Stratton - Stratton, West

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

244-246

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'Stratton - Stratton, West', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 244-246. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51313 Date accessed: 28 November 2014.


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Stratton

STRATTON, a hamlet, in the parish, union, and hundred of Biggleswade, county of Bedford, ¾ of a mile (E. by S.) from the town of Biggleswade; containing 84 inhabitants.

Stratton (St. Andrew)

STRATTON (St. Andrew), a market-town and parish and the head of a union, in the hundred of Stratton, E. division of Cornwall, 17½ miles (N. N. W.) from Launceston, and 223 (W. by S.) from London; containing, with the small port of Bude, 1959 inhabitants. This place was the scene of a great victory obtained in the early part of the civil war, by the royalist forces over the parliamentarians. In consideration of the eminent services rendered by Sir Ralph Hopton on the occasion, he was created Lord Hopton, of Stratton, in 1643; and four years after Hopton's death, Sir John Berkeley, to whose prowess and courage the victory was mainly owing, was created Baron Berkeley, of Stratton, by Charles II., who was then in exile. The town is situated in a flat country; the streets are indifferently paved. The Bude canal passes within a mile, and extends to Draxton bridge, about three miles north of Launceston: upon it are six inclined planes, worked by very powerful machinery. The market is on Tuesday; and fairs take place on May 19th, November 8th, and December 11th: a court leet is held annually by the lord of the manor, a court baron by the lord of the manor of Efford, and petty-sessions for the hundred occur on the first Tuesday in every month. The parish comprises 2500 acres, of which 1710 are arable, 60 waste, and the remainder pasture.

The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 11. 8., and in the patronage of the Duchy of Cornwall: the great tithes have been commuted for £240, and the vicarial for £200; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe contains 2 acres. The church is in the later English style, with a lofty square embattled tower crowned by pinnacles. In the north aisle is the effigy of a Knight Templar, supposed to be that of Ranulph de Blanchminster, constable of Ennour Castle, in Scilly; and at the east end of the south aisle is a tomb of black marble, on the lid of which are the effigies in brass of Sir John Arundel, Knt., his two wives, and thirteen children. A church has been built and endowed at Bude by Sir T. Dyke Acland, Bart., in whom the patronage is vested. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Some lands, now let for about £115 per annum, are vested in feoffees for the benefit of the poor. The union of Stratton embraces 11 parishes or places, and contains a population amounting to 9432. About half a mile west of the town are the remains of Binhammy Castle, the occasional residence of Ranulph de Blanchminster, occupying an elevated site surrounded by a deep fosse; there are vestiges of Roman roads in the parish, and several coins and tessellated pavements have been discovered.

Stratton (St. Mary)

STRATTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Dorchester, hundred of George, Dorchester division of the county of Dorset, 3½ miles (N. W.) from Dorchester; containing 331 inhabitants. It comprises 1683 acres, of which 190 are common or waste. The living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to that of Charminster: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £275. 10., and those of the incumbent for £5. 12. The church has a lofty tower; the chancel was pulled down in 1547. A Roman road from Dorchester to Ilchester passes through the parish.

Stratton (St. Peter)

STRATTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Cirencester, hundred of Crowthorne and Minety, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 1¾ mile (N. W.) from Cirencester; containing 546 inhabitants, and comprising an area of 1356 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 7. 6., and in the patronage of the family of Masters: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1771; net income, £300. The church is a small structure, with a low slated tower rising from between the nave and the chancel. The ancient Ermin-street passes through the parish.

Stratton (St. Michael)

STRATTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union and hundred of Depwade, E. division of Norfolk; containing 273 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1050 acres, of which about 120 are pasture, and the rest arable; it includes part of the town of Long Stratton. The living is a rectory, with that of St. Peter consolidated, valued in the king's books at £6. 12. 8½., and in the gift of New College, Oxford: the incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £330, and a rent-charge of £10 is paid to the rector of Long Stratton parish. There is a good glebe-house, erected in 1842 by the Rev. C. H. Bayly; and the glebe contains about 26 acres. The church of St. Peter has been long since demolished: that of St. Michael consists of a nave and chancel, with a low embattled tower. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Stratton

STRATTON, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Woodbridge, hundred of Colneis, E. division of the county of Suffolk; adjoining the parish of Levington, and containing but one house, the ancient Hall. In Chapelfield, between Levington and Trimley, are the ruins of a church.

Stratton (St. Margaret)

STRATTON (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Highworth and Swindon, hundred of Highworth, Cricklade, and Staple, Swindon and N. divisions of Wilts, 2½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Swindon; containing, with the tything of Upper Stratton, 1565 inhabitants, and an area of 2905a. 13p. The village is situated on the Roman road from Marlborough downs to Cheltenham, and the Wilts and Berks canal and the Great Western railway pass through the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 12. 3½.; net income, £216; patrons, the Warden and Fellows of Merton College, Oxford (the impropriators), on the nomination of the Bishop of Salisbury. The tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1798; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe contains 126 acres. The church is an ancient edifice of plain appearance. The Baptists, Independents, and Primitive Methodists have each a place of worship. An alien priory was founded here soon after the Conquest, and given by Henry VI. to King's College, Cambridge.

Stratton-Audley (St. Mary)

STRATTON-AUDLEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bicester, partly in the hundred and county of Buckingham, but chiefly in the hundred of Ploughley, county of Oxford, 3 miles (N. E. by N.) from Bicester; containing 319 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises 2268a. 1r. 37p., is supposed to have derived its name Stratton from a Roman road or street, an opinion strengthened by the discovery of Roman coins and arms in the vicinity. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £89; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. The church contains a monument to Admiral Sir John Borlase Warren, Bart.

Stratton, East (All Saints)

STRATTON, EAST (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Winchester, hundred of Mitcheldever, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 11 miles (N. N. E.) from Whitchurch; containing 419 inhabitants. Here is the splendid seat of Sir Francis T. Baring, Bart., late chancellor of the exchequer. The parish is situated on the road from Basingstoke to Winchester, a little to the east of the London and Southwestern railway. The living is annexed, with those of Northington and Popham, to the vicarage of Mitcheldever. The church was repaired by the late Sir T. Baring, and contains some windows embellished with beautifully-painted glass representing the Four Evangelists.

Stratton, Long (St. Mary)

STRATTON, LONG (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Depwade, E. division of Norfolk, 10½ miles (S. by W.) from Norwich; containing, with part of the town of Long Stratton, 690 inhabitants. The town is situated on the road from Norwich to London, by way of Ipswich, and consists of one long street irregularly built. It was chosen, during Wat Tyler's rebellion, as a place of meeting for the magistrates and gentry of the county, and was for many centuries appointed for holding the petty-sessions of the hundreds of Depwade and Henstead: those of the former district only are now held here. A corn-market is held every Tuesday; fairs occur on Whit-Tuesday and Oct. 12th, also a statute annually for hiring servants. The parish comprises 1517a. 3r. 6p., of which about 1097 acres are arable, 361 pasture, and 32 wood and waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the gift of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge: the incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £413.10., and a rent-charge of £42. 10. is payable to the rector of Stratton St. Michael; the glebe contains 40 acres. The church was built about the year 1330, and is chiefly in the decorated and later styles, with a circular tower surmounted by a low spire. Here is a place of worship for Independents. The Roman road leading to the station Ad Tuam, or Tasburgh, passed through the parish; and several Roman urns, one of them curiously ornamented, were found in 1773 on opening a gravel-pit, near which a sepulchral hearth has been since discovered. There was anciently a hermitage, with an oratory attached to it.

Stratton-On-The-Foss (St. Vigor)

STRATTON-ON-THE-FOSS (St. Vigor), a parish, in the union of Shepton-Mallet, hundred of Kilmersdon, E. division of Somerset, 6 miles (N. N. E.) from Shepton-Mallet; containing 464 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1108a. 1r. 37p.; the surface is agreeably diversified with hill, dale, and woodland, and the soil consists chiefly of a red loamy earth, producing excellent pasture for cattle. The village is situated on the ancient Fosse-way, now part of the road from Bath to SheptonMallet. Stone is quarried for building, and for repairing roads; a coal-mine is in operation, and ironstone and marl are found in abundance. The Bath market is principally supplied with butter from the dairy-farms in the neighbourhood. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 11. 5½., and in the patronage of the Crown, in right of the duchy of Cornwall: the tithes have been commuted for £60, and the glebe contains about 40 acres.

Stratton, Over

STRATTON, OVER, a tything, in the parish of South Petherton, union of Yeovil, hundred of South Petherton, W. division of the county of Somerset; containing 279 inhabitants.

Stratton, Stoney

STRATTON, STONEY, a hamlet, in the parish of Evercreech, union of Shepton-Mallet, hundred of Wells-Forum, E. division of the county of Somerset; containing 285 inhabitants.

Stratton-Strawless (St. Margaret)

STRATTON-STRAWLESS (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Aylsham, hundred of South-Erpingham, E. division of Norfolk, 4¾ miles (S. S. E.) from Aylsham; containing 277 inhabitants. It is on the road from Aylsham to Norwich, and comprises 1571 acres, of which 458 are common or waste land. The Hall, a large mansion of white brick, in a well-wooded park, is the seat of R. Marsham, Esq., in whose family it has remained since the time of Edward the First: Robert Marsham, F. R. S., who died in 1797, aged 90, was a distinguished naturalist. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 8., and in the gift of Mr. Marsham: the tithes have been commuted for £280, and the glebe comprises 32½ acres. The church consists of a nave, chancel, and south aisle, with a low embattled tower, and contains numerous monuments, and some curious specimens of stained glass.

Stratton, Upper

STRATTON, UPPER, a tything, in the parish of Stratton St. Margaret, union of Highworth and Swindon, hundred of Highworth, Cricklade, and Staple, Swindon and N. divisions of Wilts, 4¼ miles (S. W.) from Highworth; containing 383 inhabitants.

Stratton, West

STRATTON, WEST, a tything, in the parish and hundred of Mitcheldever, union of Winchester, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 6¾ miles (N. W. by N.) from Alresford; containing 187 inhabitants.