Stean - Steeton

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

198-200

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'Stean - Steeton', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 198-200. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51301 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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Stean (St. Peter)

STEAN (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Brackley, hundred of King's-Sutton, S. division of the county of Northampton, 2 miles (N. W.) from Brackley; containing 26 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Brackley to Banbury, and comprises 1128a. 34p.: it is the property of Earl Spencer. The living is a discharged rectory, united to that of Hinton-in-the-Hedges, and valued in the king's books at £5. 9. 7. The church, erected in 1620 by Sir Thomas Crewe, was the chapel belonging to the mansion of Lord Crewe, Bishop of Durham, and contains many fine monuments to the memory of the family. The park and part of the house still remain.

Steanbridge

STEANBRIDGE, a tything, in the parish and union of Stroud, hundred of Bisley, E. division of the county of Gloucester; containing 1395 inhabitants.

Stearsby

STEARSBY, a hamlet, in the parish of Bransby, union of Easingwould, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York, 7½ miles (E. N. E.) from Easingwould; containing 106 inhabitants. Its small village is situated about a mile to the east of Bransby.

Stebbing (St. Mary)

STEBBING (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Dunmow, hundred of Hinckford, N. division of Essex, 3¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from Dunmow; containing 1458 inhabitants. The parish is about nine or ten miles in circumference; the surface is elevated, and the soil for the greater part dry and fertile. The lands are intersected by a stream that turns several mills. There are two artificial mounts, one of which is said to have been formerly the site of a castle. A fair for cattle and fat calves is held on the 10th of July. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12: the great tithes, which belong, with the patronage, to Mrs. Batt, have been commuted for £820, and the vicarial tithes for £350; the impropriate and vicarial glebes contain respectively 124¾ and 2 acres. The church is a spacious and lofty structure, situated on an eminence. Here is a place of worship for Independents.

Stedham (St. James)

STEDHAM (St. James), a parish, in the union of Midhurst, hundred of Easebourne, rape of Chichester, W. division of Sussex, 2 miles (W. N. W.) from Midhurst; containing 557 inhabitants. It is intersected by the river Rother, and under the Reform act is partly within the borough of Midhurst. The living is a rectory, with that of Heyshot united, valued in the king's books at £17. 18. 6½.; net income, £386; patron, the Rev. L. V. Harcourt. The church consists of a nave and chancel, with a tower rising from the centre: in the churchyard is a fine old yew-tree.

Steel

STEEL, a hamlet, in the township and parish of Prees, union of Wem, Whitchurch division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of Salop, 3 miles (S.) from Whitchurch; containing 65 inhabitants.

Steep

STEEP, a parish, partly in the union of Petersfield, hundred of East Meon, Petersfield and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, and partly in the union of Midhurst, hundred of Easebourne, rape of Chichester, W. division of Sussex; containing, with the tythings of North and South Ambersham, 885 inhabitants, of whom 563 are in Steep tything, if mile (N.) from Petersfield. The parish comprises 2642 acres, of which 211 are common or waste. The living is annexed, with that of Froxfield, to the vicarage of East Meon; the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £300, and the vicarial for £230.

Steep-Holmes Island

STEEP-HOLMES ISLAND, in the parish of Uphill, union of Axbridge, hundred of Winterstoke, E. division of Somerset, 2 leagues (W. by N.) from Uphill. The island is a vast rock, about a mile and a half in circumference, rising perpeudicularly out of the Bristol Channel to the height of 400 feet above the level of the sea, and inaccessible at all points except two. A few rabbits burrow here, and great numbers of sea-fowl build their nests in the recesses of the overhanging cliffs. It is supposed that the island had anciently a priory, founded about the reign of Edward II., by Maurice, Lord Berkeley.

Steeping, Great (All Saints)

STEEPING, GREAT (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, Wold division of the wapentake of Candleshoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from Spilsby; containing, with the hamlet of Monksthorpe, 285 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the south by the river Steeping, and comprises, according to computation, 1300 acres; the surface is flat, and the soil clay. The living is a discharged vicarage, united to the rectory of Firsby, and valued in the king's books at £7. 18. 4.: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £160; and the vicarial for £ 129, with a glebe of 4 acres. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The remains of an old mansion here, surrounded by a moat, are occupied as a farmhouse; and a moated inclosure in the neighbourhood is said to have been the site of a monastery.

Steeping, Little (St. Andrew)

STEEPING, LITTLE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, E. division of the soke of Bolingbroke, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3¾ miles (S. E. by E.) from Spilsby; containing 289 inhabitants, and comprising 1036a. 3r. 30p. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 19. 4.; net income, £181; patron, Lord Willoughby de Eresby. The tithes were commuted for land about the beginning of the present century, at the time of the inclosure of the East fen, on the border of which the parish is situated; the glebe altogether contains 92 acres. The nave and chancel of the church were rebuilt from the old materials in 1639. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and a school is supported by an allowance of £10 per annum out of some charity lands in the parish, and a contribution of £15 from the rector.

Steeple (St. Michael)

STEEPLE (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Wareham and Purbeck, hundred of Hasilor, Wareham division of Dorset, 6 miles (S. by W.) from Wareham; containing, with the hamlet of West Creech, 272 inhabitants. It comprises 3082 acres, of which 830 are common or waste; the south side lies on a bed of fine limestone, which is quarried for buildings, and for burning into lime. The living is a rectory, with that of Tyneham united by act of parliament in the 8th of George I., and is valued in the king's books at £9. 15. 5.; net income, £382; patron, John Bond, Esq.: the glebe contains about 5 acres. The church has a plain lofty tower. There is a private episcopal chapel at Grange, in the parish; and schools are partly supported by the minister. West Creech belonged to the abbey of Bindon, and had the privilege of a market and fair granted by Henry III.

Steeple (St. Lawrence and All Saints)

STEEPLE (St. Lawrence and All Saints), a parish, in the union of Maldon, hundred of Dengte, S. division of Essex, 10 miles (E. S. E.) from Maldon; containing 584 inhabitants. This parish comprises 2748a. lr. 9p., and includes the island of Ramsey. It is bounded on the north by the river Blackwater, on which is a quay, the property of St. Bartholomew's Hospital, where barges of 70 tons deliver cargoes of chalk, and take in corn. Fairs are held on the Wednesday in Whitsun-week, and the Wednesday after Michaelmas-day. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £15. 18.; net income, £195; patrons, alternately, Sir Brook W. Bridges, Bart., and the Hunt family; impropriators, the Hunt family. The church is an ancient edifice. At Stanesgate, in the parish, a priory of Cluniac monks, subordinate to that of Lewes, existed before 1176; it was dedicated to St. Mary Magdalene, and at the Dissolution had a revenue of £38. 18. 3.: the few remains now form part of the walls of a barn.

Steeple-Ashton, county of Wilts.—See Ash-ton, Steeple.

STEEPLE-ASHTON, county of Wilts.—See Ashton, Steeple.—And all places having a similar distinguishing prefix will be found under the proper name.

Steeple-Court

STEEPLE-COURT, a manor, in the parish of Droxford, hundred of Bishop's-Waltham, Droxford and N. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 21 inhabitants.

Steepleton-Iwerne, or Preston (St. Mary)

STEEPLETON-IWERNE, or Preston (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of Pimperne, Blandford division of Dorset, 4¼ miles (N. N. W.) from Blandford; containing 34 inhabitants. This parish, which derives its name from an ancient proprietor named Steepleton, comprises 701 acres, of which 198 are common or waste land. Steepleton House and estate were the property of the late Peter Beckford, Esq., author of Letters from Italy, &c., and have descended to his grandson, Lord Rivers. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 18. 4., and in the gift of his lordship: the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £95.

Steeton

STEETON, a township, in the parish of BoltonPercy, division of Ainsty wapentake, W. riding of York, 3½ miles (E. by N.) from Tadcaster; containing 93 inhabitants. Steeton Hall, one of the mansions of the Fairfax family, is now a farmhouse, and the remains of its adjoining chapel are used as a granary.

Steeton

STEETON, with Eastburn, a township, in the parish of Kildwick, union of Keighley, E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 2¾ miles (N. W.) from Keighley; containing 963 inhabitants. Steeton is situated in a valley enriched with wood and water, on the road from Keighley to Skipton. The township comprises by computation 2160 acres, and is bounded on the north by the river Aire, which is well stocked with trout, and runs through a tract of fine meadow land. The moor was inclosed in 1787. Stone is quarried for building; and there are a worsted and a corn mill. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. In the township is a mineral spring, used for scrofulous complaints.