Staffordshire Forest Pleas
14 Edward I

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Major-General Hon. G. Wrottesley (editor)

Year published

1884

Pages

157-175

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'Staffordshire Forest Pleas: 14 Edward I', Staffordshire Historical Collections, vol. 5 part 1 (1884), pp. 157-175. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=52375 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Pleas of the Forests of Canok and Kenefare in Co. Stafford, On the Octaves of Hillary, 14 E. I., Before Roger L'estrange, Peter de Lenche, and John Fitz Nigel, Justices Assigned to Hear and Determine the Same.

These appeared on the first day (here follow the names of 44 persons against whom presentments had been made, amongst them are):—
William de la More.
William de Wrotesmere (Wrottesley).
Hugh de Tymmor.
William de Alrewych (Aldridge).
John Giffard of Chylinton.
Richard Bagod of Scheneston.
Geoffrey le Wasteneys.
Robert Boffery.
William de Overton.
Robert de Bentley.
Thomas de Bentley and John de Bentley.
William de Weston.
Thomas Hillary.
John, son of John de Somerville.
William de Wytinton.
Richard le Boteler de Senkeworth.
William Heryng of Otherton.
William le Fowler of Penne.

Fifty-one others are essoniati de morte; amongst them:—
John de Somerville.
Michael de Burgo.
Thomas de Pyrye.
Andrew Salveyn.
Henry Trumwyne.
William Inge of Wyrleye.
Robert son of Walter de Pylatonhale.
Richard de Stratton (Stretton).

M. 1 dorso.

Charter of King Henry III., in favour of the Priory of Worcester (already given in the Forest Pleas of 55 H. III.).

Charter of King Edward I., permitting the Prior of Worcester to assart 100 acres of wood and heath at Sheteresford, within the metes of the Forest of Kenefare (no date).

Charter of King Edward I., permitting the Prior of Dudley to assart a heath contiguous to his manor of Wodeford (Woodford near Womburne), which is within the metes of the Forest of Kynefare (no date).

Charter of King Henry III., permitting Leon de Romeslegh to assart his wood of Horwode, within the metes of the forest of Kynefare, and to reduce it to cultivation at the instance of his faithful and beloved Hamon l'Estrange (no date).

Charter of King Edward I., permitting Leon, son of Leon, to assart 20 acres of his waste which lies within the forest of Kynefare (no date).

Charter of King Henry III., stating that at the instance of his beloved father William, the Archbishop of York and Primate of England, he had conceded to Magister John Giffard of Chilynton, that during his lifetime he should not be put on assizes, juries, nor any other recognitions, nor should be made a sheriff, coroner, eschaetor, forester, verderer, agistor, reguardor, or any other bailiff against his will (no date).

Charter of King Henry III., granting to Hugh de Beaumeys for his life the privilege of chasing hares, foxes, badger (tesson), and cats in all his forests in cos. Salop and Stafford, except in the fence month (no date).

m. 2.

Pleas of Venison of the Forest of Kenefare.

It was presented, etc., by John fitz Philip, the chief forester in fee of the forest of Kynefare, and Henry de Prestewode, forester in fee of the bailiwick of Aswode (Ashwood), and by Henry de Morf, John de Tresel, Henry de Haggeleye, and William de Evenefeld, verderers of the same forest, that John called the Hunstman (Venator), of Thasseley in co. Salop, was passing through the wood of Chekhull on the Saturday after the Feast of St. Mathew the Apostle, 56 H. III., with a bow and arrows, and shot (bersavit) a doe, which fell dead in the Haye of Shaspel; and he departed and left the venison; and he did not appear and was not attached. The Sheriff is therefore ordered to arrest him. He afterwards appeared, and was fined half a mark, for which Thomas Corbet of Tassele and Maddok de Kyrkote are sureties.

It was presented, etc., by the same that Ralph le Wasteneys of Tykeshale, and Philip de Barynton, the lord of Cratton (Creighton), came with greyhounds and bows and arrows, into the forest on the Sunday after St. Hillary, 56 H. III., and took a hind and a feccon of a hind, and carried the venison to the house of Adam de Shetewyde (Chetwynd), who is now dead. And they did not appear, and were not attached. The Sheriff is ordered to arrest the said Ralph; and as the said Philip is in Ireland, the Sheriff is ordered to take his lands and tenements into the King's hands. The said Ralph is committed to prison, and afterwards fined 40s., for which Thomas Corbet and John de Wauton are sureties. Philip de Barynton was afterwards fined 40s., for which Robert de Stapelton, Knight, and Robert de Stafford, Knight, are sureties.

It was presented, etc., by the same that William de Wrottesleye came into the forest on the day of St. Alphege, 56 H. III., and with greyhounds chased game (ferias) out of the forest, and took the venison and carried it to his house at Wrottesleye without warrant. And William appeared and prayed that a verdict might be given by the reguardors of the forest, as well as by the foresters and verderers, and he gave 20s. for the above inquisition, for which Thomas de Creye, of Cumpton, and Robert Boffary of Penne, were sureties. The foresters, verderers, and reguardors say that the said William is guilty. He is therefore committed to prison, and was fined 20s., for which Walter de Bissheburi and Thomas de Engleton are sureties.

It was presented, etc., that Ralph Orville of Wolverenehamton came with others who are now dead to the wood of Putteleye, and took a doe at one time, and another time a roebuck (capriolum) about the Feast of the Epiphany, 56 H. III., and carried the venison to the house of Nicholas Orville, who is dead. Ralph appeared, and was committed to prison, and afterwards fined a mark, for which Warine de Penne and Richard Gerveyse of Wolvernehampton are sureties.

It was presented, etc., that William de Wrottesleye, Hugh his brother, Nicholas de la Lude, and Thomas his brother, and William, son of Alice de Penne, came into the forest, viz., into the wood of Puttesleye, on the Friday before the Feast of St. James, 56 H. III., with bows and arrows, and shot (bersaverunt) and killed a stag, and carried the venison to the house of Alditha de la Lude, who is dead; and they then divided the venison amongst them; and the said William de Wrottesleye, Nicholas, and Thomas appeared and were committed to prison; and William de Wrottesleye was bail to produce his brother Hugh before the Justices on the Sunday after St. Gregory; and the said William son of Alice did not appear, and was not attached, and could not be found. He is therefore to be exigatur; and because the vills of Overton, and Penne and Wombourn did not fully appear, they are in misericordiâ; and the said Hugh afterwards appeared, and was committed to prison; and William, son of Alice, also appeared, and is pardoned, owing to his great poverty. Nicholas was fined 20s., for which William de Penne, of Lutteley, and Richard de Seysedon are his sureties; and Thomas was fined 10s., for which Nicholas de la Lude and William de la Penne of Lutteley are sureties; and the said Hugh was fined a mark, for which Ralph de Bisheburi and William de Wrottesleye are sureties.

M. 2 dorso.

It was presented, etc., that Roger de Mortimer, who is dead, and Roger his son, and others of his household, came into the forest on the day of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, and with greyhounds took two stags without warrant. The Sheriff is ordered to arrest the said Roger. He was afterwards pardoned by the King by his verbal command (ex precepto suo ore tenus).

It was presented, etc., that William de Wytyndon, at that time verderer, on the day of St. Nicholas, 1 E. I., Robert Boffary, William de Overton, with others who are dead, entered the forest with bows and arrows, and killed a doe, and carried away the venison and divided it; and that on the Tuesday after Palm Sunday, 1 E. I., the said William and Robert Boffary, with Thomas, son of William Bleyk of Overton, entered the Haye of Aswode with bows and arrows for the purpose of taking venison, and were there all day; and towards evening in leaving the forest they were challenged by the foresters, who wished to attach them; and they insulted the foresters, and at length through the darkness of the night they escaped. The said William and Robert appeared, and being convicted were committed to prison, and the Sheriff was ordered to arrest the said Thomas. Thomas afterwards appeared, and was committed to prison; and Robert was fined 40s., for which William de Alrewych and Warine de Penne are sureties; and William de Overton was fined 5 marks, for which Ralph de Bysseburi and William de Wrotesley are sureties; and the said Thomas was fined a mark, for which John de Tresel and Warine de Penne are sureties.

It was presented, etc., that Walter le Tayllur, who was with the Lady Anabel de Segrave, and now resides at Bretteby in co. Derby, and a certain William, the groom (garcio) of the said Walter, shot at a stag in the field (campo) of Haleton, without the bounds of the forest, on the Wednesday before St. Laurence, 3 E. I., and the stag fled to the haye of Ashwode, and there fell dead; and they afterwards came on the following night and carried away the venison to the house of the said Anabel, who is now dead. The Sheriff was ordered to arrest the said Walter and William, and as they could not be found they are to be exigantur.

It was presented that William de Wytynton had retained a greyhound which was found in the forest against the Assize. His sureties are Thomas de Lutteleye and Richard le Marescal of Lutteley.

M. 3 dorso.

It was presented that on the Monday in the week of Pentecost, 10 E. I., Roger de Somery whilst hunting in his chase of Baggerugge, which is within the forest of Canok, put up a stag with his dogs, which fled towards the forest of Kenefare, and Thomas, son of Walter of Womburne, came up with bows and arrows, and shot the stag in front of the dogs, and it fell dead within the forest half a quarentene; and the said Thomas and one Hugh de Sapy, of the household (familiaris) of the said Roger, who is now dead, followed the stag and drew it out of the forest into the aforesaid chase, and carried the venison to Roger's house at Swyneford, Roger being then at Segesleye, and the said Hugh knowingly (scienter) received the venison there. Roger appeared, and in consequence of the said reception of the venison is attorned to appear before the King at the next Parliament. A postscript adds: "And because the said Roger did not satisfy the King respecting the aforesaid trespass, his fine is fixed at 200 marks, if it should so please the King (si placeat Domino Regi).

It was presented that Geoffrey Burel, of Kynelet, in co. Salop, at the time he was with the Prior of Dudley, and a monk, knowingly received malefactors of venison at the Grange of Wodeford, and that on the Saturday, the day of St. Nicholas, 1 Edward I., a hind was taken in the forest by certain strangers, whose names are not known, and was carted to the said grange during the night, and the venison was received there with his assent. The Sheriff is ordered to produce him and the present Prior of Dudley before the Justices. And it was testified by the verderers, foresters, and other jurors that this Prior was the third Prior from the one who was there at that time, and that he is not guilty of any reception of malefactors of the forest, nor did the Prior who is now dead know anything of the trespass of the said Geoffrey. Geoffrey was fined 10s., for which William Bustard and Thomas Burel are his sureties.

It was presented that on the third day after the Feast of St. Giles, 5 E. I., the Lord William de Valence, Richard de Vylers, and Geoffrey Acelyn (who is dead), his Knights, and John de Valence and William de Valence, sons of the aforesaid William, and Gerodyn Maryz and other strangers from parts beyond the seas, whose names are unknown, entered the forest; and the said William killed a buck with bow and arrow in the Haye of Assewode, and John de Valence his son killed a hind, and they carried away the venison where they pleased (quo volebant). "Coram Rege" written in the margin.

M. 4.

Pleas of Venison of Cannock.

It was presented and convicted by William Champyun, the attorney of Thomas de Weseham, who was Seneschall of the Forest of Canok, and admitted in his place in consequence of the debility of the said Thomas, and by Robert de Benetleye, the custos of the heir of William de Benetleye, the forester in fee, who is under age, and by Walter de Elmedon, forester in fee of the Haye of Teddesleye, William Tromwyne, forester in fee of the Haye of Chystlyn, and by John de Heronwyle, William le Champyun, Robert de Freford, and William de Tomonhorn, who are now verderers, and by John de Engleton, who was formerly verderer, and who answers for his own period, and by Philip de Montgomery, who is now Seneschall of Canok:—

That Ralph de Lymeseye, on the Friday after the Assumption of the Virgin, 56 H. III., came into the Haye of Alrewas and took a buck with his greyhounds, and carried the venison to his manor of Solyhull, in co. Warwick; and Ralph did not appear, and the Sheriff is ordered to produce him at Lichfield on the morrow of the Assumption. It was afterwards shown that Ralph had likewise set his greyhounds on a hind in the Haye of Hoppewas on the Thursday after the Feast of the Assumption, 56 H. III., but it was not known whether the hind was captured. Ralph was committed to prison, and afterwards fined 40s., for which Roger Morteyn and William de la More are his sureties.

That Philip de Marmyun, William de Hondesacre (who is now dead), John the Huntsman of Philip, and others of his household, came into the bailiwick of Alrewas on the Wednesday before the Feast of St. Peter ad Vincula, 56 H. III., and with greyhounds took a young buck (sourum damy), and carried the venison to Philip's house at Thomeworth; and it was further presented that John de Vylers, who was then the Squire of Philip, and is now a Knight, and holds land in co. Nottingham, and William the cook of Philip, took a doe in the Marsh of Esyngton in the week before the Nativity of our Lord, 1 E. I., and carried the venison to Tarn worth. The Sheriff of Nottinghamshire is commanded to produce the said John de Vylers on the morrow of the Annunciation. John subsequently appeared, and was committed to prison, and afterwards fined 10s. William the Cook could not be found and is ordered to be put into the exigend. Philip to answer for the trespass before the King at the next Parliament, and if the King is not satisfied, his fine is fixed at £200.

That in the week after the Assumption of the Blessed Mary, 56 H. III., Henry de Pakynton, William de Molveton, Andrew Salveyn, who is now dead, and Henry his brother, hunted a stag within the Liberty of the Bishop of Chester, which he claims, viz., in the wood of Pakynton, and followed it through the forest, viz., through the Haye of Hopwas, as far as the water called La Burne, which is the boundary between the Chace of Sotton (Sutton Coldfield) and the said Liberty, and there it was captured; and the venison was carried to the house of the said Henry de Pakynton. Henry had been attached by Adam Prymme of Pakynton, Adam de Wyrleye of the same, William son of Geoffrey of the same, Thomas son of John of the same, Robert son of Henry de Swynefen, and Adam le Roper of Swynfen, who are in misericordiâ for not producing him on the first day, etc. Henry did not appear, and could not be found; he is therefore to be exigator. And Hugh de Tymmor and Philip de Montgomery were sureties for the appearance of William de Mulveton at Lichfield. And the said Henry is ill and infirm, and he is therefore pardoned for the soul of the King. William de Molveton afterwards appeared, and was committed to prison, and fined 20s., for which Robert de Stafford and Thomas Corbet are his sureties. John le Venur afterwards came and yielded himself a prisoner, and he is pardoned because of his poverty and for the soul of the King.

That John le Twynkler and John de Orreby, who were foresters in the Haye of Alrewas, Robert le Gros, of Alrewas, Henry the Clerk of the same, Alverd de Solvy, a Knight of co. Derby, Thomas the Squire of the said Alverd, Robert son of John de Somervyle (Bastardus),with others who are dead, took a buck in the bailiwick of Alrewas on the Wednesday before the Feast of the Annunciation, 56 H. III., and carried the venison to the house of John de Somervyle, who is now dead. Robert le Gros and Henry the Clerk appeared, and were committed to prison; John le Twynkler could not be found, and is to be exigatur, and John son of John de Somervyle was surety for the appearance of John de Orreby at Easter. The Sheriff of Nottinghamshire is ordered to produce Alfred and his Squire Thomas at Lichfield; and the said Robert son of John de Somervyle could not be found. He is therefore to be exigatur. Alverd afterwards appeared, and was committed to prison. Thomas his Squire could not be found, and is to be exigatur. It was afterwards presented and convicted that Robert de Mulveton was with them at the time the buck was killed. John de Orreby appeared, and was committed to prison. Robert de Mulveton appeared and was committed to prison, and afterwards released for a fine of 20s., for which William de Wytynton, Hugh de Tymmor, Thomas de Hulton, and Henry the Clerk of Alrewas are his sureties. John de Orreby and the others were lined 20s. each.

M. 4 dorso.

It was presented, etc., that on the Thursday before Easter, 4 E. I., a certain buck was driven from the park of Brewode and followed by a greyhound, which caught it in the fields of Coven, within the forest; and one Hugh de Pendeford came up, who is now dead, and took the greyhound away and retained it without warrant. And John de Pendeford, who was at that time a verderer of the forest, came up and caused the buck to be skinned and carried to his house at Pendeford, and shortly afterwards he sold all his land and other goods he had within the county, and went beyond sea and has never returned; (fn. 1) and as the said John was elected verderer by the Knights and others of the County Stafford, in full County, to faithfully serve the King in his office of verderer, ideo inde de eis loquendum. And the Knights and the Seneschall came before the Justices and asked for a day to be given to them to take advice and to answer for the same; and a day is given to them at Lichfield on the Thursday after the Feast of the Annunciation.

Richard Bagod, of Scheneston, Hulle of Ogglelye, Elyas, who was a servant and reaper (messor) of Richard de Grendon at Scheneston, Symon son of Richard de Tykebrom, and John de Morton, of co. Warwick, took a buck in the bailiwick of Oggeleye on the Sunday before Michaelmas Day, 4 E. I., and carried the venison to the house of Richard Bagod at Scheneston. Richard and Symon appeared and were committed to prison, and afterwards fined 20s. Elyas and John de Morton could not be found, and are to be exigantur.

William de la More, of Pencrych, Thomas his servant (serviens), Robert Byseche, of the household of William, and who is now dead, and Richard Spark, of Wolgareston, took a buck with greyhounds on the Friday before the Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Mary, 5 E. I., and carried the venison to the house of the said William at la More, where it was eaten (commesta). William appeared, and was fined 40s.; Thomas, Robert, and Richard could not be found, and are to be exigantur.

It was afterwards presented and convicted by the verderers, etc., that on the Friday before the Feast of St. Barnabas, two mastiffs of the said William de la More put up (moverunt) a doe, and chased it in the forest as far as the ditch of the said William. And William de Halnton, John son of Thomas Bagod, of Doneston, servants (servientes) and of the household (manupasti) of the said William, and Henry in la Sharper of Pencrych, killed the doe. And the said William de la More, by means of William Heryng his groom (garcio), Alan de Eton, his shepherd, and Adam le Whelp, conveyed away the venison from his manor house (curia), as far as the more outside the curia, so that it might not be found within his curia; and the doe was skinned on the following day, and the venison carried to the house of the said William, where it was eaten (the rest is illegible).

* * * * * * * *

M. 5.

It was presented, etc., that on the morrow of St. Hillary, 2 E. I., John Giffard of Brumesfeld came with several of his household (familia), whose names cannot be ascertained, into the said forest, and set his greyhounds at the King's game (feras), and took a doe without warrant, and carried it to Lichefeld, where the said John stopped that night. The Sheriff was ordered to produce him, but afterwards the case was respited till the Parliament after Easter, to be heard before the King.

It was presented that when the huntsmen of the King were hunting in the bailiwick of Gaueleye, 4 E. I., they put up a stag with their dogs and followed it as far as the park of Brewode into a wood there, and John de la Wytemore came up with a bow and arrow and shot at it, and it fled out of the forest as far as the fish pond of the nuns of Brewode, and the said John followed it and dragged it out dead from the said fish pond (virarium); and John Giffard of Chyllynton came up and stated he had pursued the stag and claimed the whole of it; and they skinned it, and the said John took half of it and carried it to his house, and the nuns of Brewode had the other half. As they are poor, they are pardoned for the good of the King's soul; and although the said stag was taken outside the forest, yet it was the chase (chacia) of the King, and put up by his dogs within the forest, and taken in front of them against the assize. The Sheriff is ordered therefore to arrest the said John and John, who being convicted of the above were committed to prison. John de la Wytemore was fined 1 mark, and John de Chilinton (sic) 20s.

* * * * * * * *

M. 5 dorso.

It was presented that the Foresters of the Have of Bentley, on the Vigil of the Nativity of the Blessed Mary, found a mastiff which was not expedidated upon a beast which they killed, and he was a dog from the vill of Wyrle, where the dogs are not expeditated in consequence of the liberty claimed by the Bishop of Chester; and William de la More who now holds the manor of Wyrle being asked of whom he held it, stated he held it of the King, with the exception of a virgate of land which was held of the Bishop.

And the foresters, verderers and other ministers of the King stated that the Bishop claimed the franchise in question, but they did not know by what warrant, and that it was greatly to the detriment of the King's forest, because the King's deer were so much pursued and disturbed by the mastiffs of the said vill that they had no peace.

A day is given to the Bishop to prove his warrant for this as well as other franchises.

* * * * * * * *

M 6.

It was presented by John de Clynton, then Seneschall of the Forest of Cannock, and by the verderers, that a certain buck was killed by wolves in the forest in 9 E. I., and it was fat; the foresters had it skinned, after it had been viewed by the verderers, and it was salted and handed over to the keeping of Robert de la Putte, and the horns were given to John de Engleton to answer for the same; and as he did not produce them before the Justices, he is in misericordiâ. And William Trumwyn afterwards took the venison, and consumed it in his own house, and now before the Justices—contradicting their own presentment—they stated that he did not consume the venison in his house, but gave it to the Lepers of Freford. The said William is therefore "quietus," and John de Clynton and the other verderers who made the presentment are in misericordiâ, viz., John de Heraunvyle, William le Chaumpion, Richard de Freford, and William de Thomenhorn.

Reginald de Ateberg of Wissawe, Joshua de Sotton, John Halard, and Henry Makeley, and John Russel of the same, are in misericordiâ because they did not appear to answer for eight dogs for which they were sureties, and which were taken in the forest following a deer from the Chace of Sotton (Sutton Coldfield).

It was presented, etc., that Ralph de Bischebury at the time he was Riding Forester (Forestarius equitans) under John de Clynton in the Forest of Canok, and Henry son of Robert de Bokyngham, his groom (garcio), were malefactors of the King's venison; and that on the morrow of St. Margaret, 11. E. I., they set two greyhounds at a buck in the Haye of Gaueleye, but did not capture it; and that they were in the same Haye on the Tuesday before the Annunciation, 12 E. I., with others whose names are not known, with bows and arrows, for the purpose of taking the King's venison; and that a certain shepherd of Great Sard on saw them; and the said Ralph shot a barbed arrow which wounded him in the arm. And Ralph appeared, and was committed to prison. Henry could not be found, and is to be (exigatur).

* * * * * * * *

M. 6 dorso.

The King by his letters assigned Thomas de Bray and Peter de Lench, 13 E. I., to enquire into the state of the Forest of Cannock at the time Philip de Montgomery became Seneschall, by the oath of the foresters, verderers, and other ministers of the forest; and the King had handed the Inquisition to Roger I'Estrange the Justice of the Forests citra Trent to act upon it according to right and the assize of the forest; and it was certified that Magister Adam de Botyndon, who held the custody of the heir and Bailiwick of William de Bentleye, had been guilty of divers forest trespasses; and the said Adam knowing he was accused of the same, had asked that the truth of the matter might be enquired into by the Justiciaries of the Forest at Stafford, stating that none of the officers of the forest nor any of the county accused him except Philip de Montgomery the Seneschall, William Trumwyn, Walter de Elmedon, foresters in fee, and William Champyun the verderer. And the verderors, reguardors, agisters, and other honest and legal men of the said forest, with whom were associated all the officers of the forest of Kynefare, being examined respecting the transgressions in question, state upon oath that Magister Adam de Botyndon, 9 E. I., on a day which could not be recollected, took a buck in the Haye of Benetleye, and conveyed it in a cart concealed with timber from the house of Robert de Benetleye to his house in Botyndon; and that the said Adam was at that time custos of the Bailiwick of the Haye of Benetleye by reason of his wardship of the heir of William de Benetleye, by the King's commission.

And the same Adam, 11 E. I., took with greyhounds a buck between the Haye of Benetle and Prestwode, and carried it by night in a sack to his house in Pencrych; and the said Adam took a buck in the wood of Essingdon near the red ditch, 12 E. I., and carried it away. And that Roger Walkelyn, Clericus, who was with Magister Adam de Botyndon, is a customary malefactor of venison in the King's forest with bows and arrows and greyhounds, and had taken a doe at Stanburneford in the wood of Bromleye, which was received at the house of Nicholas de Bedenhale.

And that the said Adam and his men at the time they were living at the house of Robert de Benetleye, for a fortnight before the feast of the Assumption, 12 E. I., took the King's venison in the Haye of Benetleye with two black greyhounds and one red, but how much they took cannot be stated for certain.

And the said Magister Adam being convicted of the above was committed to prison.

It was presented that Hugh de Tymmor was the receiver of Robert de Melveton, William his brother, and of many other malefactors of venison, and consenting to their malpractices in 1 E. I.; and Hugh being convicted of the same was committed to prison.

William son of the Parson of Alrewas killed a doe in the Bailiwick of Alrewas, 1 E. I., and carried it to the house uf John de Somervyle, who is now dead. He did not appear, and Robert de Bane was his surety to produce him before the Justices at Lichfield at their first coming after Easter.

It was presented that Thomas Corbet with others who are now dead entered the Bailiwick of Alrewas 1 E. I., on a day which could not be recollected, and took a fecon of a buck, and carried the venison to his house at Bromleye. It was afterwards shown that the said Thomas had a precept from Roger de Clyfford, junior, then Justice of the Forest, to take a doe in the said Bailiwick, and his greyhounds had taken the fecon against his will, and that the said Thomas had sent the venison to Roger de Clyfford. He is therefore "quietus."

It was presented that Robert de Benetleye at the time he held the custody of the Bailiwick of Benetleye, and Thomas and John his brothers, had hunted and taken a buck in the garden of the said Robert, 1 E. I., and the same Robert, Thomas, and John and two of their grooms had taken four bucks in the Bailiwick of Benetleye immediately after the Feast of St. John, 11. E I., of which Robert gave one to Margaret la Russe, and half of another was given to the mother of the said Robert, and the other half to the widow of William de Benetleye, the brother of the said Robert, and the other two he sent to his house at Radenovere for a feast he had at his coming into his church there. They were convicted of the same, and committed to prison.

From Geoffrey le Wasteneys, Parson of the Church of Tykeshale, 40s. for his transgression. His sureties are Sir William de Estatford, Sir Thomas de Ferrers, Sir Harry de Cresswell, Henry de Cokton, and Robert le Marescal.

It was presented that Ralph le Wasteneys, Nicholas de Huggeford, Parson of Stocton, and William son of William Chanselytor, had hunted and taken a buck and a fecon of a buck in the Haye of Teddesleye on the Wednesday after the Feast of St. Peter and St. Paul, 1 E. I., and had carried the venison to the house of Thomas de Halton, who is now dead; and that they are customary malefactors of venison. Ralph appeared, and was committed to prison. Robert Body was surety for the appearance of Nicholas before the Justices at Lichfield, and the Sheriff was ordered to arrest the said William.

It was presented that Nicholas, Baron of Stafford, took a stag and a fecon of a hind on the heath of Calnheth on the vigil of the Exaltation of the Cross, 13 E. I., and Roger de Peccham and others who are unknown carried the venison to the house of the said Nicholas at Stafford. A postscript adds the said Nicholas appeared before the Justices at Huntingdon, and was convicted of the same, and because the King is out of the kingdom, before whom he should redeem his fine, because he held by Barony, it was put at 200 marks, si placeat Domino Regi.

It was presented that Richard Murel of Norton during the time he was forester in the Haye of Gauley shot a doe, 1 E. I., and carried the venison to his house at Rodbaston, which he had constructed out of wood which he had taken in the said Haye. He was committed to prison, and his sureties are in misericordiû; and as the said Richard was forester under William Trumwyne, who was at that time Seneschall, William is to answer for the same. Richard was afterwards fined a mark.

It was presented that Sir Richard de Stretton keeps greyhounds, and is a customary malefactor of the King's venison in the Haye of Gauley, and that Roger de Boey the forester of the said Haye under Philip de Montgomery, consented to the malpractices of the said Richard. They both appeared, and were committed to prison. Richard de Stretton was fined 20s., for which William de Mora and Nicholas de Bedenhale are sureties. Roger was fined half a mark, for which Philip de Montgomeri and Walter de Elmedon are sureties.

M. 7.

Contains nothing worthy of note.

M. 8.

Metes and Bounds of the Forest of Cannok, and the Liberties claimed in the same.

It is presented by all the foresters in fee of the forest of Cannok and by the foresters of Kynefare, and by all the verderers and agistors of both forests, and by twelve jurymen, knights, and others who were joined with them, viz., John de Clinton, Robert de Knigtheleye, Thomas de Ferrars, William de Stafford, Richard de Loges, Knights, Nicholas de Overton, John Paynel, Richard de Barton, William de Penne, William de Tottenhale, William de Overton, and Robert Sewale:

That the ancient metes and bounds of the forest of Cannok begin at the bridge of Finchespathe, descending by the Thame river to Holebrok, and thence by the brook of Holebrook to the vill of Waleshale, and thence as far as le Bolestile, and thence to the water called La Bourne, and descending La Bourne to the high road near the Park of Drayton, and from that road near Watlingestrete as far as the Thame river, and thence descending the Thame river to the Trent, and thence ascending the Trent as far as the Sowe river, and from the Sowe river as far as the river called Pencriz, and ascending by that river as far as the bridge of Covene, near the Park of Brewode, and thence by the road to Pendeford, and from Pendeford ascending by the middle of the Fossemor near the sichetum, as far as Oxeford, and from Oxeford to Wolvernehampton, through the middle of the vill, and from that road by the high road as far as the bridge of Finchespathe.

Within these metes the Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield holds a part of the forest in the midst of the heart of the forest (in medio cordis forestæ), which is fifteen leagues (leucas) in circuit and more, within which he takes venison at his pleasure at all times of the year, to the great destruction of the forest; and there are within the same limits two foresters who formerly held of the King in capite by Sergeanty for the custody of his bailiwicks and woods; and one of the Bishops, Alexander by name, had appropriated them to himself, it is not known by what warrant, except that King Richard had given to Hugh de Nonante, then Bishop of Coventry, the manors of Ruggeley and Cannokeburi, who held them during his time, but did not appropriate to himself the wood nor venison, nor did any of his successors before the time of Bishop Alexander. And King John had resumed possession of the said manors, and they were held by him and by King Henry until the Bishop Alexander in 13 H. III. had obtained from the King a confirmation of the grants which King Richard had made of the manors to his predecessor Hugh de Nonante, and he obtained the King's writs directed to Henry de Audithelega, then Sheriff of Staffordshire, to put him in seisin of the manors; and he then appropriated to himself the covert of the forest of High Cannok (coopertum forestæ de alto Cannok), as pertaining to the aforesaid manors, and commenced to take the venison there; and at that time Hugh de Loges was Seneschall of the forest, and he and his men prevented the Bishop and his men from taking the venison as far as he could, and often attached them for a space of two years or more; and the Bishop excommunicated him for this cause, and by force and by his excommunication opposed the said Hugh, so that at length Hugh could no longer resist him. And there was at that time a forester named Richard de Puteo who held of the King in capite a virgate of land in Ruggeley for the custody of his bailiwick, as his ancestors had formerly held it; and for the ferm of his bailiwick he rendered yearly to Hugh de Loges the Seneschall half a mark, and the Bishop Alexander appropriated to himself the said service and bailiwick by force and by his excommunications.

And Robert Tromewyne held a virgate of land in the vill of Cannokbury of the King in capite, as his ancestors had held it before him, for the custody of his bailiwick, and the same Bishop had appropriated to himself the bailiwick by force and by his excommunications. Nevertheless the said Robert always held the said land of the King as William Tromewye now holds it, and renders a mark to the Seneschall of the forest; but the said Bishop retained in his own hands the said bailiwick and the Haye of Chistlyn, but King Henry afterwards recovered them by a suit at law; and the jury say that the said Richard de Puteo and Robert Tromwyne and their ancestors always presented attachments of vert and venison for their bailiwicks before the Seneschall and verderers in the Swanimote of Cannok, and they were there tried and enrolled until the time of the Bishop Alexander, who withdrew them; and sibi attraxit per vim, ut predictum est. At the time of mast (pesson) in the same bailiwicks, the King's agisters used to deal with the pannage, and levied it for the use of the King, so that neither the covert, nor the venison, nor the said bailiwicks belonged to those manors, until the Bishop Alexander had appropriated them as above stated.

They say also that the present Bishop Roger had made a park in his wood of Heywode and two "saltatoria" (deer leaps?), within the metes of the forest, to the great injury of the forest, it is not known by what warrant.

And the same Bishop has a saltatorium against the forest (versus forestam) in his park of Brewode, which adjoins the boundaries of the forest, to the injury of the said forest, it is not known by what warrant. The Sheriff is therefore commanded to summon the Bishop to appear to answer respecting the above; and because the Bishop is infirm and weak, he prayed to appear by attorney, which is conceded, and in presence of the Justices and by his letters patent he constituted Robert de Pype his attorney to win or lose, etc.

M. 8 dorso.

And the Bishop's attorney on being interrogated stated that the Bishop's predecessor had been enfeoffed by the predecessor of the King of the manors of Kannokbury and Ruggeley, with all appurtenances, in wood and plain, etc. That the present Bishop had not made any appropriations to himself, but he had received seisin of his Barony from the King, and found his Church in seisin of the woods, with power of taking venison, etc.; and he was not bound to answer except by King's writ nor without his Peers the Barons of England (sine brevi Domini Regis vel sine paribus suis Baronibus Angliæ). And a day was given to him on the morrow of the Ascension at Lichfield, in case he should have further to alledge. On which day the Bishops attorney appeared and stated nothing more; and a day was given to the Lord Bishop to appear before the King at the Parliament which would meet at a fortnight from Michaelmas. In which parliament nothing was done in the matter; and afterwards at the Iter which finished at the Feast of St. Katherine, the Bishop's attorney was asked if he wished to show anything else on the part of the Bishop, and he stated, nothing more than what had been stated previously. And because the Bishop would show no warrant for holding the woods and for taking the venison, except the appropriation of them by his predecessors, it is ordered that the said forest with the aforesaid woods of High Cannok, so far as concerns the vert and vension, should be taken into the King's hands, and the custody of them handed over to William de Tromewine and William de Puz, the foresters in fee; and the question of the soil of the said woods and the freedom from expeditation claimed for the vill of Wirley should be referred to be heard before the King in the next Parliament. (fn. 2)

Membranes 9,10, and 11 are the Pleas of Vert, and contain nothing worth noting.

M. 12.

The Regard of the Forest of Kenefare.

The reguardors of the forest of Kenefare, viz.: Henry de Extan, Thomas de Haleberwe, Richard Gerveyse, William de Caldewell, Richard de Adenesbrok, Philip de Pollemere, Thomas de Lutteleye, Waryne de Penne, Richard Adam, Thomas de Hetheye, Richard le Marshal, and Roger de la Brok, state that:—

Tatenhale. Andrew de Asseburne holds in Tettehale half an acre of old assart, of the fee of the Church of Tettenhale, which his predecessor who is dead had assarted without warrant, and on which he had built a house. But it was shown that the house was on the site of his manse in the vill of Tettenhale, and was no injury to the forest. Andrew is therefore "quietus."

Roger son of Richard de Bosco had at Kyngeleye appurtenant to Kenefare half an acre of old assart in the fee of the King; and it was sown, but not enclosed. He is to answer for the crops.

William Sweyn holds there likewise half an acre of old assart which is not enclosed.

Walter de Bosco holds at Womburne half an acre of old assart of the fee of William de Overton, etc.

In the same way presentments respecting old and new assarts are made against tenants in Bobynton, Morf, Womburn, Arley, Lutteleye, and Tettenhale.

M. 13.

Of new purprestures in the King's demesne they say that William son of Elyas de Tettenhale, Richard Burdun, Henry the Dean, Richard de Clare, Thomas de Arleye, Robert de Levedale, Robert de Viridi (Green), and William Brydun had newly occupied four acres at Tettenhale of the King's fee, and had enclosed it with a ditch and hedge. They are therefore in misericordiâ, and the fence is to be pulled down. It was afterwards stated by the foresters and verderers that the said land was within the fee of the Church of Tettenhale. And John fitz Philip and his foresters being impleaded because they permitted the said purpresture, stated that the Canons of Tettenhale averred that the land was of the fee of the Church of Tettenhale; and they threatened the foresters with excommunication if they interfered by attachment; and that Walter de Dunmowe the Canon had impleaded in Court Christian, William son of Alexander, the King's forester, and had caused him much annoyance (eum male vexavit), because he had attached Henry son of John of Tettenhale for a trespass of vert. The Dean of Tettenhale and his proctor are therefore commanded to cause the said Walter to appear before the Justices to answer for the same. And he never appeared; and another day was given to him to appear at Huntingdon at a fortnight from St. John the Baptist.

* * * * * * * *

M. 14.

The Regard of the Forest of Cannok.

The reguardors of Cannok presented by Thomas de Hamstede, William de Alrewyz, Thomas de Hulton, Roger de Cuinbreford, Hugh de Aston, William de Boweles, Adam de Otherton, Ralph de Coven, Thomas de Lynton, Robert at the Water (ad aquam), and William Hillary; and they are all in misericordiâ because they made no presentments of old or new purprestures. (They were fined 40d. each.)

Peter de Colecestre is fined half a mark because he did not come to make the regard, or to take the oath, after he had been elected a Reguardor by the Sheriff.

Ralph de Byshebury was Reguardor in the last Iter, and in the first reguard after it, but had withdrawn himself from the office afterwards, and now made no presentment for the time he held it.

Presentments for new and old assarts and purprestures are made against tenants in Hatherdon, Kings Bromley, Coven, Otherton, Wednesfield, Hilton, Bisshebury, Rushall, Bolenhill, (fn. 3) Pendeford, Nortkote, (fn. 4) Shenestone, Benetley, Derlaston, Wednesbury, Blockeswych, Mollesley, Pilatenhale, Huntingdon, Great Sardon, Essington, Rodbaston, Wylenhale, Fetherstone, Shareshill, and Aldridge.

M. 15 dorso.

Old Assarts of the Forest of Cannok (inter alia).

Wylenhale. Isabella, the widow of William de Benetleye, holds an acre of old assart. Jacet frusca.

Hulton. Adam son of Hugh de Mollesleg, for one acre, 3.s. 6d.

Thomas son of William the Forester held an acre (frisca), which is of the fee of Wednesbury.

Wodenesburi. Thomas son of Roger Hyllaryheld half an acre, which was frisca.

Sheneston. The vill of La Lynde held four acres, for which it pays 16s.

Geoffrey son of William de Shornes, for one acre, 2s. 6d.

William de la Lynde, for an acre in the fee of Seneston, 3s. 6d.

Robert Burnel, the Bishop of Bath, for four acres he held as custos, and which Robert de Grendon had assarted, 14s.

Adam son of Bartholomew had an acre, which was frisca.

Bolenhull. Ralph Basset holds at Bolenhull twenty-four acres of old assarts, which Isabella de Audedelega held for ten years, and who is dead, 108s., for which Robert Meynil of Astwode in co. Wygorn, and Eustace the Rector of the Church of Blore, executors of the said Isabella, are responsible. Ralph Basset now holds them, but they are not enclosed against the assize (of the forest).

Coven. From Robert Bagod, for a rood of old assart, 18d. From Ralph de Pendeford, Richard Bagod of Bremesford, and Margaret de Covene, for eight acres, 60s.

Mollesley. From Robert le Rous of Mollesley, for an acre of the Alnetum of Richard de Esington, nothing, because it is frisca.

From Thomas Corbet of Bromleg, for two acres in Mollesley, which William Hubert assarted, nothing, because it is frisca.

M. 16.

New Purprestures of the first Regard of the time of Thomas de Wescham.

Pilatenhale. Michael de Pilatenhale holds an acre of the fee of Walter de Elmedon, enclosed by a ditch and dead hedge, according to the assize (inclusam fossato et martuâ hayâ secundum assisam).

Robert son of William holds an acre as above.

Stephen de Elmedon holds an acre as above.

William son of Jordan, half an acre, enclosed as above.

Huntyndon. Robert de Sardon of Huutyndon holds two acres of the fee of Walter de Elmedon, enclosed with a ditch and dead hedge.

Adam de Huntyndon, one acre, enclosed with a ditch and dead hedge.

William son of Nicholas, half an acre, enclosed with a ditch and dead hedge.

Robert at the Moor, one acre, enclosed with a ditch and dead hedge.

Pendeford. Robert Russel of Pendeford holds an acre of the fee of John de Pendeford, enclosed as above.

William the Chaplain, of Blymenhull, ditto, enclosed as above.

Reginald de Pendeford, two acres, enclosed as above.

Great Sardon. Adam son of Adam of Great Sardon holds three acres, of the fee of Emma de Bromfeld, enclosed with a ditch and hedge against the assize. Enclosure to be thrown down.

Robert son of Richard, and Lovekyn the Provost, hold four acres enclosed in the same way. To be thrown down.

Robert Costy and Robert the smith hold two acres enclosed with a ditch and dead hedge.

Bissebury. William atte Brok holds two acres of the fee of Ralph de Bysshebury, enclosed with a ditch and live hedge. Fence to be prostrated.

John the Constable of Lucy de Oxley, and Robert son of the Provost, hold four acres enclosed in the same way. Fence to be prostrated.

William Aylwyn, an acre enclosed in the same way. To be prostrated.

Richard de Walenhull, Lucy de Oxley, and Robert son of the Provost of Oxley, hold four acres, enclosed in the same way. To be prostrated.

Adam the Clerk, of Oxley, holds one acre, enclosed in the same way. To be prostrated.

Robert Sireters, half an acre as above. To be prostrated.

Robert Legges, four acres as above. To be prostrated.

Esinton. Robert ad Portam (at the Gate) holds in Esynton, of the fee of Ralph (sic) de Esynton, two acres, enclosed with a ditch and dead hedge.

Margaret de Esynton holds a rood, which had been enclosed in the same way by Nicholas her husband.

Richard le Westerneys, a rood, which had been enclosed in the same way by Nicholas de Esynton.

The same Richard and Richard le Tayllur hold two acres, enclosed in the same way.

William de Holt and John of the Churchyard, two acres as above.

William de Penne, one acre as above.

Robert de Bokyngham and Clement de Werlascroft, two acres as above.

Hatherdon. Nicholas le Wodeward, Thomas de Billeston, Adam son of Nicholas, Henry de . . . ., Richard son of Robert de Hulton, hold in Hatherdon, of the fee of the Dean of Wolvrenehamton, ten acres enclosed by a ditch and dead hedge.

Alice, the widow of Otherton, holds an acre, enclosed as above.

Otherton. John son of Bron holds half an acre of the fee of Adam de Otherton, enclosed as above.

Robert son of Walter de Pilatenhale, one acre as above.

Elyas Bonde, one acre as above.

Robert Brown, one acre as above.

Robert le Fremon, one acre as above.

Rodbalston. Richard Aylward held half an acre of the fee of Ralph (sic) de Loges, which Margaret his sister now holds, enclosed as above.

Wolvrenehamton. Richard son of Gervase holds two acres of the fee of the Dean, enclosed as above.

John de Wondon, half an acre as above.

Richard de Tounstall and Nicholas Norman, an acre, as above.

John Cope and Robert de Wondon, half an acre, enclosed with a small ditch.

William de Novo Ponte, two acres as above.

Roger de Novo Ponte, one acre as above.

William son of Stephen of Wolvrenhamton, two acres as above.

Henry de Oxeford, two acres as above.

Wylenhale. Robert son of Richard of Wylenhale holds two acres of the fee of the Earl of Cornwall, enclosed with a ditch and hedge. To be prostrated.

Richard Leveson, two acres of the same fee, enclosed in the same way. To be prostrated.

Richard son of Edwyn, two acres as above. To be prostrated.

Shareshull. Geoffrey Costy holds half an acre of the fee of Otywel Purcel, enclosed by a ditch and live hedge. To be prostrated.

William Baron holds a rood as above. To be prostrated.

Robert le Flemyng, an acre, which William his son now holds. To be prostrated.

Fetherstone. Robert son of William of Fetherstone holds a rood of the fee of John de la Wade, enclosed by a ditch and hedge. To be prostrated.

John son of Adam, half an acre as above. To be prostrated.

John son of Alverdy, half an acre as above. To be prostrated.

M. 16, dorso.

Sheneston. Geoffrey de Shornes holds an acre of the fee of Ralph de Grendon, enclosed with a dead hedge.

William atte Lynde, two acres, enclosed in the same way.

The Abbot of Oseney holds ten acres held by various tenants, enclosed as above.

Geoffrey de Wolvardeley holds an acre, enclosed in the same way.

William le Grom holds an acre, enclosed as above.

Wodenesburi. William the Forester holds an acre of the fee of John de Heronwyle, enclosed. To be prostrated.

Robert son of Hugh holds half an acre, enclosed with a dead hedge.

Hugh the Clerk holds half an acre, enclosed with a dead hedge.

John Pystor (Baker) holds half an acre, enclosed with a dead hedge.

Reginald de Neuport, one acre, enclosed with a dead hedge.

Alrewych. William de Boweles holds in Alrewych, of the fee of Felicia de Barre, twelve acres, enclosed with a ditch and dead hedge. To be thrown down.

Of New Purpresturcs of the time when William Trumwyne was Scneschall.

Coven. Richard Bagod, Hugh de Pendeford, and Margaret de Coven, hold in Coven, of the fee of William Bagod, ten acres, enclosed with a ditch and dead hedge, without warrant. Fence to be thrown down.

Bisseburi. Henry de Wylaston (Wybaston) holds of the fee of Ralph de Byssheburi a rood, enclosed by a ditch and hedge. To be thrown down.

Robert Parcel held two acres, which Margaret his wife now holds, enclosed in the same way. Fence to be thrown down.

William Aylwyn of Oxley, one acre as above. To be thrown down.

Ralph de Bysseburi, an acre as above. To be thrown down.

Richard de Wybaldeston, two acres as above. To be thrown down.

Richard de Northcote, two acres as above. To be thrown down.

Robert Pepercorn of Oxley, one acre as above. To be thrown down.

Mollesley. Robert son of Richard de Mollesley holds half an acre, of the fee of Robert de Esynton, enclosed as above. Fence to be thrown down.

William Beket, half an acre as above. Fence to be thrown down.

Nicholas de Bosco, half an acre as above. Fence to be thrown down.

Wodenesburi. Tandy de la Coldelvere holds an acre of the fee of John de Heronvyle, enclosed as above. Fence to be thrown down.

Richard de la Grene holds half an acre as above.

William the Forester, Robert son of Hugh, and William son of Lucy, hold three acres, enclosed as above. To be thrown down.

Waleshalle. William de Morteyn held in Waleshall four acres, how held by Roger his son, enclosed as above.

Simon Jurdayn, one acre, enclosed as above.

Margaret la Rus, one acre, enclosed as above.

Richard Faber Sagittarius (Fletcher), half an acre, enclosed as above.

Thomas Bonde, half an acre, which John the Baker now holds.

William the Carpenter, one acre as above.

Richard Dyrdey, one acre as above.

John son of the Lord of Benetleg, one acre as above.

Nicholas Wodemon, one acre, which William his son now holds.

Geoffrey son of William the Forester, of Blockeswych, one acre, enclosed by a ditch and hedge.

Robert le Roper, one acre, enclosed as above.

Alrewych. Adam Jordan and Richard de Asterhul hold in Alrewych one acre, of the fee of William de Alrewich, enclosed as above.

Thomas son of Matilda, one acre, of the fee of Felicia de Barre, (fn. 5) enclosed as above.

Robert Machi held four acres, now held by Richard Wylle, enclosed as above.

John of the Churchyard, two acres, as above.

Shenestone. William the Smith held half an acre, of the fee of Ralph de Grendon, which Robert the Smith now holds, enclosed as above. Fence to be thrown down.

Eva de Bosco, one acre, now held by Geoffrey her son, enclosed as above. Fence to be thrown down.

William son of Osbert, two acres, which Alesia his wife now holds. Fence to be thrown down.

Richard son of Sara, half an acre, which Elyas de la Lynde now holds. Fence to be thrown down.

Esynton. William Campion holds in Esynton five acres, of the fee of Robert de Whyston, enclosed as above. Fence to be thrown down.

M. 17.

New Purprestures of the Third Regard of the time of John de Clynton, Scneschall.

Here follow encoachments at Huntingdon and Pilatenhale, of the fee of Walter de Elmedon.

At Hatherdon, of the fee of the Dean of Wolverhampton.

At Eton (Water Eaton), of the fee of Matilda Devereux.

At Coven, of the fee of William Bagod.

At Brimesford, of the fee of William Bagod.

At Fetherstone, of the fee of John de la Wade.

At Derlaston, of the fee of William de Derlaston.

At Hulton, of the fee of the Dean of Wolverhampton.

At Hulton, of the fee of Ralph de Bysseburi.

At Wednesbury, of the fee of John de Heronvyle.

At Alrewych, of the fee of William de Alrewych.

At Russhale, of the fee of William de Russale.

At Tunstall, of the fee of Isabella de Tonstall.

And at Bisshebury, of the fee of Ralph de Bissheburi.

New Purprestures of the time of Philip de Montgomery of the Third Regard (inter alia).

Coven. Ralph de Wyverston holds two acres in Coven, of the fee of Ralph de Coven, enclosed with a ditch and dead hedge. To be prostrated.

Fulk de Brymesford (Brinford), the carpenter, holds an acre enclosed as above.

Great Sardon. Richard le Caven of Sardon holds an acre of the fee of Emma de Brymesford (de Brumfield) enclosed as above.

Byssheburi. Roger the Parson of the Church of Bysshebury, William de Brok, and Thomas del Oldefallyngge, hold three acres enclosed as above. Fence to be prostrated.

Robert Purcel enclosed two acres which Ralph de Bysshebury and Roger Peye now hold. Fence to be thrown down.

Essynton. Richard le Westerne holds an acre of the fee of Robert de Whyston, enclosed partly with a hedge. To be thrown down.

Waleshale. William de Morteyn enclosed two acres now held by Roger his son, enclosed with a ditch and a dead hedge. To be thrown down.

Alrewas. The vill of Alrewas has enclosed thirty acres of the fee of Robert de Somervyle with a ditch, and the same vill enclosed twelve acres with a ditch and dead hedge. The fence to be thrown down.

The same vill enclosed eight acres as above. Fence to be thrown down.

Gorstycote. Richard Horeye and Robert the miller of Peleshale hold two acres of the fee of William de Penne enclosed as above. Fence to be thrown down.

Poleshale (Pershall). William Cocas of Poleshale holds of the fee of the Dean of Wolvernehamton a rood enclosed with a hedge. To be thrown down.

The same William Cocus and Reginald de Poleshale and Simon of the same hold three acres as above. To be thrown down. Hugh de Beaumes holds three acres enclosed as above. Fence to be thrown down.

Rushale. Hugh de Cave holds two acres of the fee of William de Boueles enclosed by a little ditch.

William de Angulo holds a rood enclosed in the same way.

M. 18.

This membrane contains the sums obtained for the agistment of the forests of Kynefare and Canok.

The Agistors for Kynefare were Henry de Morf, and Warine, son and heir of William de Penne, who answered for his father, who had died.

For 56 H. III., nothing was obtained, the mast having failed.

" 1 E. I., £9 6s. 8d.

" 2–3–4–5 and 6 E. I., nothing through defect of mast (nichil pro defectu pessona).

" 7 E. I., 10s. 2d.

" 8 E. I., nothing, through defect of mast.

" 9 E. I., 12s. 11d.

" 10 E. I., 105s. 8d.

" 11 and 12 E. I., nothing, through defect of mast.

" 13 E. I., £14 11s. 3d., for which Henry de Morf and William de Wytyndon answer.

De escapio of the same forest:—

Henry de Morf answered for 56 H. III.

William de Wytynton for I E. 1.

John de Trysel for 3 and 4 E. I.

William son and heir of Richard de Evenefeud answered for the years 5–6 and a part of 7 E. I.

William son of Elias of Tettenhale for the rest of 7 E. I., and for 8 E. I.

John de Eton answered for 9 E. I.

John de Trysel for 10 E. I., and for 12 E. I.

Henry de Morf for 11 E. I., and 13 E. I.

For the cabilitio of the same forest:—

John de Eton, John de Trysel, William de Evenefeld, and William de Overton answered.

Agistment of Cnnnok. Roger de Cumberford, William son and heir of Nicholas de Alrewiz, Hugh de Stretheye son and heir of William de Stretheye, and Robert son and heir of Adam de Parco, Richard Bagod, William de Boweles, Peter de Colecestre, Thomas Engleton, and Robert de Wolselegh, agistors, answer for the Pannage of Cannock.

For ancient destruction of woods (de veteri rasto boscorum):—

From Felicia de Barre and William de Alrewych for ancient waste in Alrewych, ½ mark.

From Robert Burnel, Bishop of Bath, for ditto in Grendon½ mark.
" Robert deWhiston and his coparceners for ditto in Esington½ "
" Walter de Elmyndon (Elmedon) for ditto in Huntingdon½ "
" the Dean of Wolverhampton for ditto in Hulton½ "
" Ralph Basset for ditto in Bolenhull½ "
" William de Derlaston for ditto in Derlaston½ "
" Petronilla de Benetleye for ditto in Bentley½ "
" John de Heronvyle for ditto in Wodnesburi½ "
" Ralph de Bissheburi for ditto in Bisseburi½ "
" Roger de Morteyn and John Paynel for ditto in Waleshale½ "
" William de Worcester for ditto in Great Sardon½ "
" Richard de Marham for ditto in Oxeleye½ "
" the Dean of Wolverhampton for ditto in Peleshale½ "

Of new destruction of woods, it was presented that the Dean of Wolverhampton had made new destruction in Wednesfield. The wood to be taken into the King's hands.

Thomas Corbet had done the same (no place named).

Philip Marmion had done the same in the wood of Hopwas which belonged to the King's demesne in Wytynton, which Philip held by the King's commission.

That Richard de Loges and William de Mora had done the same at Wyrleye.

And Adam de Otherton had done the same (no place named). In each case the wood is to be taken into the King's hands.

Footnotes

1 John de Pendeford sold his manor of Pendeford shortly after this date to the monks of St. Thomas of Stafford. The above presentment of the Foresters of Cannock probably gives the reason of his expatriation and sale of his lands.
2 The subsequent proceedings taken by the Bishop to recover his chase are given at length by Manwood from the "Institutes."
The Bishop acknowledged that his woods were within the metes of the King's forest of Cannock, but stated that King Richard had given to his predecessor Hugh formerly Bishop of Coventry the villa of Ruggelegh and Cannock, with the churches, Hundreds, etc., and all liberties pertaining to them, in the first year of his reign, by a charter which he produced. He also produced another charter by the same King granting to the same Bishop that all his lords and vassals, and all the fiefs of the Church of Lichfield and Coventry, should be quit of all suits to Shire or Hundred, of the Sheriff's aid, and of all pleas of Forest, etc. (de placitis forestæ, de vastis, assart is, et rewardis forestæ). And he stated that since the time of these charters he and all his predecessors had held these woods free from all interference by the King's foresters, Terderers, or other ministers until the last Iter of the Justices, and they had been accustomed to hunt and take in the same woods at will beasts which came from the King's forest.
After some further proceedings and adjournments, the Bishop came before Parliament at Westminster at Easter, 18 E. 1., and gave up to the King all his woods, etc., within Cannock Forest; and the King of his special favour conceded and granted again to the Bishop the same woods, to hold in free and perpetual alms as his free chase for ever, and so that it may be lawful for him to enclose his woods and make parks in them at his will, so long as he and his successors made in them no "saltaries" or used nets to capture the King's deer (absque hoc quod saltatoria faciant in risdem sen rechia habeant ad venationem Domini Regis capiendtim); and for this concession the Bishop gave to the King £1,000.
3 Bolenhull is stated to be of the fee of Ralph Basset.
4 Stated to be of the fee of Ralph de Bysshebury.
5 It will be noted there were two manors at Aldridge.