Thurleigh - Thuxton

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

351-355

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'Thurleigh - Thuxton', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 351-355. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51342 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Thurleigh (St. Peter)

THURLEIGH (St. Peter), a parish, in the hundred of Willey, union and county of Bedford, 6 miles (N.) from Bedford; containing 617 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 3379 acres. The manufacture of pillow-lace employs nearly all the females above six years of age. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9; net income, £142; patron and impropriator, S. Crawley, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1805; there is a parsouage-house, with 237 acres of glebe. The church is chiefly in the later English style, and has an ancient tower entered by a Norman doorway, in which is an arch filled up with a stone block having a sculptured representation of the Temptation and Fall of Adam and Eve in Paradise. Here is a place of worship for Baptists; also a national school endowed with £17 per annum. In the parish is the moated site of the ancient mansion of Blackbull Hall; and on Bury Hill are vestiges of a circular camp.

Thurlestone

THURLESTONE, a parish, in the union of Kingsbridge, hundred of Stanborough, Stanborough and Coleridge, and S. divisions of Devon, 4 miles (W.by S.) from Kingsbridge; containing 437 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the English Channel, and on the east bank of the river Avon. It comprises 1763a. 29p., of which 1253 acres are arable, 167 meadow and pasture, 62 in orchards and gardens, 100 in brakes and common, and the remainder beach, &c. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £25. 10., and in the patronage of Mrs. Ann Ilbert: the tithes have been commuted for £328. 10., and the glebe consists of about 33 acres, with an excellent house lately built. The church appears to have been erected about the 14th century, and contains 200 sittings. A remarkable rock called Thurlestone rock, about a furlong out at sea, is supposed to have given name to the parish; it is arched, and in stormy weather the waves may be heard many miles off.

Thurlestone

THURLESTONE, a township, in the parish of Penistone, union of Wortley, wapentake of Staincross, W. riding of York, 8½ miles (S. W.) from Barnsley; containing 1872 inhabitants. The township comprises 7740 acres, a considerable portion of which is wild moor, extending to the confines of Cheshire. The substratum is generally coal, gritstone, and ironstone, all of which have been more fully disclosed in excavating for the Sheffield and Manchester railway. There are some woollen manufactories, and the village is spacious and well built, near the river Don. The Independents and Wesleyans each have a place of worship; and an old chapel built by Presbyterians, is still used as a meeting-house by dissenters. Nicholas Saunderson, the eminent mathematician, author of the Elements of Algebra, and a treaties on Fluxions, was born here in 1682. He lost his sight in infancy, but learned to read by passing his fingers over the inscriptions in the churchyard, and in addition to a profound knowledge of the mathematics, made himself perfect master of the dead languages. There is an inscription to his memory on a wall opposite the mansion of John C. Milner, Esq.

Thurlow, Great (All Saints)

THURLOW, GREAT (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Risbridge, W. division of Suffolk, 9 miles (S. by E.) from Newmarket; containing 431 inhabitants, and comprising 2023a. 2r. 12p. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 11. 5½.; net income, £300: the Queen presents on the nomination of the owner of the manor, and the impropriation belongs to Lady Harland. The tithes have been commuted for £497. 10.; the glebe contains 72 acres. An hospital or free chapel, dedicated to St. James, and subordinate to that of Hautpays, or De Alto Passu, was founded here in the time of Richard II., and at the suppression of alien houses, was valued at £3 per annum, and granted to the Maison de Dieu in Cambridge, now part of King's College. Great Thurlow Hall was the seat of the Vernon family.

Thurlow, Little (St. Peter)

THURLOW, LITTLE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Risbridge, W. division of Suffolk, 5½ miles (N. by E.) from Haverhill; containing 422 inhabitants. Little Thurlow Hall, which has been the seat of the Soame family since the reign of Elizabeth, was built by Sir Stephen Soame, Knt., lord mayor of London, who was buried in the parish church, under a handsome monument. The living is a rectory, valued iu the king's books at £7. 10. 5.; net income, £401; patron, the Rev. T. Crick. Sir Stephen Soame, in 1618, founded and endowed an almshouse for eight unmarried men or women, and a school for twenty boys.

Thurloxton (St. Giles)

THURLOXTON (St. Giles), a parish, in the union of Bridgwater, hundred of North Petherton, W. division of Somerset, 5 miles (S. S. W.) from Bridgwater; containing 188 inhabitants. It is intersected by the road from Bridgwater to Exeter, and comprises by admeasurement 551 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 15. 10., and in the gift of Lord Portman: the tithes have been commuted for £93. 14.; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains 82 acres. The church is ancient.

Thurlton (All Saints)

THURLTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Loddon and Clavering, hundred of Clavering, E. division of Norfolk, 4 miles (E. by S.) from Loddon; containing 405 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4., and in the patronage of Trustees: the tithes have been commuted for £205, and the glebe contains 22½ acres. The church is chiefly in the later English style, with a rich Norman doorway.

Thurlton, county Suffolk.—See Whitton.

THURLTON, county Suffolk.—See Whitton.

Thurmaston, North

THURMASTON, NORTH, a chapelry, partly in the parish of Barkby, and partly in that of Belgrave, union of Barrow-upon-Soar, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 3¼ miles (N. N. E.) from Leicester; containing 251 inhabitants. Petty-sessions for the hundred are held here. The walls of the ancient chapel, dedicated to St. John the Evangelist, are still remaining.

Thurmaston, South

THURMASTON, SOUTH, a chapelry, in the parish of Belgrave, union of Barrow-upon-Soar, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 3 miles (N. N. E.) from Leicester; containing 978 inhabitants. The Leicester canal joins the MeltonMowbray canal near the village, which is also intersected by the Roman fosse-way. The chapelry comprises 1100 acres of land; the soil is in general light, and the substratum loam, gravel, and clay. In consequence of a benefaction of £200 by Dr. Percy, Bishop of Dromore, and the surrender of £22 per annum by the vicar of Belgrave, the chapelry was severed from Belgrave in 1798: the patronage of the living, a perpetual curacy, belongs to the Pochin family, and the income is £100. A tithe-farm of 140 acres belongs to the see of Lichfield. The chapel is dedicated to St. Michael, and contains many old monuments to the Simons family. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The most ancient Roman milliarium known in Britain was found here; it is 3½ feet high, and 7½ inches in circumference, and now stands on a pillar in Leicester.

Thurnby (St. Luke)

THURNBY (St. Luke), a parish, in the union of Billesdon, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 4½ miles (E. by S.) from Leicester; containing, with the hamlet of Bushby and the chapelry of Stoughton, 369 inhabitants, of whom 162 are in Thurnby township. This parish comprises 2697 acres, of which 586a. 3r. 24p. are in the township of Thurnby; of the latter, 422 acres are meadow and pasture, 130 arable, and 32 in homesteads, buildings, and garden ground. The soil is fertile, and is watered by a small rivulet. The village is situated on a bed of gravel, on a slight eminence, commanding a distant view of Broadgate Park and Charnwood Forest; the scenery generally is of pleasing character. G. A. Legh Keck, Esq., is lord of the manor, which passed to his family in marriage with the heiress of the Beaumonts in 1739. The weaving of stockings, which was formerly carried on to a much greater extent, employs a few looms. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11, and in the patronage of Mr. Legh Keck: the tithes have been commuted for £205; and there is a good vicarage-house, with about four acres of glebe-land. The church has a large south aisle and a small low north aisle, each separated from the nave by three lofty arches, over each of which is a clerestory window; the tower is at the east end: the chancel was taken down (having fallen into a state of dilapidation) a little more than twenty years ago. There is a chapel of ease at Stoughton. A day and a Sunday school are supported by subscription. Mrs. Allinson lately left £100, the interest to be distributed annually among the poor of Thurnby and Bushby.

Thurne, county of Norfolk.—See Thirne.

THURNE, county of Norfolk.—See Thirne.

Thurnham

THURNHAM, anciently Thornham, a township, partly in the parish of Cockerham, and partly in the parish and union of Lancaster, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 5 miles (S. S. W.) from Lancaster; containing 723 inhabitants. This place was possessed at an early period by the Flemings, the Harringtons, Bonviles, and Greys, successively. In the reign of Richard III., Thomas Grey, Marquess of Dorset, was attainted of high treason, and his estates were seized by the crown, but were restored 1st Henry VII., 1485. The manor was subsequently held by Thomas Lonne, citizen and grocer of London, who, in the reign of Philip and Mary, sold it to the Daltons, of Bispham, which family continues to possess nearly the whole township. The township is beautifully situated on the rivers Lune and Conder, and comprises 1726a. 1r. 4p., of which the surface is undulated, the soil moss by the Lune side, and in the higher parts clay; two-thirds of the area are arable, and the remainder pasture and meadow. On the north are views of the Lake mountains, and on the west of Fleetwood. Thurnham Hall, the seat of Miss Dalton, is seated on a gentle eminence, and forms a portion of the ancient mansion of Thurnham; it was new fronted in 1823, and the grounds improved. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £122. 10. The Roman Catholic chapel of St. Thomas the Apostle, here, was built in 1847, from the designs of Charles Hanson, Esq., of Bristol, and cost £3000: it is in the early English style, with a spire; the eastern window is of stained glass. The Rev. Thomas Crowe, the priest, has about 12 acres of land, with a house; annual value, £30. A Roman Catholic school is endowed with £20 per annum, left by the late John Dalton, Esq. In the township are the modern harbour of Lancaster, called Glasson-Dock; and the venerable remains of Cockersand Abbey.—See Glasson, and Cockersand Abbey.

Thurning (St. James)

THURNING (St. James), a parish, in the union of Oundle, partly in the hundred of Polebrooke, N. division of the county of Northampton, but chiefly in that of Leightonstone, county of Huntingdon, 5 miles (S. E.) from Oundle; containing 161 inhabitants, of whom 124 are in Huntingdonshire. The parish comprises by admeasurement 1001 acres, of which 60 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 4. 2., and in the gift of Emmanuel College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted for £180, and the glebe comprises 60 acres.

Thurning (St. Andrew)

THURNING (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Aylsham, hundred of Eynsford, E. division of Norfolk, 14 miles (N. E. by N.) from East Dereham; containing 166 inhabitants. It comprises 1584a. 1r. 19p., of which 1200 acres are arable, 300 pasture and meadow, and 80 plantation. The surface is agreeably undulated, and the high grounds command fine views of the picturesque scenery within and around the parish, which is remarkable for the number and variety of wild flowers with which its meadows are studded. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7, and in the gift of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted for £367, and the glebe comprises upwards of 18 acres, with a handsome house erected in 1832. The church is chiefly in the decorated style, with a square embattled tower: the chancel is dilapidated; the other parts of the edifice were thoroughly repaired, and the body repewed, in 1825.

Thurnscoe (St. Helen)

THURNSCOE (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Doncaster, N. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 7½ miles (W. by N.) from Doncaster; containing 220 inhabitants. This place is in the Domesday survey called Ternusch, and notice of the church occurs in the foundation charter of Holy Trinity monastery at York, dated 1089. The parish comprises by measurement 1665 acres, of which 1002 are arable, 424 meadow and pasture, 214 woodland and plantations, and 23 in roads and waste; the soil is partly a clayey and partly a sandy loam, and the arable lands are in good cultivation, producing excellent crops of wheat, barley, and turnips. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 7. 8½., and in the gift of Earl Fitzwilliam: the tithes have been commuted for £186, and there is a good parsonage-house, with a glebe of 133¾ acres. The present church was built by subscription of the patron and landed proprietors, in 1729, and is a neat structure in the Grecian style, of stone from the quarries at Badsworth and South Kirkby. Some almshouses were founded in 1710, by the Rev. Dr. Spencer.

Thurrock, Grays (St. Peter and St. Paul)

THURROCK, GRAYS (St. Peter and St. Paul), a market-town and parish, in the union of Orsett, hundred of Chafford, S. division of Essex, 22 miles (S. S. W.) from Chelmsford, and 20½ (E. by S.) from London; containing 1464 inhabitants. The town consists of a single street irregularly built, on the north bank of the Thames, which has a creek here navigable for small craft. On the river is a wharf connected by a railway with some kilns where lime-burning is carried on to a considerable extent; and the making of bricks for the London builders, which are conveyed hence in barges, affords employment to about 300 persons. Great facility of communication with the metropolis is afforded by the Gravesend steamers, some of which stop at the neat pier of this place. The market is on Thursday; and fairs for cattle and hardware are held on May 23rd and October 20th. The parish takes its distinguishing epithet from the noble family of Grey, who were proprietors of the manor for more than three centuries: it comprises 1300 acres, all arable, with the exception of a little woodland, and 100 acres of pasture. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 0. 10., and in the gift of the Rev. H. S. Hele: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £220, and the vicarial for £249. The church is a handsome cruciform structure, with a tower rising from the north transept, surmounted by a spire: the edifice has lately been improved. The old market-house is used as a place of worship for dissenters. A free school situated in the churchyard, and now united with a national school, was founded and endowed by William Palmer, in 1706. Rare and valuable fossils are frequently found in the chalk-pits.

Thurrock, Little (St. Mary)

THURROCK, LITTLE (St. Mary ), a parish, in the union of Orsett, hundred of Barstable, S. division of Essex, 1 mile (E.) from Grays-Thurrock; containing 301 inhabitants. It is bounded on the south-west by the river Thames, and comprises by computation 1400 acres, of which 800 are arable, and 600 pasture. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 15.; net income, £505; patron, the Rev. E. Bowlby. In the south wall of the church are some arched recesses. Near the highway leading to Stifford are ancient excavations termed Danes' Holes.

Thurrock, West (St. Clement)

THURROCK, WEST (St. Clement), a parish, in the union of Orsett, hundred of Chafford, S. division of Essex, 1 mile (W.) from Grays-Thurrock; containing 1032 inhabitants. This parish, which includes the populous village of Purfleet, is bounded on the south by the river Thames, where is a landing-place opposite to Greenhithe. It is about three miles in length, and two and a half in breadth. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £15. 13. 4., and in the gift of W. H. Whitbread, Esq., who, with the family of Montgomery, is impropriator: the great tithes have been commuted for £236. 18., the vicarial tithes for £311. 14., and there is a parsonage-house, with a glebe of 4 acres. The church is an ancient structure of stone, with a massive square tower. At Purfleet is a chapel of ease.

Thursby (St. Andrew)

THURSBY (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Wigton, ward, and E. division of the county, of Cumberland, containing, with the townships of Crofton, and Parton with Micklethwaite, 574 inhabitants, of whom 390 are in the township of High Thursby, 6 miles (S. W.) from Carlisle. This parish is supposed to have derived its name from Thor, the Saxon deity, to whose honour a temple is said to have been erected at Woodrigs, in the neighbourhood. High Thursby comprises 1071a. 1r. 6p., of which 861 acres are arable, 176 meadow, and 21 mere. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 10. 5.; net income, £160; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Carlisle. The great tithes of High Thursby have been commuted for £150, and the small for £84: the vicar has a glebe of 23 acres. Here is a school, founded in 1740, and endowed in 1798 by Thomas Tomlinson, Esq., with the interest of £354. A pillar of coarse stone, inscribed to Philip the Emperor and his son, A.D. 248, dug up near the military way at Wigton, is carefully preserved here.

Thursfield, or New-Chapel

THURSFIELD, or New-Chapel, a chapelry, in the parish of Wolstanton, union of Wolstanton and Burslem, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 6½ miles (N. by E.) from Newcastle; containing, with the townships of Brieryhurst, Chell, Stadmerslow, and Wedgwood, 3191 inhabitants, of whom 495 are in the township of Thursfield. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £81; patrons, Ralph Sneyd, Esq., and others. The chapel is a plain brick edifice, erected in 1767, and re-roofed in 1827. Dr. Robert Hulme, in 1708, bequeathed certain lands now producing an income of £73, for instruction. James Brindley, of Turnhurst, the celebrated engineer, was interred here in 1772; and a plain altar-tomb has been erected to his memory.

Thursford (St. Andrew)

THURSFORD (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of North Greenhoe, W. division of Norfolk, 3½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Walsingham; containing 347 inhabitants. The road from Holt to Fakenham, and that from Holt to Walsingham, both run through the parish. The living is a discharged rectory, annexed to that of Great Snoring, and valued in the king's books at £8. The church contains portions in the three styles of English architecture, with a square embattled tower, and is situated in the grounds belonging to Thursford Hall.

Thursley (St. Michael)

THURSLEY (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Hambledon, Second division of the hundred of Godalming, W. division of Surrey, 5 miles (S. W. by W.) from Godalming; containing 704 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 3170 acres, of which 1330 are arable, 180 meadow, 150 copse, and 1500 waste. Ironstone is abundant, and there were anciently several large iron-foundries, of which the only memorials are four large ponds called Hammer Ponds. The silk manufacture was subsequently introduced, but it has been for some years discontinued. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Witley.

Thurstaston (St. Bartholomew)

THURSTASTON (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union, and Lower division of the hundred, of Wirrall, S. division of the county of Chester, 2½ miles (S. S. W.) from Upton; containing, with part of the townships of Greasby and Irby, 168 inhabitants, of whom 114 are in Thurstaston township. At the time of the Domesday survey the manor appears to have belonged to the de Rodelents, who gave the church to the convent of St. Werburgh, Chester. William de Rodelent assumed the local name, and from Him the manor passed by successive female heirs to the families of Heselwell and Whitmore, the latter of whom held it from the reign of Edward III. till 1751, when Joseph Whitmore died, leaving six daughters, co-heiresses to the property. The parish forms some of the highest land in the hundred, immediately overhanging some meadows that descend to the shores of the river Dee; it comprises about 1500 acres, arable and pasture land, of which 716 acres are in the township of Thurstaston. The views of the opposite Welsh shore are very beautiful. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 6.; net income, £242; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Chester. There are 31 acres of glebe with a house. The former church, at one time inclosed in the courtyard of the Hall, was of great antiquity; being extremely low, dark, and inconvenient, it was taken down, and the present edifice built in 1825. Lucy Brown, in 1832, left £1000 three per cent. consols, for the poor.

Thurston (St. Peter)

THURSTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Stow, hundred of Thedwastry, W. division of Suffolk, 4½ miles (E. by N.) from Bury St. Edmund's; containing 599 inhabitants. This parish, which is particularly healthy, comprises 2200a. 1r. 28p., of a generally light soil, with gravel and sand pits. Here is a station of the Ipswich and Bury railway. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4., and in the patronage of Sir H. Blake, Bart.: theimpropriate tithes have been commuted for £480. 3. 3., and the vicarial for £210. The church is a remarkably fine structure 3 the pillars of the nave are peculiarly light and airy. Some land arising from bequests, and an allotment under an inclosure act, produce £50 a year, for parochial and charitable purposes.

Thurstonland

THURSTONLAND, a township, in the parish of Kirk-Burton, union of Huddersfield, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 5 miles (S. by E.) from Huddersfield; containing 1286 inhabitants. The township comprises about 2000 acres of land, in good cultivation; the substratum abounds with coal, of which three mines are in operation, and there are some quarries of building-stone. Storthes Hall, the seat of Charles Horsfall Bill, Esq., lord of the manor, is a handsome residence here. The village is pleasantly situated on an eminence: many of its inhabitants are employed in weaving. A meeting-house, built by subscription in 1810, was in 1834 converted into a church, and placed under the patronage of the Vicar; it is a neat plain edifice, containing 300 sittings, of which 100 are free. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A parochial school was built by Mrs. Ann Ludlam, who in 1763 endowed it with £500 vested in a turnpike trust, with a house and garden. Many Roman coins of brass, of the Lower Empire, were dug up in a field in 1838.

Thurton (St. Ethelbert)

THURTON (St. Ethelbert), parish, in the union of Loddon and Clavering, hundred of Loddon, E. division of Norfolk, 8 miles (S. E.) from Norwich; containing 246 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Beccles to Norwich, and consists of about 772 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £70; patron and impropriator, Sir W. B. Proctor, Bart., whose tithes have been commuted for £220. The church is chiefly in the early style, and its windows have been decorated with stained glass; the entrance on the south is richly ornamented. Various Roman coins were found in 1707, and on opening several tumuli a few years since, some Roman urns were discovered.

Thurvaston, Derbyshire.—See Osleston.

THURVASTON, Derbyshire.—See Osleston.

Thuxton (St. Paul)

THUXTON (St. Paul ), a parish, in the union of Mitford and Launditch, hundred of Mitford, W. division of Norfolk, 4 miles (N. by E.) from Hingham; containing 103 inhabitants, and comprising 1084a. 2r. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 6. 3.; net income, £211; patron, Mrs. Castell. The church is an ancient structure in the early and later English styles, with a tower and octagonal turret; in the east window is a figure of St. Paul, in stained glass, given by the Rev. W. Castell.



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