Plea Rolls for Staffordshire
1239-43

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Major-General Hon. George Wrottesley (editor)

Year published

1883

Pages

90-102

Citation Show another format:

'Plea Rolls for Staffordshire: 1239-43', Staffordshire Historical Collections, vol. 4 (1883), pp. 90-102. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=52388 Date accessed: 29 November 2014.


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Banco Roll No. 9, Tower Records.

Headed, "Placita apud Sanctum Brigidam Londonii, de termino Sanctæ Trinitatis, anno R. Henrici, filii Regis Johannis, XXIII." [May and June, 1239.]

Staff. Hervey, son of Hervey de Stafford, sued Henry de Aldidelegh to hold to a fine levied in the Court of the King at Lichfield between the said Hervey, complainant, and Hervey, the father of Hervey, tenant, respecting the manor of Horton; (fn. 1) and he complained that whereas by that fine the whole of Horton should remain to the said Hervey saving 21d. of rent, the said Hervey had deforced him of nearly three hundred acres of wood, and had built upon the land and devastated the wood, so that he was damaged to the extent of 200l., and he produced the chirograph of the fine in Court, by which Hervey his father acknowledged all the aforesaid manor to be the right of the said Henry, to be held of the said Hervey and his heirs by the service of 10s., and for which acknowledgment, &c., the same Henry gave to Hervey all the land which he held in Norton under Kevrement, viz., ten librates of land.

And Henry appeared in Court and acknowledged the fine, and denied he had deforced Hervey of any wood belonging to the land of Norton, which had remained to his father by the fine. The Sheriff is commanded to summon sixteen Knights and others of the vicinage of Norton, to be in Court at fifteen days from Michaelmas, to make recognition as to the amount of wood which pertained to Norton in the twelfth year of the present King when the said fine was levied, and if the said Henry against the tenor of the fine had raised buildings in the wood belonging to the said land of Norton, &c. m. 3, dorso.

Staff. Robert Marescall appeared against Ralph Purcel in a plea that he had sued him in Court Christian, &c., and Ralph did not appear, and the Sheriff returned he was a Clericus, and held no lay fee by which, &c., the Archdeacon of Stafford is therefore commanded to produce him at fifteen days from Michaelmas. m. 4.

Staff. Richard de Herleg and John, son of Richard de Huhtesden, were attached to answer the complaint of Henry Blund, that they had deforced him of his common of pasture in Kingeston, pertaining to his free tenement in Huhtesdon (Hixon), and which he ought to have according to the purports of charters which he held of Geoffrey de Greseleg and the ancestors of Geoffrey, and which charters the said Geoffrey had acknowledged before the Justices Itinerant at Lichfield.

Richard and John appeared, and Richard stated that he held the tenement in which Henry claimed common of pasture of Geoffrey de Greseleg, and he called the said Geoffrey to warranty. Geoffrey to be summoned at fifteen days from Michaelmas. John stated he could not plead to the writ because he was a villain of the said Geoffrey; he is therefore dismissed from the suit.

The same Henry sued Geoffrey de Greseleg for deforcing him of common of pasture in Kingeston, belonging to his free tenement in Huhtesdon; and Geoffrey did not appear, and was attached by Gilbert de Morton and Geoffrey le Franceis. He is therefore to be attached by better sureties to appear at the same term. m. 6, dorso.

Staff. Alditha de Sandon sued Richard Meverel for five bovates of land in Herdewik; and Richard prayed a view. A day is given to the parties at three weeks from Michaelmas. m. 7.

Warw. Fraricus de Dicheford was attached to answer the complaint of Vivian de Standon, that he did not hold to the fine levied in the Court of King Henry, the grandfather of the King, before the Justices Itinerant at Oxford, between Adam de Standon, the grandfather of Vivian, whose heir he is, and Robert de Dicheford, the father of the said Fraricus, whose heir he is, respecting half the manor of Dicheford. And the said Vivian complained that whereas the said manor should remain to the said Robert, father of Fraricus, and his heirs for the service of a knight's fee and 4s. yearly, the said Fraricus had detained the service of half the fee, viz., four marks and 40d. of divers scutages.

Fraricus acknowledged the fine, and conceded the service demanded, and arrears from the time that the castle of Bedford had been besieged. (fn. 2) m. 14.

Staff. John Marescall appeared on the fourth day against William de Aldithelee and Clemence his wife, in a plea that they should declare by what right they claimed common of pasture in the land of the said John in Stanton, when he had no common of pasture in the land of William at Blore; nor did William and Clemence perform any service to him by which they could claim common in his land. William and Clemence did not appear, and are to be attached for the morrow of St. Martin. m. 22.

Roll No. 53.

Headed, "Placita coram Domino Rege in Octabis Sancti Hillarii, anno regis ejusdem XXV." [20th January, 1241.]

M. 7. "Placita in Crastino clausi Paschæ, anno XXV." [8th April, 1241.]

Salop. A long and interesting suit, in which Vitalis Engayne and Roger Gernet claim the Honor of Montgomery, as descendants of the first wife of Baldwin de Bullers, living temp. Henry I.; and Giles de Erdington claimed it on account of a grant made to his father Thomas by Stephen de Stanton, a descendant of Baldwin by a second wife. William de Cantilupe derived his claim by a grant from Reginald Gernet, one of the co-heirs. The pleadings give the following pedigrees:—

Baldwin de Bollers, to whom Henry I. gave the Honor of Montgomery with Sibilla de la Faleyse, the niece (nepotem) of the King.


Pedigree of Vitalis Engayne

Pedigree of Vitalis Engayne

The issue from the second wife was as follows: (fn. 3)


Pedigree of Stephen de Stanton

Pedigree of Stephen de Stanton

The verdict is for Vitalis Engaine and William de Cantilupe. m. 12.

Staff. Magister Peter de Radenore, the official of the Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, and Robert, Chaplain of Patingham, were summoned to show cause why they had suspended the Church of Claverlegh, which is a chapel of the Lord the King, and had sequestered the goods and corn of Peter de Rivallis (Rivaux), the rector of the Church; and they did not appear, and the Sheriff returned they held no lay fee by which they could be attached. The Bishop was therefore commanded to produce them; and the Bishop neither produced them nor sent a writ. The Bishop is therefore summoned for the octaves of Michaelmas, and to bring with him the said Peter and Robert. m. 19.

Rolls Nos. 46 and 47 contain no Staffordshire suits.

Roll No. 48.

The third membrane is headed, "Placita apud Oxon: a die Paschæ in XV. dies coram W. de Ebor, Preposito Beverlac: et sociis suis Justiciariis Itinerantibus, anno regni Regis H., filii Regis J., vicessimo quinto." [14th April, 1241.]

Norht. Ralph Basset and Geoffrey de Appelby sue Isabel de Bruis to acquit them of the third part of a debt of 100l.; and they sued John de Balliol and Derforguill his wife, to acquit them of the sixth part of a debt of 100l., for which John, formerly Earl of Chester, the brother of the said Isabel, and uncle of the said Derforguilla, whose heirs they are, had put them into pledge against Robert fitz Richard. The defendants did not appear; to be attached to appear at Canterbury at fifteen days from Trinity. Isabella de Bruis to be distrained in co. Huntingdon. m. 8, dorso.

Oxon. An assize came, &c., if Geoffrey de Dunstanville, the uncle of Gilbert de Boseville, of William de Engelfend, (fn. 4) and of Alan Basset, was seised as of fee of one-third of a knight's fee in Shiplake when he died, &c., which Richard de Anvers and Muriell his wife hold.

Richard and Muriell plead that they are not bound to answer to the writ, because Gilbert, William, and Alan form but one heir, and Geoffrey was their grandfather, and not their uncle. The plaintiffs withdraw their claim. (fn. 5) m. 17, dorso.

Roll No. 49.

Headed, "Placita et assisæ captæ apud Cantuariam in Comitatu Kantia, in Octabis Sanctæ Trinitatis, anno R. R. H., filii R. Johannis, XXV., coram W. de Ebor, Preposito Beverlac., et sociis suis. [2nd June, 1241.]

Salop. Fulk fitz Warin acknowledged to have received from Maurice le Buttillier (fn. 6) 300 marks for the maritagium of Matilda his niece (nepotis suæ), daughter and heir of William Pantulf, and which Fulk had sold to him on condition that when the son of Maurice should marry Matilda, Maurice should endow her with one-third of all his land. m. 5.

Staff. Stephen de Meverel sued William de Ferrars, Earl of Derby, and Agnes his wife, for the advowson of Gaiton; and William and Agnes appeared by attorney, and stated that the advowson formed part of the inheritance of Agnes, which fell to her by the death of Ralph, Earl of Chester, and that they cannot answer without their co-parceners, viz., Hugh de Albini, Earl of Arundel, Hawise de Quency, Countess of Lincoln, Henry de Hastings and Ada his wife, Isabel de Bruis, John de Balliol and Dervorgoil his wife, and William de Force, and Christiana his wife. The other co-parceners are therefore to be summoned to appear at Westminster at three weeks from Hillary. m. 5.

Roll No. 50.

Headed, "Placita coram Domino Rege apud Westm: in crastino Sancti Michalis, anno XXV." [30th September, 1241.]

"Placita coram Domino R. a die Paschæ in XV. dies." m. 21.

Staff. A day is given to William Ruffus, in a plea of quo warranto, versus the Lord the King, on the Octaves of St. John the Baptist. m. 24, dorso.

"Placita coram Domino Rege in crastino Sancti Johannis." m. 31. [25 June, 1242.]

H., the Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, was summoned to show cause before the Lord the King why he should not surrender to the King the manors of Ruggeleg and Canok, which were part of the King's demesne, and for which King John had first given to the Bishop's predecessor 10l. annually from the Treasury, and afterwards that he might be quit of payment of the said 10l., and that the said manors might revert to the King's father, he gave him the advowsons of the Churches of Waleshale and Canok. The Bishop appeared by attorney, and prayed a view. A day is given to him at the Octaves of Michaelmas; a view is to be taken in the interim. m. 32.

Salop. An assize, &c., if Simon de Frankeley (fn. 7) had disseised the Abbot of Hales of his free tenement in Hales, &c., viz., of a turbarium, and a curtilage, &c. Simon stated he ought not to be obliged to answer to the writ, because the Abbot had put in the view certain exclusas, which had been raised for twenty years past, in the time of the first Abbot, and he had put in the view a curtilage which was in Worcestershire, and over which tenement the Sheriff of Salop could have no jurisdiction, nor yet in the exclusis, which were also in Worcestershire. The jury return a verdict for the Abbot, and Simon is in misericordiâ; his sureties are Laurence de Alvineleg and Stephen de Gatacre. m. 37.

Rolls Nos. 51 and 52 contain no Staffordshire suits.

Roll No. 54.

Headed, "Placita apud Westm: a die Paschæ in XV. dies, coram Roberto de Lexinton, W. de Culleworth, G. de Preston, et sociis suis, anno R. Regis XXVI." [4th May, 1242.]

Staff. Oliver de Aincurt and Matilda his wife, put in their place Thomas de la Hide versus the Abbot of Mirivall, and A. de Rideware and Henry Malveisin, in a plea of dower. m. 2.

Staff., Wilts. Elena; the wife of Andrew le Blund, puts in her place Andrew her husband, versus Pagan de la Lee, in a plea quod acquietaret. m. 2, dorso.

Warw. Hawise, the widow of Emeric, son of Gilbert, sues Bartholomew de Gresebrok for one-third of half a virgate and eight acres of land in Hasfurlong, as her dower. Bartholomew stated that Emeric was not seised as of fee of the land, and therefore could not endow her with it. A jury of the vicinage to be summoned before him by the Sheriff, to make inquisition as to whether Emeric was seised as of fee or not, and the inquisition to be returned into Court at the Octaves of Trinity. m. 21, dorso.

Staff. Margery, the widow of Robert the miller, sued the Abbot of Hales for one-third of a mill and two acres of land, and an acre of pasture in Bromwic, as her dower. The Abbot called to warranty Richard fitz William de Bromwic, who is to be summoned for the Octaves of Trinity. m. 6.

Staff. The Prior of Trentham sued Peter de Cokenache for customary services due for a free tenement he holds of him in Kokenache (Cokenage). Peter did not appear, and is to be attached for the Octaves of Trinity. m. 7, dorso.

Staff. Oliver de Doddingesell, and Alienora his wife, sue Robert de Waterfalle for one-third of two mills in Tena and Benston, which Alienora had demised to him for a term which had expired. Robert did not appear, and is to be re-summoned for the Octaves of Michaelmas, the tenements to be taken into the King's hands. m. 13, dorso.

Staff. and. Leic. Oliver de Ayncurt and Matilda his wife, sue Henry Malveysin for one-third of a messuage and a garden, five acres of land, twenty acres of pasture, and one-third of two parts of one hundred acres of wood, and one-third of two parts of a mill, and a fish-pool in Hamstall, in co. Stafford, and for one-third of a messuage, and thirty acres of wood, three acres of pasture, 40s. 2d. rent, a pound of pepper, and nine arrows, and a virgate and two acres of land in Seyle, co. Leycester; and they sue the Abbot of Mirivall for one-third of three and a half acres of wood in Seyle, as dower of Matilda. The Abbot appeared by attorney, and called to warranty William, son and heir of Walter de Rideware, who is within age, and in ward to the said Henry (Mauveisin), who appeared in Court, and conceded the dower asked for in the lands of the said heir, and he conceded dower in all the land in co. Leycester, which they claimed, and likewise in two parts of one hundred acres of wood, and the said fish-pool in Hamstall, in co. Stafford; and regarding the rest he called to warranty the Prior of Lapley. The Prior is therefore to be summoned for fifteen days after Michaelmas, and Henry puts in his place Hugh de Colton. m. 21, dorso.

Roll No. 55.

Headed, "Placita apud Westm: in Octabis Sancti Michaelis, coram Roberto de Lexinton et sociis suis, anno R. R. H. XXVI., incipiente XXVII. [6th October, 1242.]

Staff. Robert de Waterfall sued to replevy his land which was taken into the King's hands in consequence of his default in the suit versus Oliver de Oddingesel and Alienora his wife. m. 1.

Staff. Margery, the widow of Robert le Muner (Miller) sued the Abbot of Hales for one-third of a mill, &c., in Bromwyz as her dower; and the Abbot called to warranty Richard fitz William, who appeared and warranted the mill and land, and stated that Robert the Miller could not endow his wife, because he held in villainage. The Sheriff was therefore commanded to take an inquisition by twelve of the vicinage on oath before himself and the custodes of the Pleas of the Crown (the Coroners), as to whether Robert held his land freely, and could endow her or not, and to return the inquisition into Court on the Octaves of St. Martin. At which day the inquisition was received; and it testified that Robert held his land freely, and could endow Margaret with it. Margaret is therefore to have seisin of her dower, and Richard is in misericordiâ. m. 1.

Staff. The suit between the Prior of Kenilworth and Robert de Stafford, respecting the Priory of Stanes, is respited to the Octaves of Hillary in consequence of default of the jury, by the King's command, m. 4, dorso.

Staff. Oliver de Ayencurt and Matilda his wife sue Alina, the widow of Roger de Rydeware, for the third part of a virgate of land in Rideware and twelve acres in Hampstall, as the dower of Matilda, of which Walter de Rideware, her first husband, had endowed her, &c.

And Alina appeared and pleaded that Matilda had no claim to dower in the land, because Walter had assigned this land to her for her life as dower, and as part of the land he had warranted to Roger de Rideware her husband. Oliver and Matilda plead that Walter had given the land in question to Alina after she (Alina) had been in full seisin of her dower. The Sheriff is commanded to make inquisition concerning the facts, and to return it into Court at the Octaves of Hillary. m. 7.

Warw. Ela, widow of Thomas Earl of Warwick, sues the tenants of her late husband for dower. m. 7.

Staff. Lettice, the widow of Laurence de Huttokeshagh (Uttoxeter), sued Roger Blund for one-third of a messuage and seven acres of land in Huttokeshagh, as her dower. Verdict for Lettice. m. 16, dorso.

Staff. Richard de Bare gives 20s. for licence of concord with Philip de Rughel in a plea of land. (fn. 8) m. 20, dorso.

Staff. Richard de la Bare sued Hugh de Buell and Alice his wife for the manor of Russehall, excepting the advowson of the Chapel of the same.

Hugh and Alice appear and pray a view; a day is given to the parties on the Octaves of the Purification; a view to be made in the interim. m. 21.

Staff. Isabella, widow of William de Lee, sued Robert de Haleghton for one-third of a carucate of land in Legh, as her dower. Robert pleaded that William never held the land so freely (ita libere) that he could endow her with it; and the Sheriff is commanded to make inquisition upon oath into the facts, and to return the inquisition into Court at three weeks from Easter. The verdict (a postscriptum) is for Robert. m. 29, dorso.

Roll No. 56.

M. 7, headed, "Placita coram W. Ebor, Archiepiscopo et aliis de consilio Domini Regis, apud Westm: in crastino Sancti Michaelis, anno R. R. Henrici, filii Regis J., XXVI., incipiente XXVII." [30th September, 1242.]

Staff. Robert de Bissopburi (Bushbury) was summoned to answer to the Lord the King by what right he claimed to impede the presentation to the Church of Penne, which was in the King's hands by reason of the vacancy of the See of Coventry and Lichfield.

Robert pleaded the advowson belonged to him, and stated that Hugh de Bissopburi his grandfather had presented his clerk John de Wulfhampton, who had been admitted and instituted Parson of the Church. Magister Nicholas de St. Alban who appeared for the King, admitted that Hugh bad presented the last Parson to the Church, who had lately died, but stated that, after that presentation, Hugh the father of Robert, and son of the aforesaid Hugh, had granted the advowson to Alexander, the Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, and that his charter is deposited at Lichfield; and because both parties are agreed concerning the last presentation, the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield are commanded to produce the charter, if they have it, at fifteen days from Michaelmas; at which day Magister Hugh de Sotteby, Canon of Lichfield, produced the charter of Hugh, father of Robert; and because Robert could not deny the charter, he is in misericordiâ. m. 7.

M. 12, headed, "Placita coram consilio Domini Regis in Octabis Sancti Hillarii." [20th January, 1243.]

Staff. John de Aketun, Ralph de Dulvern, Robert de Esingtun, and Robert de Wistun, four Knights sent to view Stephen Meverel, who is languidus, and to report whom he wished to attorn in the assize of novel disseisin which he had arraigned before W. the Archbishop of York, and others of the Council of the Lord the King, at the first arrival of the King at Dunstaple, versus Thomas Fromund and Plesentia his wife, respecting a tenement in Temseford, came and stated that he attorned in his place Robert de Eslimere. m. 12.

Staff. William le Burguillun was attached to answer to the Lord the King for what reason he extorted undue services and customs from his men of Wytemore-under-Lyme, who complained that whereas when the said manor was of the ancient demesne of the Crown, and the tenants held their lands of the King, each of them who held a virgate of land, used to render for it 4s. for all service and tallage when the King raised a tallage from his other demesne lands, the said William now extorted from them for each virgate 12s. of tallage, besides merchetum (fn. 9) and heriots, and all the other villain services likewise.

And William appeared and stated that the men who complained were not men of the Lord the King, nor is the manor the demesne of the King, nor in his hands; that the men are villains of John, son and heir of Ralph, son of John, who is within age and in his custody; and that the said Ralph, father of John, was seised of all the aforesaid villain services on the day he died; and John the father of Ralph likewise died seised of the same; and he appealed to a jury. The Sheriff is commanded to summon a jury before himself and the custodes of the Pleas of the Crown (i.e., the coroners) to make inquisition respecting the tenure of the men of Wytemore, and to return the inquisition into Court at three weeks from Easter. m. 12.

M. 17. "Placita coram consilio Domini Regis a die Paschæ, in tres septimanas." [3rd May, 1243.]

Staff. The Sheriff was commanded to summon a jury of twelve before him, and in full county to make recognition if the manor of Wytemore-under-Lyme was formerly of the demesne of the Lord the King, and if so, in what king's reign it had been alienated, and whether the said manor had been in the King's hands, and the tenants of the same had held their lands by the service of rendering for every virgate of land 4s. per annum, for all service and tallage, when the King tallaged his other demesnes, as the men of the manor say; or whether the said manor was the free tenement of John, son and heir of Ralph fitz John, and the said men held their lands by the service of rendering for every virgate of land 12s. per annum, and tallage at the will of the said John, and merchetum for their daughters and sisters, and cariagium (cartage), and all other villain services; and if Ralph the father of John was seised of all the above services on the day he died, as William Burguillon, the guardian of the said John, stated. The Sheriff sent a writ by the adverse party to say he had not been able to obtain sufficient evidence; and he is commanded to make another inquisition, and to return it into Court at fifteen days from Trinity. At which day the Sheriff was to attend the Court, and hear judgment (upon himself) for not sending a sufficient inquisition by two (of the jury) as he had been commanded. At which day an inquisition came, such as it is (quod talis est). Left unfinished. m. 17.

Warw. Margaret, the widow of John Mareschall, and the heir of the Earl of Warewik, acknowledged before W. the Archbishop of York, the Bishop of Carlisle, W. de Cantilupe, W. of York, the Provost of Beverley, Robert de Lexinton, Warine de Montechanisi, and Robert Passelewe, and conceded that, if before the Vigil of the Ascension of the Lord she had been married to anybody, all her lands and tenements which she held on that day in demesne together with the Castle of Warewik, would fall into the King's hands. She also acknowledged and conceded besides, that she had not been married without the King's licence, and if she should so marry, that all her lands as before said would fall (incurrantur) to the Lord the King. (fn. 10) m. 19, dorso.

Roll No. 58.

Headed, "Placita apud Westm: coram Roberto de Lexinton et sociis suis, Justiciariis, de termino Sancti Hillarii, anno R. R. H., fil. R. J., XXVII." [January, 1243.]

Staff. Oliver de Eyncurt and Matilda his wife, sue Henry Mauveysin for one-third of a messuage, and five acres of land, and twenty acres of meadow, and one-third of two parts of a meadow, and of two parts of a mill in Humstall (Hamstall), as dower of the said Matilda; and Henry appeared, and called to warranty the Prior of Lappelle; who now appeared and pleaded that he was not bound to warrant; and Henry produced a chirograph (of a fine) made between the Prior and himself, in which it was contained that the said Prior had conceded to Henry the manor of Hamstall, until the lawful age of the heir of Walter de Rydeware, for 10 marks per annum. The Prior acknowledged the chirograph, and gave no reason why Oliver and Matilda should not have dower from the manor. It is therefore considered that Oliver and Matilda should have seisin, and the Prior should make an exchange of equal value to Henry. It was afterwards agreed between Henry and the Prior that the Prior should concede to Henry the two parts of the manor for 6 marks per annum until the lawful age of the heir, and all contentions between them should be fully remitted. m. 2, dorso.

Staff. Agnes, the widow of Nicholas de Baddele, sued Lettice de Baddele for one-third of a carucate of land in Baddele, (fn. 11) and one-third of two bovates of land in Wytemore, and one-third of 8d. rent in Holedich, as her dower. Lettice pleaded that Nicholas was never seised of the land, so that he could endow her with it. Verdict for Lettice. m. 3, dorso.

Oxon. William de Englefeud, (fn. 12) Alan Basset, and Gilbert de Bosevill, sue Robert Danvers and Muriell his wife, for half a knight's fee (excepting two carrucates) in Shiplak, and the advowson of the Church; and state that one Geoffrey de Dunstanville their ancestor was seised of them as of fee in the time of King Henry, the grandfather of the present King, and from Geoffrey the right descended to Emma, Cecilia, and Alice, his sisters and heirs, because he died without issue; and from Emma to Alan (de Engelfeld), as her son and heir; and from Alan to William, as son and heir, who now sues.

And from Cecilia the right descended to the said Alan Basset, who now sues, as her son and heir. And from the said Alice the right descended to Gilbert de Basevill, as her son and heir.

Robert and Muriell admit the above facts, but state that the land in question was the inheritance of one Muriell, who was wife of Alan de Dunstanvill and the mother of the said Muriell, and of Emma, Alice, and Cecilia; and after the death of Geoffrey the said William, Alan, and Gilbert had taken with them the said Muriell as one of their heirs, and had gone with her to the Earl Richard, the capital lord of the fee, and they had paid together their relief. The verdict is for the plaintiffs, excepting as to that portion of the land which formed the marriage portion of Muriell. m. 4, dorso.

Staff. Alice, the widow of William de Gretewyc, sued Robert de Gretewyc for dower, but did not appear. See is therefore in misericordiâ. m. 5, dorso.

Staff. John de Parles was summoned by the Prior of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England, in a plea of services and suit owing for a free tenement which he holds of the Prior in Hunesworth. A concord was made by which John acknowledged he held the tenement of the Prior for 20s. per annum, and agreed to pay to the Prior 43s. and 4d. on the morrow of the close of Easter. m. 9.

Staff. William de Camvill sued Richard de Camvill for the manor of Camvill, excepting one and a half virgates of land. Richard appeared and stated he ought not to answer to the writ, because on the last day of the plea William had essoined himself on the service of the King, and he claimed that he should show the King's warrant; and William could show no warrant, except that he now produced letters of John de . . . . by which he could have no warrant. It is therefore considered that Richard should be dismissed from the suit, and William and his sureties are in misericordiâ, and to sue by another form of writ if he chose; William is amerced 40s. m. 10.

Roll No. 59.

Headed, "Essonia de malo lecti capta apud Westm: in Octabis Sancti Hillarii, anno Regni Regis Henrici, filii Regis Johannis, XXVII." [20th January, 1243.]

M. 7. "Placita."

Staff. Suit of Oliver Deyncourt and Matilda his wife, versus Henry Mauveisin, respecting the dower of Matilda in Hamstall (recorded as in Roll No. 58).

Staff. Agnes, the widow of Nicholas de Baddelegh, sued Lettice de Badelegh for one-third of a virgate of land in Badelegh, and sued Robert de Offelegh for one-third of two bovates of land in Whytemore, and Adam de Holedich for one-third of 8d. rent in Holedich, as her dower (record in other respects the same as on Roll No. 58). m. 5.

Warw. A long suit, in which Ela, the widow of Thomas, Earl of Warwick, sues the tenants of the demesne lands of the late Earl for her dower. Amongst others she sues many tenants in Tamworth, who called to warranty Margaret, the widow of John Mariscall. Margaret to appear before the Court at a month from Easter. m. 11.

Oxon. The suit of William de Engelfeld, Alan Basset, and Gilbert de Bosevill, versus Robert Danvers and Muriel his wife (given at greater length than in Roll No. 58). It states that William, Alan, and Gilbert denied they had ever recognised Muriel as a co-heir, and they asked for judgment if Muriel ought to have a part of the land in dispute, inasmuch as she was no heir, nor could be heir of the said Geoffrey de Dunstanvill. (fn. 13) m. 13.

Staff. Peter de Kokenes (Cokenage) was summoned to answer the complaint of the Prior of Trentham, that whereas, when the manor of Trentham was in the hands of King Henry, the grandfather of the present King, all the ancestors of Peter, and similarly Peter himself, had done suit to his mill, the said Peter now three years back had withdrawn his suit, by which the Prior had been damaged to the value of 100s. Peter denied that his ancestors or himself had ever done suit, dues, or customs, to the mill of Trentham. Verdict for the Prior; damages 2 marks. m. 16.

Staff. The suit of William de Kamvill versus Richard de Kamvill repeated nearly rerbatim. The name of the witness of William who testified by letter that he was in the service of the King, and which was illegible on the other roll, is John de Munewe. m. 18, dorso.

Roll No. 57.

Headed, "Placita apud Westm: a die Paschæ in XV. dies, coram Roberto de Lexinton et sociis suis, anno R. R. H., filii Regis Johannis, XXVII." [26th April, 1243.]

Staff. Oliver de Doddingeseles and Alienora his wife, sue Robert de Waterfalle for one-third of two mills in Tene and Deneston, of which Alienora had been seised as of her dower, and had demised to him for a term of six years which had expired. Robert stated it was true the mills had been demised to him, but that Alienora had afterwards demised to him the mills for her life by a charter which had been burnt by misfortune. Verdict for Oliver and Alianora. m. 8. dorso.

Staff. It was agreed between the Prior of Kenilworth and Robert de Stafford, that Robert should confirm by his charter and seal to the Prior all the concessions and confirmations which Hervey de Stafford his father had made to the House of Stanes. m. 12, dorso.

Oxon. Henry de la Waude sued Richard de Harecurt to hold to a fine levied in the Court of the King at Oxford, respecting two carucates of land in Stanton. Richard did not appear, and the Sheriff had been ordered to distrain him, and in place of distraining had returned Robert Conk and two others as his sureties. They are therefore in misericordiâ, and fined half a mark each, for which the Sheriff is to distrain them, and to produce them at five weeks from Trinity, and to appear at the same time to hear judgment upon himself. m. 16.

Plea Roll No. 7, Tower Records.

Second Membrane, headed, "Placita coram Rege, in Octabis Sancti Michaelis, anno R. R., XXVII." [6th October, 1243.]

Staff. Roger de Sumervill was attached to answer the complaint of the tenants of Alverwas, that he had ejected them from their lands and tenements in Alverwas, which was formerly the demesne of the Lord the King, when they were prepared to perform all the customs and services due for their lands according to an inquisition which had been taken and returned into the Curia Regis; and Geoffrey fitz Geoffrey complained that he had been ejected from lands which he and his ancestors had held since the reign of King Henry the grandfather of the grandfather of the Lord the King; and the other tenants likewise, viz., William fitz Oweyn the Clerk, Richard the Palmer, Gilbert Bernard, Walkelin, William de la Hethe, Gilbert son of Robert, Richard Wyteman, Philip son of Geoffrey, Richard Goderich, Henry Swetappell, Geoffrey the Smith, Richard Pany, Richard son of Roger le Noreys, Walter son of Brun, Richard Bissup, Agnes the Widow, William son of Geoffrey, Matilda widow of John Torsteyn, Hawise the Widow, Hugh le Hore, William Lescot, Margaret widow, Matilda widow of Robert Payn, Nicholas de la More, Richard Pistor (Baker), William son of Amelote, Geoffrey le Sutherne, Richard Wuderove, Buse, Cecilia widow, Robert son of Thomas, Edwine, and William le Piper.

Roger appeared and defended the action, and stated he had obtained a writ from the King to the Sheriff, to inquire into the lands which were of the ancient demesne of the Crown. The Sheriff was therefore commanded to return the inquisition into Court at three weeks from Easter. m. 6, dorso.

Convention enrolled, made between Roger de Monte Alto (Monhaut) and Cecilia his wife on one part, and Robert, son of Robert de Tatteshall, on the other part, respecting the partition of the inheritance of Hugh de Aubeny, Earl of Arundell. Robert claiming the manor of Covintry as belonging to his portion of the inheritance, witnessed by the Lord William de Ebor, Provost of Beverley, Lord Roger de Somery, Lord John de Grey, Lord Roger de Clifford, Sir William de Englefeud, Sir Fulk de Orreby, Sir Adam Mauvesyn, Sir Richard de Stratton, Sir William de Bermingeham. m. 8.

Membrane 14, headed, "Placita coram Domino Rege, a die Paschæ in XV. dies, anno XXVIII." [17th April, 1244.]

Staff. Roger de Sumervill was attached to answer the complaint of the men of Alverwas (as before), with the addition that the tenants stated that he had accepted fines from them for their lands at the death of his father. The following jury was elected to try the issue by the consent of the parties, viz., Ralph Basset of Drayton, Robert de Esington, Robert de Grendon, Robert de Toke, Robert Selveyn, William de Tymor, David de Pakington, Robert del Wall, Richard de Thikebrom, Richard del Puz, Thomas le Venur, Richard de Whytinton, Nicholas de Alrewyche (Aldridge), and William Wymer. The jury return (a postscriptum) that the men of Alverwas (the plaintiffs), after Roger de Sumervill was in seisin of the manor, and after the death of his father Roger, had made a fine with him that they might hold their tenements of him in peace according as they were of the ancient demesne, or of villainage, and that he had ejected them afterwards by a writ he had obtained, and by no other means. m. 20.

Roll No. 60.

Headed, "Placita apud Westm: a die Paschœ in XV. dies, coram R. de Lexinton et sociis suis, anno XXVII." [27th April, 1243.]

Salop. The men of Hales acknowledge that they should give merchetum (fn. 14) for their daughters at the will of the Abbot, whether they were married in or out of the manor of Hales; that they should do suit to the mill of the said Abbot in Hales unless there is a manifest defect in the mill; and if they are amerced in the court of the Abbot, the amount of the fine should be according to the transgression; that they should render relief for their lands at the discretion of the Abbot; that they should be tallaged according to the custom of the manor, but only when the Lord the King tallaged his manors, and not at other times; that they should perform ploughing and harrowing for the Abbot, viz., in Lent for each virgate of land, six ploughings and six harrowings, and he who had less land should do less service (in proportion); and that they would perform all other services which they ought to perform. And the said Abbot granted for himself and his successors that they would exact no other services than the foregoing, and that the tenants need not buy in his market of Hales except at their own will; and if the Abbot obstructed any ingress or egress from the common of pasture of the tenants, it should be rectified by the view of lawful men; and finally the Abbot remitted to them 12½ marks which had been pledged to him in the name of tallage. m. 16.

Footnotes

1 See fine No. 72, dated Lichfield, 27th November, 1227.
2 i.e., from A.D. 1224, Falk de Bréauté had seized and imprisoned one of the King's Justiciars in the castle of Bedford, and refused to release him. The King raised an armed force, took the castle after two months' siege, and hanged all the knights and men-at-arms which had formed the garrison. Falk was not present, but afterwards surrendered himself, and was banished from the kingdom.
3 When Mr. Eyton wrote his "Antiquities of Shropshire." he had not apparently seen this suit of 25 H. III., which would have cleared up all his doubts respecting the nature of the claim of Giles de Erdington and the Cantilupes to the Honor of Montgomery. It will be seen that neither the Erdingtons nor the Cantilupes claimed by hereditary descent, their claims resting only on grants made by the Stantons and Gernets respectively of their shares of the patrimony.
4 William de Engelfend was tenant of Roger de Somery at Himley and Swindon, in Staffordshire.
5 The suit was not within the legal limit of an assize of mordancestor. It appears by it, that the Englefields were co-heirs of the Barony of Dunstanville.
6 Maurice le Boteler, of Oversley in Warwickshire, hereditary Butler to the Earls of Leicester. See Dugdale's "Warwickshire."
7 Lord of Tresel (Trysull) in Staffordshire.
8 See Final Concord of 3rd November, 1242, respecting manor of Ruelegh (Rowley Regis).
9 Merchetum was the fine paid to the lord of a manor on the marriage of the daughters of tenants.
10 It was supposed that Margaret had made a private marriage, see p. 203, Vol. I., of Collections. She was sister of Thomas, Earl of Warwick, lately deceased, and heiress of the D'Oilli fief in right of her mother.
11 Probably Bradley in Biddulph, Whitmore being a member of Biddulph.
12 William de Englefeld, the mesne lord of Himley and Swindon. It appears from this suit he was a co-heir of the Barony of Dunstanville.
13 Although not stated, Muriel must have been daughter of Muriel de Dunstanville by another husband, and half-sister only to the co-heiresses of Geoffrey de Dunstanville.
14 The fine which customary tenants of a manor paid on the marriage of their daughters. It is supposed by some antiquaries to be a commuted payment for the "droit de seigneur," if such a right ever existed.