, and Trowbridge and Bradford Subdivisions, of Wilts, 2½ miles (N.) from Trowbridge; containing 228 inhabitants. The chapel has been enlarged, the Incorporated Society granting £125 in aid of the expense: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Rector, with a net income of £100. Here is a large cloth manufactory.

Stawell

STAWELL, a chapelry, in the parish of Moorlinch, union of Bridgwater, hundred of Whitley, W. division of Somerset, 5 miles (E. by N.) from Bridgwater; containing 221 inhabitants. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £105, and the vicarial for £60: there is a glebe of one acre.

Stawley (St. Michael)

STAWLEY (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Wellington, hundred of Milverton, W. division of Somerset, 7 miles (W. by N.) from Wellington; containing 222 inhabitants. It comprises about 800 acres of land, nearly equally divided into arable and pasture, interspersed with woodlands; the soil is loamy, with portions of lighter quality. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 8. 6½.; net income, £150; patron, John Hayne, Esq. The church is a plain ancient structure.

Staxton

STAXTON, a township, in the parish of Willerby, union of Scarborough, wapentake of Dickering, E. riding of York, 6½ miles (S. by W.) from Scarborough; containing 263 inhabitants. It comprises about 1640 acres of land: the village is pleasantly situated on the high road from Hunmanby to Malton. The tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1801. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Stayley

STAYLEY, or Staly, a township and ecclesiastical district, in the parish of Mottram-in-Longdendale, union of Ashton-under-Lyne, hundred of Macclesfield, N. division of the county of Chester; containing, with part of the town of Stalybridge (which is described under its own head), 3905 inhabitants. The manor was held under the manor of Longden, and was conveyed to Robert de Staveley or Staveleigh by Robert de Hough in 1318. From the Staveleys it passed by a female heir about 1471 to the Ashtons, whose co-heiress conveyed it to the Booths; and it afterwards passed, with Matley and other estates in the parish, to the earls of Stamford. The township comprises 2760 acres, whereof 470 are common land; the surface is hilly and undulating, and the scenery bold, with extensive views: quarries of good stone are wrought. There are several large cotton-mills, and a few woollen-mills. The Huddersfield canal and the Huddersfield railway pass through the township. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop of Chester and three other Trustees; net income, £180. The appropriate tithes, payable to the bishop, have been commuted for £150. The church, dedicated to St. Paul, is in the early English style, with a square tower; it is prettily seated on the side of a hill, and cost £4000. Several cottages have been built as an endowment for the organist. There is a good school. Stayley Hall, the ancient seat of the family of Staveley, is now occupied by James Adshead and Brothers.

Stayleybridge.—See Stalybridge.

STAYLEYBRIDGE.—See Stalybridge.

Staynall, county Lancaster.—See Stalmine.

STAYNALL, county Lancaster.—See Stalmine.

Staythorpe

STAYTHORPE, a township, in the parish of Averham, union of Southwell, N. division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 4 miles (W.) from Newark; containing 68 inhabitants. The township comprises by measurement 632 acres: the river Trent is about a mile from the village. The tithes have been commuted for £187. 9. There are some vestiges of a grange which belonged to the abbots of Rufford.



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