Wasdale - Waste-Lands

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

482-484

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'Wasdale - Waste-Lands', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 482-484. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51380 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Wasdale, or Nether Wasdale

WASDALE, or Nether Wasdale, a chapelry, in the parish of St. Bees, union of Whitehaven, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 4 miles (E.) from Gosforth; containing 203 inhabitants. The chapelry comprises about 15,200 acres, of which 14,000 are common and waste, and the rest arable, pasture, and woodland, in nearly equal portions. Here is the beautiful lake Wast-water, three miles long, half a mile broad, and forty-five fathoms deep, or about fifteen fathoms below the level of the sea; which disproportion as to its extent and depth accounts, perhaps, for its never having been known to freeze. A fair for sheep is held on the first Monday in September. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £66; patron, the Incumbent of St. Bees.

Wasdale-Head

WASDALE-HEAD, with Eskdale, a chapelry, in the parish of St. Bees, union of Bootle, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 11 miles (S. W. by S.) from Keswick; containing 375 inhabitants, of whom 35 are in Wasdale-Head. It is pleasantly situated at the head of Wast-water lake, in a narrow valley almost surrounded by lofty hills. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £80; patron, the Incumbent of St. Bees. The chapel is very small.

Washaway

WASHAWAY, a hamlet, in the parish of Egloshayle, union of Bodmin, hundred of Trigg, E. division of Cornwall, 3 miles (N. W.) from Bodmin. The petty-sessions for the division are held here, on the last Monday in every month.

Washbourn, Great, or King's Washbourn (St. Mary)

WASHBOURN, GREAT, or Kings Washbourn (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Winchcomb, Upper division of the hundred of Tewkesbury, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 6 miles (E. by N.) from Tewkesbury; containing 100 inhabitants. It comprises 650 acres, the whole, with the exception of about 100 acres, the property of the Craven family. The living is variously styled a rectory and a perpetual curacy; net income, £59; patron, the Rev. Charles Covey, who is also incumbent. The church, which is very ancient, contains a handsome font, and has recently been repewed at the expense of the parish, and beautified at that of the rector: it is situated on an elevation commanding extensive views of the beautiful country by which it is surrounded.

Washbourn, Little

WASHBOURN, LITTLE, a chapelry, in the parish of Overbury, union of Winchcomb, Middle division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Pershore and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 6½ miles (E. by N.) from Tewkesbury; containing 37 inhabitants, and comprising 449 acres. The chapel is a neat structure.

Washbrook (St. Mary)

WASHBROOK (St. Mary), a parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Samford, E. division of Suffolk, 4 miles (W. by S.) from Ipswich; containing 506 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, annexed to the rectory of Copdock, and valued in the king's books at £8. 6. 8.: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £191. 10., and the vicarial for £217; the glebe comprises 26 acres. The church contains several ancient stalls, which have been recently renovated; and a window of stained glass has been placed over the communion-table, at the expense of Lord Walsingham. Felchurch, a chapel to Washbrook, has been for many years destroyed.

Washfield (St. Mary)

WASHFIELD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Tiverton, hundred of West Budleigh, Collumpton and N. divisions of Devon, 2½ miles (N. N. W.) from Tiverton; containing 503 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 7. 6., and in the gift of J. Francis Worth, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £400; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe comprises 25 acres. The church contains an old oak screen, which has been painted white; and a curious monument with brasses to the family of Worth. Ancient swords and other military weapons have been found upon the site of what is supposed to have been a Roman encampment.

Washford-Pine (St. Peter)

WASHFORD-PINE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Crediton, hundred of Witheridge, South Molton and N. divisions of Devon, 7 miles (N. by W.) from Crediton; containing 197 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Exeter to South Molton; and comprises 1140a. 3r. 7p., of which about 112 acres are moor now drained and inclosed, 75 coppice and plantations, 15 orchard, and the remainder arable, with a little pasture. The soil in general is a dark earth having a subsoil of clay. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 0. 2½., and in the gift of the Rev. C. Tucker: the tithes have been commuted for £90; the glebe contains 90 acres. There was formerly a chapel at Whenham, in the parish.

Washingborough (St. John the Evangelist)

WASHINGBOROUGH (St. John the Evangelist), a parish, in the Second division of the wapentake of Langoe, parts of Kesteven, union and county of Lincoln, 3 miles (N. E.) from Lincoln; containing, with the chapelry of Heighington, 1099 inhabitants, of whom 573 are in Washingborough township. The parish is bounded on the north by the navigable river Witham, and comprises by admeasurement 4860 acres, in two distinct portions, one of which is high and the other fen land. The former, comprising 2734 acres, is considerably undulated, and the soil runs through several varieties, from light loam to heavy clay; about 550 acres are pasture, 42 acres wood, and the rest good corn land. The fenny tract consists of a peaty earth, formed chiefly by the decomposition of vegetable matter, and nearly all of it suited to the growth of grain and hardy vegetables. Washingborough is a considerable village, on the banks of the river. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £26. 13. 4., and in the gift of Sir W. A. Ingilby, Bart.; it has an excellent parsonage-house, and the glebe contains 536 acres, valued at £785 per aunum, in addition to which there are corn-rents amounting to £850. The church is a large handsome structure, with a lofty tower. At Heighington are a chapel and a Wesleyan meeting-house. A school for young children has an endowment of £15. 10. per annum; and there is a free grammar school at Heighington, founded in 1619 by Thomas Garrett, who endowed it with lands and houses of the present annual value of £134. In 1701, Sir Edward Clarke left land now producing £70 per annum, for apprenticing children.

Washingley

WASHINGLEY, a parish, in the union of Peterborough, hundred of Norman-Cross, county of Huntingdon, 1½ mile (W.) from Stilton; containing 133 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, united to that of Lutton: there being no church, the inhabitants attend at Lutton.

Washington

WASHINGTON, a parish, in the union of Chesterle-Street, E. division of Chester ward, N. division of the county of Durham; containing, with the chapelry of Usworth, the township of Barmston, and part of North Bidick, 2396 inhabitants, of whom 941 are in Washington township, 5½ miles (S. E.) from Gateshead. The township comprises 1802 acres. The surface of the parish generally is elevated about 100 feet above the river Wear, which flows on the south and south-east. The soil is various, but in a good state of cultivation, producing excellent crops; and the scenery embraces extensive views, including the cathedral of Durham, the vale of Wear, and Gateshead Fell. There are several quarries of fine building-stone, and one of firestone of great value; and three coal-mines are in operation, affording employment to 700 or 800 hands. A small manufactory of magnesia and other chemicals belongs to Hugh Lee Pattinson, Esq., of Gateshead. The river is navigable for small vessels as high as the staiths on the southern border of the parish, about a mile from the village; and the Pontop and Shields, and the York and Newcastle, railways pass through the parish. The Hall, a large gavel-ended mansion with windows divided by stone mullions and transoms, stands a little south of the church. The village is scattered, and on irregular, broken ground. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18, and in the patronage of the Bishop of Durham: the tithes have been commuted for £528, and the glebe comprises 130 acres of good land, with a parsonage-house. The church is a neat structure, erected in 1832. At Unsworth is a separate incumbency. There are several sulphureous springs. The family of Washington, the American general, is said to have come from this place.

Washington

WASHINGTON, a parish, in the union of Thakeham, hundred of Steyning, rape of Bramber, W. division of Sussex, 10 miles (N. W.) from Shoreham; containing 880 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the road from London to Worthing. It is remarkable for its fine sweep of lofty down land, and comprises 3164 acres, of which 1470 are arable, 1106 pasture, 265 wood, and 323 waste and roads. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 10., and in the gift of Magdalen College, Oxford: the great tithes have been commuted for £398. 5., and the vicarial for £201. 14.; the glebe contains 13¼ acres. The church is in the early English style.

Wasing (St. Nicholas)

WASING (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Newbury, hundred of Faircross, county of Berks, 8 miles (E. S. E.) from Newbury; containing 87 inhabitants. It comprises 685 acres, of which 206 are arable, 205 pasture, 221 woodland, and 53 waste. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 13. 4.; income, £100; patron, W. Mount, Esq.

Wasperton (St. John the Baptist)

WASPERTON (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Warwick, Warwick division of the hundred of Kington, S. division of the county of Warwick, 4 miles (S. S. W.) from Warwick; containing 283 inhabitants. The parish is partly bounded on the west and north by the river Avon, and is intersected by the road from Warwick to Shipston; it comprises 1619 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5; patron and appropriator, the Rector of Hampton-Lucy. The great tithes have been commuted for £290, and the vicarial for £108; the glebe comprises 50 acres.

Wass

WASS, a township, in the parish of Kilburn, union of Helmsley, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York, 4½ miles (S. W.) from Helmsley; containing 137 inhabitants. The township comprises about 800 acres. The village is pleasantly situated near the source of a rivulet, in a secluded spot sheltered by moorland hills richly wooded, and within half a mile of the picturesque ruins of Byland Abbey.

Wassand

WASSAND, a hamlet, in the township of Seaton, parish of Sigglesthorne, union of Skirlaugh, N. division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 2 miles (W.) from Hornsea. It is called in Domesday book Wadsande, and after passing through the abbeys of Meaux and of St. Mary at York, and several families, came, in the time of Henry VIII., to the Constables, by whom it is still possessed. Wassand Hall, occupying the site of the old mansion, is an elegant edifice in the Italian style, with grounds very agreeably disposed, which in some parts command beautiful views. The Wassand family resided at the place for about two centuries. The lordship consists of nearly 400 acres of land, chiefly laid out in pasture; the soil in general is a mixture of sand, gravel, and light clay.

Waste-Lands

WASTE-LANDS, an extra-parochial liberty, locally in the parish of Swineshead, union of Boston, wapentake of Kirton, parts of Holland, county of Lincoln, 6½ miles (W. by S.) from Boston.