Tincleton - Tittleshall

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

362-366

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'Tincleton - Tittleshall', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 362-366. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51346 Date accessed: 01 September 2014.


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Tincleton

TINCLETON, a parish, in the union of Dorchester, hundred of Piddletown, Dorchester division of Dorset, 5¼ miles (E.) from Dorchester; containing 187 inhabitants. It is bounded on the south by the river Frome, and comprises 1000 acres by computation. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £5. 11. 8.; net income, £92; patron, H. C. Sturt, Esq.: the glebe contains about 4 acres. The church is a small structure, the burial-place of the Baynards, of Cliff, of which family it has several memorials.

Tingewick (St. Mary)

TINGEWICK (St. Mary), a parish, in the union, hundred, and county of Buckingham, 2¾ miles (W. by S.) from Buckingham; containing 911 inhabitants. A market was formerly held here on Tuesday, granted in 1246 to the abbey De Monte Rothomago, in Normandy, to which the manor had previously been given by the family of Finmore. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 16. 3.; net income, £260; patrons, the Warden and Fellows of New College, Oxford: the tithes were commuted for land in 1773. The church is evidently of great antiquity; the south doorway exhibits a handsomely-carved Norman arch: the tower, which is built from the ground, and the chancel, were both erected by William of Wykeham. A stone over the central window, in the south battlement, contains a very old and curious inscription. The building was completely restored a few years since, by the parish, at an expense of £500. Charles Longland, in 1688, bequeathed property now producing £11 per annum for the poor; and the Rev. Francis Edmonds, in 1751, endowed a charity school with £15 per annum.

Tingrith (St. Nicholas)

TINGRITH (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Woburn, hundred of Manshead, county of Bedford, 4¼ miles (E. by S.) from Woburn; containing 158 inhabitants. It comprises 942a. 1r. 30p. About thirty-five women and children are employed in making lace and straw-plat. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9, and in the patronage of the Misses Trevor: the tithes have been commuted for £240; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe comprises 5½ acres.

Tinhead

TINHEAD, a tything, in the parish of Edington, union of Westbury and Whorwelsdown, hundred of Whorwelsdown, Whorwelsdown and N. divisions of Wilts, 1 mile (N. by E.) from the village of Edington; containing 484 inhabitants.

Tinsley

TINSLEY, a parochial chapelry, in the union of Rotherham, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 2¾ miles (S. W. by W.) from Rotherham; containing 512 inhabitants. It comprises about 1570 acres, the property of Earl Fitzwilliam, who is lord of the manor; the soil is fertile, and the surface varied. The strata abound with excellent coal, in the working of which a great part of the population is employed; and slate of an inferior quality is quarried. The Rotherham and Sheffield canal runs through the chapelry, and joins the river Don a little below the village, where is an old wharf; the high road to Sheffield also intersects the chapelry. The living is reputed to be a vicarage, and has a net income of about £100; patron and impropriator, Earl Fitzwilliam. The church is very ancient, having portions in the earliest Norman style. A school is endowed with £10 per annum.

Tintagel (St. Symphorina)

TINTAGEL (St. Symphorina), a parish, in the union of Camelford, hundred of Lesnewth, E. division of Cornwall; comprising the disfranchised borough of Bossiney, and containing 1185 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the Bristol Channel, by which it is bounded on the north; and was distinguished at an early period for its castle, whose foundation is attributed to King Arthur. This fortress was built partly on a stupendous craggy rock surrounded by the sea, and partly on the precipitous cliff that skirts the main land, the two portions being separated by a frightful chasm, 300 feet deep, over which was a drawbridge. It was occasionally occupied by the English princes: in 1245, Richard, Earl of Cornwall, entertained his nephew, Davydd, Prince of Wales, in it, during the latter's rebellion against Henry III.; and in subsequent reigns, till within a few years of that of Elizabeth, it continued to be a royal castle, under a governor appointed by the crown, and was used as a state prison for the duchy of Cornwall. The remains consist chiefly of large scattered masses of the broken towers, and parts of the walls pierced for discharging arrows: in Leland's time the keep was remaining, and, according to that writer, contained "a praty chapel, with a tumbe on the left syde."

The parish comprises 3709 acres, of which 450 are common or waste land; the soil exhibits almost every variety. The scenery is strikingly picturesque; on the Trevillet estate is a deep vale of considerable length, in some parts richly wooded, in others marked with spiral rocks and overhanging precipices, and terminating on the south-east with a lofty cascade. Upon the cliffs, which are bold and romantic, are several slate-quarries, whence 200 cargoes are annually procured, and shipped at a wharf near the remains of Arthur's Castle: in these quarries are found those beautifully transparent and regular polygonal crystals called Cornish diamonds. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 11. 3.; net income, £220; patrons, the Dean and Canons of Windsor; impropriator, Lord Wharncliffe: there is a parsonage-house, with a glebe of 40 acres. The church is an ancient structure, with a curious Norman font. In the parish were formerly two chapels, one dedicated to St. Piran, and the other to St. Denis. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. On the Trevillet estate are some remains of earthworks called Condolden Burrows; in the churchyard are three barrows, and in the town of Bossiney is another, on which the writ for the election of members for that borough was read. Near the town also is an ancient cross.

Tintern, Little (St. Michael)

TINTERN, LITTLE (St. Michael), a parish, in the union and division of Chepstow, hundred of Raglan, county of Monmouth, 6 miles (N.) from Chepstow; containing 375 inhabitants. This parish, which consists of about 650 acres, is romantically situated on the right bank of the river Wye, and on the road from Chepstow to Monmouth. The neighbourhood is adorned with the remains of Tintern Abbey, described in the article on Chapel-Hill. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £2. 1. 5½.; net income, £162; patron, W. Gale, Esq. The church is an ancient structure. Philip Hacket, in 1634, bequeathed property now producing £36 per annum, for the poor of ChapelHill and Little Tintern.

Tintinhull (St. Margaret)

TINTINHULL (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Yeovil, hundred of Tintinhull, W. division of Somerset, 2¼ miles (S. W.) from Ilchester; containing 553 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £90; patron and impropriator, the Hon. Hugh Arbuthnot. The tithes were commuted for £396. 10., and there is a glebe of one acre. The Roman fosseway passes through the parish, which is bounded on the north by the river Ivel. Stock-Dennis, now a tything, was anciently a very populous place.

Tintwistle

TINTWISTLE, a township, in the parish of Mottram-in-Longdendale, poor-law Union of Ashtonunder-Lyne, hundred of Macclesfield, N. division of the county of Chester, 13 miles (E. by S.) from Manchester; containing 2290 inhabitants. This township comprises 17,050 acres, and includes the chapelry of Woodhead, which see. The population are mostly employed in the manufacture of cotton and woollen goods, and in quarrying stone in the neighbourhood: Messrs. John and Robert-Hyde Buckley have a cotton-mill for spinning and weaving, employing 300 hands. The village is situated on an acclivity rising from the western bank of the river Etherow. Fairs for cattle are held on May 2nd and November 1st. This was anciently a borough, and had a court leet; it is now a member of the lordship of Mottram. Christ Church, in the township, was erected in 1837, at a cost, including a parsonage and school, of £3000; it is in the early English style, with a tower. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Trustees; income, £150. There are places of worship for Independents and Calvinistic Methodists.

Tinwell (All Saints)

TINWELL (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Stamford, hundred of East, county of Rutland, 1½ mile (S. W. by W.) from Stamford; containing, with the hamlet of Ingthorpe, 258 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the south and south-east by the river Welland, which here separates Rutland from Northamptonshire. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 10. 5.; net income, £303; patron, the Marquess of Exeter. A payment of £105 per annum, in lieu of tithes, is received from his lordship; and the glebe consists of about 158 acres. The church contains a monument to Elizabeth Cecil, sister of Lord Treasurer Burghley.

Tipton (St. Martin)

TIPTON (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Dudley, S. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 1½ mile (N. E.) from Dudley; containing 18,891 inhabitants. This place, sometimes called Tibbington, is situated nearly in the centre of a rich mining district, and has risen progressively from an inconsiderable village to its present size and importance, from the abundant and apparently exhaustless beds of coal and ironstone under almost every acre of its surface. The coal, which is of excellent quality, occurs in seams about thirty feet in thickness, and is extensively wrought at the Moat and Tibbington collieries, at which, within half a mile of each other, are four powerful steam-engines, pumping from the mines not less than 10,000 tons of water every twenty-four hours, exclusively of numerous other engines in the immediate neighbourhood. The ironstone is also wrought to a very great extent; in the parish are not less than twelve blast-furnaces with apparatus for smelting the ore, and on an average 1500 tons of wrought or malleable iron are made weekly.

There are twelve forges for the manufacture of wrought-iron articles of every kind, including boilers for steam-engines, iron-boats, fenders, fire-irons, hinges, nails, and tin-plates; aud several factories for soap, muriatic potash, and red-lead. The principal iron-works are those of Messrs. John Bagnall and Sons, at TollEnd, in which 250 tons of iron are made weekly; those of Messrs. Edward Cresswell and Sons, producing about the same quantity; and those of Messrs. Bramah, Barrows, and Hall, in which 400 tons are made weekly. In the Gospel-Oak works, belonging to Messrs. John and Edward Walker, the manufacture of iron and tinplates is largely carried on; and adjacent is a foundry in which bridges, immense quantities of cannon, &c, are made. These works together employ 350 persons, and the wrought-iron cannon produced in the establishment have been brought to such perfection as probably to supersede brass cannon, from their possessing more tenacity, when hot, than those of brass, and not being heavier, a great desideratum with artillery-men. In the Factory iron-works of Messrs. Richard Bradley and Son, boiler-plates, &c., are made. At the Moat forge, belonging to Mr. Thomas Spencer, every description of hammered iron is made for marine engines and other uses. The Park-Lane coal and iron works, the property of Messrs. Thomas Morris and Sons; and the Horsley iron-works, belonging to Messrs. Bramah and Co., are also extensive; and there are several others on a smaller scale. The consumption of coal in the parish, in manufactures, is upwards of 4000 tons per week. The various factories are lighted with gas from works at West Bromwich, 2½ miles distant; and the trade is much facilitated by the Birmingham canal, and several of its collateral branches, which intersect the parish, affording a communication with almost every line of inland navigation. A court leet is held annually by the lord of the manor, at which officers are appointed. The parish comprises 2095a. 2r. 7p., the greater portion being arable: the river Trent has its source within a few hundred yards of the western boundary.

The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £419; patron, J. S. Hellier, Esq. The present church, a neat structure of brick with a tower and cupola, was erected at a cost of £1500, in 1797, to replace the ancient edifice which had become dilapidated. St. Paul's church, to which an ecclesiastical district is annexed including Tipton-Green and a population of 7000, was erected in 1839 at a cost of £3700; of this sum, £2000 were granted by the Church Commissioners, and the remainder raised by subscription. It contains 1300 sittings, of which 770 are free in consideration of a grant of £300 from the Incorporated Society. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Incumbent of the parish, and has a parsonage-house; net income, £150. A church district named Ocker-Hill has been endowed by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, Primitive Methodists, Methodists of the New Connexion, and Wesleyans; and several national schools are supported by subscription, and the proceeds of a bequest of £650 by Mr. Solomon Woodhall, in 1796, for the foundation and endowment of a school, to which subsequent benefactions have been added. Mr. Sheldon bequeathed £40 per annum, to be distributed in bread to poor widows not receiving parochial relief.

Tirley (St. Matthew)

TIRLEY (St. Matthew), a parish, in the union of Tewkesbury, partly in the Lower division of the hundred of Westminster, and partly in that of the hundred of Deerhurst, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 8 miles (N. by E.) from Gloucester; containing 550 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 1891 acres, about one-third of which is arable, and the remainder pasture; the soil is a rich loam. The river Severn flows through the parish, and is crossed at Haw by a handsome stone bridge, completed in 1824, on the new line of road leading from Cheltenham into Herefordshire, Monmouthshire, and South Wales. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £375; impropriator, the Earl of Coventry: the tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1795. The church is partly in the decorated and partly in the later English style. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Tisbury (St. John the Baptist)

TISBURY (St. John the Baptist), an ancient parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Dunworth, Hindon and S. divisions of Wilts, 3½ miles (S. E.) from Hindon; comprising East and West Tisbury parishes, and the parish of Wardour; and containing 2420 inhabitants, of whom 972 are in East and 735 in West Tisbury. A castle appears to have been erected here prior to the reign of Edward III., which was successively the seat of the families of St. Martin, Touchet, Audley, and Willoughby de Broke. It subsequently belonged to Sir John Arundel, whose son Thomas was by James I. created Lord Arundel of Wardour, by which name the castle was distinguished. In the civil war of the 17th century, it was besieged by a detachment of the parliamentarian army, consisting of 1300 men under the command of Sir Edward Hungerford, and was defended in the absence of Lord Arundel by his wife, the Lady Blanche, with a garrison of only 25 men. After nearly a week's siege, it surrendered on May 8th, 1643, upon honourable terms, which, however, were not fulfilled by the captors. In the course of the same summer, it was retaken by the royalists under Lord Arundel and Sir Francis Doddington, from the celebrated Ludlow, who had been made governor by the parliament, and who, in his memoirs, accuses the royalists of the same disregard of the terms of capitulation which had been shown by the parliamentarians. In consequence of the great injury the castle received, especially on the latter occasion, it became totally unfit either for the purposes of a fortress or a residence; and since the year 1776, the family of Arundel have erected the magnificent mansion called Wardour Castle, consisting of a centre and two wings projecting in a curvilinear shape, the whole forming a handsome structure of freestone, beautifully situated within a mile of the original castle. The parish of Tisbury was divided in 1834, by act of parliament, into the three parishes of East and West Tisbury, and Wardour.

The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £18. 10. 10.; patron, Lord Arundel; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Bristol. The appropriate tithes have been commuted for £880, and the vicarial for £440; £67. 12. are paid to the rector of ComptonChamberlayne, and £50 to another impropriator: the appropriate and vicarial glebes contain respectively 12 and 3 acres. The church is a spacious structure in the Norman style, and contains numerous monuments to the family of Arundel. There is a place of worship for Independents. Several bequests have been left to the poor. The union of Tisbury comprises 20 parishes or places, with a population of 10,106. The remains of the ancient castle are situated under a range of hills in the form of an amphitheatre, richly crowned with wood, and consist principally of the hexagonal court which formed the centre of the buildings: contiguous are the remains of the mansion occupied by the family, after the destruction of the castle, till the completion of their present seat. Sir Nicholas Hyde, chief justice of the king's bench and lord treasurer in the reign of James I., was born in Wardour Castle; and Sir John Davies, eminent as a lawyer, poet, and political writer, was a native of the hamlet of Chisgrove, in the parish.

Tissington (St. Mary)

TISSINGTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the hundred of Wirksworth, S. division of the county of Derby, 4 miles (N.) from Ashbourn; containing 427 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the road from Ashbourn to Buxton; it comprises 2262 acres by admeasurement, and borders on the romantic district of Dovedale, which abounds with striking scenery. Here is a quarry, the produce of which is used for building; and a cotton-factory, on Bradbourn Brook, employs about 130 hands. Tissington Hall was garrisoned for Charles I. by its owner, Col. Fitzherbert, in 1643. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Sir H. Fitzherbert, Bart., with a net income of £97: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £229, and the vicarial for £3. 10. The church is partly Norman, and partly of later date, with a tower, and contains handsome memorials to the Fitzherbert family: it is beautifully situated in the midst of fine old trees, on an eminence overlooking the village. A national school for boys has an endowment of £7 per annum, and one for girls £4. In the parish are five springs of the purest water, which at a remote period are said to have furnished the only supply of the neighbourhood for several miles round.

Tisted, East (St. James)

TISTED, EAST (St. James), a parish, in the union of Alton, hundred of Selborne, Alton and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 5 miles (S. by W.) from Alton; containing, with the tything of Rotherfield, 220 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Alton to Gosport and Portsmouth, and comprises 2200 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16; net income, £333; patron, James Scott, Esq. There is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains 29 acres. The Rev. Philip Valois in 1760 bequeathed £300, and the Rev. John Williams in 1822 gave £400 three per cents., in support of a school. John Groves, Savilian professor of astronomy in the university of Oxford, in-the reign of Charles II., was born here.

Tisted, West

TISTED, WEST, a parish, in the union of Alresford, hundred of Bishop's-Sutton, Alton and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 9 miles (S. W. by S.) from Alton; containing 252 inhabitants. It is about a mile from the London and Gosport road, and comprises 2236 acres, of which 1938 are arable, 47 meadow, and 251 wood and coppice. The surface is undulated, and the soil a poor flinty earth with a substratum of chalk; the chief produce is wheat, oats, barley, and turnips. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £58; patrons and impropriators, the President and Fellows of Magdalen College, Oxford, whose tithes have been commuted for £410. The church contains about 150 sittings.

Titchbourn (St. Andrew)

TITCHBOURN (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Alresford, hundred of Fawley, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Alresford; containing 340 inhabitants. The living is annexed, with that of Kilmeston, to the rectory of Cheriton: the tithes have been commuted for £494, and there are 2½ acres of glebe.

Titchfield (St. Peter)

TITCHFIELD (St. Peter), a town and parish, in the union of Fareham, hundred of Titchfield, Fareham and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2½ miles (W.) from Fareham; containing, with the chapelries of Crofton and Sarisbury, 4030 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the west by the Southampton Water, and comprises 15,407 acres, of which 1372 are common or waste. The town is well built, and pleasantly situated in a valley on the road from Southampton to Portsmouth, about two miles west of the Titchfield river. A customary corn-market is held on Tuesday; and fairs take place on the Saturday fortnight before Lady-day, on May 14th, September 25th (for hiring servants), and the Saturday fortnight before December 21 st. A court baron occurs twice a year, and a court leet annually, the latter with jurisdiction in all pleas of debt under 40s. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 17. 3½.; patron, H. P. Delmé, Esq.; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Winchester. The great tithes have been commuted for £2886, and the vicarial for £35; the incumbent receives also £150 from the appropriators: there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe comprises 7 acres. The church is a fine edifice: the north aisle was built by William of Wykeham; the chancel is kept in repair by the Duke of Portland, and contains a handsome monument to Henry, first earl of Southampton. At Crofton and Sarisbury are separate incumbencies. There are places of worship for Independents and other dissenters. Twelve girls are educated from funds arising out of land and premises demised in 1620 by Henry, Earl of Southampton, for charitable uses, and now producing about £70 per annum. At a short distance north of the town are the remains of Palace or Place House, erected by the earl, on the site and with the materials of an abbey for Præmonstratensian canons founded by Peter de Rupibus, in 1231, and the revenue of which at the suppression was valued at £280. 19. 10. In this mansion Charles I. was concealed after his escape from Hampton Court in 1647, and again previously to resigning himself to Col. Hammond, who conducted him to Carisbrooke Castle, in the Isle of Wight. The entrance gateway is the only part standing. It is asserted that the nuptials of Henry VI. with Margaret of Anjou were celebrated at Titchfield. Rachel, wife of Lord Russell who was beheaded in the reign of Charles II., was born here. The place confers the title of Marquess on the family of Bentinck.

Titchmarsh (St. Mary)

TITCHMARSH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Thrapston, hundred of Navisford, N. division of the county of Northampton, 2 miles (E. N. E.) from Thrapston; containing 905 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the east by a portion of the county of Huntingdon, and consists of 3857 acres. On the west is the river Nene; and the road from Oundle to Thrapston, and the Blisworth and Peterborough railway, pass through. The surface is more undulated here than in many parts of the county; the soil in some places is a rich loam, in others rocky, and in some a deep blue clay: there are several quarries of good stone. The manufacture of lace employs a portion of the female population. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £45; net income, £782; patron, Lord Lilford. The church, built in 1247, has a beautiful massive tower of modern date; it was thoroughly repaired in 1840-43, at a cost of about £2000. There are two places of worship for dissenters. An allotment of about 28 acres was awarded under an inclosure act, in 1778, in lieu of an estate purchased with a bequest by Edward Pickering in 1697; the rental amounting to £36. 10., is distributed among poor persons. Dorothy Elizabeth Pickering and Frances Byrd, in 1756, founded and endowed an almshouse for eight unmarried women; the income is £165.

Titchwell (St. Mary)

TITCHWELL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Docking, hundred of Smithdon, W. division of Norfolk, ½ a mile (W.) from Brancaster; containing 166 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1521a. 2r. 13p., of which 1300 acres are arable, and 200 pasture and marsh: at the inclosure in 1786, about 220 acres of land were embanked against the irruption of the sea. In the village, which is situated on the road from Lynn to Wells, is the lofty octagonal shaft of an ancient cross. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12, and in the gift of Eton College: the tithes have been commuted for £410; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains 18¾ acres. The church is chiefly in the later English style, with a round tower. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Tithe Hill

TITHE HILL, a hamlet, in the parish of Carham, union of Glendale, W. division of Glendale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 4½ miles (S. S. E.) from Coldstream. It comprises 230 acres of good arable land, having a level surface and a light soil.

Titley (St. Peter)

TITLEY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Kington, hundred of Wigmore, county of Hereford, 3 miles (N. E. by E.) from Kington; containing 393 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road between Presteign and Kington, and comprises 1757 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £231; patrons and impropriators, the Warden and Fellows of Winchester College, whose tithes have been commuted for £229. 10. The church was erected about 60 years since, on the site of one that belonged to a priory of Benedictine monks founded as a cell to the abbey of Tyrone, in France. There are no vestiges of the priory, except the moat that encompassed it, and a remarkably fine spring of water still called the Priory well.

Titlington

TITLINGTON, a township, in the parish of Eglingham, union of Alnwick, N. division of Coquetdale ward and of Northumberland, 7¼ miles (W. by N.) from Alnwick; containing 70 inhabitants. It lies east of the road between Morpeth and Wooler, at the southern extremity of the parish; and between it and Crawley is a high hill called Titlington Pike. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £54. 0. 6., and the impropriate for £24. 9.

Titsey

TITSEY, a parish, in the union of Godstone, Second division of the hundred of Tandridge, E. division of Surrey, 5 miles (N. E. by E.) from Godstone; containing 205 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the road from Croydon to Maidstone, and includes within its limits one of the sources of the river Medway. It comprises 1936 acres, of which 620 are meadow and pasture, 328 wood, 31 in hop-grounds, and the rest arable; the soil is in some parts chalk, in others clay, and lime of superior quality is made from the chalk-pits of Botley Hill here, which is 880 feet above the level of the sea. The village is beautifully situated in the midst of verdant meadows and richly-wooded hills. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 17. 3½.; net income, £290; patron, W. L. Gower, Esq.: the glebe contains about 30 acres. The ancient church, which stood near the mansion-house of Titsey Place, was taken down, and a new edifice erected in 1776, by Sir John Gresham; in the north wall of the chancel is a stone with brass effigies of William Gresham and family.

Tittenhanger

TITTENHANGER, a hamlet, in the parish of St. Peter, borough and union of St. Alban's, hundred of Cashio, or liberty of St. Alban's, county of Hertford, 2½ miles (S. E. by E.) from St. Alban's; containing 1220 inhabitants.

Tittenley

TITTENLEY, a township, in the parish of Audlem, union of Drayton, hundred of Nantwich, S. division of the county of Chester; containing 23 inhabitants. It comprises 439 acres, of which the soil is two-thirds clay and one-third of light quality.

Tittensor

TITTENSOR, a liberty, in the parish and union of Stone, Southern division of the hundred of Pirehill, Northern division of the county of Stafford; containing 347 inhabitants.

Tittisworth

TITTISWORTH, a township, in the parish and union of Leek, Northern division of the hundred of Totmonslow and of the county of Stafford, 2 miles (N. E. by N.) from Leek; containing 438 inhabitants.

Tittleshall (St. Mary)

TITTLESHALL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Mitford and Launditch, hundred of Launditch, W. division of Norfolk, 10 miles (N. N. E.) from Swaffham; containing, with the merged parish of Godwick, 607 inhabitants. The united parishes comprises 3364a. lr. 28p., of which 2306 acres are arable, 634 meadow and pasture, and 260 woodland. The living of Tittleshall with Godwick is a rectory, with that of Wellingham annexed, valued in the king's books at £11. 1. 6½., and in the gift of the Earl of Leicester: the tithes of Tittleshall with Godwick have been commuted for £665, and the glebe comprises 52 acres, with a house. The church is an ancient structure in the decorated style, with a square embattled tower, and contains an effigy in white marble of the celebrated Sir Edward Coke, in his judicial costume: on the north side of the chancel is the mausoleum of the earls of Leicester. There are places of worship for dissenters.



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