Plea Rolls for Staffordshire
1269-70

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Major-General Hon. George Wrottesley (editor)

Year published

1883

Pages

170-181

Citation Show another format:

'Plea Rolls for Staffordshire: 1269-70', Staffordshire Historical Collections, vol. 4 (1883), pp. 170-181. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=52394 Date accessed: 21 August 2014.


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Roll No. 150.

Headed, "Placita de diversis Comitatibus apud Derby, a die Paschœ in quindecim dies, coram Gilberto de Preston et sociis suis Justiciariis, anno quinquagesimo tertio." [7th April, 1269.]

Staff. Alesia, widow of Philip de Leye, sued Robert de Grendon for two mills in Schenestan, and Adam de Gresebrok for a messuage and two acres of land in the same vill, as her right, by writ of entry (breve de ingressu). Robert and Adam appeared, and called to warranty Robert de Leye, who was present in Court, and warranted the tenements to them, and, with the permission of the Court, gave up the said tenements to Alesia. She is therefore to have seisin, and the said Robert and Adam to have land of the said Robert to the value of them. m. 1.

Staff. William de Parles appeared against Simon Jordan, of Waleshale, Henry Onewyn, of Warre, John Tornepeny, Richard, son of the Parson, of Alta Warre, William de Byrches, Milisent de Warre, John, Prior of Sandwell, Edrich of Blokeswyk, William le Waleys, of Benetleye, Geoffrey de Russehale, Henry de Pyrye, and twenty-eight others, for cutting down and carrying away his trees at Hunesworth, to the value of 60l. The defendants did not appear, and the Sheriff is ordered to distrain them, &c., and to have their bodies before the Court on the Sunday after Ascension Day. m. 2.

Staff. Alesia, the widow of Philip de Leye, by her attorney, sued Richard de Stokes for one-third of a messuage and forty-two and a half acres and half a rood of land in Leye, and Henry le Mouner (the miller) for one-third of two messuages, two mills, and forty-six acres of land in the same vill, and Robert, son of Hugh de Leye, for one-third of four acres and a rood of land, and Roger de Paunton, Henry le Despencer, Thomas de Stepelton, Magister John le Fisicien, and other tenants in Leye, for a third of their tenements in the same vill, as her dower; and she sued John de Bromshulf for a third of a messuage and fourteen acres of land in Strongeshulf (Stramshall) as her dower.

All the defendants appeared, and called to warranty Robert de Leye, who was in Court, and warranted the tenements to them, and admitted the right of Alesia to dower out of them. Richard and the other defendants therefore are to hold their tenements in peace, and Alesia to have land of Robert elsewhere to the value of her dower. m. 2, dorso.

Staff. The Lord the King sent a precept to his beloved and faithful Gilbert de Preston to enquire by the oath of knights and other honest and loyal men of the co. of Stafford, by whom the truth could be best ascertained, whether the vill of Westoun-under-Couremund was situated in the King's Hundred of Tatesmanneslawe from time out of memory, and used to answer to the same Hundred with the vill of Caverswall as one vill, and whether Geoffrey Gryffyn, to whom has been granted the Hundred of Pyrhulle, to hold to him and his heirs at fee farm for ever, had annexed the said vill of Weston to the Hundred of Pyrhulle whilst he was Sub-Sheriff of Staffordshire, and still forced the said vill to answer to his Hundred of Pyrhulle, to the great detriment and loss of the King.

The inquisition made by Peter de Touk, Henry de Bredeheved, John de Bettelega, Robert, the Clerk of Gretewyz (Gratwich), Thomas de Tene, Roger de Lutlehay, Nicholas le Chamberleng, of Athelaston, Thomas de Combrugge, Benedict de Botredon, Richard de Towall, William, son of Philip de Tene, Robert de Lutheburgh, who say on their oath that the said vill of Weston is situated in the Hundred of Tatemoneslowe, and used to answer with the vill of Kavereswell as one vill in the Hundred of Tatemoneslowe, and that Geoffrey Gryffyn, formerly Sub-Sheriff of Staffordshire, had drawn (attraxit) the said vill to his Hundred of Pyrehull, which he held at fee farm from the Lord the King, without the King's license, immediately after the war of King John, now fifty-seven years ago. The above inquisition to be sent to the Barons of the Exchequer. (fn. 1) m. 3.

Staff. William Wyther and Orabilla his wife appeared by attorney against Philip de Draycote, to hold to the convention made between them respecting the wardship of Richard, son and heir of the said Philip, and respecting 21l. of annual rent in Draycote and Neweton. Philip did not appear, and the Sheriff is ordered to distrain him, &c., and produce him at fifteen days from Trinity, at York. m. 3.

Staff. John de Bromhuluf (sic) gives a mark for license of concord with Nicholas de Wulvelega and Margaret his wife. (fn. 2) m. 4.

Warw. William de Parles appeared against William Salomon, of Aston, Richard, the Vicar of the Church of Aston, and fourteen other tenants of Aston, in a plea that they should show by what right they claimed common of pasture in the land of the said William de Parles in Honesworthe, when William had no common rights in the lands of the said Salomon and the others. The defendants did not appear, and are to be attached at the Octaves of Michaelmas at Leycester. m. 5.

Leyc. William de Acorve gives 2 marks for a license of concord with William de Venables and Amice his wife in a plea of warranty of charter, and upon that came one Robert de Acorve (Okeover) stating he was the heir of one Hugh de Acorve his father, and that half the manor of Minsterton and 10s. of rent in Werehengle, to which the chyrograph referred, were given to Amice and her heirs on her marriage, and he gave 20s. to the King that enquiry might be made. A day is given to the parties at the Octaves of Michaelmas at Leycester, and William de Venables and Amice put in their place William de Langeford or Richard de Wylburham. m. 5.

Staff. The suit of William de Parles against Symon Jordan of Waleshale and others for cutting down his trees at Honesworthe adjourned to Leycester at the same term. m. 5.

Roll No. 151.

Headed, "Placita de diversis Comitatibus apud Glouc: coram R. de Myddelton et sociis suis Justiciariis itinerantibus, anno quinquagesimo tertio." [A.D. 1269.]

Sussex. Roys, the widow of John Doylli, (fn. 3) by her attorney, sued Alan de la Wure for a messuage and half a virgate of land, excepting twenty acres, in Warnham, and Alan le Draper, of Horsham, and other tenants, for land in the same vill, by writ of entry.

And Alan and the others appeared at Oxford on the morrow of Michaelmas, and called to warranty Alan le Draper, who called to warranty Roger, son of John Doylli; and Alan le Draper being asked in what county he wished Roger to be summoned, answered in co. Stafford. And the Sheriff of Staffordshire had returned that Roger held nothing within his bailiwick; and the attorney of Roys complained that the said Alan had called to warranty one who held nothing in the county where he sued for warranty. It is therefore considered that Roys should recover seisin, and Alan le Draper is in misericordiâ. m. 4.

Staff. Richard, son of James (de Blithfield), appeared against Robert, son of John, in a plea that he should permit him to have common of pasture in Knoleton (sic) (Colton), belonging to his free tenement in Blithefeld. Robert did not appear, and the Sheriff is ordered to distrain him, &c., and to produce him at Gloucester on the Octaves of Trinity. m. 6.

M. 10. "Placita de forinsecis Comitatibus apud Gloucestriam, in Octabis Sanctæ Trinitatis, anno LIII." [26th May, 1269.]

Staff. Robert, son of John de Edmundston (Admaston), was summoned to answer the plea of Richard, son of James de Blithefeld, that he should permit him to have common of pasture in five acres of land in Colton, belonging to his free tenement in Blithesfeld, of which the said Robert had unjustly disseised James de Blithefeld, the father of Richard, whose heir he is.

And Robert appeared, and denied he had disseised the said James, and stated that one William de Wasteneys, William de Colton, William Griffyn, and Hugh, son of Thomas, held the said land in common, and in severalty, excepting so far that the said James, father of Richard, should have common of pasture in it, and they had afterwards enfeoffed him (Robert) of the tenement, to be held in the same way as William and the others had held it, and that the said James, father of Richard, never had common of pasture of which he could be disseised, and on this he appealed to a jury; and Richard likewise. The Sheriff was ordered to summon a jury to be at Northampton at fifteen days from St. John the Baptist. m. 11.

Roll No. 144.

Headed, "Placita coram Rege in Octabis Sanctæ Trinitatis (53 H. III)." [26th May, 1269.]

Staff. Philip Marmyun by his attorney appeared against Jordan de Pulesdon, Roger Bagot, Thomas de Pesale, Geoffrey de Gresele, Roger de Walton, Geoffrey de Aston, Richard de Flotebroc, Bertram de Burgo, Henry de Wyliston (sic), Thomas Donne, and eight others named, for entering his manor of Northbury, vi et armis, and committing damage, &c. (as before). The defendants did not appear; and the Sheriff was ordered to attach them, and sent word that Roger Bagot was attached by John Bagot of Suston, and Richard de Pesenhale and Henry de Wiverston by Adam the miller, of Wyverston, and another, and Bertram de Burgo by Thomas de Wilbriton and another. The Sheriff is ordered therefore to arrest them and produce them at fifteen days from St. John the Baptist. m. 2.

Staff. Richard Brun appeared against Robert Cotun (sic), Simon Burgilun, Adam le Fevre, of Swynerton, and six others, for coming to his house at Eston and taking from him vi et armis, 13 marks in money, and a horse of the value of 6 marks, and committing other damages, &c. The defendants did not appear; and the Sheriff was ordered to distrain them, &c., and returned that John, the Lord of Somerton (Swynnerton), and Scofanus de Aspele, stood bail for Robert de Cotes, &c. The Sheriff is ordered to distrain them and the other sureties, and produce the defendants on the morrow of St. John the Baptist. m. 2.

Staff. Robert de Knitele was attached to answer the complaint of Philip Marmiun, that he had come vi et armis to his manor of Norbiri on the Thursday after Ascension Day, 48 H. III., and prostrated his houses and mills, carried away his timber, broken the dam of his fish-pool, cut down his trees, and committed other damages, to the amount altogether of 200l. Robert appeared and defended the suit, and stated that he ought not to be required to answer to this writ, because the time mentioned was a time of war, and he was a man of war (homo guerræ), and an adherent of the adverse party; and he asked for the judgment of the Court whether it had not been provided and ordained by the Lord the King and the magnates who are of his Council, that all trespasses committed at that time should be pleaded before the Justices assigned, "de terris datis." (fn. 4)

Salop. Petronella de Eyton appeared against Robert de Benethale, Hugh his brother, John de Kentreye, and Philip de Benethale, in a plea of rape (raptu) and breach of the King's peace, of which she appealed them; and they did not appear. The Sheriff is ordered to arrest them and keep them in safe custody, and to produce them coram Domino Rege at the Octaves of Michaelmas. m. 15, dorso.

Staff. In the plea of Richard Brun versus William Serle, for abducting his ward Avelina and taking his goods, &c., from Aston-in-Hales, to the value of 40 marks, William appeared and denied the accusation in toto, and put himself on a jury, and Richard likewise. The Sheriff is therefore commanded to summon a jury coram Rege for the Octaves of Michaelmas. m. 17.

Warw. William Bagot was summoned to answer before the King by what warrant he had entered into a messuage and carucate of land at Sowe, which Hugh de Loges, lately dead, held of the King by Sergeanty, and which he had alienated without license, and which the King had conceded to Richard de Loges, the son and heir of the said Hugh. William appeared and prayed a view of the land; a day is given to the parties at a month from Michaelmas. m. 17, dorso.

Staff. The suit of Philip Marmiun versus Robert de Knighteley comes up again. In answer to the plea of Robert, Philip stated by his attorney that the Lord the King by virtue of his regal power, could and ought to hear and determine all suits of trespass committed by any of his kingdom, and asked for judgment, inasmuch as Robert had admitted the trespass and damage complained of, and had stated nothing except that he had adhered in time of war to a party adverse to the Lord the King. Upon this Robert de Knightley withdrew the exception he had made to the writ, and denied the whole accusation, and put himself on the country, and Philip likewise. The Sheriff is therefore commanded to summon a jury for the Octaves of Michaelmas. A postscriptum adds, that on the Octaves of Michaelmas the parties appeared in Court, and a concord was made by which Robert was to give Philip 25 marks, at two terms, viz., 12½ marks at the close of Easter, 54 H. III., and the rest at the Feast of St. Peter ad Vincula following, and should he fail to make payment, he conceded that the Sheriff might levy the money from his lands. m. 25, dorso.

Roll No. 145 is a duplicate of No. 144.

Roll No. 146 contains no Staffordshire suits.

Roll No. 142.

Membrane 6, headed, "Assisæ et Inquisitiones captæ apud Northanton, die Veneris, scilicet in vigilia Exaltationis Sanctæ Crucis, coram Gilberto de Preston et Ricardo de Seyton, sibi per eundem Gilbertum associato, anno LIII." [13th September, 1269.]

The King sent mandate to his beloved and faithful G. de Preston, that ex parte Hamon, son of Hamon, it has been shown that whereas he, the said Hamon, being under age and in ward to William de Parles, had lately arraigned an assize of novel disseisin against Geoffrey de Lucy, concerning a tenement in Olthorpe; certain malefactors and disturbers of our peace at the very instant that the assize was being taken, had come vi et armis, and had taken and abducted the said Hamon, against the said custos, and still detain him, in order to prevent the assize from being taken, against our peace and in manifest contempt of our Court; we have therefore assigned you to inquire diligently into the truth, and to act in the matter of the transgression according to law and custom. Twelve jurymen elected to try the question, say upon their oath, that Geoffrey de Lucy, Hugh le Engayne of Northampton, Thomas de St. Andrew, John de Cantelou, Jordan de Morton, Thomas fitz Hamon, John de Dalham, and Henry de Isham, on the Sunday of the Feast of St. Giles in the present year, came to the house (hospitium) of Symon Gaugy, in the market-place of Northampton, where the said Hamon and William de Parles his custos were staying, and abducted the same Hamon, against his will and that of his guardian, and carried him to the manor of the said Geoffrey at Daylington, and the said jury on being questioned as to those who were present at the said abduction, stated that when William de Parles raised the hue and cry, one Richard de St. Neots, at that time Bailiff of Ralph le Cachepole, and William de la Chaunge, had come to the hue and cry and impeded the said William from prosecuting it, and had taken away the horn from a groom of William, with which the hue and cry was raised, &c. The defendants, with the exception of Henry of St. Neots, did not appear, and the Sheriff was commanded to arrest them. A day was afterwards given to William de Parles to prosecute his suit against them at Westminster, at fifteen days from Michaelmas. m. 6.

Roll No. 147.

Headed, "Placita coram Domino Rege apud Westm: de Octabis Sancti Michaelis, anno, &c., LIII." [6th October, 1269.]

Salop. Petronilla de Eiton appeared against Robert de Benehale, Hugh his brother, John de Keverya, and Philip de Benehale, in a plea of rape, robbery, &c., and they did not appear; and the Sheriff was ordered to arrest them, and if he could not find them, to put them into the exigent and to outlaw them; and with regard to Hugh de Benehale, the Sheriff returned that he was in his prison; and he is therefore commanded to produce him as a prisoner at the Octaves of St. Martin, and with regard to Philip de Benehale the Sheriff returned he would not permit him to arrest him. The Sheriff is therefore commanded to go with sufficient force, &c., and to take him and to keep him in safe custody until the same date. m. 2, dorso.

Roll No. 148 is the attorney and essoin Roll of the same term, and of Easter and Trinity Terms, 54 H. III.

Essonia, "De quindena Paschæ, anno LIII."

Salop. Henry de la Porte versus Edelina, the widow of Roger Corbet, (fn. 5) in a plea of trespass by William, son of Adam.

William de Baggeshore versus the same, in the same plea by Roger, son of William.

Reginald de Gravenore versus the same, in the same plea by William le Waleys.

John de Mortimer versus the same, &c., by Alan Prest.

Richard de Wrotteslega (fn. 6) versus the same, &c., by Peter de Cunce.

William Chantereye versus the same, &c., by Baldwyne de Stotwille, and twenty-four others, likewise essoin their attendance in the same suit.

Roll No. 149.

Headed, "Placita coram Domino Rege, in Octabis Sancti Michaelis, anno L., tertio." [6th October, 1269.]

Staff. Peter de Wynton, Parson of the Church of Esseburne, appeared by attorney against Hugh Cave of Edulfeston, William de Benetlega, and Richard Cok, for taking his cattle from his pasture in Esseburne in co. Derby, and driving them to the manor of the Prior of Tudebury of Matherfeld (Mayfield), and there detaining them. The defendants did not appear, and the Sheriff returned that they lived in co. Derby. The Sheriff of Derbyshire is therefore commanded to attach them for fifteen days from St. Martin. m. 9, dorso.

Staff. Robert de Berneville sued Nicholas de Turri for a messuage and a virgate of land in Witegrave by writ of right. Nicholas appeared and asked for license of concord, and had a chirograph. m. 11.

Staff. Philip Marmiun appeared by attorney against Robert le Poter of Draitone, Henry de Brok, William, son of Ralph de Draiton, Hugh de Draitone, Robert Parson of Draiton, Robert Champeneis, Robert de Faresleye, Henry de Wirleye, William de Hopwas, William Serle, Walter Serle, Richard de Echeles, Henry Russel, Richard, son of Inge, and thirty-seven others named, for entering his wood of Middelton and cutting down and carrying away his trees. The defendants did not appear, and the Sheriff is ordered to attach them for fifteen days from Hillary. m. 11.

Derby. A precept was sent to the Sheriff that whereas the Lord the King had given to his beloved Philip de Stapelton all the lands and tenements of Robert fitz Nicholas in Langele, Thurvedeston and Bruere, with a rent of 20s. 2d. in Weston, on the occasion of the transgressions committed by the said Robert during the late disturbances in the kingdom; and Robert is prepared to stand to the Dictum de Kenilwurth to redeem his lands, &c., the Sheriff is therefore to cause to be extended the said lands and tenements according to their true value by the oath of honest and loyal men by whom the truth can be best ascertained, viz., how much the lands are worth in demesne as in services, &c., and to have the extent distinctly and properly drawn up and produced coram Rege on the morrow of St. Martin. m. 15.

Staff. Edith, the widow of Philip le Symple, appeared against Richard le Jovene of Adilbroke, Michael de Kant, Davet de Kantia (Kent), and Richard le Franceis for coming vi et armis to her house in Rouley, breaking it open and taking her goods and chattels to the value of 20 marks. The defendants did not appear, and are to be attached for the Octaves of Hillary.

The same Edith appeared against William de Edlinge for having instigated the outrage. He did not appear, and the Sheriff is commanded to attach him for the same term. m. 15, dorso.

Warw. William Bagod was summoned to show by what warrant he had entered into a messuage and a carucate of land in Sowe, which Hugh de Loges, who was lately dead, had held of the King by Sergeanty, and had alienated, &c. (as before).

William Bagod appeared and took exception to the form of the writ by which the Lord the King was made to sue for a third party, who was of full age. A postscriptum adds that afterwards on the morrow of the Ascension, 55 H. III., the said William withdrew his exception, and stated Hugh de Loges had enfeoffed him by a charter which he produced, and which testified that Hugh gave to William Bagod and his heirs all his land in Sowe which he had recovered by a writ of novel disseisin against Richard his son before Gilbert de Preston, the King's Justice at Shokebyri, and which donation the Lord the King had confirmed and ratified by Inspeximus dated 16th February, 54 H. III.

Richard de Loges stated that long before the above date the said Hugh his father had been coram Rege, and was found to be "non compos," and the King had then for a fine of 120 marks committed to him the custody of all his lands and tenements, with power to the said Richard to sue in the King's name for all lands, &c., which had been alienated by the said Hugh, who was to be decently and honourably maintained by him, and he asked for the judgment of the Court whether the confirmation by the King of the grant of Hugh de Loges ought to avail against the King's grant to him. Afterwards a precept from the King and Council ordered that notwithstanding the Inspeximus produced by William Bagod, the Court should proceed to do justice. m. 18, dorso.

Staff. The Dean and Chapter of Wulverhampton appeared against Thomas de Hamsted, John Gocelyn, Richard, son of Henry de Hamsted, and William le Bedel, of Lichefeud, in a plea that whereas they and their tenants of the Church of Wulverhampton by the charters of the King's progenitors possess the liberty that no Sheriff or King's Bailiff should distrain the Dean and Chapter or their tenants within their liberty, the said Thomas and the others had lately at Peleshale within the said liberty taken the cattle of Robert de Peleshale, Richard, son of William, Walter le Ken, and other tenants, and detained them until they had extorted from them a mark. The defendants did not appear, and the Sheriff is ordered to attach them for the morrow of the Purification. m. 31, dorso.

Roll No. 152.

M. 9. Headed, "Placita coram Domino Adamo de Grenvill, die Lunæ prox. post Festum Sancti Jacobi Apostolici, apud Horeburn, anno quinquagesimo tertio." (fn. 7) [29th July, 1269.]

Essonia.

Staff. John de Chetewinde versus William, son of Robert de Wyverston, by William Shortloc, in a plea of mort d'ancestor, at three weeks from Michaelmas, at Oxon, was pledged to prosecute.

Elena, the wife of the same John, versus the same, by John de Eyton, at the same term, &c.

Thomas, son of Roger le Pestur (the Baker), who brought an assize of mort d'ancestor against William, son of Warine le Provost, respecting two parts of a messuage in Haywode appeared on the above day, and it was testified that the said William had never been summoned. The Sheriff is therefore commanded to summon him to be at Oxford at three weeks from Michaelmas. m. 9.

Staff. From William de Chawerreswell, the Sheriff of Staffordshire, in misericordiâ for contempt, 20 marks.

From Ralph de Burgo, Sub-Sheriff of Staffordshire, for a withdrawal (subtractione) of writs, 10 marks.

From John Saulle, the Clerk of the Sheriff of Staffordshire, for contempt, 100s. m. 9.

"Assisa captæ apud Horburn, die Lunæ prox., post festum Sancti Jacobi Apostolici, anno LIII." [29th July, 1269.]

Staff. An assize, &c., if Richard de Costentyn, William Brun, John de Constantin, Jordan of Ireland (de Hibernia), William, son of Richard de Childecote, and Hugh his brother, had unjustly disseised Nicholas de Eccleshale of his free tenement in Thorp, viz., of a messuage, and fifty-seven acres and a rood of land.

Robert, the Bailiff of Richard Costentin, came and answered for all the defendants, and stated that the tenement had belonged to William Brun, who wished to sell it to Nicholas; and Richard, as capital lord, had refused to allow Nicholas entry into the tenement, and bought the tenement himself from William, and that Nicholas had never had seisin of it, and William Brun had quit claimed to Richard the tenement by a charter, which Robert Seolwyn, the Bailiff of Richard, produced in Court.

Nicholas stated that William had enfeoffed him of the tenement by a charter which he produced, and had put him in peaceable seisin of it, and he had held it for seven weeks and upwards, and William had also given to him the original charter (cartam capitalem) by which he held the same tenement from one Geoffrey Costentyn, and that the charter which Robert Selwyn produced had been drawn up fraudulently and by collusion, and he appealed to a jury. The jury state that the defendants, with the exception of John Costentyn and Jordan le Hyreis, had unjustly disseised Nicholas of the tenement in question. Damages 10s. m. 10.

Roll No. 153 is the Record of Assizes taken before John de Cokefeld, assigned specially to take assizes in Norfolk and Suffolk. (fn. 8) It contains no Staffordshire suits.

Rolls Nos. 154 and 155 contain no Staffordshire suits.

Tower Records, No. 39.

Headed, "Placita apud Westm: in Octabis Sancti Michaelis, anno LIII., incipiente LIII." [6th October, 1269.]

Staff. The Prior of Stanes, by his attorney, sued Philip de Draycote to acquit him of the service which William de Cuverswell and Mary his wife claimed from him for the free tenement which he holds of Philip in Stalington, and of which Philip is medius between them, and ought to acquit him. Philip did not appear, and is to be attached by better pledges for the Octaves of the Purification. m. 21.

Staff. The Sheriff is commanded to cause to be recorded in full county the suit which was in the County Court by the King's writ of right, between Robert, son of Robert de Swynesheved, plaintiff, and Hugh, son of William de Swynesheved, tenant of two parts of a virgate of land, excepting nine acres, in Swynesheved (Swineshead), and in which the said Hugh avers that the Court delivered a false judgment, and to send the record under his seal into the King's Court. And the Sheriff had done nothing, but returned that the writ reached him too late. He is therefore commanded as before, and to send the record here at fifteen days from Easter. m. 22.

Leic. Joan, the widow of Henry de Hastings, sued William de Harecurt and Hillaria his wife, (fn. 9) for a third of 20l. of land in Hayleston, and she sued Robert de Stapleton for a third of 40s. of rent in Wystantowe, as her dower. The defendants appeared and called to warranty John, son and heir of the said Henry, who is under age, and in ward to William de Valence, and whose land is in custody of Richard the King of Germany, by charters of Henry the father of the heir. The defendants called to warranty appeared by their attorney and conceded the dower claimed. m. 26.

Banco Roll No. 21.

Headed, "Placita coram Domino Rege, (fn. 10) in Octabis Sancti Hillarii, anno regni Regis Henrici quinquagesimo quarto." [20th January, 1270.]

Salop. In the suit of Petronilla de Eytone versus Robert de Benethale and others, for rape and robbery, the Sheriff returned that all the defendants except Philip de Benethale are in prison at Salop. The Sheriff is ordered to produce them Coram Rege at fifteen days from St. John the Baptist. m. 10, dorso.

Staff. Richard de Loges came into Court and sued to replevy his land which had been taken into the King's hands through his default of appearance on the Octaves of Hillary versus the Lord the King, in a plea of land in Rodbaldeston and Wyrlegh. m. 14.

Roll No. 156.

The second membrane, headed, "Placita coram Domino Rege, a die Paschæ, in quindecim dies, apud Westm: anno, etc., L. quarto." [27th April, 1270.]

Staff. The Lord the King, by his attorney Richard de Wymberton, appeared against Ralph, son of Ralph de Burgo, in a plea that whereas the King had lately recovered the advowson of the Church of Asseburne, together with the chapelries appurtenant to it, the said Ralph had come with Roger Wyldegos and others to the Chapel of Edelveston and taken away a sum of money and other goods and chattels belonging to the said Chapel. The defendants did not appear, and the Sheriff is ordered to distrain them, &c., and to produce them on the Octaves of St. John the Baptist. m. 13, dorso.

Staff. The Lord the King, by his attorney Thomas de Weseham, sued Richard de Loges for the manor of Rodmareston (Rodbaston) and the vill of Great Wyrle, excepting two virgates of land, and in which Richard had no entry except by Hugh de Loges, to whom the King had demised them for his life.

Warw. The King, by the same Thomas, sued the said Richard for a messuage and four carucates of land and 20 marks of annual rent in Cestreton, in which Richard had no entry except as above.

Richard appeared, and defended his right to the lands, and stated that a certain Richard le Venur, (fn. 11) his ancestor, had held the said tenement in the time of St. Edward the King of England, by Sergeanty, and from the said Richard the tenements had descended from heir to heir of the heirs procreated of the said Richard to Hugh de Loges his father, whose heir he is, and the said Hugh his father, after the death of Hugh, grandfather of Richard, entered into the said tenements, and held them by Sergeanty of the present King, as his son and heir, and he asked that the Lord the King, if it was his pleasure (si placeat), should show cause in what way Hugh his father had changed his status in the said lands and tenements within the King's own reign, so that after his death they should revert to the King.

And Thomas replied that Hugh de Loges, father of Richard, had the custody of the Hayes and Royal Forest of Kanoc, and held the said tenements of the King by Sergeanty, and Hugh was convicted of a certain trespass committed by him within his own bailiwick, in the time of John Byset, the Justiciary of the Forests citra Trent, (fn. 12) and the said tenements fell into the King's hands, who was in seisin of them for a year and a half; and the King had then of his special grace conceded the lands to the said Hugh for his life for a fine of 120 marks, and that after the death of the said Hugh the lands reverted to the King, and he appealed to a jury.

And the said Thomas was asked by the Court whether he could not verify his statement by the Rolls of the Chancery or the Exchequer, or by other means, because the Lord the King should not subject his claim to a jury when it could be proved by other methods, and such grants of the King are usually and ought to be enrolled; and the said Thomas stated that the grant made to Hugh de Loges had been enrolled, but the rolls had been burnt, and it was therefore necessary to inquire into the facts by a jury.

Richard denied that any rolls of the reign of the present King had been burnt. A postscriptum states that afterwards, on the morrow of the Purifica tion, the said Thomas came and stated that he was ready to show that the King had only granted the lands to Hugh de Loges for his life by the writs sent to the Sheriff to put him into seisin of them.

Richard replied that the King never held the tenements in his demesne as of fee, in consequence of their having been taken into his hands for a transgression, and that, for a fine of 100l. which Hugh de Loges had made, the King had granted the lands to him without any conditions, excepting only the Bailiwick of the Forest of Kannoc and the wood of Galeweye (Gauley), which were to remain to the King in consequence of the said crime (delictum), and he appealed to the Rolls of the Exchequer in support of this. Afterwards, at fifteen days from Trinity, 55 H. III., a scrutiny was made of the Rolls of the Exchequer at Westminster, by which it appeared that Hugh de Loges had fined 100l. for a transgression made in his Bailiwick of the Forest of Kannoc, and a mandate was sent to the Sheriff of Staffordshire to take security for the payment of the said fine, retaining in the King's hands the Bailiwick of the Forest of Kannock and the wood of Gauleye, which he had lost by the judgment of the Curia Regis, as appeared in the originalia of 24 H. III., (fn. 13) and on the Great Roll (of the Pipe) of 25 H. III., in co. Stafford; and the said Richard states if that is not sufficient (here the record stops abruptly). m. 14.

Roll Nos. 157 and 158 contain no Staffordshire suits.

Banco Roll No. 22.

Headed, "Placita apud Westm: de Octabis Sanctæ Trinitatis, coram M. de Litlebiri, Magistro R. de Seyton, J. de Cobeham, anno R. R. H., LIIII." [15th June, 1270.]

Derby. An assize of last presentation to the Church of Langeleye, the advowson of which Robert fitz Nicholas claimed against Robert de Stafford, Henry de Chamera, and Magister John de Weston. Robert fitz Nicholas stated that one Ralph fitz Nicholas his father, whose heir he is, last presented a certain Walter his Clerk, who was admitted and instituted upon his presentation, and had died parson of the Church. Robert and the others did not appear, and had previously made default, and the assize was therefore taken without them. The jury find in favour of Robert fitz Nicholas. m. 3, dorso.

Staff. Matilda, the widow of Ralph le Rende, sued Adam Terry for a third of a rood of land in Leppeley (Lapley), and other tenants in the same vill for a third of their tenements, as her dower. The defendants did not appear, and are to be re-summoned for the Octaves of Michaelmas. The land to be taken into the King's hands. m. 9.

Staff. Symon de Coventre, Clericus, and Joan his wife, sued the Prior of the Hospital of St. John of Lychefeld for two acres of land in Lychefeld, which they claim as the right of Joan. The Prior did not appear, and had previously made default, and the land had been taken into the King's hands. Symon and Joan therefore to recover seisin by the default of the Prior. m. 13, dorso.

Staff. Thomas, son of Hugh le Fraunceys, of Amelecote, sued Ingeran, son of Laurence de Amelecote, for a messuage and two acres of land in Amelecote (Amblecote). Ingeran did not appear, and is to be summoned for a month after Michaelmas, and the land taken into the King's hands. m. 25.

Staff. William Trumwyne appeared against Nicholas de Newenham and Angnes his wife in a plea that they should warrant to him a messuage and twenty-four acres of land in Sandon, for which he holds their charter. Nicholas and Agnes did not appear, and are to be attached for three weeks from Michaelmas. m. 25, dorso.

Derby. Margaret, the widow of William fitz Herbert, sued Walter de Rydeware and Elena his wife for one-third of a toft and fifty-six acres of land, and half a rood and three bovates of land, and sixteen acres of wood, twelve and a half acres of pasture, and 53s. of rent in Doscynton, as her dower. Walter and Elena called to warranty Agnes, the niece and heir of William fitz Herbert, who is under age, and in ward to Margaret de Ferrars, Countess of Derby, who appeared by her attorney, and warranted the land to them, and with the permission of the Court conceded dower to the said Margaret. Walter and Elena are therefore to hold their land peaceably, and Margaret to have dower of the same value out of the land of Agnes in the custody of the Countess. m. 27.

Staff. Thomas de Weseham, the Seneschall of the Forest of Kynnock (Cannock), appeared against Hugh de Eynesham in a plea that he should render to him an account for the time he had been his bailiff of the said forest. And Hugh had not appeared to his summons, and had concealed himself, and it was testified that he was wandering about the bailiwick (vagabundus in ballivâ). The Sheriff is ordered to arrest him, and to produce him at fifteen days from Michaelmas. m. 27, dorso.

Staff. Henry de Staymore acknowledged he owed to Magister Robert de Schefeud 40 marks, to be paid at the Feast of the Nativity of the Virgin in this year; and if he failed the Sheriff might raise the money from his goods and chattels. m. 29, dorso.

Rolls Nos. 159 and 160 contain no Staffordshire suits.

Roll No. 161.

Headed, "Adhuc de Octabis Sancti Martini." Supposed to be of Michaelmas, 55 H. III. [18th November, 1270.]

Staff. Roger Bidolf appeared against John de Wethamstede, Henry de Bray, Alan Pes, bailiff of John de Werdun, of Dulton (sic) (Alton), in a plea that whereas it had been ordained by the Common Counsel of the Magnates of the Kingdom that no one should be distrained to perform suit at the courts of their lords except according to the form of their feoffment, they had distrained him to do suit to his lord of Alton, against the said prohibition, &c. The defendants did not appear, and are to be attached by better pledges for a month from Easter. m. 5.

Footnotes

1 Domesday places both Caverswall and Weston-Coyney in Totmonslow Hundred, and they are in that Hundred at the present time.
2 See Calendar of Fines; this fine was levied at Nottingham, 20th May, 1296.
3 Of Ranton, Staffordshire.
4 These were the Justices specially assigned to hear claims for the redemption of land under the Dictum of Kenilworth. Some of their proceedings are extant, but none unfortunately relating to Staffordshire.
5 Edelina was widow of Roger Corbet, of Kings Bromley.
6 This Richard de Wrottesley was brother of Hugh de Wrottesley, who was head of his house at this date (Deeds at Wrottesley).
7 This Roll is one of a somewhat rare character. It is not a Coram Rege Roll, but is the record of some of the suits which Adam de Grenville, one of the Justices specially assigned to take assizes in various counties, heard and determined in his circuit of 53 H. III. See Introduction for an account of these annual Justices. Some of these Justices in place of sitting in the chief towns of the counties, travelled from one manor house to another, accepting the hospitality of the principal persons of the county. In the case before us Adam de Grenville heard all his Staffordshire suits at the Bishop's Manor of Harborne. Such a practice must have been very inconvenient to the local officials, and it will be noted that the Sheriff had neglected to serve the writs, and apparently was not in attendance himself.
8 See Introduction. This Roll forms no part of the proceedings of the Justices Itinerant in the counties named.
9 Hillaria was sister of the famous Henry de Hastings, and second wife of William de Harecourt of Ellenhall and Ranton (Ranton Chartulary). William de Harecourt died shortly after this date, for the Fine Rolls show he was dead in 54 H. III.
10 This Roll has been designated a Banco Roll at the Record Office, but it is clearly a Coram Rege Roll.
11 Richard Chenvin was the chief Forester of Staffordshire A.D. 1086 (Domesday Book).
12 It appears from the Quo Warranto Rolls that he had killed a stag to his own use.
13 The originalia of this year are missing.