Lancashire Fines
21-30 Edward I

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

William Farrer (editor)

Year published

1899

Pages

176-200

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'Lancashire Fines: 21-30 Edward I', Final Concords for Lancashire, Part 1: 1189-1307 (1899), pp. 176-200. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=52540 Date accessed: 23 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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21-30 Edward I.

No. 64.—At Westminster, in a month from Easter, 21 Edward I. [26th April, 1293].

Between Eustace de Cotesbeche, plaintiff, and John de Knyttecote of Leycestre, deforciant of a messuage and two carucates of land in Caturhale.

John acknowledged the messuage and land to be the right of Eustace, and rendered the same to him, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Eustace gave him sixty marks of silver.

No. 65.—At York, on the Octave of St. John the Baptist, 21 Edward I. [1st July, 1293].

Between Brother Thomas, Abbot of St. Werburge's, Chester, plaintiff, by Adam de Byrcheles put in his place, and William de Heskeyth and Matilda, his wife, tenants, of two oxgangs of land, six acres of meadow, four acres of wood, ten acres of marsh, and six shillings rent, in Rufford, (fn. 1) near Croston, co. Lanc.; and between the said Abbot, plaintiff, by the said Adam, and Edmund de Legh and Anabill, his wife, tenants, by John Smart put in their place, of two oxgangs of lands, six acres of meadow, four acres of wood, and ten acres of marsh, in the same town.

The Abbot acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Matilda and Anabill, to hold to William and Matilda, Edmund and Anabill, and the heirs of Matilda and Anabill, of the Abbot and his successors and his Church of St. Werburge, in perpetuity, rendering yearly forty shillings at the feasts of St. Martin in Winter, and the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, for all services, to wit, 20s. by William and Matilda and the heirs of Matilda, and 20s. by Edmund and Anabill and the heirs of Anabill; for which they formerly rendered five shillings. For this acknowledgment they gave the Abbot ten pounds sterling. The Jury, for this purpose chosen, say that this Fine will not be to the injury or prejudice of the Lord the King.

No. 66.—At Westminster, on the Morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 21 Edward I. [8th May, 1293].

Between Thomas Banastre, plaintiff, and William, son of Hugh de Thorp, and Alice, his wife, impedients of three acres and one rood of land in Bretherton and Thorp, respecting which a plea of warranty of charter had been summoned between them.

William and Alice acknowledged the land to be the right of Thomas, as that which he had by their gift, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment he gave them one hundred shillings sterling.

No. 67.—At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Michael, 22 Edward I. [6th October, 1294].

Between Adam de Waleton, clerk, plaintiff, and Master Adam de Waleton, deforciant, by John Banastre, put in his place, of the manor of Hole [Hoole]. (fn. 2)

Adam acknowledged the manor to be the right of Master Adam. For this acknowledgment Master Adam granted it to him, to hold to him and the heirs of his body, in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging, with remainder, in default of issue, to Master Adam and his heirs.

No. 68.—At Westminster, on the Morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 23 Edward 1. [13th May, 1295].

Between Thomas Travers, plaintiff, and Hugh, son of Paul de Preston, and Alice, his wife, impedients of a messuage, and the third part of one oxgang of land in Etheleswyk, respecting which a plea of warranty of charter had been summoned between them.

Hugh and Alice acknowledged the messuage and land to be the right of Thomas, as that which he had by their gift, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment he gave them forty shillings of silver.

No. 69.—At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Michael, 23 Edward I. [6th October, 1295].

Between Adam, son of Henry de Chernok, plaintiff, and Hugh de Asshogh, and Margery, his wife, deforciants of a messuage and eleven acres of land in Chorleye.

Hugh and Margery acknowledged the messuage and land to be the right of Adam, as that which he had by their gift, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Adam gave them twelve marks of silver.

No. 70.—At Westminster, on the Quindene of Holy Trinity, 23 Edward I. [12th June, 1295].

Between Robert, son of Gilbert de Ines, plaintiff, and Roger de Botle and Cecily, his wife, deforciants of a messuage, six acres and one rood of land in Waleton, near West Derby.

Roger and Cecily acknowledged the messuage and land to be the right of Robert, and rendered it to him, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Robert gave them forty shillings of silver.

No. 71.—At Westminster, on the Octave of Holy Trinity, 23 Edward I. [5th June, 1295].

Between John de Lacy of Crumbwelbothum, (fn. 3) plaintiff, by Otes de Shepeden, put in his place, and Gregory, Abbot of the Church of St. Mary of the blessed place of Stanelawe, deforciant, by Geoffrey Kay put in his place, of the advowson of the church of Caselton, in Rachedale.

John acknowledged the advowson to be the right of the Abbot and his church of St. Mary, and quit-claimed it to him and his successors in perpetuity. For this release Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, whom the Abbot called to warrant, at the Abbot's request, gave John twenty pounds sterling. The Abbot and his predecessors were seised of the advowson long before the Statute of Mortmain was passed.

No. 72.—At Westminster, on the Morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 24 Edward I. [4th May, 1296].

Between Henry, (fn. 4) son of . . . . . [illegible] [plaintiff], and William de Ayntre, deforciant of a messuage, five oxgangs, and the fourth part of one oxgang and twenty two acres of land, two shillings and three pence rent, and the fourth part of a mill in Ayntre.

Henry acknowledged the tenement to be the right of William. For this acknowledgment William granted the same to Henry, to hold to him and the heirs of his body, of William and his heirs, rendering yearly a rose at the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, and performing the services due therefor to the chief lords of the fee. Moreover William granted that one oxgang and one acre of land, twelve pence rent, and the fourth part of the mill, which Alice, widow of Henry de Ayntre, held in dower, of William's inheritance, and which after her death ought to revert to William and his heirs, should wholly remain to Henry and his heirs, to hold with the aforesaid tenement as aforesaid. If Henry shall die without heir of his body, the tenements shall wholly remain to Gilbert, his brother, and the heirs of his body; like remainder to Robert, brother of Gilbert, with reversion to William and his heirs in perpetuity, to hold of the chief lords of the fee.

No. 73.—At Westminster, on the Quindene of Holy Trinity, 24 Edward I. [3rd June, 1296].

Between Robert Sonky, junior, plaintiff, and Robert Sonky, senior, deforciant of ten messuages, one mill, eight oxgangs of land, four acres of meadow, and three acres of wood in Weryngton [Warrington].

Robert, junior, acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Robert, senior. For this acknowledgment Robert, senior, granted the tenements to Robert, junior, and the heirs of his body, to hold of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging; with remainder to Jordan Sonky and the heirs of his body, to hold as aforesaid, with remainder to Robert, senior, and his heirs.

No. 74.—At Westminster, on the Octave of Holy Trinity, 24 Edward I. [27th May, 1296].

Between Robert Haydok, plaintiff, and Alice, formerly the wife of Henry de Haydok, impedient of a messuage and four and a half oxgangs of land in Thornton, respecting which a plea of warranty of charter had been summoned between them.

Alice acknowledged the messuage and the land to be the right of Robert, as that which he had by her gift, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Robert gave her ten pounds sterling.

No. 75.—At Westminster, on the Morrow of St. Martin, 24 Edward I. [12th November, 1296].

Between Roger Noel, junior, plaintiff, and Roger Noel, senior, impedient of four messuages, eighty acres of land, forty acres of meadow, two pence rent, and the moiety of a mill in Great Merlay, respecting which a plea of warranty of charter had been summoned between them.

Roger, senior, acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Roger, junior, as those which he had by his gift, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Roger, junior, gave him a hundred marks of silver.

No. 76.—At Westminster, in three weeks from the feast of St. Michael, 24 Edward I. [20th October, 1296].

Between Henry de Kygheleye and Ellen, his wife, plaintiffs, and Roger de Kyrkeby and Margery, his wife, deforciants of the third part of a toft and one oxgang of land in Great Eccleston.

Roger and Margery acknowledged the said third part to be the right of Henry, as that which Henry and Ellen had by their gift, to hold to them and the heirs of Henry, in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Henry and Ellen gave them eight marks of silver.

No. 77.—At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Michael, 24 Edward I. [6th October, 1296].

Between Hugh de Clyderhowe, plaintiff, by Roger de Cliderhowe put in his place, and Thomas de Hilton and Dionise, his wife, deforciants of a messuage, three oxgangs and three acres of land, and four shillings rent, in Salebury.

Thomas and Dionise acknowledged the tenement to be the right of Hugh, and rendered it to him, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment he gave them fifty marks of silver.

No. 78.—At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Michael, 24 Edward I. [6th October, 1296].

Between William de la Donne, (fn. 5) clerk, plaintiff, by Roger Baldewyne put in his place, and Henry de Kygheleye and Ellen, his wife, deforciants of the Manor of Bedeford.

William acknowledged the manor to be the right of Henry. For this acknowledgment Henry and Ellen granted it to William for life, rendering yearly one penny at the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, and performing the services due to the chief lords of the fee. After William's decease the manor shall wholly revert to Henry and Ellen, and the heirs of Henry, in perpetuity, to hold of the chief lords of the fee.

No. 79.—At Westminster, on the Quindene of St. Martin, 25 Edward I. [25th November, 1296].

Between Richard de Redyval, plaintiff, by Gilbert de Singleton, put in his place, and Roger de Plessyngton, impedient of thirty-six acres of land and two mills, in Plessington, and Lyveseye, respecting which a plea of warranty of charter had been summoned between them.

Roger acknowledged the land and mills to be the right of Richard, as those which he had by his gift, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Richard gave him ten pounds sterling.

No. 80.—At Westminster, on the Octave of St. John the Baptist, 25 Edward I. [1st July, 1297].

Between Richard, son of Robert de Bolde, plaintiff, and Robert de Bolde, (fn. 6) deforciant of five messuages, one hundred and sixty acres of land, one hundred acres of wood, and five shillings and eight pence rent, in Bolde.

Richard acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Robert. For this acknowledgment Robert granted them to him and the heirs of his body, to hold, in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging, and rendering yearly to Robert during his life, ten pounds at the feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Mary. If Richard shall die without heir of his body, the tenements to wholly remain to Peter, his brother, and the heirs of his body, to hold, as aforesaid, and rendering the said rent; like remainder to Matthew, brother of Peter, and the heirs of his body, with remainder to Robert and his heirs.

No. 81.—At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Martin, 26 Edward I. [18th November, 1298].

Between William de Heskayth and Matilda, his wife, plaintiffs, and Edmund de Legh and Anabill, his wife, deforciants of two parts of the third part of the manor of Great Harewoode, (fn. 7) in Blakeburneshyre.

William and Matilda acknowledged the two parts to be the right of Anabill. For this acknowledgment Edmund and Anabill granted the same to William and Matilda, and the heirs of William by Matilda; to hold of Edmund and Anabill and Anabill's heirs, in perpetuity, rendering yearly during the life of Anabill, 47s. 8d. at the feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Mary, and performing the services due to the chief lords of the fee. Moreover Edmund and Anabill granted that the third part of the third part of the said manor, which Alexander Hyrel and Margaret, his wife, hold in dower, of Anabill's inheritance in the said town, and which after the death of Margaret ought to revert to Edmund and Anabill, and the heirs of Anabill, shall after the death of Margaret wholly remain to William and Matilda and their heirs, to hold as aforesaid. After Anabill's decease, William and Matilda and their heirs shall be acquitted of the said yearly payment. And if William shall die without heir by Matilda, then after their deaths the tenements shall wholly remain to the right heirs of Anabill, to hold of the chief lords of the fee, for ever. This Fine was made in the presence of Alexander and Margaret, and they agreed to it, and did fealty to William and Matilda in Court.

No. 82.—At York, on the Quindene of Holy Trinity, 26 Edward I. [15th June, 1298].

Between John, son of Adam Banastre, plaintiff, and Adam Banastre, (fn. 8) deforciant of eight oxgangs of land in Tarleton.

John acknowledged the land to be the right of Adam. For this acknowledgment Adam granted it to John, to hold to him and the heirs of his body, in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging; remainder to Thomas, brother of John, and the heirs of his body, to hold as aforesaid; like remainder to William, brother of Thomas; like remainder to Robert, brother of William; remainder to the right heirs of Adam.

No. 83.—At York, on the Quindene of Holy Trinity, 26 Edward I. [15th June, 1298].

Between Robert, son of Alexander de Etheleswyk, plaintiff, and Adam, son of Ulf, and Agnes, his wife, impedients of a messuage and the moiety of one oxgang of land, in Etheleswyk, respecting which a plea of warranty of charter had been summoned between them.

Adam and Agnes acknowledged the messuage and land to be the right of Robert, as that which he had by their gift, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Robert gave them twenty pounds sterling.

No. 84.—At York, on the Octave of St. Martin, 26 Edward I. [18th November, 1298].

Between Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, plaintiff, by John Turpyn put in his place, and Gregory, Abbot of the Church of the Blessed Mary of Stanlowe, tenant, by Roger de Toxtath put in his place, respecting the advowson of the church of Whallay, respecting which a jury of Grand Assize had been summoned between them.

The Earl acknowledged the advowson to be the right of the Abbot, and of his church of St. Mary, and quit-claimed it to him and his successors in perpetuity. For this release the Abbot received the Earl into all orisons and benefits henceforth to be made in his church of St. Mary, for ever. This concord was made by precept of the lord the king.

No. 85.—At York, on the Quindene of St. Michael, 26 Edward I. [13th October, 1298].

Between William de Atherton, plaintiff, and William de Bradeshagh and Mabill, his wife, deforciants of the manors of Hagh and Blakerode. (fn. 9)

William and Mabill acknowledged the manors to be the right of William de Atherton, and rendered them to him, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment William de Atherton gave them two hundred pounds sterling.

[Endorsed].—Thomas de Osbaldeston puts in his claim.

No. 86.—At York, on the Octave of St. Michael, 26 Edward I. [6th October, 1298].

Between John, son of Adam de Smerleshalgh, plaintiff, and Adam de Smerleshalgh, deforciant of a messuage and sixteen acres of land in Reved [Read].

Adam acknowledged the messuage and land to be the right of John, as that which he had by the gift of Adam, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment John gave him one hundred shillings of silver.

No. 87.—At York, on the Octave of Holy Trinity, 27 Edward I. [21st June, 1299].

Between Adam, son of Adam de Pynintonn, plaintiff, by Geoffrey de Bradagh, his guardian, put in his place, and Adam de Pynintonn, deforciant of six messuages, eighteen acres of land, and ten acres of wood, in Pynintonn (fn. 10) [Pennington, parish of Leigh].

Adam de Pynintonn acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Adam, son of Adam, and rendered them to him in Court, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Adam, son of Adam, gave him twenty pounds sterling.

No. 88.—At York, on the Octave of St. Martin, 27 Edward I. [18th November, 1299].

Between Thomas Banastre, plaintiff, by Gilbert de Syngelton put in his place, and Orme de Kellet, (fn. 11) deforciant, by Robert Haydok, put in his place, of the manor of Netherkellet.

Orme acknowledged the manor to be the right of Thomas, and rendered it to him, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Thomas gave him one hundred pounds sterling.

No. 89.—At York, on the Morrow of St. John the Baptist, 27 Edward I. [25th June, 1299].

Between Richard, son of Henry de Wrkedeleye, junior, plaintiff, by Robert de Asston, his guardian, put in his place, and Henry de Wrkedeleye, deforciant of one hundred acres of land, twenty acres of meadow, one hundred acres of wood, and twenty acres of pasture in Wrkedeleye [Worsley]. (fn. 12)

Henry acknowledged the tenement to be the right of Richard, and rendered it to him, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Richard gave him one hundred pounds sterling.

No. 90.—At York, on the Octave of Holy Trinity, 27 Edward I. [21st June, 1299].

Between Richard, son of Adam de Pyninton, plaintiff, by Geoffrey de Bradegate, his guardian, put in his place, and Adam de Pininton, deforciant of two messuages, sixty acres of land, and sixty acres of wood, in Pininton. (fn. 13)

Adam acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Richard, and rendered them to him in Court, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Richard gave him ten pounds sterling.

No. 91.—At York, on the Morrow of All Souls, 27 Edward I. [3rd November, 1299].

Between William de Turnaghe, plaintiff, and Richard, son of Sighrede de Wordhull, and Matilda, his wife, deforciants of two acres of land and fifteen acres of pasture in Spotland.

Richard and Matilda acknowledged the tenement to be the right of William, as that which he had by their gift, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment William gave them ten pounds sterling.

No. 92.—At York, on the Morrow of the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 28 Edward I. [3rd February, 1300].

Between Robert de Lathum, plaintiff, and John, son of Alexander de Kyrkebyirlith, deforciant of the manors of Kyrkebyirlith and Dunerdale. (fn. 14)

John acknowledged the manors to be the right of Robert, and rendered them to him, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Robert gave him two hundred marks of silver.

No. 93.—At York, in a month from Easter, 28 Edward I. [8th May, 1300].

Between Adam de Prestwych, plaintiff, and Beatrice, daughter of Elias de Penilburi, deforciant of the manor of Penilburi (fn. 15) [Pendlebury] and one oxgang of land in Barton.

Beatrice acknowledged the manor and land to be the right of Adam, and quit-claimed them to him and his heirs in perpetuity. For this release he gave her one hundred pounds sterling.

No. 94.—At York, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 28 Edward I. [20th January, 1300].

Between Richard de Penewortheham, plaintiff, and William de Sotheworth, and Ellen, his wife, deforciants of a messuage in Preston.

William and Ellen acknowledged the messuage to be the right of Richard, as that which he had by their gift, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Richard gave them twenty shillings of silver.

No. 95.—At York, on the Octave of Holy Trinity, 28 Edward I. [12th June, 1300].

Between Robert de Lathum, plaintiff, by Richard, son of Alexander de Lathum, put in his place, and Alan, son of Peter de Burnhul, (fn. 16) tenant of the manor of Skelmaresdale.

Robert acknowledged the manor to be the right of Alan, and quit-claimed it to him and his heirs in perpetuity. For this release Alan gave him forty pounds sterling.

No. 96.—At York, on the Octave of St. John the Baptist, 28 Edward I. [1st July, 1300].

Between John, son of Adam Banastre, plaintiff, and Adam Banastre (fn. 17) of Bretherton, deforciant of two messuages, one mill, one carucate of land, eight acres of meadow, and twenty shillings rent, in Bretherton.

John acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Adam. For this acknowledgment Adam granted the same to him, and rendered the estate to him, to hold to John and the heirs of his body, of Adam and his heirs in perpetuity, rendering yearly one penny at Easter, and performing the services due to the chief lords of the fee; remainder to William, brother of John and the heirs of his body, to hold as aforesaid; like remainder to Robert, brother of William, with remainder to Adam and his heirs.

No. 97.—At York, on the Octave of St. John the Baptist, 28 Edward I. [1st July, 1300].

Between Jordan de Workesleye, plaintiff, and Henry de Workesleye, impedient of six messuages, one hundred acres of land, twelve acres of meadow, two hundred acres of wood, and one hundred acres of pasture, in Workesleye [Worsley], respecting which a plea of warranty of charter had been summoned between them.

Henry acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Jordan, as those which he had by the gift of Henry, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Jordan gave him forty pounds sterling.

No. 98.—At York, on the Quindene of St. Michael, 28 Edward I. [13th October, 1300].

Between Thomas le Clerk of Meles, and Emma, his wife, plaintiffs, by Robert de Asshton, put in their place, and Thomas, son of Alan de Snape, deforciant, by Thomas le Waleys, put in his place, of a messuage and twenty-four acres of land in Halsale.

Thomas, son of Alan, acknowledged the messuage and land to be the right of Emma, and rendered the same to them, to hold to them and the heirs of Emma in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment they gave him ten pounds sterling.

No. 99.—At York, in a month from the feast of St. Michael, 28 Edward I. [27th October, 1300].

Between Hugh de Standyshe, plaintiff, and Robert, son of Robert de Hepay, deforciant of two parts of the Manor of Hepay [Heapey, parish of Leyland].

Robert acknowledged the two parts of the manor to be the right of Hugh, and rendered the same to him, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. Moreover Robert granted that the third part of the manor, held in dower by Margery, wife of Richard de Haydok, of Robert's inheritance, shall, after her decease, wholly remain to Hugh and his heirs, to hold with the said two parts as aforesaid. For this acknowledgment Hugh gave him forty pounds sterling. This concord was made in the presence of the said Richard and Margery, and they agreed to it and did fealty to Hugh in court.

[Endorsed].—Robert de Heppay puts in his claim.

No. 100.—At York, on the Quindene of St. Michael, 28 Edward I. [13th October, 1300].

Between Gilbert de Singelton, plaintiff, and Alice, daughter of William de Coygners, deforciant of one toft, and forty acres of land in Warton, near Lythum.

Alice acknowledged the toft and land to be the right of Gilbert, and rendered it to him, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment he gave her twenty pounds sterling.

No. 101.—At York, on the Octave of St. Martin, 28 Edward I. [18th November, 1300].

Between John, son of Alexander de Kyrkeby Irlith, and Margery, his wife, plaintiffs, by Hugh de Standisch, put in their place, and Robert de Lathum, deforciant, by Richard de Lathum put in his place, of the manors of Kirkeby Irlith and Donerdale [Dunnerdale].

John acknowledged the manors to be the right of Robert, as those which he had by the gift of John and Margery. For this acknowledgment Robert granted the same to John and Margery, and rendered them to them; to hold to them and the heirs of John of Margery begotten, in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging, with remainder to the right heirs of John. (fn. 18)

No. 102.—At York, on the Octave of St. John the Baptist, 29 Edward I. [1st July, 1301].

Between Richard, son of Richard de Hoghton, plaintiff, and Richard, son of Adam de Hoghton, deforciant of seven messuages, two carucates, four oxgangs, and forty acres of land, four acres of meadow, and thirteen shillings and nine pence rent in Greymesargh, Lyvesaye, Whythull, Ecleshull and Etheleston. (fn. 19)

Richard, son of Adam, acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Richard, son of Richard. For this acknowledgment the latter granted and rendered the same to him, to hold to him and the heirs of his body in perpetuity, of Richard, son of Adam, and his heirs, rendering yearly a rose at the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, and performing the services due to the chief lords of the fee; remainder to Joan, sister of Richard, son of Richard, and the heirs of her body, to hold as aforesaid; like remainder to Margery, sister of Joan, and her heirs; remainder to Richard, son of Adam, and his heirs.

No. 103.—At York, on the Morrow of the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 29 Edward I. [3rd February, 1301].

Between Henry, son of William de Lee of Reynhull, plaintiff, and William de Lee of Reynhull, deforciant of two messuages and fourteen acres of land in Reynhull [Rainhill]. (fn. 20)

William acknowledged the messuages and land to be the right of Henry, and rendered them to him, to hold to him and his heirs, in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Henry gave him five marks of silver.

No. 104.—At York, on the Morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 29 Edward I. [12th May, 1301].

Between John de Caton, plaintiff, and John de Hoton and Sigred, his wife, deforciants of a messuage and ten acres of land in Caton.

John and Sigred acknowledged the messuage and land to be the right of John de Caton, as that which he had by their gift, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment John de Caton gave them ten marks of silver.

No. 105.—At York, on the Octave of St. John the Baptist, 29 Edward I. [1st July, 1301].

Between William de Holcroft, plaintiff, and William, son of Geoffrey de Glasebrok, deforciant, by John Travers put in his place, of a messuage and nineteen acres of land in Glasebrok.

William, son of Geoffrey, acknowledged the messuage and land to be the right of William de Holcroft, and rendered it to him, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment William de Holcroft gave him ten marks of silver.

No. 106.—At York, on the Morrow of St. John the Baptist, 29 Edward I. [25th June, 1301].

Between Robert, son of Henry de Workesleye, plaintiff, by Robert de Asshton, his guardian, put in his place, and Henry de Workesleye, deforciant of one hundred acres of wood and two hundred acres of pasture in Workesleye [Worsley]. (fn. 21)

Henry acknowledged the tenement to be the right of Robert, son of Henry, and rendered it to him, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Robert, son of Henry, gave him forty pounds sterling.

No. 107.—At York, on the Quindene of Holy Trinity, 29 Edward I. [11th June, 1301].

Between Jordan, son of Robert de Penketh, plaintiff, and Robert de Penketh, deforciant of two oxgangs of land in Penketh. (fn. 22)

Robert acknowledged the land to be the right of Jordan, and rendered it to him, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Jordan gave him forty shillings of silver.

No. 108.—At York, on the Quindene of Holy Trinity, 29 Edward I. [11th June, 1301].

Between Adam, son of Elias de Leure, and Margery, his wife, plaintiffs, and Richard, son of William Hert, tenant of a messuage and fifteen acres of land in Hindelegh [Hindley].

Adam and Margery acknowledged the tenement to be the right of Richard, and quit-claimed it to him and his heirs in perpetuity. For this quit-claim he gave them ten marks of silver.

No. 109.—At York, on the Octave of St. John the Baptist, 29 Edward I. [1st July, 1301].

Between Ranulf le Gentyl, plaintiff, by Robert de Shyreburn, put in his place, and John le Gentyl, impedient, by William de Brex, put in his place, of one messuage, nineteen tofts, six shillings and eight pence rent, forty acres, and the fifth part of two carucates of land, one mill, and one mill-pool in the water of Lone, in Schotford [Scotforth] and Assheton in Lonesdale, respecting which a plea of warranty of charter had been summoned between them.

John acknowledged the tenement to be the right of Ranulf, as that which he had by John's gift, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Ranulf gave him one hundred pounds sterling.

No. 110.—At York, on the Octave of Holy Trinity, 29 Edward I., [4th June, 1301].

Between Adam de Waleton of Hole, plaintiff, and Adam, son of Warin de Waleton, deforciant, by Robert de Lichfield put in his place, of the manor of Waleton, thirty acres of land in Laylande, thirty shillings rent in Kelgrimesargh, and the moiety of the manors of Eccleston, Heskyn, and Laylond. (fn. 23)

Adam de Waleton of Hole acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Adam, son of Warin. For this acknowledgment the latter granted and rendered them to the said Adam de Waleton of Hole, to hold to him and the heirs of his body, in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging; remainder to Adam de Waleton of Mitton and the heirs of his body, to hold as aforesaid; like remainders to William de Waleton and Margery de Waleton, with reversion to the said Adam, son of Warin de Waleton, and his heirs.

[Endorsed].—Matilda, formerly the wife of John de Walton, puts in her claim; Margery, daughter of John de Waleton, Joan and Margaret, her sisters, put in their claim; John de ffarinton puts in his claim.

No. 111.—At York, on the Quindene of Easter, 29 Edward I. [16th April, 1301].

Between William, son of William de fforneby, and Margery, his wife, plaintiffs, and Jordan le Tayllor, and Almarica, his wife, deforciants of a messuage, twenty acres of land and six acres of meadow, in Inis, near Crosseby [Ince Blundell].

William acknowledged the tenement to be the right of Almarica. For this acknowledgment Jordan and Almarica granted it to William and Margery, to hold to them and the heirs of William by Margery his wife, of Jordan and Almarica, and the heirs of Almarica, in perpetuity, with remainder to Jordan and Almarica and the heirs of Almarica, to hold of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging.

No. 112.—At York, in three weeks from the feast of St. Michael, 29 Edward I. [20th October, 1301].

Between Henry de Trafford, plaintiff, and Adam de Prestwych, deforciant of a messuage, eighty acres of land, six acres of meadow, ten acres of wood, and one hundred acres of pasture in Barton (fn. 24)

Adam acknowledged the tenement to be the right of Henry. For this acknowledgment Henry granted it to him, to hold for life, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. After Adam's decease the tenement shall wholly remain to Henry, son of Agnes de Trafford, and the heirs of his body, to hold as aforesaid, in perpetuity; like remainder to Margaret, sister of Henry, and the heirs of her body; like remainder to Ellen, sister of Margaret, and the heirs of her body; like remainder to Margery, sister of Ellen, and the heirs of her body; like remainder to Joan, sister of Margery, and the heirs of her body; remainder to the right heirs of the said Adam.

No. 113.—At York, on the Morrow of All Souls, 29 Edward I. [3rd November, 1301].

Between Richard, son of Robert de Bolde, plaintiff, and Robert de Bolde, deforciant, by Richard Gothewayt put in his place, of the manor of Bolde. (fn. 25)

Robert acknowledged the manor to be the right of Richard, and rendered it to him, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Richard gave him one hundred pounds sterling.

No. 114.—At York, on the Morrow of All Souls, 29 Edward I. [3rd November, 1301].

Between Adam de Hodeleston, plaintiff, by William de Blumvill, put in his place, and John de Hodeleston, deforciant, by William de Holecroft put in his place, of the manors Whytington in Lonesdale, and Cleyton, near Ribcestre. (fn. 26)

Adam acknowledged the manors to be the right of John. For this acknowledgment John granted them to him, to hold for life, rendering yearly a rose at the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, and performing the services to the chief lords. After Adam's decease the manors shall wholly remain to Robert, son of the said John, and the heirs of his body, to hold as aforesaid; like remainder to Adam, brother of Robert, and the heirs of his body, with remainder to the said John and his heirs.

No. 115.—At York, on the Octave of St. Martin, 29 Edward I. [18th November, 1301].

Between Hugh, son of Henry de Tyldesleye, plaintiff, and Henry de Tyldesleye, deforciant of seven messuages, one mill, eighty-six acres of land, ten acres of meadow, one hundred and sixty acres of wood, and twenty-six acres of pasture, in Tildesleye.

Henry acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Hugh, and rendered them to him to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Hugh gave him ten pounds sterling.

No. 116.—At York, on the Quindene of St. Martin, 30 Edward I. [25th November, 1301].

Between Robert de Clyderhou, clerk, plaintiff, and John, son of Roger de Boulton, and Cecily, his wife, deforciants of three messuages, sixty acres of land, four acres of meadow, and three shillings rent, in Bayleye and Clyderhou [Clitheroe].

John and Cecily acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Robert, and quit-claimed them to him and his heirs in perpetuity. For this acknowledgment and quit-claim Robert gave them ten pounds sterling.

No. 117.—At York, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 30 Edward I. [20th January, 1302].

Between Robert de Clyderhou, plaintiff, and William, son of Nicholas de Mitton, deforciant of one messuage, ten acres, and and one and a half oxgang of land, one acre of meadow, and four pence rent, in Acton [Aighton].

William acknowledged the tenement to be the right of Robert, and rendered it to him, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Robert gave him twenty pounds sterling.

No. 118.—At York, on the Octave of St. John the Baptist, 30 Edward I. [1st July, 1302].

Between John de Langeton, clerk, plaintiff, by Robert de Cliderhou put in his place, and John, son of Robert de Langeton, (fn. 27) and Alesia, his wife, deforciants of the manors of Waleton, Neuton, Lauton, and the moiety of the manor of Goldeburn, and of the advowson of the church of Wygan.

John and Alice acknowledged the manors, and the moiety to be the right of John de Langeton, and rendered them to him, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment he gave them two hundred pounds sterling.

No. 119.—At York, on the Octave of St. John the Baptist, 30 Edward I. [1st July, 1302].

Between Adam Noel, plaintiff, and Roger Noel, (fn. 28) deforciant of a messuage, eighty acres of land, twenty acres of meadow, eight acres of pasture, and the moiety of a mill in Great Merleye [Mearley].

Adam acknowledged the tenement to be the right of Roger. For this acknowledgment Roger granted it to him, to hold to him and the heirs of his body, rendering yearly to Roger during his life twenty marks, to wit, one moiety at Pentecost and the other at the feast of St. Martin in Winter. And after Roger's decease rendering yearly a rose at the feast of the Nativity of St John the Baptist, and performing the services due to the chief lords of the fee. Remainder to Roger, brother of Adam, and his heirs, to hold as aforesaid in perpetuity.

No. 120.—At York, on the Quindene of St. Hilary, 30 Edward I. [27th January, 1302].

Between Roger de Lancastre, (fn. 29) plaintiff, by Thomas de Warthecop put in his place, and Simon le Tayllour and Beatrice, his wife, impedients of eighty acres of land in Ulverestone, respecting which a plea of warranty of charter had been summoned between them.

Simon and Beatrice acknowledged the land to be the right of Roger, as that which he had by their gift, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Roger gave them twenty pounds sterling.

No. 121.—At York, on the Octave of the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 30 Edward I. [9th February, 1302].

Between Edmund Talbot, plaintiff, by Walter de Scotton, put in his place, and William de Ederesford and Almarica, his wife, deforciants of one messuage, thirty-four acres of land, and six acres of meadow, in Dounum [Downham] and Twyselton.

William and Almarica acknowledged the tenement to be the right of Edmund, as that which he had by their gift, to hold to him and his heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Edmund gave them twenty pounds sterling.

No. 122.—At York, on the Octave of the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 31 Edward I. [9th February, 1303].

Between Peter de Ryselegh and Gilbert, his brother, plaintiffs, and John Gylibrand, and Ellen, his wife, deforciants of a messuage, three oxgangs of land, three acres of meadow, fifty acres of pasture, and twelve pence and one halfpenny rent, in Langeton.

John and Ellen acknowledged the tenement to be the right of Peter, and rendered it to Peter and Gilbert, to hold to them and the heirs of Peter in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment Peter and Gilbert gave them twenty marks of silver.

No. 123.—At York, on the Quindene of St. Hilary, 31 Edward I. [27th January, 1303].

Between Beatrice, daughter of Thomas de Okelshagh, plaintiff, and Thomas de Okelshagh, deforciant of one messuage, twenty acres of land, and one acre of meadow, in Adburgham [Abram].

Thomas acknowledged the tenement to be the right of Beatrice, to hold to Beatrice and her heirs in perpetuity, of the chief lords of the fee, by the services thereto belonging. For this acknowledgment she gave him ten pounds sterling.

Footnotes

1 "Richard Bussel (1153—1164) gave to the Abbey of Chester one carucate of land in Ruthford in alms, which the Abbot of Chester holds" in 1212. (Testa, ii, f. 817). One of the Fittons of Bollin appears to have been enfeoffed of this estate by an Abbot of St. Werburg under the yearly fee farm rent of ten shillings. Richard Fitton, who received Great Harwood from his cousin, Edmund Fitton, had issue three daughters, Matilda, the wife of William de Hesketh; Elizabeth, the wife of Roger Nowel of Read; and Amabel, the wife of Edmund de Lea. The moiety of Rufford was given to Matilda and Amabel, who, with their husbands, are the tenants named in this concord.
2 See note to No. 110 postea.
3 See his release in the Coucher of Whalley, p. 145.
4 Probably Henry, son of Henry de Aintree. Alice, widow of Henry de Aintree is named in the concord, as holding her third part in Aintree in dower.
In the reigns of Henry II. and Richard I., Alan de Holland held Aintree, as appears by the following entry in a schedule of the ferm of the Hundred of West Derby, preserved in the Pipe Roll of the 11 Henry III. "De Alano de Holland de [th]einagio in Hoiland et Aintre et Barton, xviijs." Alan had issue Henry, who succeeded him, and Adam, and possibly a daughter, married to Robert, son of Wrenou. In the survey of 1212, Henry de Holland is returned as holding three carucates, two oxgangs, in Down-Holland, Aintree, Barton, and Ribbleton, in chief of the King for 26s. yearly service. Before that date he had enfeoffed Robert, son of Wrenou, of two oxgangs, and his brother Adam of two oxgangs in Barton; Alan de Holland of one and a half oxgangs, Robert de Molyneux of one oxgang, Henry, son of Gilbert, of three oxgangs, and Hawise, daughter of Richard, of two oxgangs in Aintree, for the total service of 8s. 2d. The other half oxgang in Aintree was probably included in the three grants in frankalmoign to Cockersand Abbey, the Hospital of Chester, and the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem. (Testa, ii., f. 821). Henry had issue, Roger de Holland, who succeeded him, and Elias, who assumed the surname of Barton. The succeeding descents are not clear, but Richard de Holland held these estates in 1346. He had issue, Alan, who married Katharine, daughter of Robert de Coudray, Roger, to whom his father gave Down Holland, Henry, Andrew, Charles and Ameria. Roger, who succeeded to Down-Holland, had Thomas, who died 20th May, 1387, leaving issue, William his son and heir, aged ten years. (Dodsworth's MS. xxxix, f. 138 et seq)
Possibly Henry de Aintree, sen., named in the concord, may be identified as the heir of Henry, son of Gilbert, who held three-eighths of Aintree in 1212.
5 Cf. Nos. 31 and 76 antea. Ellen, wife of Henry de Kighley, is said to have been a daughter of Sir Hugh Venables, Knt., Baron of Kinderton. Another daughter Elizabeth, married Richard de la Donne, Lord of Utkinton, co. Chester. Probably William de la Donne, the plaintiff, was one of her younger sons. Bedford appears to have been given to Ellen Venables, presumably by her father in marriage. (Hist. of Cheshire, by Ormerod, II., p. 248.
6 A concord to establish a settlement of the demesne of Bold, made by Robert de Bold upon his three sons, Richard, Peter and Matthew, successively in tail.
7 See Whitaker's History of Whalley, ii, p. 388.
8 A concord to establish a settlement of the Manor of Tarleton, made by Adam Banastre upon his sons, John, Thomas, William, and Robert, successively in tail. See No. 96, postea.
9 Hugh le Norreis obtained Blackrod by the grant of John, Count of Mortain (1189–1194); which grant King John confirmed by a Charter which passed at Chinou, 10th October, 1199 (Charter Roll, 2 John, m. 5). He was possessed of Haigh as early as the time of Henry II., as appears from an entry in the Pipe Roll of the 6 Richard I., 1194–5, recording a fine paid by Hugh for returning to the King's allegiance, after the rebellion of Count John of Mortain had been quelled; and for recovery of his said estates. "Et de iij. m. de Hugone de Hagh pro pace et benevolentia Regis habenda." He died in 1223, and was succeeded by his son Hugh, who gave ten marks for his relief of one carucate of land in Blackrod, formerly of the fief of William Peverel of Nottingham, and had livery by writ, dated 12th May, 1223 (Fine Roll, 7 Henry III., m. 5). This Hugh appears to have been succeeded by another Hugh, whose daughter, Mabel, married Sir William Bradshaw, and so brought Haigh and Blackrod into that family. She appears to have been married before 1281–2, as her husband occurs in a schedule of the ferm of Salford Hundred in the 10 Edward I., 1281–2, as holding Blackrod by the yearly service of 20s. (Mamcestre, p. 173). Mabel survived until after 1346, in which year she was returned in the survey then made as holding the Manor of Haigh by military service. (Chetham Society, vol. 74, Pt. II., p. 37). It appears to be an error to suppose that there was any connection between Norreis of Haigh and Blackrod, and Norreis of Sutton, Eccleston and Rainhill. (See note to No. 154, p. 125). The nature of the relationship of William de Atherton and Thomas de Osbaldeston to Mabel, daughter of Hugh le Norreis does not appear from this concord. It is possible that their wives were also of the family of le Norreis.
10 A concord to establish a settlement by the father upon his son, of a portion of the demesne of Pennington. Cf. No. 205, p. 149; and No. 90, postea.
11 Orm de Kellet was the last of an English family who had held Nether Kellet (three carucates) by serjeanty of the bailiwick of Lonsdale, Cartmel and Furness, since the time of Henry I., or perhaps earlier. In defending a plea of quo warranto in 1292, Orm pleaded that his ancestors had held Nether Kellet, and the serjeanty of the Wapentake of Lonsdale since the time of William the Conqueror, from heir to heir (Quo Warranto Rolls, p. 384). He held this estate at the death of Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, in the 25 Edward I., but, as is evident from this concord, he alienated the manor in 1299 to Thomas Banastre of Broughton and Singleton, for a consideration of £100 sterling. Within a year or two after this date, Thomas Banaster appears to have disposed of his title to Sir Robert de Holland, whose mother is said to have been a daughter of Adam Kellet, the grandfather of Orm.
12 A concord to establish the title of Richard de Worsley to an estate late his father's, Henry de Worsley, jun., then deceased. The deforciant Henry appears to have been an elder relation of Richard's, for by inference he was known as Henry, senior.
13 Cf. No. 87, antca.
14 It is difficult to give an explanation of this concord. It seems to point to a grant of Kirkby-Irleth and Dunderdale (both in Furness), by John de Kirkby to Robert de Lathom, by way of mortgage, for a consideration of two hundred marks. See No. 101, postea.
15 Robert de Pendlebury had a grant of Pendlebury (one carucate) from John, Count of Mortain (1189–1194), confirmed in 1199. He had issue Elias, who held the manor in 1212, and died in 1219. Adam his son and heir had livery on the 27th October, 1219, and had seisin of the bailiwick or serjeanty of the Wapentake of Salford in the 2 Henry III. (Close Roll, m. 8). He was succeeded by his son Roger. In the extent of Salford Hundred, made in 1282, Alice de Prestwich is returned as rendering 10s. yearly for Pendlebury. She was evidently an heiress of the house of Pendlebury, and I suspect that she was the wife of Adam de Prestwich, and sister of Beatrice, the deforciant. The oxgang in Barton was Wickleswick, formerly a hamlet, but now merged in Trafford Park.
16 Peter de Ashton contributed two marks to the tallage levied in the year 1202. (Pipe Roll, 4 John). He was probably the father of Thomas de Burnhull, who held in the year 1212—besides Burnhull and Auderton— three and a half carucates in Ashton-in-Makerfield cum membris in thanage. Thomas had issue Sir Peter de Burnhill, Knt. (Assize Roll of 1246, No. 404, m. 2, Whalley Coucher, pp. 848, 852), who held Ashton, Anderton and Burnhull, and died before 1292 (Quo Warranto Roll, p. 377). He was succeeded by his son Alan, who was under age in 1292, and in ward to Gilbert de Clifton. Sir Thomas Gerrard, Knt., whose grandfather married the heiress of Burnhull temp. Edward III., died in 1416, seised of the Manor of Skelmersdale (Lancashire Inquisitions, i, p. 123).
17 Cf. No. 82, antea, p. 184. Adam Banastre of Bretherton, living temp. John and Henry III., was the father of Richard, living 1246. (Assize Roll, No. 404, m. 7). He was probably the father of Adam, who in a previous concord (No. 82) settled Tarleton, and in this concord one carucate in Bretherton, upon his sons in tail.
18 A concord to establish a settlement of the Kirkby estates upon Sir John de Kirkby and Margery his wife, and their issue. Sir Robert de Lathom was probably mortgagee of these estates, having some months before given Sir John de Kirkby two hundred marks, in return for which he had obtained a conveyance of Kirkby-Irleth and Dunnerdale as security for the loan. (Cf. No. 92, antea).
19 Richard de Hoghton, son of Richard, being unmarried and probably in bad health, conveyed the above estates in Grimsargh, Livesey, Whittlele-Woods, Eccleshill, and Elston to his cousin Richard, son of Adam, brother of the grantor's (or plaintiff's) father, but settled the remainder, if his cousin had no issue, upon his own sisters, Joan and Margery. Which settlement this concord duly confirmed and established.
20 A concord to establish a settlement of land in Rainhill by the father upon the son.
21 Cf. No. 89, antea. Richard and Robert de Worsley, sons of Henry de Worsley, appear to have acquired estates from their mother Joan, who died 1293. She may have been an Ashton, seeing that Robert de Ashton was guardian of her sons until their majority.
22 A concord to establish a settlement of the demesne estate of Penketh by Robert de Penketh upon Jordan, his son and heir.
23 A note to the Inquisition post mortem of Sir Ralph de Radcliffe (1433) in Lancashire Inquisitions, ii., p. 35, partially explains the genealogical details of this concord. The Manor of Walton, i.e., Ulneswalton, had been held by the family of Walton as far back as the commencement of the thirteenth century, of the Barony of Penwortham, by the service of one-fifth knight's fee. The moiety of the manor of Eccleston in Leylandshire, was held by this family in 36 Henry III. (1251–2) of Roger Gernet, Chief Forester of Lancashire, by the free service of 4s. yearly (Escaeta, 36 Henry III., No. 59). Heskin was also held of Gernet by the same tenure, but by what service does not appear. Adam de Walton had obtained a moiety of the manor of Leyland by the grant of Richard Bussel (Legh of Lyme Deeds). The title to thirty solidates of land in Kellamergh may be traced by the following record of a suit at Lancaster Assizes in 1246. "An assize came to make a recognition if Siward de Kelgrimesarewe, father of Margery, was seised of the third part of two oxgangs of land in Kelgrimesarewe, of which Thomas de Bethum holds the third part of one oxgang, and Jordan, son of Quenild, the third part of the other oxgang. Thomas stated that the land was of the inheritance of his wife Amuria, by whom he had issue, Ralph, his son. Jordan called to warrant Warin de Waleton, who warranted, and called to warrant Richard Banastre, who warranted, and called to warrant Robert de Stokeford (sic), Roger Gernet and Quenild his wife, and Ralph, son and heir of the said Ammira, formerly the wife of Thomas, who appeared, and stated that the land was the villeinage of one Hugh de Moretoyn, and that the said Siward held it of him in villeinage. Afterwards Robert, Roger and Quenild came and said that the town of Kergrimesarh was a member of Singleton, which was of the King's demesne, where such a writ runs not. Whereupon they were dismissed, and Margery was in mercy for a false claim. She was poor." (Assize Roll, No. 404, m. 10).
These estates eventually descended to Legh of Lyme and Barton of Smithells, through the daughters and co-heirs of Margery de Walton named above, by her husband, Adam de Norlegh of Pemberton.
24 This estate is the manor of Wickleswick, now called Whittleswick in the parish of Eccles. Adam de Prestwich appears to have married Agnes, sister (?) of Henry de Trafford, by whom he had issue, Henry, upon whom the manor of Wickleswick was hereby settled subject to his father's life interest, and daughters, Margaret, Ellen, Margery and Joan, upon whom the reversion of the manor was settled successively in tail, in default of issue of their brother. This estate appears to have belonged to Agnes de Trafford in her own right. It was accordingly settled upon her children after her death (before the date of this concord), subject to her husband's life interest. The heir of Adam de Prestwich appears to have been a daughter, Alice, an only child by a first wife. Alice, daughter of Adam de Prestwich probably married Richard de Pontefract and died young, leaving issue a daughter, usually described as Alice de Prestwich. By her husband, . . . de Wolveley, she had issue Thomas de Wolveley, who succeeded to the manors of Prestwich and Alkrington, Robert died young s.p., Alice married Jordan de Tetlawe, and Agnes, who died s.p. See Lancashire Inquisitions, p. 53; and Final Concords, temp. Edward II., Nos. 40 and 52.
25 A concord to establish a settlement of the manor of Bold by Robert de Bold upon his son and heir, Richard, for a consideration of one hundred pounds sterling.
26 The estate in Whittington in Lonsdale was one carucate of land, forming only a portion of the township. Adam de Copeland gave his manor of Whittington and two-thirds of the advowson of the church to Sir John de Huddleston (Inquisition ad quod damnum, 28 Edward I., No. 140). Sir Adam de Huddleston acquired a moiety of Billington in 1288, from Adam de Billington, and the other moiety, and Clayton-le-Dale from Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, at whose death in 1311, he held Clayton and Billington for 10s. yearly service, and by military service. Sir Adam died s.p. in 1322, when Richard, son of his brother, Sir John de Huddleston, was found heir of Billington (Escaeta, 15 Edward II., No. 3).
27 John, son of Robert de Langton, married Alice, only daughter and heiress of James Banastre, the last of the Banastres, lords of Makerfield. The plaintiff, John de Langton, clerk, was brother of Robert de Langton. He was elected Bishop of Chichester 5th April, 1305, and was Chancellor of England from 1 to 4 Edward II, 1308–1311. This concord established a conveyance of the Banastre estates to John Langton, clerk, to secure a charge of two hundred pounds.
28 Roger Nowell, the father, resigned this estate in Great Mearley to Adam, his son and heir, in return for an annuity of twenty marks. This family settlement was confirmed by the above concord.
29 Sir Roger de Lancaster, Knt., was Lord of Ulverston, Broughton in Furness, and estates in the Barony of Kendal. He married Philippa, eldest daughter and co-heir of Hugh de Bolebeck, of co. Northumberland.