Lancashire Fines
1-11 Henry III

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

William Farrer (editor)

Year published

1899

Pages

40-54

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'Lancashire Fines: 1-11 Henry III', Final Concords for Lancashire, Part 1: 1189-1307 (1899), pp. 40-54. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=52532 Date accessed: 28 August 2014.


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Lancaster.

3 Henry III.

No. 1.—At Lancaster, (fn. 1) on Wednesday next after the feast of St. Hilary, 3 Henry III. [16th January, 1219].

Between Syrith, daughter of Godwin, and Wynniva and Matilda, her sisters, plaintiffs, and Walter Mutun, tenant of one oxgang of land with the appurtenances in Ribecestre. An assize of mort d'ancestor had been summoned between them.

Syrith, Wyniva and Matilda quit-claimed from themselves and their heirs to Walter and his heirs in perpetuity, all their right in the land. For this quit-claim Walter gave them twenty shillings sterling.

No. 2.—At Lancaster, on Wednesday next after the Octave of St. Hilary, 3 Henry III. [23rd January, 1219].

Between Beatrice, formerly the wife of Hugh de Mitton, Michael de Athelakeston, and Avice, his wife, and Richard, son of Swain and Yseuda, his wife, plaintiffs, (fn. 2) and Nicholas de Yeland, tenant, of two oxgangs of land and two parts of one oxgang with the appurtenances in the town of Hoton. An assize of mort d'ancestor had been summoned between them.

Beatrice, Michael and Avice, his wife, Richard and Yseuda, his wife, quit-claimed from themselves and their heirs to Nicholas and his heirs in perpetuity all their rights in the land. For this quit-claim Nicholas gave them ten marks of silver.

No. 3.—At Lancaster, on Tuesday next after the Octave of St. Hilary, 3 Henry III. [22nd January, 1219].

Between Richard de Wykerdley, plaintiff, and Richard de Hylton, tenant of six oxgangs of land (fn. 3) with the appurtenances in Hylton, whereupon a plea had been summoned between them in the said Court by the King's writ of præcipe quod reddal; in which land Richard de Hylton had no entry except by Yvort, his father, to whom Richard de Wikerley had pledged the same for a term which has now expired, as he avers, and which Richard de Wikerley claims to be his inheritance.

Richard de Hylton acknowledged the land to be the right of Richard de Wikerley. For this acknowledgment he granted the said land to Richard de Hylton, to hold of him to farm for the term of 17 years, rendering yearly two shillings at the feast of St. John the Baptist, and performing forinsec service, for all other service and demand. At the end of 17 years, the land to quietly return to Richard de Wikerley or his heirs, unless in the mean time Richard de Hylton or his heirs, with good intent towards Richard de Wirkedley or his heirs, shall do something whereby the land ought finally to remain to them. For confirmation of this agreement Richard de Hylton gave Richard de Wyrkedley one mark of silver.

No. 4.—At Lancaster, on Monday next after the Purification of the Virgin Mary, 3 Henry III. [4th February, 1219].

Between William, son of Robert, plaintiff, and Gilbert fitz Renfrid, tenant of eight oxgangs of land with the appurtenances in Lathebote. (fn. 4) An assize of mort d'ancestor had been summoned between them,

William quit-claimed the land from himself and his heirs, to Gilbert and his heirs. For this Gilbert gave him two oxgangs of land in Warton which belonged to Robert de Treueles; and also the service of eight shillings yearly to be received of William, son of Warin, in Thistelton, and homage; to hold to him and his heirs, of Gilbert and his heirs in perpetuity, rendering yearly two shillings at the feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Mary, for all secular service and demand, saving forinsec service to the chief lord.

No. 5.—At Westminster, on the Quindene of Holy Trinity, 3 Henry III. [16th June, 1219].

Between Thomas le Waleis, plaintiff, by Richard le Waleis put in his place, and William le Butiller, (fn. 5) tenant of two oxgangs of land with the appurtenances in Bruches. (fn. 6) An assize of mort d'ancestor had been summoned between them.

Thomas acknowledged the land to be the right of William. For this acknowledgment William granted to Thomas the moiety of the said two oxgangs, to wit, that moiety which lies towards the sun; to hold to him and his heirs, of William and his heirs, by the service of twelve pence yearly at the feast of St. John the Baptist, for all service, except forinsec service.

No. 6.—At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 5 Henry III. [20th January, 1221].

Between Adam le Arbalaster and Alice, his wife, plaintiffs, by the said Adam put in Alice's place, and Richard Waleys, tenant of four oxgangs of land with the appurtenances in Withull. (fn. 7)

Adam and Alice quit-claimed from themselves and their heirs to Richard and his heirs in perpetuity, all their right in the land. For which Richard gave them ten marks of silver.

No. 7.—At Westminster, on the morrow of the Purification of the Virgin Mary, 7 Henry III. [3rd February, 1223].

Between Robert de Viliers, plaintiff, and Walter de Holes, and Beatrice his wife, tenants of one oxgang of land with the appurtenances in Holes. (fn. 8)

Robert acknowledged the land to be the right of Beatrice, to hold of him and his heirs, to Walter and Beatrice, and the heirs of Beatrice, in perpetuity, rendering yearly two shillings at two terms, to wit, one moiety at Easter, and the other at the feast of St. Michael, for all service, except forinsec service. Moreover Robert granted to them, and the heirs of Beatrice, common of pasture in the said town for all their own beasts, wherever the beasts of the free men of the said town depasture. Nevertheless the said Robert and his heirs shall have power to break up (frussire) a portion of the pasture, lying between the water of Ascalon and "la onisse," in whatever place shall be to their greater advantage, for the improvement of the Manor of Holes, without gainsay of Walter and Beatrice, and the heirs of Beatrice. For this acknowledgment they gave him twenty shillings sterling.

No. 7a.—At Westminster, on the morrow of St. Luke, 8 Henry III. [19th October, 1224].

Between Simon de Grubbeheued, plaintiff, and Richard, son of Richard, tenant of the Manor of Lathom with the appurtenances. (fn. 9)

Simon quit-claimed from himself and his heirs, to Richard and his heirs, in perpetuity, all right in the manor. For this quit-claim Richard granted to Simon three carucates of land in Childewal, and three carucates in Raby, and two oxgangs in Anlauesargh, to wit, the whole of his land in the said towns; to hold of him and his heirs, to Simon and his heirs for ever, rendering yearly one pound of cumin, or four pence at the Nativity of our Lord, for all service, saving forinsec service. And Richard and his heirs will warrant to Simon and his heirs the land hereby granted.

No. 8.—At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Michael, 8 Henry III. [6th October, 1224].

Between Matilda, daughter of Henry, plaintiff, and Roger, son of Roger de Leycestre, respecting one carucate of land with the appurtenances in Ribbelton. Matilda complained that Roger had not kept the agreement made by chirograph in the court of King John, between Roger, father of the said Roger, whose heir he is, and the said Matilda. There had been a "plea of fine made" between them.

Roger granted to Matilda one oxgang of land of the said carucate, to wit, that which William de Echelton held; to hold to her and her heirs, of him and his heirs in perpetuity, together with two other oxgangs of land, which she formerly held, being part of the said carucate, by the said fine; rendering yearly two shillings at the four terms, to wit, at the Nativity of our Lord 6d., at Mid-Lent 6d., at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist 6d., and at the feast of St. Michael 6d., for all service, custom, and secular demand, And Roger and his heirs will warrant to Matilda and her heirs the said three oxgangs for the said service. For this acknowledgment Matilda quit-claimed from herself and her heirs, to Roger and his heirs for ever, all her right in the surplus of the said carucate. And be it known that the fine previously made is hereby cancelled. (fn. 10)

No. 9.—At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 9 Henry III. [20th January, 1225].

Between William Gernet, plaintiff, and Roger Gernet, whom William le Vilein and Cecily his wife called to warrant, respecting Cecily's dower of the Manor of Fischwic with the appurtenances, which Manor William Gernet claimed against William and Cecily, and which Roger warranted to them. (fn. 11)

William Gernet quit-claimed from himself and his heirs, to Roger, William and Cecily, and the heirs of Roger, in perpetuity, all his right in the Manor. For this quit-claim Roger granted that William Gernet and his heirs should have and hold half a carucate of land in Crophill, which he formerly held of Roger and his heirs, performing therefor forinsec service belonging to half a carucate of land, where 21 carucates make the service of one knight for all service.

No. 10.—At Westminster, in a month from Easter, 9 Henry III. [27th April, 1225].

Between Nicholas, Master of the Hospital of St. Leonard of Lancaster, plaintiff, and Roger, son of Ralph, impedient of five acres of land with the appurtenances in Lancastre, respecting which a plea of warranty of charter had been summoned between them. (fn. 12)

Roger acknowledged the land to be the right of the Master, and of the Hospital of St. Leonard of Lancaster, as that which they have of the gift of Warin, son of Emma, his grandfather, whose heir he is; to hold to the Master and his successors and to the said Hospital, of Roger and his heirs in perpetuity, in free, pure and perpetual alms, quit of all secular service and demand. And Roger and his heirs will warrant the land to them as aforesaid for ever. For this acknowledgment the Master has received Roger and his heirs into all benefits and prayers which shall hereafter be made in the said Hospital.

No. 11.—At Westminster, on the morrow of the feast of SS. Simon and Jude, Apostles, 9 Henry III. [29th October, 1224].

Between Simon de Haleshal, plaintiff, and Robert de Holand, tenant of two carucates of land, with the appurtenances in Holand. (fn. 13)

Simon quit-claimed to Robert and his heirs in perpetuity, all his right in the land. For this quit-claim Robert gave him five marks of silver.

No. 12.—At Lancaster, (fn. 14) on the morrow of St. Hilary, 11 Henry III. [14th January, 1227].

Between Geoffrey de Glasbroc and Edith his wife, plaintiffs, and Richard de Cotun, tenant of one oxgang of land with the appurtenances in Billesburg. An assize of mort d'ancestor had been summoned between them.

Geoffrey and Edith quit-claimed to Richard and his heirs in perpetuity, all their right in the land. For this quit-claim he gave them four marks of silver.

No. 13.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 11 Henry III. [20th January, 1227].

Between Robert Gredley, plaintiff, and Thomas de Brunhill, Alexander de Harwude, Thomas de Wurthington, and Adam de Radclive, deforciants, (fn. 15) respecting suit of court (de sectis), which Robert claimed of them from the tenements which they hold of him in Harwude, Wurthington, Leoure and Brimhill, whereupon he claimed from them, beside other services which they owe for their said tenements, that they should perform suit to him fortnightly at his court at Mamecestre, whereas they only acknowledge that they ought to do suit from month to month. A jury of grand assize had been summoned between them.

Thomas, Alexander, Thomas and Adam acknowledged for themselves and their heirs, that they would perform suit at the court of Robert and his heirs at Mamecestre every three weeks, and fortnightly at pleas to be held by the King's writ, and at the judgment of thieves. For this acknowledgment Robert quitclaimed to them all arrears of suits unto this day.

No. 14.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 11 Henry III. [20th January, 1227].

Between William de Liveseye, plaintiff, and Adam de Bilington, tenant of 20 acres of land with the appurtenances in Liveseye. A jury of grand assize had been summoned between them.

Adam acknowledged 12 acres of the said land, to wit, those 12 acres on the west side of the water of Derewente, to be the right of William, and quit-claimed them from himself and his heirs to William and his heirs in perpetuity. For this acknowledgment William quit-claimed from himself and his heirs to Adam and his heirs for ever, all his right in the residue of the land.

No. 15.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 11 Henry III. [20th January, 1227].

Between William, son of Thomas de Tunstal, plaintiff, and Roger, son of William de Tunstal, deforciant, respecting customs and services which William claimed of Roger from two oxgangs of land with the appurtenances, which Roger holds of him in Tunstal, whereupon William claimed that Roger should render to him yearly 7s. 7½d., which customs and services Roger did not acknowledge.

Roger acknowledged the land to be the right of William. For this acknowledgment William granted it to Roger for life, to hold of him and his heirs, rendering yearly 7s. 7½d. and one pound of pepper at two terms, to wit, one moiety at the Nativity of our Lord, and the other at the feast of St. Martin, for all service and demand. After the death of Roger the land to peaceably revert to William and his heirs.

No. 16.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 11 Henry III. [20th January, 1227].

Between Jordan the Goldsmith (aurifaber), plaintiff, and William, son of Ketel, tenant of half an oxgang of land with the appurtenances in Aston. A jury of grand assize had been summoned between them.

William acknowledged the land to be the right of Jordan. For this acknowledgment Jordan granted it to William, to hold to him and his heirs, of Jordan and his heirs in perpetuity, rendering yearly six pence at two terms, to wit, at Easter three pence, and at the feast of St. Michael three pence, for all service, saving forinsec service belonging to the land. For this grant William gave him half a mark of silver.

No. 17.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 11 Henry III. [20th January, 1227].

Between Adam de Bury, plaintiff, and John de la Mare, tenant of 200 acres of land and one mill with the appurtenances in Suttelesworth. (fn. 16) An assize of mort d'ancestor had been summoned between them.

John acknowledged the moiety of the land and mill with the appurtenances, in demesnes, and the services of the free tenants, who held of the said tenement at this time, to be the right of Adam, to wit, that moiety of the whole demesne, wheresoever it lies towards the north (versus umbram), to hold to Adam and his heirs, of John and his heirs in perpetuity, rendering yearly twelve pence at two terms, to wit, at Easter six pence, and at the feast of St. Michael six pence, for all service and demand. And be it known that those who were formerly enfeoffed by John, shall perform the moiety of the service due from their tenements to Adam and his heirs, and the other moiety to John and his heirs.

No. 18.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of St. Hilary, 11 Henry III. [14th January, 1227].

Between Alexander de Kirkeby, plaintiff, and Robert, Abbot of Furness, tenant of four oxgangs of land with the appurtenances in Kirkeby. (fn. 17)

Alexander quit-claimed from himself and his heirs to the Abbot and his successors and to his church of Furness, in perpetuity, all his right in the land. For this quit-claim the Abbot gave him five marks of silver.

No. 19.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 11 Henry III. [20th January, 1227].

Between Eve, formerly the wife of Adam de Edesford, plaintiff, and Jordan de Whetelegh, tenant of one oxgang of land with the appurtenances in Whetelegh. (fn. 18)

Jordan acknowledged the land to be the right of Eve. For this acknowledgment she gave it to him, to hold to him and his heirs begotten of Mayancia, formerly his wife, and sister of Eve, and their heirs in perpetuity, rendering yearly to Eve and her heirs one pound of cumin at the feast of St. Giles, and to the chief lords of that fee fourteen pence at the said term, for all service and demand, saving forinsec service belonging to that land.

No. 20.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 11 Henry III. [20th January, 1227].

Between Matilda, daughter of Robert, plaintiff, and Richard, son of Roger, (fn. 19) tenant of five oxgangs of land with the appurtenances in Frekelton.

Matilda quit-claimed from herself and her heirs to Richard and his heirs in perpetuity, all her right in the land. For this quit-claim Richard gave her three marks of silver.

No. 21.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of St. Hilary, 11 Henry III. [14th January, 1227].

Between Roger, son of Roger de Heton, plaintiff, and Robert, Abbot of Furness, tenant of 15 acres of land with the appurtenances in Querneberg. (fn. 20) An assize of mort d'ancestor had been summoned between them.

Roger acknowledged the land to be the right of the Abbot, and of his church of Furness, and quit-claimed it from himself and his heirs to the Abbot and his successors in perpetuity. For this acknowledgment the Abbot gave him two marks of silver.

No. 22.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. Hillary, 11 Henry III. [20th January, 1227].

Between Roger de Tunstal and Matilda his wife, by the said Roger put in Matilda's place, plaintiffs, and Richard, Prior of St. Wilfrid of Horneby, (fn. 21) tenant of one oxgang of land with the appurtenances in Wenington; and between the said Roger and Matilda, plaintiffs, and the said Prior, whom William, son of Richard called to warrant, and who warranted to him, respecting one oxgang of land with the appurtenances in the said town. An assize of mort d'ancestor had been summoned between them,

Roger and Matilda quit-claimed from themselves and the heirs of Matilda to the Prior and his successors, in perpetuity, all their right in the land. For this quit-claim the Prior gave them ten shillings sterling.

No. 23.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of St. Hilary, 11 Henry III. [14th January, 1227].

Between Elias the Clerk, plaintiff, and William, son of Thomas, tenant of one oxgang of land with the appurtenances in Ribbelcestre. A jury of grand assize had been summoned between them.

William acknowledged the land to be the right of Elias. For this acknowledgment Elias granted it to him, to hold to him and his heirs, of Elias and his heirs in perpetuity, rendering yearly twelve pence at the feast of St. Giles for all service and demand, saving forinsec service belonging to that land.

No. 24.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 11 Henry III. [20th January, 1227].

Between Adam, son of Walter, plaintiff, and Adam de Ieland, tenant of one oxgang of land with the appurtenances in Warton. (fn. 22) An assize of mort d'ancestor had been summoned between them.

Adam, son of Walter quit-claimed from himself and his heirs to Adam de Ieland and his heirs in perpetuity, all right in the land. For this quit-claim Adam de Ieland gave him two marks of silver.

No. 25.—At Lancester, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 11 Henry III. [20th January, 1227].

Between Roger de Bowelton, plaintiff, and Syward de Dukesbiri, tenant of one carucate of land with the appurtenances in Dukesbiri. (fn. 23)

Syward acknowledged the land to be the right of Roger. For this acknowledgment Roger granted it to him, to hold to him and his heirs, of Roger and his heirs in perpetuity, rendering yearly 6s. 4d. at the feast of St. Martin, for all service and demand, saving forinsec service belonging to that land. And Roger and his heirs shall acquit Syward and his heirs every year from forty pence to the chief lords of that fee for ever Elias de Tonge was present when this concord was made, and agreed thereto. And Roger granted to him and his heirs in perpetuity, eighteen pence of the said rent, to be received yearly at the feast of St. Martin. And if escheats, relief or wardship shall accrue from this land, the profit so arising shall be divided between Roger and Elias and their heirs.

No, 26.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of St. Hilary, 11 Hen. III. [14th January, 1227].

Between Robert, Abbot of Furness (de Fornacibus) plaintiff, and Alexander de Kirkeby, deforciant, respecting the advowson of the church of Kyrkeby Yrlith. (fn. 24) A jury of grand assize had been summoned between them.

Alexander acknowledged the advowson of that church to be the right of the Abbot and of his church of Furness, and quitclaimed it from himself and his heirs, to the Abbot and his successors in perpetuity. The Abbot received Alexander into every benefit thereafter to be made in the church of Furness for ever.

No. 27.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 11 Henry III. [20 January, 1227].

Between Edward de Brochol, plaintiff, and William, son of Roger, tenant of one carucate of land with the appurtenances in Samlesbiri. (fn. 25)

Edward quit-claimed from himself and his heirs to William and his heirs in perpetuity, all right in the land. For this quitclaim William gave him ten marks of silver.

No. 28.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of St. Hilary, 11 Henry III. [14th January, 1227].

Between Avice, formerly the wife of William Brun, and Robert Plumbe, and Cecily his wife, plaintiffs, and Robert, son of Ulfy, tenant of one oxgang and three parts of one oxgang of land with the appurtenances in Dileworth. A jury of grand assize had been summoned between them.

Robert, son of Ulfy acknowledged the land to be the right of Avice, Robert and Cecily. For this acknowledgment they granted to him the moiety of the said land, to wit, that moiety which lies towards the north, to hold to him and his heirs, of them and the heirs of Avice and Cecily, in perpetuity, rendering yearly twenty-two pence at the feast of St. Giles, for all service and demand, of which Avice, Robert and Cecily and the heirs of Avice and Cecily will acquit Robert and his heirs towards the chief lords, of twenty-one pence yearly for ever. And they will answer to the chief lords of the fee for the service which belongs to the moiety which remains to them in demesne.

Footnotes

1 The Justices in Eyre were:—Philip de Ulcot, Thomas de Multon, Ralph de Feritate, and Lawrence de Wilton, clerk. They held assizes in 3 Henry III., in "Cumberlaunde, Westmerilaund, and Launcastre" (Endorsement on Final Concord, No. 3).
2 Beatrice, Avice, and Ysolt were daughters and co-heiresses of Robert, son of Bernard of Goosnargh, Catterall, and Wrightington. Cf. Cockersand, Chartulary, p. 234 n.
3 This estate of six oxgangs was in Higher Worsley, over Hulton and Little Hulton. It is not included in the survey of 1212, and was therefore presumably in the King's hands at that time. From a schedule of lands in Salford Hundred, held as of the Honour of Lancaster, recorded in the Pipe Roll of 10 Henry III., but of a date early in the reign of King John, it appears that Worsley and Hulton were held by Gerard de Camvill and William de Nevill, by the thanage service of 20s. per annum. These two persons were both partisans of King John, when he was Count of Mortain, and Lord of Lancaster (1189–1194), it is therefore probable that this estate had been given to them by King John, being an escheat in his hands. William de Nevill died before 1212. From a schedule of the lands and tenants of Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, made in the 10 Edward I. (1281–2), it appears that Hugh de Nevill then held this estate. The Birch Feodary, so called, which appears to be a survey of the possessions of Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, in the county of Lancaster, also records Hugh de Nevill as tenant. Richard de Worsley, named in this fine, would therefore appear to have held under Camvill and Nevill, and to have pledged or mortgaged the estate before 1215, to Jorwerth de Hulton, who died in that year (Pipe Rolls, p. 256.) In 1385, Geoffrey de Worsley died seised of the manor of Worsley, held by the socage rent of 13s. 4d., and three-fourths of the manor of Hulton. Elizabeth his dau. and heiress married Arthur de Worsley. (Chetham Soc., xcv., pp. 23, 118).
4 Apparently a place in Amounderness, but not identified.
5 William le Boteler, fifth Baron of Warrington.
6 Bruch, in the township of Poulton-with-Fearnhead, which was a member of the Warrington fief.
7 Welsh Whittle in the parish of Standish, was part of 5 carucates of land given by Warin Bussel II. in marriage with his daughter to Ranulph de Marsey. The predecessor of Richard le Waleis, or Welsh, had been enfeoffed of this estate, which thereupon acquired the name of Welsh Whittle, to distinguish it from Whittle-le-Woods. In Trinity Term, 4 Henry III., in the King's Court, Adam Arbalaster (Balistarius) and Alice, his wife, sued Richard le Waleis (Walensis) for 4 oxgangs of land in Withull, as the right and marriage portion of Alice, into which Richard has no entry except by Roger de Leicestre, formerly husband of Alice. Richard called to warrant William de Lancaster, son of Gilbert. To appear at 2 weeks from St. Michael by the order of the Court. Richard puts in his place Robert, his son; Alice puts her husband in her place. (C. R. Roll, No. 74, m. 22.) In Michaelmas Term, Peter, son of Richard, essoiner of Robert Waleis, who was the attorney of Richard Waleis sued William de Launcestre in a plea to warrant to Richard 4 oxgangs in Hwethul, which Adam Arbalaster and Alice, his wife, claim from Richard, &c. William did not come. Judgment against him to be taken from his land to the value of 4 oxgangs of land, and to be summoned to appear on the Octave of St. Hilary. (C. R. Roll, No. 76, m. 21). On the Octave of St. Hilary, 5 Henry III., Richard le Walleis gave half a mark for licence to concord by the surety of Robert de Liuerlande. (C. R. Roll, No. 79, m. 4 dorso).
8 Pagan de Vilers gave Much Hoole to Thomas de Vilers, his son, whose successor, Robert de Vilers held it in 1212, and also at the date of the above fine. It is probable that Beatrice was a daughter of Robert, and that Walter de Hoole had received the oxgang of land in frank marriage with her. Walter was living in 1242 (Testa ii., f. 787.) In 16 Edward I., a portion of Great Hoole (probably the above estate), was held by Adam de Walton, of William de Ferrers, by the yearly service of 2s. (Escaeta, 16 Edward I., No. 27).
9 Richard de Lathom, son of Richard, son of Robert had livery of Lathom by writ dated at Westminster, 27th January, 1221 (Fine Roll Excerpts, p. 60.) In Hilary Term, 7 Henry III., in the King's Court, Simon Grubheued sued Richard, son of Richard de Lathum—who essoined himself de malo lecti—in a plea of land. The four knights sent to view his infirmity, to wit, Adam de Radecliue, Fernhald de Hulehiat (? Holgate), Simon de Ludehat (Lydiate), and Alex. de Derewent, came and told that they had been to Lathum in accordance with the King's writ sent to them, but they found him not there, because he lies at Knole (Knowsley.) Which was found to be so in the Rolls, being a mistake of the Clerks. Wherefore the four knights were directed to go to Knowle to view him, and if he were not sick, to give him a day at three weeks from Easter. But if he were sick, the knights to testify accordingly on the said day at the Court. (C. R. Roll, No. 82, m. 3.) As Richard de Lathom died childless, it is probable that this alienation of the Lathom estates, was a demise of Richard's life interest only for considerations received from Simon Grubhead. It is noteworthy that Richard "dwelt at Knowsley," thus confirming the statement in the note, p. 8, that Knowsley had been an estate of the Lathom family long before the marriage of Sir Robert de Lathom to Katharine de Knowsley.
10 Cf. Fine No. 33, temp. John, p. 21.
11 In Michaelmas Term, 7–8 Henry III., Adam de Preston, essoiner of Nicholas de Fischwic, who was attorney for William le Vilein and Cecily his wife, sued Roger Gernet, brother and heir of William Gernet, in a plea to warrant to them the Manor of Fishwic, which William Gernet claimed as his right; whereupon they had called to warrant the said Roger, who did not appear. Judgment to be taken from his land to the value of that Manor, and to be summoned for the Octave of St. Hilary. (C. R. Roll, No. 85, m. 21 dorso).
12 The suit was commenced on the Octave of St. Michael, 8–9 Henry III. (C. R. Roll, No. 87, m. 7), and postponed to Hilary Term, when Roger failed to appear, and the writ was not returned.
13 Up-Holland, in the parish of Wigan. This estate was held in thanage.
14 There are 17 Final Concords (Nos. 12–28), which were made before the Justices in eyre at Lancaster, during the fortnight commencing on the 14th January, 1227. The names of the Justices are—Martin de Patshull, Ranulph, son of Robert, Brian fitz Alan, William de L'Isle, Richard Ducket, and part of the time, John de Lacy, Constable of Chester. No Assize Roll of the proceedings of this eyre now exists. But in the Pipe Roll of 11 Henry III., s. t. "Amercements by M. de Patishull and his associates," there is an account of £311 11s. 4½d., paid into the Treasury by the Sheriff, arising from amercements upon persons and townships, the details of which were entered upon a roll, which the Justices delivered to the Treasury. In addition there are entries of 45 names of persons, who rendered account of their own amercements, discharged partly that year, and partly in the year following. The first entry relates to the above Fine. "Geoffrey de Glasebroc renders account of 10s. for default. Paid to the Treasury ½m., and he owes 40d." (Pipe Roll, No. 71, m. 1.) From the Cockersand Chartulary it appears that Richard de Cottam was son of Robert, son of Ughtred, who was brother of Richard de Singleton (1180–1212).
15 There is mention of these suits in the Plea Rolls. On the feast of St. Edward, 5 Henry III., in London, a day was given to Thomas de Bur[n]hull versus Robert de Grelai, in a plea of service, by Jordan de Bur[n]hull, in a month from St. Hilary. (C. R. Roll, No. 78, m. 4 dorso.) The same day was given to Adam de Radeclive in a like suit. (Ibid., m. 14.) Robert de Greley, by his attorney, sued Thomas de Wurthington in a plea that he should perform the customs and rightful services, which he ought to do to him for the free tenement which he holds of him in Wurthinton. Thomas although summoned, did not appear, and was to be attached to appear on the above-named day. (Ibid., m. 15.) The details of the estates owing these suits are as follows:—Brindle, 3 carucates, an estate originally a member of the Penwortham barony, but without service to that Barony, and so afterwards annexed to Manchester; 1 carucate in Harwood, parish of Bolton, which formed part of the fee of one Knight with Childwall 3 carucates, Aspul 1 carucate, Turton 1 carucate, and Brockholes ½ carucate; Worthington and Heaton-under-Horwich held for ½ Knight's fee; Little Leaver, 2 oxgangs.
16 Shuttleworth, in the parish of Bury was, before 1225, a member of Roger de Montbegon's estate in Salford Hundred. John de la Mare had been enfeoffed of numerous estates in the Montbegon fief. Adam de Bury held one moiety of the manor under him; and in 1311, his successor, Henry de Bury, held this moiety by the service of 12d. yearly, of the Earl of Lincoln. The other moiety was probably in demesne.
17 Kirkby Irlith. Cf. Furness Coucher, p. 317.
18 Wheatley, in the parish of Chipping.
19 Richard de Freckleton, lord of Freckleton.
20 In Urswick. Cf. Furness Coucher, p. 453.
21 The Priory of Hornby, dedicated to St. Wilfrid, (a cell to the Abbey of Croxton, in co. Leicester) was probably founded by Adam de Montbegon, who acquired Hornby by marriage with one of the daughters and co-heiresses of Adam fitz Swain. It appears probable from charters preserved in the Register of that Abbey, that Adam de Montbegon, or Roger, his son, gave the Priory of Hornby to Croxton, temp. Henry II. or Richard I.
22 Warton in Amounderness. Cf. Cockersand Chartulary. p. 191, note.
23 In the 16 Edward I., 1288, Adam de Duxbury held one-third part of Duxbury of William de Ferrers, by homage and service of 14d.; Roger de Bolton and Elias de Tong each another third by the same service. (Escaeta, 16 Edward I., No. 27).
24 In Hilary Term, 9 Henry III., at Westminster, the Abbot of Furness sued Alexander de Kirkeby for the advowson of the church of Kirkeby Yrlith, as the right of his church, and averred that his predecessor, Abbot John (11521175), was seised thereof as of fee, and presented a certain Roger, his clerk, in the time of Henry II., who took the profits thereof to the value of 5s., &c. Alexander defended his right, and put himself on the grand assize, as to whether he had the greater right in the advowson, or the Abbot. The Abbot said that it did not seem to him that the assize ought to be made, because William, son of Roger, grandfather of Alexander granted and quitclaimed to the church of Furness his right in the gift of the church of Kirkeby Yrlith. Alexander defended his right &c. as before. A day was given to them upon the advent of the Justices [to Lancaster]. (C. R. Roll, No. 89, m. 8). Cf. Furness Coucher, p. 210.
25 In Hilary Term, 9 Henry III., at Westminster, Edward de Brochole by his attorney, sued Roger de Shamelesbiri for one carucate of land in Shamelesbiri as his right, because that Orm, his grandfather was seised thereof as of fee and right in his demesne in the time of Henry II., taking thereof profits to the value of 5s., and from Orm the right descended to Edward, his son, and from Edward to this Edward, who now sues, &c. Roger defended his right, &c., and put himself on the grand assize, and prayed for a verdict. A day was given to them upon the advent of the Justices. (C. R. Roll, No. 89, m. 10 dorso).