Upchurch - Upsland

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

418-420

Citation Show another format:

'Upchurch - Upsland', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 418-420. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51362 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Upchurch (St. Mary)

UPCHURCH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Milton, Upper division of the lathe of Scray, E. division of Kent, 5½ miles (E. by S.) from Chatham; containing 520 inhabitants. The parish comprises 3553a. 2r. 34p., of which 1277 acres are arable, 731 pasture, 1297 salt-marsh, 61 wood, 94 in orchards and gardens, and 26 in hop-grounds. It contains also 63 acres of land tithe-free. On the north flows the Medway, where are Otterham creek and quay, at which corn is shipped. By a survey made in the reign of Elizabeth, it appears that twelve vessels belonged to the place. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11; net income, £155; patrons and impropriators, the Warden and Fellows of All Souls' College, Oxford. The church, built probably in the reign of Edward III., is a handsome structure, partly in the decorated and partly in the later English style.

Upend

UPEND, a hamlet, in the parish of Kirtling, union of Newmarket, hundred of Cheveley, county of Cambridge; containing 187 inhabitants.

Up-Exe

UP-EXE, a tything, in the parish of Rewe, union of St. Thomas, hundred of Hayridge, Wonford and N. divisions of Devon, 6 miles (S. W. by W.) from Collumpton; containing 120 inhabitants.

Upham

UPHAM, a parish, in the union of Droxford, hundred of Bishop's-Waltham, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 3 miles (N. W. by N.) from Bishop's-Waltham; containing, with the tything of Woodcott, 581 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2853a. 2r. 36p., of which 1602 acres are arable, 237 pasture, 502 woodland, hedge, and dells, 207 down, 46 orchard, buildings, and homesteads, 218 common, and 37 highway. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 2. 1., and in the gift of the Bishop of Winchester: the tithes have been commuted for £420, and there are 2 acres of glebe. At Durley is a chapel of ease. Dr. Edward Young, author of the Night Thoughts, was born at Upham, during the incumbency of his father; and the mother of Bishop Heber was also born in the rectory-house, her father, the Rev. Mr. Allanson, being the incumbent for about eighty years. On Stephen Castle down, a barrow was opened in March, 1836, when four skeletons were dug up, parts of which are preserved at Belmour House.

Uphaven (St. Mary)

UPHAVEN (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Pewsey, hundred of Swanborough, Everley and Pewsey, and N. divisions of Wilts, 4 miles (S. W. by S.) from Pewsey; containing 512 inhabitants. A Benedictine priory, a cell to the abbey of Fontanelle, in Normandy, was founded here about the commencement of the reign of Henry I., and, at its suppression, was granted by Henry VI. to the monastery of Ivy-Church, in exchange for lands, &c, in Clarendon Park. The parish is situated on the road from Devizes to Andover, and is intersected by the river Avon: it comprises by computation 3287 acres. A market for the inhabitants was granted by Henry III. to Peter de Mauley; and in the reign of Edward I., Hugh de Spencer procured a charter of free warren, and two annual fairs, one of which, as well as the market, is discontinued. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 16. 8., and in the patronage of the Crown; impropriators, the Provost and Fellows of King's College, Cambridge. The great tithes have been commuted for £594. 18., and those of the vicar for £150: there are nearly 3 acres of glebe. The church was probably erected in the time of Henry VII.; the nave seems to have formed part of the priory. Here are places of worship for Particular Baptists and Wesleyans. About a mile to the west are the remains of an intrenched camp with a spacious praetorium, called Casterley, the area of which, comprising sixty acres, is intersected from north to south by a broad fosse.

Uphay

UPHAY, a tything, in the parish, union, and hundred of Axminster, Honiton and Southern divisions of Devon; containing 57 inhabitants.

Uphill (St. Nicholas)

UPHILL (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Axbridge, hundred of Winterstoke, E. division of Somerset, 8 miles (N. W. by W.) from Axbridge; containing 400 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1036a. 1r. 12p., and is bounded on the south by the river Axe, which falls into the Bristol Channel at the village. Its proximity to Weston-Super-Mare, a fashionable bathingplace, has induced capitalists to purchase a considerable portion of land in it with a view to erect houses. Stone is quarried for building and for the roads. The Bristol and Exeter railway passes through the parish. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 7.; net income, £184; patron, John Fisher, Esq.: there is a glebe of about 30 acres. The old church, with its central tower, occupies the summit of a lofty eminence south of the village; a new church has been erected by subscription. Here is a place of worship for Baptists. A cave was discovered at Uphill a few years since, similar to the caves in the same ridge of hills, at Burrington and Banwell.

Up-Holland, Lancashire.—See Holland, Up.

UP-HOLLAND, Lancashire.—See Holland, Up.

Upleadon (St. Mary)

UPLEADON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Newent, hundred of Botloe, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 3 miles (E. by N.) from Newent; containing 250 inhabitants. This parish, which takes its name from the river Leadon, by which it is intersected, is about two miles and a half from the road between Gloucester and Ledbury. It comprises by measurement 1109 acres, whereof two-fifths are pasture, about 12 acres woodland, and 43 common or waste; the soil is chiefly loam, inclining to clay, and the surface level. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £82; patron, the Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Gloucester. The church has a wooden tower, and a Norman entrance on the north side.

Upleatham

UPLEATHAM, a parish, in the union of Guisborough, E. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 2½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Guisborough; containing, with part of the township of Redcar, 329 inhabitants, of whom 209 are in Upleatham township. This place, in Domesday book written Upelider, was granted by the Conqueror to Hugh, Earl of Chester, and was afterwards the fee of Robert de Brus. It descended to the lords Fauconberge, and from them to the lords Conyers; the Athertons subsequently held the estate, and among other families that have had possessions here, occur those of Lowther and Dundas. The parish forms part of the district called Cleveland, and comprises about 1100 acres; the soil is a rich loam, and the surface boldly undulated, commanding from the higher grounds some fine sea views. Freestone of good quality for building is found in abundance. The village is pleasantly situated on a declivity. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £80; patron and appropriator, the Archbishop of York, whose tithes have been commuted for £236. The church was rebuilt in 1836, at an expense of £450, by subscription, towards which the lord of the manor contributed £200, the late archbishop £100, and the Incorporated Society £75; it is a neat structure in the Norman style. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Uplowman (St. Peter)

UPLOWMAN (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Tiverton, partly in the hundred of Halberton, but chiefly in that of Tiverton, Collumpton and N. divisions of Devon, 4½ miles (E. N. E.) from Tiverton; containing, with the tything of Whitnage, 428 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2537 acres, of which 49 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 0. 10., and in the gift of the Rev. Sydenham Pidsley; net income, £601.

Uplyme (St. Peter and St. Paul)

UPLYME (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union and hundred of Axminster, Honiton and S. divisions of Devon, 1¼ mile (N. W.) from LymeRegis; containing 1057 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2358a. 3r. 2p., together with about 800 acres of common, an act for inclosing which was passed in 1841. Here are some extensive beds of blue and white lias, replete with organic marine remains, and applicable to building, paving, or burning into lime. A manufactory for woollen-cloth is carried on. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 8. 11½., and in the gift of the Rev. C. W. Ethelston: the tithes have been commuted for £450, and the glebe contains 36 acres. The church, which is a very ancient structure, has been enlarged.

Upminster (St. Lawrence)

UPMINSTER (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Romford, hundred of Chafford, S. division of Essex, 3½ miles (E. S. E.) from Romford; containing 1117 inhabitants. This parish is about seven miles in length, and one mile in average breadth. It contains the hamlets of Corbetstye, Upminster-Common, and Harton; and comprises 3369a. 1r. 36p., of which 1241 acres are arable, 1010 meadow and pasture, 91 woodland, 148 common, and 178 in roads, &c. The surface towards the north is considerably elevated; the soil in the uplands is clayey, and in the low grounds light and sandy. The scenery is enlivened with numerous good residences and flourishing plantations. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £26. 13. 4., and in the patronage of the Trustees of the late J. R. Holden, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £1052, and there are 23 acres of glebe. The church is a handsome structure, with a tower and spire; on the north side of the chancel is a chapel belonging to Gaines Hall. Here is a place of worship for Independents. Dr. Derham, author of Physico-Theology, &c., was rector of the parish from 1689 to 1735.

Up-Ottery (St. Mary)

UP-OTTERY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Honiton, hundred of Axminster, Honiton and S. divisions of Devon, 5¼ miles (N. E. by N.) from Honiton; containing 991 inhabitants. The parish comprises 5265 acres, of which 1120 are common or waste. Fairs for cattle are held on March 17th and October 24th. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £15. 5.7½., and in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Exeter. The great tithes have been commuted for £335, and those of the vicar for £430; there are 76 acres of impropriate glebe, and 4 of vicarial. The church has been enlarged. Here are places of worship for Baptists and Calvinistic Methodists; and at Roridge, in the parish, was anciently a chapel.

Upper Allithwaite.—See Allithwaite, Upper.

UPPER ALLITHWAITE.—See Allithwaite, Upper.—And all places having a similar distinguishing prefix will be found under the proper name.

Upperby

UPPERBY, a township, in the parish of St. Cuthbert, Carlisle, union of Carlisle, Cumberland ward, E. division of Cumberland, 1¾ mile (S. E. by S.) from Carlisle; containing 471 inhabitants, chiefly employed in the manufacture of linen. The Lancaster and Carlisle railway passes close by. A church, built by subscription, was consecrated in June 1846, for the inhabitants of this and other out-townships of the parish. The venerable incumbent of St. Cuthbert's, the Rev. John Fawcett, author of some popular family sermons, was active in promoting its erection. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Incumbent of St. Cuthbert's.

Uppingham (St. Peter and St. Paul)

UPPINGHAM (St. Peter and St. Paul), a markettown and parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Martinsley, county of Rutland, 6 miles (S.) from Oakham, and 89 (N. N. W.) from London; containing 2034 inhabitants. The name of this place is descriptive of its elevated situation. The town consists principally of one good street, with a square area in the centre, and is tolerably well paved; the houses are commodious and well built, and the inhabitants are supplied with water from a spring in the, upper part of the town. The air, though keen, is pure and salubrious, and the surrounding country is pleasingly diversified. The market, granted by Edward I. in 1280 to Peter de Montford, is held on Wednesday, and is well supplied with corn and cattle; fairs take place on March 7th and July 7th, chiefly for horses, horned-cattle, and sheep, and also for coarse linen-cloth. The powers of the county debt-court of Uppingham, established in 1847, extend over the registration-district of Uppingham, and part of that of Billesden. The town is situated on the roads from London to Melton-Mowbray, and from Stamford to Leicester, and is about three miles distant from the river Welland, which divides the county of Rutland from Northamptonshire. The lands are on the lias formation, possessing its peculiar features of long ridges of low but steep hills separated by fertile valleys. The soil is of a red appearance; beneath, to the depth generally of two or three feet, is a shaly red stone, and under this, as far as it has been worked, either a red stone, or a blue stone encrusted with red, of variable thickness, and a very stiff blue clay which makes good bricks. The red stone is soft and easily worked; the blue is much harder: both are used for building.

The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 0. 10.; net income, £661; patron, the Bishop of London: the glebe comprises about 265 acres. The church, situated on the south side of the square, is a spacious structure in the ancient English style, with a tower surmounted by a lofty spire. There are places of worship for Independents and Calvinistic and Wesleyan Methodists. The free grammar school (adjoining the churchyard) and an hospital for poor men were founded in 1584, by Robert Johnson, archdeacon of Leicester, and rector of North Luffenham, in this county, who instituted a similar school and hospital at Oakham, which see. Many eminent persons have been educated in the school, including Dr. Charles Manners Sutton, Archbishop of Canterbury; Lord Manners, late chancellor of Ireland; Dr. Henry Feme, Bishop of Chester; and Dr. Bramston, Roman Catholic Bishop of the London district. The celebrated Jeremy Taylor was rector of Uppingham. The poor-law union comprises 35 parishes or places, of which 16 are in Leicestershire, and 19 in Rutland, the whole containing a population of 10,049.

Uppington (Holy Trinity)

UPPINGTON (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Atcham, Wellington division of the hundred of South Bradford, N. division of Salop, 4 miles (W. S. W.) from Wellington; containing 96 inhabitants, and comprising 747a. 2r. 20p. The living is a donative; net income, £70; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Cleveland. The great tithes have been commuted for £140, and those of the incumbent for £40.

Upsall

UPSALL, a township, in the parish of South Kilvington, union of Thirsk, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York, 3¾ miles (N. N. E.) from Thirsk; containing 98 inhabitants. It comprises about 1230 acres of fertile land, and its small village is pleasantly situated on a commanding eminence east of the road from Thirsk to Borrowby: a little to the west of it, flows a tributary of the Cod beck. Here are some remains of a castle of the Mowbrays, which subsequently became the residence of the Scroop family.

Upsall

UPSALL, a township, in the parish of Ormesby, union of Guisborough, E. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 3 miles (W.) from Guisborough; containing 15 inhabitants. It contains the hamlets of East and West Upsall, situated near the source of the river Tame, and on the border of Barnaby moor. At the time of the Conquest, some land here was demesne of the crown; and since that date property has been held by the families, among others, of Brus, Percy, Conyers, and Jackson. The appropriate tithes have been commuted for £30, payable to the Archbishop of York; and the vicarial tithes of the township for £18. 5.

Upshire

UPSHIRE, a hamlet, in the parish of WalthamAbbey, or Holy-Cross, union of Edmonton, hundred of Waltham, S. division of Essex; containing 853 inhabitants. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Upsland.—See Kirklington.

UPSLAND.—See Kirkltngton.



<--Previous:
Ulceby - Unthank
Next:-->
Upton