Staffordshire Forest Pleas
Michaelmas, 55 Henry III

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Major-General Hon. G. Wrottesley (editor)

Year published

1884

Pages

140-156

Citation Show another format:

'Staffordshire Forest Pleas: Michaelmas, 55 Henry III', Staffordshire Historical Collections, vol. 5 part 1 (1884), pp. 140-156. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=52374 Date accessed: 26 November 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Pleas of the Forest at Lichfield on the Morrow of St. Michael, 55 H. III., Before Roger de Clifford, Matthew de Columbariis, and Nicholas de Romeseye, Justiciaries Assigned to Hear and Determine the Said Pleas.

The first membrane consists entirely of essoigns, and of the names of those against whom presentments had been made, and who had appeared on the first day of the sittings.

M. 2.
Respecting Venison of Kenefare.

It was presented and convicted by John fitz Philip, the custos of the forest, and by Alan de Englefeld, Philip de Lotteleye, Henry de Morf, and Richard de Eveneffeld, the verderers of the same forest, that Richard de la Boruwe and other unknown men took a stag in the forest without warrant on the Friday before the Feast of St. Kenelm, 46 H. III. And the said Robert did not appear, and was not attached, and could not be found. He is therefore to be put in the exigend and to be outlawed if he did not appear.

It was presented by the same and convicted that Robert Hasteng, Gilbert de Waldingesfeld his squire, and Walter, who was a servant of the said Robert at Chebbeseye, and John the clerk of the same Robert, of whose surname further inquiry is to be made; Adam le Parker, Benedict le Curly, and six others named, had entered the said forest on the Wednesday after the Feast of the Translation of St. Thomas in the aforesaid year (46 H. III.) with bows and arrows, and had taken five stags and three hinds without warrant, and had carried the venison to the house of the said Robert at Chebbesey. William de la Cornere appeared on the first day, and was committed to prison and fined 20s. for his release; and Richard son of the said William is dead and was not attached, and the others did not appear nor were they attached. The Sheriff is therefore ordered to arrest them. Robert de Hasteng and Walter his serviens afterwards appeared, and were committed to prison, and the Sheriff is ordered to arrest the others.

It was presented, etc., that Thomas de Bromlegh and Stephen Mosterel took in the said forest on the Sunday before the Feast of St. Clement, 46 H. III., a stag without warrant. Thomas appeared, and is already in prison, and Stephen never appeared nor was attached. He is therefore to be exigatur, and Thomas is detained in prison at Warwyk.

It was presented, etc., that Richard del Frene of Morf, and Richard son of Thomas Wodekoc of the same, took a fecon of a hind (feconem bisse) in the said forest about the Feast of St. Barnabas, 46 H. III., without warrant. Richard son of Thomas came, and being convicted of the same is committed to prison. And Richard del Frene had fled, and is outlawed for a felony which he had committed. Richard son of Thomas being led forth (eductus) from prison, was fined half a mark, for which Henry de Morf is his surety. (fn. 1)

It was presented, etc., that Robert Hasteng and many others of his household and maintenance who are named above and with others who are unknown, entered the said forest on the Wednesday after the Feast of St. Barnabas with bows and arrows, and took three bucks and a "fecon" of a doe ("unum feconem damæ").

M. 2 dorso.

It was presented, etc., that Thomas de Bromley and Nicholas Pyte, who is dead, took a stag in the said forest and carried it away about the Feast of St. Luke, 46 H. III.; and Symon de Beaumes, at that time forester, came up, and challenged them, and followed them until one of them killed his horse, and in this way they escaped. See about Thomas above.

It was presented, etc., that Thomas de Weston, Robert de Bromleye, Thomas de Bromlegh, and others who were of the garrison of the castle of Bruges (Bridgenorth), under Hamon Lestrange, 48 H. III., entered the said forest on the Thursday before the Feast of Pentecost in the same year, and took a hind without warrant, and carried it away to the said castle.

It was presented, etc., that William son of Alan de Overton, Hugh de Byscopbyri, who is dead, and Walter de Boweles, men of the household (manupasti) of William Bagot, by orders of the said William, entered the said forest about the same time and took a hind, and carried it to the house of the said William at Pateleshulle. William Bagot afterwards appeared, and being convicted thereof is detained in prison; and he put in bail for the other malefactors of his household. William son of Alan afterwards appeared, and being convicted thereof is detained in prison, and a day is given to him at Salop.

It was presented, etc., that John del Ho, Richard son of John de Estroode, and Robert Blundel of Evenefeld, took a stag without warrant in the said forest on the Wednesday before the Feast of St. Botulf, 51 H. III. They are not to be found, and are therefore to be outlawed.

It was presented that Walter le Bere, of Swyndon, and Walter Petit, of the same, took a hind in the said forest on the Saturday before the Feast of Pentecost, 49 H. III., which was in front of the dogs of the King (ante canes Domini Regis), and carried it away secretly; and they appeared, and being convicted thereof, are detained in prison. And Walter le Petyt is pardoned because he is weak-headed (quia captivus). (fn. 2) Walter le Bere is afterwards released for a fine of a mark.

It was presented, etc., that Ralph, son of Ralph de Aras, of co. Salop, took a hind in the said forest without warrant on the Tuesday after Pentecost, 50 H. III., and carried the venison to the house of his father at Subbiri, who knowingly received him with the said venison. They did not appear, nor were attached. The Sheriff is therefore to produce them on the octaves of Michaelmas. They afterwards came, and were committed to prison.

Presentments in the same form for taking venison were made against the following, viz.:—
William de Huggerford, of co. Salop.
Robert del Chenne.
Michael de Burgo extra Ronton.
William Chanselitere.
Robert de Bromlegh.
William de Chene.
Richard de Ruton.
Walter Warrock, of Kenefare.
Robert le Coliere, of the same.

M. 3.

It was presented, etc., that Richard de Aston, in Claverlee, Osbert son of Robert Toky, of Arnlegh, Richard de Amblelegh, Chepman, a certain freeman living near the Church of the said vill, and William de Harpecote, are malefactors of venison in the said forest with greyhounds; and they used to be received in the house of Peter son of Leon de Romeslegh, in co. Salop, who was a consenting party to their malpractices, etc.

It was presented, etc., that William de Perton, and William son of Alan de Overton, took a hind and a doe in the said forest on the Thursday before the Purification, 50 H. III., without warrant, and carried the venison to the house of the said William de Perton, who being convicted of the same is committed to prison. And the said William de Overton appeared, as is shown above. And William de Perton was fined 20s., for which William le Faunt and John de Pendeford are his sureties. He was afterwards pardoned at the instance of William Child.

It was presented, etc., that William de Beauchamp, now Earl of Warwick, and John de Beauchamp his brother, took a hind in the said forest on the vigil of the close of Easter, without warrant; and they did not appear. The Sheriff of Worcestershire is therefore ordered to produce them at Salop on the morrow of All Souls.

It was presented, etc., that Benedict de Rigge, who lives in the manor of Wrofeld in co. Salop, is a frequent malefactor of venison in the said forest. He did not appear; and the Sheriff was ordered to arrest him. He afterwards came, and being convicted was committed to prison. He was fined 40s., and released. His sureties are Hugh de Wrotesle and Walter le Deneys.

It was presented, etc., that Henry de Woddeford, of the manor of Claverley, in co. Salop, took a stag without warrant in the said forest about the Feast of St. Valentine, 54 H. III., and carried it to his house at Claverle; and Henry did not appear; and the Sheriff had been ordered elsewhere to attach him, and stated to the Justices that John fitz Aery would not permit the writ of attachment to be served. The Sheriff is therefore commanded to take with him a sufficient posse comitatûs and attach him and the said John, and to produce them before the Justices on the Saturday after the Feast of St. Dionisius. The said Henry afterwards came, and being convicted of it was committed to prison. He was afterwards released and fined 40s., for which John fitz Philip is his surety.

Also William de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, and Walter his brother, took two hinds in the said forest on the Vigil of the Epiphany, 53 H. III. Respecting William, see above; and Walter did not come, nor was attached. The Sheriff of Warwickshire to produce him on the Saturday after tht Feast of St. Dionisius.

It was presented, etc., that Brother John Burel, the Converse (Concensus) of the Abbey of Combe, with other unknown men of the same Abbey, entered the forest many times during the season of venison (tempore pinguetudinis), 54 H. III., with bows and arrows, to take the King's venison; and were received in the grange of the said Abbey at Trescote. None of them appeared, nor were they attached. The Sheriff is therefore ordered to distrain the Abbot of Combe by his lands, etc., until he shall appear to answer for his conversum William. A day is given to him at Salop.

It was presented, etc., that Robert de Haggelegh, William lord of the vill of Overton, and William son of Ivetta, of the same, took a stag in the said forest without warrant on the Wednesday before the Nativity of the Virgin, 54 H. III.; and they appeared, and being convicted of it are committed to prison. William lord of Overton was lined 40s. by the pledge of Henry de Morf and of Richard de Evenefeld and William Ivet was fined 40s. by the pledge of William lord of Overton, and Reginald de Bradelegh; and Robert de Haggele was fined a mark by the pledge of Walter le Deneys, of Amelecote, and John de Bilston.

M. 3 dorso.

It was presented, etc., that Baldwyn de Fryvyle, Alexander his brother, John de Asserigge, and others of the household of Godfrid, Bishop of Worcester, took a stag and three hinds in the above forest on the Vigil of St. Martin, 55 H. III., without warrant, and carried the venison to the Bishop's Castle of Hertleburi, where the said Bishop was then staying, and who received them knowingly with the said venison. None of the defendants appeared, nor were they attached. The Sheriff of Worcestershire is therefore commanded to produce the said Baldwyne and John on Saturday after the Feast of St. Dionisius, and the Bishop is to be prosecuted coram Rege, and to answer for the said Alexander, inasmuch as he has nothing by which he can be attached.

Presentments for taking venison at various dates were made in the same form against the following, viz.:—

Nicholas de Ochull, Walter de Ochull, Richard de Ochull, John le Messir of Seysdon; John and Bartholomew the sons of John the Clerk of Patingham, Williamde Beauchamp and JamesdeBeauchamphisuncle, and Adam de Storton. Those who surrendered were imprisoned during the sitting of the Court, and released on the condition of the payment of a fine, for which two persons were responsible in every case. If they did not surrender, the Sheriff was ordered to attach them by pledges to appear at a date named. If the Sheriff returned they held nothing by which he could distrain them, they were ordered to be put into the exigend, and if they did not appear, to be outlawed.

It was presented etc., that whereas when Roger de Clifford, the Justice of the Forest 49 H. III., had given to Godfrid Giffard, at that time the King's Chancellor, two bucks from the said forest, and Godfrey had assigned Thomas de Cherlecote of co. Warwick to take the said bucks in his place, the said Thomas together with William de Mulneton, John de Sallegh, Walter de Benetlegh, and William Lovel, had taken in addition to the two bucks a roedeer (capriolum) and a fecon of a hind without warrant. They did not appear, and were not attached; and the Sheritf of Warwickshire is ordered to produce the said Thomas on the Saturday after the Feast of St. Dionisius: and because the others had nothing by which they could be distrained they are to be exigentur and outlawed. The said Thomas Lovel and Thomas de Cherlecote afterwards appeared, and their offence was condoned at the request of the said Godfrid, who is now Bishop of Worcester.

It was presented, etc., that William de Loddesdon in Wolvrehampton is a receiver of Thomas de Bromlegh, a very frequent malefactor of venison; and he did not appear, nor was he attached. The Sheriff is ordered to arrest him.

M. 4.

The Regard of Kenefare presented by Hugh de Wrotesley, John de Tresel, William de Overton, William fitz Warin, John son of Adam de Lutteslegh, Henry de Henkeston, Thomas de Holebroc, Reginald de Bradley, Walter Denys, Clement de Wolvernhamton, John de Molesle, and William de Wytenton, Reguardors, who say that Richard son of Agnes had newly assarted half an acre of land in a certain riffletum of John fitz Philip in Bobinton without warrant, and still holds it. He is therefore in misericordiâ, and the land is to be taken into the King's hands, and it was not sown; and Richard appeared and fined half a mark for his misericordiâ, and another half mark to have his land back again.

The following were also fined for making new assarts within the forest, viz.:—

William the gardener of Bobinton, for an assart in Bobinton; Thomas de la Putte, of the Lude, for an assart within the fee of Sir William de Wombume.

Nicholas le Tornor of Morf, for an assart within the riffletum of Henry Lord of Morf.

Hamon, the cissor (cutler), of Eggebaston, who is dead, for an assart within the wood of Philip de Lutteslegh in Luttelegh.

Osbert at the bridge of Wystewyk, Alexander at the grene of the same, Alexander son of Osbert of the same, Walter son of Adam of the same, Adam at the spring (fontem) of the same, William ad fontem of the same, Richard at the wood of Tetenhale, Thomas son of Spuyvy of the same, Roger son of Margery of the same, William the Flemeng of the same, Henry the carpenter of the same, Luke of the hill (ad montem) of the same, Ralph son of Robert of the same, Henry son of William of the same, and Juliana, the widow of Roger de Tetenhale, had newly occupied and hold the King's soil in the said forest without warrant. They are therefore in misericordiâ, and the land is to be taken into the King's hands; and the third part of it was in corn, for which they will answer. (They were fined from 40d. to half a mark each.)

Osbert at the bridge of Wystewyk had occupied newly an acre and a half of the King's wood pertaining to his manor of Wytewyk. He is therefore in misericordiâ, etc.

The following were also fined for making new assarts within Tetenhall, Adam at the bridge of Wystewyk, Thomas de Creye of Compton, William son of Marjery, Luke Attestone of Tetenhale, Elyas son of Simon, Richard de Clare, Elyas le Chanoigne (the Canon), and William his son, Richard de Bosco, Henry le Roer, Roger de Kronekwall, Alexander the forester of Compton, William le Cock of Compton, Henry le Carpenter, William at the spring (fontem) of Wystewyk, Robert à la Grave, Alditha the widow, Alexander atte Grene, Walter de Wytwyk, and Osbert de Wytewyk.

Walter le Chapeleyn of Kenefare was fined 18d. for a new assart in Womburne, and Thomas de la Putte of the Lude 3s. for another.

The wood of William de Overton, which is called Puttelich, was wasted (vastatus) both newly and of old, by Walter the father of the said William. It is therefore to be taken into the King's hands. The said William afterwards came and fined both for the old and new waste, and to have back his wood, as appears elsewhere.

From John Tracy for an old waste of his wood of Reningeford, half a mark.

Respecting Vert of Kanuk.

From Edemon, son of Sibilla of Wyrle, for vert half a mark; and onehundred and three others are likewise fined sums varying from 40d. up to half a mark for the same. From their names they appear to be inhabitants of Wirley, Blockswich, Handsacre, Bromley, Longdon, Essington, Sardon, Oxley, Fradsley, Badenhall, Acton, Elmhurst, Wednesfield, Wytinton, Coven, Pershall, and Alrewas.

m. 5. Respecting Venison in Kanock.

It is presented and convicted by Thomas de Weseham the Seneschall of the forest of Kanock, William de Bentlegh, forester-in-fee of the Bailiwick of Bentlegh, Walter de Elmedon, forester-in-fee of the Haye of Teddesley, William Tromwyne, forester-in-fee of the Haye of Christlyn, and by Thomas de Thomenhorn, Nicholas de Bedenhale, and John de Hervounvyle, verderers of the said forest, that Richard de Loges, William de Sowe, and others unknown, took a hind and her fecon on the Wednesday after the close of Easter, 46 H. III., without warrant, and carried the venison to the house of the said William at Rodbalston. Eichard appeared, and being convicted of it is committed to prison; and William was not attached, and could not be found. He is therefore to be exigatur and outlawed.

Presentments for taking venison are made in the same form against Roger le Estrange and Richard le Bole, the huntsman of John le Estrange, William de Belme, Robert his brother, William de Tene, and William Chanselite.

It is presented, etc., that James de Audedelegh, James his son, John his chaplain, and John de Coudray his esquire (armiger), with others unknown, took in the same forest, without warrant, on the Vigil of the Assumption, 56 H. III. (sic), two beasts, viz., within the Bailiwick of Bentlegh a buck, and in the Bailiwick of Gaule a stag; and James with the said men of his household (cum familiaribus suis) is now in Ireland in the service of King Edward, son of the King. He is therefore to answer for it coram Rege.

Presentments for taking venison were also made against William Tolose, who was Bailiff of the Bishop of Chester, Ralph Pelle, the huntsman of Roger de Someri, Adam Huber, and William the Parker of Midelton, and Nicholas Wene of Doddeley.

It is presented, etc., that Robert de Staundon, Ralph Pelle, Stephen de Boulers, Robert de Knytelegh, William his brother, Adam Huber, Jobin Don,. Richard de Wemme, Walter Served, Hemy de Bykerton, and many others who are dead, came with Ralph Basset, who is likewise dead, on Wednesday before Christmas Day, 48 H. III., and took ten does and three bucks, two hinds and a fecon, without warrant, and carried the venison to the house of the said Ralph at Drayton. And the said Robert de Knystele and Richard de Wemme came, and being convicted, are committed to prison; and the said William de Knystele is in Ireland with James de Audelegh, and the said William Wodekock (fn. 3) and Robert de Staundon are in the Holy Land, therefore let it be respited as against them. And as regards the said Ralph Pelle and Adam Huberd, the Sheriff had orders above. And the Sheriff is commanded to produce Jobyn Don at Salop on the morrow of All Souls. And the said Stephen de Boulers, Walter Served, and Henry de Bykerton, could not be found; they are therefore to be exigantur and outlawed. And Richard de Wemme is pardoned for the soul of the King, because he is poor and a minstrel (quia pauper et menestrallus est). And Robert de Knystele being brought forth out of prison, was fined 20s., for which Peter de Marham and William de Musselawe are his sureties.

It is presented, etc., that William Tolose, who was with the Bishop of Chester, Henry de Aumary, Colin the Huntsman of Roger de Aumary, Jordan de Rewel, William Chansfelitte, William de Perton, John his brother, William son of Alan de Overton, Ralph de Bysopburi, Roger his brother, and John de Brunesford, who were residing at that time in Lichfield and Stafford, in the forty-eighth year of the reign, were customary malefactors of the King's venison in the said forest, with greyhounds, bows, and arrows. And they advocaverunt se by Ralph Basset, so that no forester dared to attach them. And the said Jordan and Walter appeared, and being convicted are committed to prison; and the said William Chanselitte, William de Perton, and William de Overton came as is shown respecting venison in Kenefare. And John son (sic) of William de Perton, is now a monk at Wenlok. The Sheriff is therefore ordered to distrain the Prior of that place to produce him before the Justices on the morrow of All Souls. And the said John de Brunesford could not be found; he is therefore to be exigatur and outlawed. Henry de Aumary is now a Hospitaller, and in the Holy Land; Colin could not be found; he is therefore to be exigatur and outlawed. And the said Ralph bailed his brother Richard (sic) to have him before the Justices on the Feast of St. Dionisius. Jordan de Rewel being brought out of prison, is fined 20s. by the pledge of John (rest illegible).

M. 5, dorso.

It is presented, etc., that Richard de Loges, Richard de Pynlesdon, William de Knystele, John Mist of Wyrley, and Thomas de Wytinton, took in the forest on the Friday before the Feast of St. Bartholomew, 48 H. III., a cheverellum without warrant, and carried it to the house of the said Richard at Rodbaston. Respecting Richard de Loges and William, see above. And John Mist came, and being convicted of it, is committed to prison. And the Sheriff is ordered to arrest the said Richard and Thomas. John was fined a mark, for which Richard Atteyate, Robert de Esenington, and Robert Moul of Essington are sureties. Thomas Myst afterwards appeared and was committed to prison.

Presentments for taking vension were made in the same form against William de Hondesacre, Thomas de Bromle, Ralph the Baker of Wolverehampton, Robert Crune, Robert de Staundon, Richard de Pywelesdon and Henry Dymmak of Hoggenorton in co. Oxford. In the case of Robert de Staundon the presentment states the venison was carried to Great Sardon, which at that time (49 H. III.) was in the hands of the said Robert.

A presentment was also made against Robert Hasteng, Henry de Wyvereston, John de Scheteford, Richard de Bromlegh, William de London, and Thomas de Pessale, who were all de societate of the said Robert, for taking venison in the same year, and carrying it to the house of Robert at Chebbeseye.

Hamon Lestraunge passing through the forest twice in the same year (50 H. III.) took five beasts, viz., on the vigil of Easter, a doe and a zoerum of a buck (a sorel), and on the morrow of St. Barnabas he took a zoerum of a buck and two fecons.

Robert Chenney, William de Huggeford, Nicholas his brother, William de Perton, William son of Alan de Overton, and John de Brunesford, took in the forest on the Saturday before the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross(50 H. III.), three bucks, a doe and a fecon without warrant, and carried the venison to Chylynton, which was then in the hands of the said Robert. William de Perton and William de Overton appeared as shown above. And the Sheriff has orders respecting William de Huggeford and Robert and Nicholas as shown above. And the said John is to be put in the exigend as shown above.

It is presented, etc., that John de Klynton, stopping in the house of the Dean of Thammoth (Tamworth), sent Osberthis brother and Ralph Pelle with his dogs into the said forest on the day of St. Mark the Evangelist (51 H. III.) to take venison, and they took two cheverells in the Haye of Hopewas, and carried them to the said John. Respecting Ealph Pelle see above. And the Sheriff of Warwickshire is commanded to arrest the said John and Osbert.

M. 6.

A presentment for taking venison in the same year was made against Philip Marmyon, William de Hondesacre, Simon Coli, and Richard, the serviens of William, the venison being taken to the house of the said William at Handsacre.

A presentment was also made against Philip Marmion, William de Sekyndon, Nicholes de Sekendon, Henry de Pakynton, William de Mulneton, and Peter de Marham, for taking venison, 54 H. III., and carrying it to the castle of Philip at Thamwurth.

Hamon Lestrange, passing through the bailiwick of Teddeslegh, in the same year, took a buck, a fecon of a roe deer, and a roe deer.

It is presented, etc., that Walter de Elmedon, forester in fee of the bailiwick of Teddesley, and Roger de Pecham, riding forester (forestarius eques) for the whole forest of Kanoc, coming into the said bailiwick on the Tuesday after the Feast of St. Gregory, 51 H. III., found in the parcum coopertum of the Haye of Teddeslegh, one Thomas de Bromlegh, a very frequent malefactor of venison, and often indicted for such transgressions in the King's forests in the counties of Stafford and Salop, with a bow and arrows; and they immediately challenged him, and the said Thomas defended himself in an oak tree, and shot arrows at them until they took him by force and delivered him to the custos of the Castle of Bruges (Bridgenorth); and Hugh de Mortimer, then Sheriff, and the custos of the same castle, are commanded to produce the said Thomas before the Justices for judgment. He is convicted, and it was shown that he had been frequently received at Wolverhampton by John le Cauf, who was cognizant of his misdeeds; and John, having appeared, was committed to prison, but afterwards pardoned because of his poverty.

M. 7.

Philip Marmyon, passing through the bailiwick of Bentlegh, on the Saturday after the Feast of St. John, 51. H. III., took a buck without warrant.

It is presented, etc., that when the King had given to the said Philip a stag and a buck in the said forest, that Philip and William de Morteng had taken on the morrow of the Nativity of the Blessed Mary in the same year, a doe and a fecon of a buck, and a cheverell, and on the Wednesday following a doe. The said William appeared, and being convicted of it is committed to prison. A day was given to him at Salop on the morrow of All Souls to pay his fine.

It is presented that William de Morteyn, Robert his brother, and Haward his esquire (armiger), are customary malefactors in the said forest.

It is presented that William de Doddingeseles, junior, took a doe and a cheverel in the bailiwick of Oggele on the Wednesday after the Feast of the Nativity of the Virgin, 51 H. III., without warrant; he did not appear, and was not attached. The Sheriff of Herefordshire is ordered to produce him at Salop on the morrow of All Souls.

Philip Marmyon took a doe on the Wednesday before Christmas Day, 52 H. III., without warrant.

It is presented etc. that Ralph le Botyler, senior, passing through the bailiwick of Gaule with his household (cum familiâ suâ), on the Sunday after the Feast of St. Michael, 53 H. III., caused four couple of greyhounds (lessas leporariorum) to run at a herd of doe. The Sheriff is commanded to produce him at Salop on the morrow of All Souls.

William de Hondesakre and Alexander de Hondesakre took in the wood of Bromle within the said forest, a doe, without warrant, on the Wednesday after the Epiphany, 53 H. III. William appeared as shown above; and the Sheriff is ordered to,arrest Alexander.

Hamon le Strange, passing through the bailiwick of Teddesle on the Wednesday after the Feast of the Nativity of St. John, 53 H. III., took a buck without warrant, and carried it to his castle of Charteleye; and the same Hamon took in the Haye of Chiselegh, on the day of the Apostles Peter and Paul, in the same year, two does without warrant.

Gervase de Levedale, John Fige his servant, and William Hod, who is dead, coming into the Haye of Teddesle on the Wednesday before the Feast of the Translation of St. Edmund the Archbishop, 53 H. III., found a dead doe, and took it in a covered cart to the house of the said William; and they skinned it there and divided it between them. Gervase appeared, and being convicted was committed to prison, and fined one mark and released.

A presentment was made against Alured de Moloney, Hugh de Tymmor, James his brother, William de Mulveton, and John Salveyn, for entering the Haye of Hopewas, 53 H. III., with greyhounds, bows, and arrows, for the purpose of hunting. Hugh and James were committed to prison. James was afterwards released for a fine of 20s., for which John de Tresel and Henry de Morf are his sureties.

A presentment was made that William le Paumer, of Bromle, and Robert son of Osbert, of the same, were customary malefactors of venison in the said forest.

It is presented, etc., that Henry de Bruly and his groom (garcio), of whose name they are ignorant, passing through the forest on the Saturday before the Feast of St. Peter and Paul, 53 H. III., took a hind without warrant, and concealed it in a certain moor; which John, son of Robert de Homerwiz (who is dead), Robert le Mouler of Essenington, and Richard, at the Gate of the same, perceiving, they secretly carried away the hind, and divided it amongst them. Robert and Richard appeared, and being convicted of it were imprisoned, and afterwards released for a fine from each of them of 20s.

It is presented, etc., that William de Perton, William son of Alan de Overton William son of Hugh de Bosco, of Trymple, Ralph de Bysopburi, Roger his brother, William son of Hugh de Wroteslegh, William de Penne, John Selveyn, and John de Brunesford, are customary malefactors of venison (consueti malefactores de venatione) in the bailiwicks of Bentlegh and Oggele, and that they took three does without warrant in the bailiwick of Bentlegh on the Friday before Pentecost, 54 H. III., and carried them to the house of the said Ralph de Bysopburi, and there divided them between them. The said William de Wroteslegh now appeared, and being convicted is detained in prison; and the said William de Perton, William, Ralph, and Roger appeared as shown above; and the Sheriff is ordered to arrest the said William de Penne. John and John are in the exigend, as appears above; and the said William son of Hugh de Trympele held nothing by which he could be distrained; he is therefore to be put in the exigend. William de Penne afterwards appeared, and being convicted, was put into prison; and afterwards released for a fine of 20s., for which William de Bentlegh and John de Pendeford are his sureties. And the said William de Wrotesley was released for a fine of 20s., for which Hugh his father is surety.

M. 7 dorso.

The Regard of Kanoc, presented by Nicholas de Alrewich, William de Strethay, Eobert de Freford, Roger de Comberford, Richard de Thyckebome, Thomas de Hamsted, William de Derlaston, Thomas de Hulton, Ralph de Byssopburi, John de Engleton, and Peter de Colcestre, Eeguardors, who say that—

James de I'Isle (de Insula), who is dead, had newly assarted twenty-four acres of the wood of Bedenhulle which was Ralph Basset's. The land was sown with oats, for which John de Arderne, who now holds it, must answer, and the land is to be taken into the King's hands.

Presentments were also made against the following for newly assarting land within the regard of the forest:—

John de Aldeport, for an assart in the wood of Robert de Grendon at Stonhale.

Gilbert le Rus, of Hatherdon, for an assart in Hatherdon, in the wood of the Dean of Wolverhampton.

Robert le Couper, of Coven, for an assart in Coven.

Ralph de Coven, who is dead, had newly assarted eight acres, and which had been sown. Thomas Payn, Henry de Wodiston (Wyverstone), and William de Drayton, who now hold the land, to be answerable for the crops, and the land to be taken into the King's hands.

Richard le Rus, of Moleston (sic), who is dead, had newly assarted an acre, without warrant, of the alnetum of Robert de Eseningeton, at Molesle. To be taken into the King's hands. Robert his son now holds the land, and it was not sown, and he gave 4s. to have back the land.

William Huberd of Bromle had newly assarted and holds two acres of the wood of Thomas Corbet in Bromle. The land to be taken into the King's hands. The land had been sown twice in wheat (blado), twice in invernagio, and twice in oats. He is to answer for the value of the crops, aud his misericordiâ is half a mark.

Presentments were likewise made against fifteen other tenants for making small assarts in the wood of Bromley. The assarts were ordered to be taken into the King's hands. Thomas Corbet afterwards appeared and fined a mark to have them back again.

M. 8, of Old Assarts of Kanok.

Elyas de Lynde vi. s. for an acre and a half of old assart in la Lynde, of the fee of Robert de Grendon.

Adam, son of Bartholomew of Schenestan, 18d. for an acre of old assart in the same fee.

And seven other tenants of Robert de Grendon pay for old assarts sum s varying from 6d. to 9s.

William de la Penne 6s. 9d. for an acre and a half in Northicote, of the fee of Byssheburi.

Milithenta, widow of William the Forester, of Blokeswic, for half an acre assarted in the fee of William de Mortein, 6s. 9d., and 2s. 3d. for the value of the crops.

Robert de Somerford for an acre and a half assarted in Northicote 6s. 9d.

Richard le Levesune, of Wilenhall, 2s. 3d. for half an acre assarted of the fee of the Dean of Wolverhampton.

Richard, son of for John Belamy, half an acre assarted in Wodnesfeld 4s. ¼d., of the Dean of Wolverhampton.

Six other tenants of the Dean are fined for old assarts in Wednesfield.

Symon Baldwyn, of Walsterwode, for half an acre assarted in the fee of John de Heron vile 2s. 3d.

Adam Dukan, of Pilatonhall, 9d for a rood assarted in the fee of Walter de Elmedon; it is in grass.

From Roger, son of Robert de Hutyndon, 6d., for half an acre assarted in the same fee.

Alicia de Russale for two acres assarted in her own fee 2s.

Richard, son of William Edrich of Loynhull, for half an acre assarted of the fee of Adam de Otherton.

Six tenants of Wednesfield are fined for old assarts in the fee of the Dean of Wolverhampton.

The Reguardors made no presentment of the above old assarts before the last Iter; they are therefore in misericordiâ.

M. 8 dorso. Respecting Old and New Purprestv.res of Kannok.

Stephen de Hulton and John his son, of Wodnesfield, have newly occupied three acres of heath of the fee of the Dean of Wolverhampton in Wondnesfolde, enclosed with a ditch and hedge to the injury of the forest and against the assize. They are therefore in misericordiâ and the fence is to be thrown down. They are fined 4s. each.

Thomas, son of Matilda of Alrewych (Aldridge), has newly occupied an acre of the fee of Felicia de Barre and enclosed it with a ditch and hedge. To be thrown down. Fine 2s.

John the Baker (Pistor), of Waleshall, had newly occupied an acre and a rood in the fee of William Mortein, enclosed in the same way. The fence to be thrown down.

William the Wheeler (Rotarius), of the same, had occupied two acres and enclosed it. Fine 2s., and the fence to be thrown down.

Adam Pres, of Etone, and Sweyn of the same, had enclosed two acres in the same way, of the fee of Matilda Devereux (de Eboraco). (fn. 4) Fine 4s., and the fence to be thrown down.

Walter le Roer, of Hatherdon, had enclosed an acre in Hatherdon, of the fee of the Dean of Wolverhampton. Fine 40d., and the fence to be thrown down.

Three other tenants are fined for enclosures in Hatherdon of the same fee.

Adam de Oldefalling and Philip his brother had enclosed two acres of the fee of Ralph de Byscopesburi. They are fined 40d. each, and the fence to be thrown down.

Nicholas Lyberter, of Molesle, had enclosed half an acre in the same fee. Fine 40d., and the fence to be thrown down.

Two tenants of the Dean were fined for enclosures in Wednesfield.

Richard de Estrehul had enclosed an acre of the fee of Felicia de Barre. Fine 2s., and the fence to be thrown down.

M. 9. On the Waste made in the Woods of the Demesne Woods of the King after the late Pleas, by Gifts, Sales, Takings, or by consent of the Foresters.

It is presented by the verderers, reguardors, as well as by other ministers, jurors, aud vills of the forest of Kanok, that when Hugh de Evesham was riding forester for a long time for all Kanok under Thomas de Weseham the Seneschall, and during the time that William Cardon, and a stranger who was called Benedict the Forester, were foresters in the Haye of Alrewas, a great destruction was made in the said Haye, and that they sold by common assent 20 oaks, the value of which was 40d. each oak.

That the said William cut down in the same Haye and carried to his house in Lichfield four oaks and more; the value of the four oaks is a mark.

And afterwards for the remaining time that William was forester, and after Benedict had been removed and Richard Wyz, of Lichfield, had been put in his place, these two sold from the same Haye twenty oaks, value 5 marks; besides which Richard took to his own use four oaks, of the value of one mark.

And all the time that the said William was forester he had a cart with two horses drawing brushwood and timber from the said Haye to the town of Lichfield and elsewhere, viz., for two years and a half; and more or less it may be computed that for each day he carried away a cartload, value 4d., the sum of which is £15 3s. 4d.

An inquisition respecting the names of those who drew timber and brushwood from the said Haye with the permission of the foresters mentions Robert and the Carter of Elmhurst and twelve others.

The rest of the membrane contains similar presentments and the fines levied upon the trespassers.

M. 9 dorso.

It was further presented that Hugh and the others previously named during the time they were foresters were accustomed to stop all carts passing through their bailiwick with salt and other merchandize on the high roads, and to take for each cart 4d. at least in the name of chiminage, and for other carts 12d., and for some 2s. And this took place when the carts were not loaded with timber or brushwood nor anything from the forest, nor when the carters had committed any trespass in the forest; and in this way they raised a large sum of money, of which the exact amount cannot be told.

And the said Hugh and the other foresters were accustomed to compel those driving swine on the high roads in their bailiwicks to give pannage when the swine were not agisted in the woods of the King.

And further the said Hugh took with him a certain clerk whom he said was the Clerk of the Justices of the forest, and made a view of dogs which were not expeditated throughout his bailiwick, and thus extorted a great sum of money from the men of the bailiwick unjustly, not being content with any mode of expeditation, saying, if the right leg was expeditated the left leg ought to be expeditated, and vice versâ, and if all the feet were expeditated, saying falsely that this was against the assize and the tenor of the King's charter.

It was presented that the Hayes of Alrewas and Hopewas were much wasted since the last pleas, through the bad custody of the foresters and by their gifts and sales, because the foresters were frequently removed and others put in their place by the Seneschall, who took from each on his entering a great sum of money; and besides this a yearly sum from each for the tenure of his bailiwick; and the foresters could not pay these sums unless they permitted assarts and waste to be made in the woods of their bailiwicks, for which they took a large sum of money, to the great damage of the King and the destruction of his forest.

M. 10.

This membrane is entirely filled both sides with presentments of new assarts within the Regard of Cannock, made for the most part by small freeholders and tenants in Otherton, Sardon, Willenhall, Wednesfield, Wednesbury, Bloxwich, Rushall, Coven, Hatherton, Shareshill, Hilton, and Stanhall.

Some which throw light on the tenure of these manors are given below.

William de Kynewaston had newly assarted an acre at Otherton, in the fee of Adam de Otherton. He is therefore in misericordiâ, and the land is to be taken into the King's hands. It had been sown twice with oats, for which he must answer. William appeared and fined for his misericordiâ, and to have his land, 2s.; value of the crops 12d.

Richard the Canon of Sardon had newly assarted two acres and a half at Sardon in the fee of James de Auddedelegh. To be taken into the King's hands. Fine half a mark; to have back the land.

John de Pendeford had newly assarted half an acre of his own fee. To be taken, etc. Fines 2s. to have back his land.

John the Baker (Pistor), of Walesale, had newly assarted half an acre within the fee of John de Heronvyle, in Wednesbury. To be taken into the King's hands; he fines 1 mark to have his land back.

Robert son of Hugh had newly assarted in the same fee a rood of land. To be taken into the King's hands. His misericordiâ is 12d. And afterwards John de Heronvile, of whose soil the assart is, and for another assart presented below, gave to have them back again half a mark.

William son of Robert de Blockeswich, who is dead, had newly assarted two acres within the fee of William de Morteyn. The land to be taken into the King's hands.

Richard son of Spivey of Russale had newly assarted half an acre of the fee of Hugh de Boweles. To be taken into the King's hands. Fine 6d., which is afterwards remitted.

William de Boeles had newly assarted an acre in the same fee. To be taken into the King's hands. Fine half a mark.

William Atteyolies of Stonhale had newly assarted two acres in the fee of Robert de Grendon. To be taken into the King's hands. Fine half a mark.

Richard Bagot, of the same, had newly assarted three and a half acres in the same fee. To be taken, etc. Fine 4s.

Henry de Wyverston had newly assarted a rood of land within his own fee at Coven. To be taken into the King's hands. Fine 12d.

Margery, the daughter of Robert Aylward of Rodbaston, had newly assarted half an acre in Rodbaston of the fee of Richard de Loges. To be taken into the King's hands. Fine 12d.

Adam, son of Geoffrey of Schareshull, had newly assarted half an acre at Shareshull of the fee of Otuewel Purcel. To be taken into the King's hands. Fine 2s.

Geoffrey Costey of the same, and Robert the Smith (faber) of the same had newly assarted two acres of the fee of James de Audedeleye. To be taken into the King's hands. Fine half a mark.

Adam de Holta in Hulton had newly assarted half an acre in Hulton of the fee of the Dean of Wolverhampton. To be taken, etc. Fine 40d.

Richard Owyn of Fethereston had newly assarted half an acre of the same fee. To be taken, etc. Fine 2s.

M. 10 dorso.

Adam de Bosco of Molesle, Adam son of Hugh of the same, and Robert son of Richard, of the same, had newly assarted at Molesle, of the fee of Robert de Eselington (Essington), two acres. To be taken, etc. Fine 2s.

Robert de Medeway of Russale had newly assarted an acre of the fee of Alice de Russale. To be taken, etc. Fine 2s.

William de Boeles had enclosed with a ditch and hedge half an acre of alnetum of the fee of Nicholas de Alrewich. To be taken into the King's hands. Fine alibi. The fence to be thrown down.

Robert de Grendon had newly assarted four acres of his own fee. To be taken into the King's hands. Fine one mark.

Robert de Gressebrok in Stonehal had newly assarted two acres in the same fee. To be taken into the King's hands. Robert son of Henry de Stonhale now holds it, and it had been sown once with siligin, and once with oats, for which he is responsible. Fine 4s.; which is remitted at the request of Mathew de Columbariis (the Justiciary).

M. 11.

The forinsec wood of Hopewas, belonging to the King's demesne of Wygynton, and which is held by Philip Marmiun, is newly wasted by him and his bailiffs. He is therefore in misericordiâ. The wood to be taken into the King's hands. The names of those who took timber and brushwood from the said wood, viz.:—

Thomas de Tonstal, half a mark; Richard de Sheldon, half a mark; and thirty-two others named are fined from 40d. to half a mark each. Three charcoal burners are also fined 40d. for causing waste in the same wood.

The King conceded to Thedise de Camilla, the Dean of Wolvrehampton, license to sell in his (the Dean's) woods of Brestwode and Peshale the dead wood of oaks, and of dry oaks not bearing leaves, to the amount of £20; and the bailiffs of the said Thedise had caused to be cut down some of the best and handsomest oaks in the same woods, so that they are nearly devastated. The said waste was made without the knowledge of the said Thedise. He is therefore quit of his misericordiâ, but the wood is to be taken into the King's hands.

The wood of William de Morteyng which is called Walesale, was devastated during the war by Ralph Basset in one part, and again by the said William in another part, so that scarcely any of it now remains; William is in misericordiâ, and the wood is to be taken into the King's hands. Ralph Basset is dead.

Henry de Wyverston's portion of the wood of Coven is newly wasted by the said Henry. He is therefore in misericordiâ, and it is to be taken into the King's hands.

The wood of Great Sardon is newly wasted by James de Audedelegh, who formerly held it; Emma de Bromfelt now holds it, and she committed no waste. The wood to be taken, etc.

From Alice de Russale, for old waste of her wood at Russale, half a mark.

From Felicia de Barre and Nicholas de Alrewych, for old waste in the wood of Hatheredhurst, half a mark.

From Robert de Grendon, for the same in his wood of Schenestan, half a mark.

From Thedise de Camilla, for the same in the wood of Wodnesfeld, half a mark.

From Robert de Esington and Robert de Wyston, for old waste in their wood of Esington, half a mark.

From Walter de Elmedon, for old waste in his wood of Hontindon, half a mark.

From John de la Wade, for the same in his wood in Hulton, half a mark.

From Roger de Clyfford, for the same in his wood of Bolenhull, half a mark.

From William de Derlaston, for the same in his wood of Derlaston, half a mark.

From William de Bentle, for old waste in his wood of Bentle, half a mark.

From John de Heronvile, for old waste in his wood of Wodnesbyri, half a mark.

From Ralph de Byscopburi, for old waste in his wood of Byscopburi, half a mark.

From Richard de Marnham and Roger de Someri, for old waste in their wood of Oxle, half a mark.

The following foresters, who had found pledges to faithfully serve the King, and had been convicted for permitting many assarts and purprestures, and many trespasses of vert both in the demesne woods of the King as well as in others within their bailiwicks, are, together with their sureties, in misericordiâ.

The foresters are named Henry Botte, Richard de Bentle, Nicholas de Hulton, Hugh, de Hoggele, Godfrid de Elmelrurst, William de Drakenhege, Walter Venator, and William Cardun. Their sureties are fined from 40d. to half a mark each.

M. 12.

Fines for default (probably of appearance).

From Robert de Muleford, 1 mark.
" Robert de la Ware in Tetenhale, 20s.
" Robert Buffere in Penne, half a mark.
" Elyas de Tetenhale the Canon, 20s.
" John de Burgo (no sum named).

The following vills were amerced in sums from 40d. to a mark for not appearing in full, viz.:—

Overton, Wamburne, Evenefeld, Luttelegh, Netherpenne, Hulmelegh, Tresel, Kenefare, Dunclent, Hethey, Churchull, Wolvardlegh, Wolaston, Morf, Bobynton, Pebmor, Horselegh, Olde-Swyneford, Eton, Kenewaston, Pylatenhale, Huntyndon, Hopewas, Bolenhill, Alrewas, Bromlegh, Penkrich, Rodbaston, Wolgarston, Hatherdon, Russale, Schelfhul, Pelesale, Blocheswic, Esingeton, Wodnesfeld, Stonhale, Alrewic (pro eodem videlicet pro parte existente in forestâ, xl. d.), Covene, Pendeford, Schareshul, Hulton.

Agisiment of Kanok.

Nicholas de Alrewyz and William de Strethay agistors.

For the year 47 H. III., 37s. 2¼d.
Do. 48 H. III., £8 15s. 7¼d.
Do. 49 H. III., nothing through defect of mast (pessonis).

For the year 50 H. III., 46s.
Do. 51 H. III., nothing through defect of mast.
Do. 52 H. III., £8 9s. 10d.
Do. 53 H. III., nothing through defect of mast.
Do. 54 H. III., nothing through defect of mast.
Do. 55 H. III., 23s.

The same Nicholas and William answer for the escapium (fn. 5) of the Hayes of Alrewas, Hopewas, Gaule, Chistling, and Teddesleye, viz., for 47 H. III., 2s. 8d.

For the year 48 H. III., nothing from any of the Hayes.
Do. 49 H. III., 3s. 10d. from the above Hayes.
Do. 50 H. III., 3s. 9d., 51 H. III., 3s. 2½d., 52 H. III., 3s. 6¼d.
Do. 53 H. III., 3s. 3¼d., 54 H. III., 3s. 10d., 55 H. III., 2s. 4d.

M. 12 dorso.

William de Bentley, in the same way, answers for the escapium of Bentley Haye for the same years.

Thomas de Weseham, the Seneschall of the forest, pays for the cableicium (fn. 6) of the years 42 H. III. and 43 H. III., 10s. each year, and Walter de Elmedon for the year 52 H. III., from the Haye of Teddesleye, 5s.

Agistment of Kenefar.

Henry de Morf, the agistor, answers for the pannage of Kenefar. For the year 47 H. III., nothing through defect of mast.

For the year 48 H. III., £6 19s. 7d.
Do. 49 H. III., nothing through defect of mast.
Do. 50 H. III., nothing through defect of mast.
Do. 51 H. III., £4 0s. 4d.
Do. 52 H. III., nothing (mast failed).
Do. 53 H. III., nothing (mast failed).
Do. 54 H. III., 45s.
Do. 55 H. III., nothing (mast failed).

The same Henry answered for the escapium of Kenefar and Chacepel for the same year, sums varying from 5s. 2d. to 10s.

And for cableicium sold in the same forest, viz.:—

For 48 H. III.32s.5d.
50 H. III.6s.8d.
52 H. III.£76s.8d.

M. 13.

Johannes Dei gratiâ Rex Angliæ, etc., Archiepiscopis, Episcopis, etc., salutem. Sciatis nos omnino deafforestasse Novam Forestam in Comitatu Stafford de omnibus quæ ad forestam et forestarios pertinent, exceptâ hayâ nostrâ de Clyf juxta novum castrum subtus Limam, etc.

Henricus Dei gratiâ Rex Angliæ, etc., Archiepiscopis, etc., salutem. Sciatis nos concessisse, etc., dilecto et familiari nostro Hugoni Coventrensi Episcopo et successoribus suis ut omnia maneria sua, et omnes terræ suæ, et omnes homines sui, et omnia maneria, etc., et feoda Ecclesiæ suæ de Coventriæ et de Lichefeld, et de Cestriæ, et de Salopscira, et de Gnoweshale, in perpetuum libera sint et quieta de murdro et latrocinio, schiris et hundredis, et sectis schirarum et Hundredorum, de auxiliis vicecomitis, de forestâ et placitis forestæ, de vastis, et assartis et regardo forestæ et omnibus operibus tam castelli quam vivariorum, etc.

Charter by Henry III. to the Prior and Monks of the Church of St. Mary of Worcester, in which the body of his father King John is buried, that they may have the privilege within the metes of the forests of Feckenham and Kenefare of guarding their own woods, so that no forester or verderer shall enter the said woods except in pursuit of the King's venison, etc.

Henricus Dei gratiâ, etc. Rogero de Clifford, juniori, Justiciario forestæ nostro citra Trentam, salutem. Mandamus vobis quod Leoninus filius Leonini, boscum suum de Horwode qui est in forestâ nostrâ de Kenefare, permittatis juxta tenorem cartæ nostræ quam nuper ei inde fieri fecimus. Teste me ipso apud Westm. xxvi. die Januarii anno R. nostro lv.

Henricus Dei gratiâ Rex Angliæ, etc. Sciatis quod concessimus pro nobis et heredibus nostris, dilecto et fideli nostro Willielmo de Morteyn, quod toto tempore vitæ suæ habeat hanc libertatem videlicet, quod cum canibus suis propriis fugare possit vulpem et catum per omnes forestas nostras in comitatu Stafford quandocunque voluerit excepto mense vetito, etc. (Dated 21 January, 47 H. III.)

Johannes Dei gratiâ Rex Angliæ, etc. Sciatis nos dedisse concessisse, etc., dilecto nostro Rogero de Somervile ad feodifirmam totum manerium nostrum de Alrewas, etc. Tenendum de nobis, etc., per antiquam firmam et per crementum centum solidorum per annum, etc., et preterea per servitium quartæ partis feodi unius militis pro omni servitio et demandâ, etc., cum sac et soc, et toll, et theam, et infangenethef in omnibus locis, etc., ad predictum manerium pertinentibus, etc. (Date not given.)

Footnotes

1 This part in italics is in different coloured ink, and is evidently a postscriptum. The usual course in the case of those defendants who had appeared on the first day seems to have been to commit them to prison for the period the Iter lasted, and on the last day to release them for a fine, for which they found sureties.
2 French "chetif."
3 This defendant had not been previously mentioned by name.
4 A mistake for Ebroicis.
5 Escapium was, I think, the fines paid for cattle trespassing within the forest.
6 The Cabliscium or Cableicium was wood prostrated by tempest.