Whitley - Whittering

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

555-557

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'Whitley - Whittering', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 555-557. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51400 Date accessed: 02 August 2014.


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Whitley

WHITLEY, a tything, in the parish of Cumner, poor-law union of Abingdon, hundred of Hormer, county of Berks, 5 miles (W. by S.) from Oxford; containing 22 inhabitants.

Whitley

WHITLEY, a hamlet, in the parish of St. Giles, Reading, union and hundred of Reading, county of Berks, 2 miles (S.) from Reading; containing 518 inhabitants. The hamlet comprises 2081a. 3r. 25p.; the village is pleasantly situated, and is lighted with gas.

Whitley

WHITLEY, a township, in the parish and union of Tynemouth, E. division of Castle ward, S. division of Northumberland, 3 miles (N.) from North Shields; containing 749 inhabitants. The township comprises 515 acres of arable land; the soil is a good loam, and the subsoil clay. Coal, of an inferior quality for household purposes, but excellent for the use of steam-engines, is wrought here, though now nearly exhausted; and a considerable quantity, wrought in the adjoining township of Monkseaton, is raised from a pit near the village, and conveyed by a tramway to the lower part of Shields, whence it is exported. Ironstone abounds in the neighbourhood; and limestone is extensively burned, the produce of a quarry here, interesting to the geologist as forming the northernmost point of the magnesian limestone stratum which extends from Shields to near Nottingham. In the lower beds of the formation is contained an abundance of fossil fish, but as the quarry is not worked deep, the specimens are not often exposed. The limestone appears to have been entirely covered by a bed of sulphate of barytes, varying in thickness from a few inches to 27 feet. There are two places of worship for Methodists. The impropriate tithes of part of the township have been commuted for £124.

Whitley

WHITLEY, a tything, in the parish, union, and hundred of Calne, Chippenham and Calne, and N. divisions of Wilts; containing 15 inhabitants.

Whitley

WHITLEY, a township, in the parish of Kellington, Lower division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 5½ miles (W. by S.) from Snaith; containing 372 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Selby to Doncaster, and comprises 1800 acres of land, all made tithe-free at the inclosure in 1793. The Knottingley and Goole canal passes close to the village. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists.

Whitley-Booths.—See Barley.

WHITLEY-BOOTHS.—See Barley.

Whitley, Lower

WHITLEY, LOWER, a township and chapelry, in the parish of Great Budworth, union of Runcorn, hundred of Bucklow, N. division of the county of Chester, 4¾ miles (N. W. by N.) from Northwich; containing 219 inhabitants. The township comprises 974 acres, of which the soil is partly sand and partly clay. Sir John Chetwode, Bart., is lord of the manor, and principal landed proprietor. The hamlet of Grimsditch is in the township; and Grimsditch Hall is the property of the family of Grimsditch. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £108; patron, Sir John Chetwode; appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. The chapel, rebuilt about 1600, is a small brick edifice with bay-windows. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also a school, founded in 1645.

Whitley, Lower

WHITLEY, LOWER, a township, in the parish of Thornhill, union of Dewsbury, Lower division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 3 miles (S. E. by S.) from Dewsbury; containing 1125 inhabitants. There are two scribbling-mills, a tan-yard, and a colliery. The first stone of a church dedicated to St. Mary was laid on the 7th of July, 1842, by Thomas Wheatley, Esq., at whose expense the structure was erected, on a site given by the Earl of Dartmouth; it is in the Norman style, and contains about 400 sittings, the whole free. On the occasion of laying the first stone, a mallet and a silver trowel were presented to Mr. Wheatley, by the Dewsbury District Committee of the Ripon Diocesan Society. In the township is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Whitley, Over

WHITLEY, OVER, a township, in the parish of Great Budworth, union of Runcorn, hundred of Bucklow, N. division of the county of Chester, 5½ miles (N. N. W.) from Northwich; containing 330 inhabitants. It comprises 961 acres, partly a sandy and partly a clayey soil; and includes the hamlets of Antrobus, Crowley, Norcot, and Seven-Oaks.

Whitley, Upper

WHITLEY, UPPER, a township, in the parish of Kirk-Heaton, union of Huddersfield, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 4½ miles (E. by N.) from Huddersfield; containing 984 inhabitants. The founder of the ancient family of Beaumont here, was a Knight Hospitaller of St. John of Jerusalem, who received the manor on condition of performing certain military services in the time of Henry III. Whitley Hall has ever since been the principal residence of the family, and is now in the possession of R. H. Beaumont, Esq. Grange Hall is the seat of Sir J. L. Kaye, Bart., and both mansions are remarkable for their elegance, and the fine and extensive prospects obtained from them. The township is situated on the road from Huddersfield to Wakefield, and comprises 1955a. 2r. 11p. of fertile land; the surface is varied. Coal and building-stone of good quality are abundant, and extensively wrought.

Whitlingham (St. Andrew)

WHITLINGHAM (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union and hundred of Henstead, E. division of Norfolk, 2½ miles (E. S. E.) from Norwich; containing 28 inhabitants. This parish comprises 557a. 1r. 38p., nearly all arable land, and is bounded on the north by the navigable river Yare: the scenery along the banks of the river is beautifully picturesque. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of E. Lombe, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £123. 15. The church, now dilapidated, is situated on the verge of a lofty precipice near the Yare, and forms an interesting feature in the landscape.

Whitmore

WHITMORE, a parish, in the union of Newcastleunder-Lyme, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill, and of the county of Stafford, 4 miles (S. W.) from Newcastle; containing 367 inhabitants. The parish is on the road from Newcastle to Market-Drayton, and comprises 1986a. 3r. 5p., whereof 250 acres are common or waste, inclosed under an act passed in 1841. The Liverpool and Birmingham railway has one of its principal stations here, where it attains its summit level; the buildings extend 300 feet in length. The village is beautifully situated; the cottages are kept in neat order, and ornamented with roses and woodbine. Whitmore Hall, with the grounds attached to it, forms one of the pleasantest seats in this part of the county. The living is a rectory not in charge, in the gift of Captain Mainwaring: the tithes have been commuted for £280, and the glebe comprises 29 acres. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style.

Whitnage

WHITNAGE, a tything, in the parish of Uplowman, union and hundred of Tiverton, Collumpton division of Devon, 2¼ miles (N.) from Collumpton; containing 80 inhabitants.

Whitnash (St. Margaret)

WHITNASH (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Warwick, Kenilworth division of the hundred of Knightlow, S. division of the county of Warwick, ¾ of a mile (S. by E.) from Leamington; containing 276 inhabitants. It comprises 1198 acres, of which 40 are common or waste. The Warwick and Napton canal passes within half a mile. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 9. 9½., and in the gift of Lord Leigh: the tithes have been commuted for £280, and the glebe comprises 77 acres. The church, a very ancient structure, has undergone frequent repairs.

Whitnell

WHITNELL, a tything, in the parish of Emborrow, union of Shepton-Mallett, hundred of Chewton, E. division of Somerset; containing 69 inhabitants.

Whitnell

WHITNELL, a tything, in the parish of St. Cuthbert, without the limits of the city of Wells, union of Wells, hundred of Wells-Forum, E. division of Somerset; containing 40 inhabitants.

Whitney (St. Peter and St. Paul)

WHITNEY (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Hay, hundred of Huntington, county of Hereford, 4 miles (N. E.) from Hay; containing 237 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Wye, and comprises 1483a. 15p. A considerable traffic in bark and timber is carried on by the Wye, which is navigable; and the road from Brecknock to Hereford passes through the parish. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 8., and in the gift of Tomkyns Dew, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £234, and the glebe comprises 20 acres of profitable land. The church was erected in 1740.

Whitridge

WHITRIDGE, a township, in the parish of Hartburn, union, and W. division of the ward, of Morpeth, N. division of Northumberland, 9½ miles (W. by N.) from Morpeth; containing 9 inhabitants. It comprises 197 acres, of which 74 are arable and the remainder pasture, all the property of Sir Walter Trevelyan, Bart. A colliery was wrought here in 1748. The tithes have been commuted for £10 payable to the lay rector, and £3. 3. to the vicar of Hartburn.

Whitrigg, Cumberland.—See Torpenhow.

WHITRIGG, Cumberland.—See Torpenhow.

Whitsbury, or Whitchbury (St. Leonard)

WHITSBURY, or Whitchbury (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Fordingbridge, hundred of Cawden and Cadworth, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 3½ miles (N. by W.) from Fordingbridge; containing 186 inhabitants. This parish formed part of the possessions of Breamore Priory, founded by Baldwin de Redveriis in the reign of Henry I. It is situated on the highest land between Hants and Wilts, commanding an extensive view of the New Forest, and southward to the sea over a wide tract of fertile country. The number of acres is 1769. The substratum is chalk, which is dug in large quantities, and sent to considerable distances, being accounted to possess a peculiarly fertilizing property. A fair is held on the 17th of November, chiefly for pigs. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £5. 13. 4., and in the gift of Captain J. B. Purvis, R.N.: the tithes have been commuted for £300, and the glebe comprises 6 acres, with a house. The church is an ancient structure, situated on an eminence at the extremity of the parish; the chancel is within the county of Southampton. In the parish is a Roman encampment, occupying an elevated area surrounded by a trench, and commanding a fine view of Salisbury Cathedral and the castle of Old Sarum. In 1823, a barrow was opened on the estate of Sir Lucius Curtis, Bart.; and traces of a Roman road are discernible towards Clarebury Riggs. Charles Delafaye, Esq., a distinguished secretary of state in the reign of George I., resided and was interred here.

Whitson, county Monmouth.—See Witston.

WHITSON, county Monmouth.—See Witston.

Whitstable (All Saints)

WHITSTABLE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Blean, hundred of Whitstable, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 5¾ miles (N. N. W.) from Canterbury; containing 2255 inhabitants. The parish lies near the entrance to the East Swale, opposite the Isle of Sheppy; and comprises 3610 acres, of which 439 are in wood. On the shore, by Tankerton, are several establishments where copperas, or green vitriol, is manufactured. Whitstable bay is frequented by a number of colliers, from which Canterbury and the surrounding places are supplied with coal, by means of the Canterbury and Whitstable railway. It is also a station for hoys, which sail to and from London alternately, every week. The railway, one of the first constructed in the south of England, is six miles in length; it was originally worked by horses, and by fixed engines for raising the trains up the inclined planes, but was opened as a complete railway for passengers in 1846. Many boats are employed in the fisheries, Whitstable being a royalty of fishery, or oyster-dredging, appendant to the manor; and for the due regulation of the trade, a court is held on the second Thursday in July. There are fairs on the Thursday before Whitsuntide, near the water side; on Midsummer-day, at Church-street; and on St. James' day, in Whitstable-Street, which is a thriving village, containing shops well stored with every necessary article of consumption for those engaged in the extensive traffic here carried on. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Archbishop of Canterbury, with a net income of £150; impropriator, T. Foord, Esq., whose tithes have been commuted for £935. The church contains 800 sittings. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans. Great quantities of Roman pottery have been found in dredging for oysters round a rock, now called the Pudding-pan, which is supposed by some to have been the island Caunos mentioned by Ptolemy, though now covered by the sea.

Whitstone

WHITSTONE, a parish, in the union and hundred of Stratton, E. division of Cornwall, 7 miles (S. S. E.) from Stratton; containing 466 inhabitants. The parish is situated in the north-eastern part of the county, bordering upon Devonshire, and is intersected by the Bude canal; it comprises 3600 acres, of which 200 are common or waste. Stone is quarried, chiefly for repairing the roads. A fair for cattle is held on the first Thursday in June. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 11. 0½., and in the gift of the Rev. W. Kingdon: the tithes have been commuted for £258, and the glebe comprises 30 acres, with a house. The church is a neat structure. There is a meetinghouse for Bryanites.

Whitstone (St. Catherine)

WHITSTONE (St. Catherine), a parish, in the union of St. Thomas, hundred of Wonford, Wonford and S. divisions of Devon, 3¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Exeter; containing 670 inhabitants. It is situated on the Falmouth road, and comprises by measurement 4077 acres, of which about 2700 are arable, 570 meadow and pasture, 450 coppice, and 260 orchard and garden ground; the soil is principally clay. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 3. 4., and in the gift of the Rev. Charles Brown: the tithes have been commuted for £616. 16., and the glebe comprises 79 acres. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, and contains 284 sittings, of which two-thirds are free. John Splatt, in 1753, bequeathed £20 per annum for teaching children; he also founded almshouses for five people.

Whittering (All Saints)

WHITTERING (All Saints), a parish, in the poorlaw union of Stamford, soke of Peterborough, N. division of the county of Northampton, 2½ miles (N. N. W.) from Wansford; containing 261 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 0. 10.; net income, £101; patron, the Marquess of Exeter.