Lancashire Fines
47-50 Edward III

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

William Farrer (editor)

Year published

1902

Pages

185-192

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'Lancashire Fines: 47-50 Edward III', Final Concords for Lancashire, Part 2: 1307-77 (1902), pp. 185-192. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=52556 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


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47-50 Edward III

183. At Westminster, at three weeks from St. Michael, 47 Edward III. [20th October, 1373].

Between William de Denwalle, of Longeton, and Almarica his wife, plaintiffs, and Robert de Horseford and Cecilia his wife, deforciants of a third part of a messuage, 28 acres of land, 2 acres of meadow, and 5s. of rent in Hoghwyk [Howick].

Robert and Cecilia for themselves and the heirs of Cecilia remitted all right to William and Almarica and to the heirs of Almarica, for which William and Almarica gave them 20 marks.

184. At Westminster, on the Quindene of Easter Day, 47 Edward III. [1st May, 1373].

Between William de Lynales and Katherine his wife, plaintiffs, and John de Henthorn, chaplain, and Robert Collan, chaplain, deforciants of the manor of Ribbechastre [Ribchester], (fn. 1) with the appurtenances.

William and Katherine acknowledged the said manor to be the right of John, for which John and Robert granted it to William and Katherine; to have and to hold to them and to the heirs issuing of their bodies, in default to remain to the heirs of the body of Katherine, in default to remain to Richard, son of Alexander de Lynales, and to the heirs of his body, in default to remain to the right heirs of Katherine.

185. At Westminster, on the Quindene of Easter Day, 47 Edward III. [1st May, 1373], and afterwards recorded on the Octave of Holy Trinity in the said year [19th June, 1373].

Between William, son of Henry de Dutton, plaintiff, and Richard, son of John de Hodirsale and Emma his wife, deforciants of a messuage, 18 acres of land, one acre of meadow, and a third part of two messuages in Alston.

Richard and Emma acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of William; to have and to hold to him and his heirs, for which William gave them 10 marks.

186. At Westminster, on the morrow of the Ascension, 47 Edward III. [27th May, 1373], and afterwards recorded on the Octave of Holy Trinity in the said year [19th June, 1373].

Between Geoffrey le Massy, Lawrence de Holcroft, and Richard de Middelton. plaintiffs, and Robert de Clipston, of Salfordshire, and Joan his wife, deforciants of a messuage, 12 acres of land, and one acre of meadow in Kenyan and Culchith.

Robert and Joan remitted all right to the plaintiffs and to the heirs of Lawrence, for which the plaintiffs gave them 20 marks.

187. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. John the Baptist, 47 Edward III. [1st July, 1373].

Between John de Ipre, chivaler, and Margery his wife, plaintiffs, and Henry Wright, of Alwalton, and Agnes his wife, deforciants of a messuage and 6 acres of land in Lancastre.

Henry and Agnes remitted all right for themselves and the heirs of Agnes to John and Margery and the heirs of John, for which John and Margery gave them 10 marks.

188. At Westminster, on the morrow of St. Martin, 48 Edward III. [12th November, 1374].

Between Thomas de Broghton, parson of the church of Neweton, and John de Fourneys, chaplain, plaintiffs, and William, son of Roger de Slene, deforciant of a third part of the manor of Ellale. (fn. 2)

William remitted all right to Thomas and John and to the heirs of Thomas, for which Thomas and John gave him 100 marks.

189. At Westminster, on the Quindene of Easter Day, 48 Edward III. [16th April, 1374].

Between Henry de Scolefeld and Robert del Shore, chaplain, plaintiffs, and Robert del Lawe and Joan his wife, deforciants of a fourth part of a messuage, 40 acres of land, 12 acres of meadow, and 40 acres of wood in Honeresfeld [Hundersfield].

The deforciants for themselves and the heirs of Joan remitted all right to the plaintiffs and to the heirs of Robert del Shore, for which the plaintiffs gave them 20 marks.

190. At Westminster, on the Quindene of Easter Day, 49 Edward III. [6th May, 1375].

Between John Blundell, of Ines, plaintiff, and John, son of Henry de Chatherton, and Katherine his wife, deforciants of the manor of Ines [Ince-Blundell], (fn. 3) near Sefton, and of a moiety of one acre of land in Sefton.

John, son of Henry, and Katherine remitted all right to John and his heirs, for which John gave them 100 marks.

191. At Westminster, at three weeks from Easter Day, 49 Edward III. [13th May, 1375].

Between John del Halle, of Erghum [Arkholme], and Katherine his wife, plaintiffs, and Thomas le Wyse, parson of the church of Chippyng, deforciant of 16 acres of land and a moiety of a messuage in Mellyng [in Lonsdale].

John and Katherine remitted all right to Thomas and his heirs, for which Thomas gave them 20 marks.

192. At Westminster, on the Octave of Holy Trinity, 49 Edward III. [24th June, 1375].

Between Roger de Culwen and Agnes his wife, plaintiffs, and John Swaynson and Agnes his wife, deforciants of a moiety of the manor of Caton. (fn. 4)

John and Agnes acknowledged the said moiety to be the right of Roger, for which Roger and Agnes granted it to John and Agnes; to have and to hold to them for their lives, rendering by the year to Roger and Agnes and to the heirs of Roger a rose at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist. After their decease the said moiety to revert to Roger and Agnes and to the heirs of Roger.

193. At Westminster, at one month from Easter Day, 50 Edward III. [11th May, 1376].

Between Robert le Breton, vicar of the church of Huyton, and Thomas de la Rydyng, chaplain, plaintiffs, and Thomas de Lathum, knight, deforciant of the manors of Lathum, Knouselegh, Childewalle, Roby, and Huyton, and of 6 messuages, 100 acres of land, 20 acres of meadow, 200 acres of pasture, 40 acres of wood, 100 acres of moor, and 18s. of rent in Anlasargh and Whistan, and of a third part of the manor of Wrightyngton, and of the advowson of the priory of Burscogh.

Thomas de Lathum remitted all right to the plaintiffs and to the heirs of Robert, for which the plaintiffs gave him 1,000li.

194. At Westminster, on the Quindene of Easter Day, 50 Edward III. [27th April, 1376].

Between Thomas de Fasacrelegh, plaintiff, and John Brown and Margery his wife, deforciants of two messuages and two acres of land in Lyverpull.

John and Margery remitted all right to Thomas and his heirs, for which Thomas gave them 20 marks.

195. At Westminster, on the morrow of the Ascension, 50 Edward III. [23rd May, 1376], and afterwards recorded on the Octave of Holy Trinity in the said year [15th June, 1376].

Between John le Mareschall, of Preston in Amondernesse, and Alice his wife, plaintiffs, by William de Horneby put in their place, and John Hunt, of Ivere, and Agnes his wife, deforciants of 2 acres 1 rood of land, and 1 rood of meadow in Preston in Amondernesse.

John and Agnes remitted all right to the plaintiffs and to the heirs of John le Mareschall, for which the plaintiffs gave them 20s.

196. At Westminster, on the Octave of Holy Trinity, 50 Edward III. [15th June, 1376].

Between John de Nevill, chivaler, (fn. 5) plaintiff, and William Massy and Ellen his wife, deforciants of the manors of Overkellet and Stubbe, and of a messuage, 60 acres of land and 12 acres of meadow in Halton.

William and Ellen acknowledged the said manors and tenements to be the right of John, for which John granted them to William and Ellen; to have and to hold for their lives, rendering a rose at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist during Ellen's life, and after her decease 10 marks by the year. After their decease the said manors and tenements to revert to John and his heirs.

197. At Westminster, on the morrow of St. Martin, 50 Edward III. [12th November, 1376], and afterwards recorded on the Octave of St. Hilary in the said year [20th January, 1377].

Between Richard de Hoghton, plaintiff, and John Froysell, "Taillour," and Cecilia his wife, deforciants of 3 messuages, 16 acres of land, and an acre of meadow in Preston in Amundernesse and Lee Gallica [French Lea].

John and Cecilia acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Richard; to have and to hold to him and his heirs, for which Richard gave them 20 marks.

198. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Michael, 50 Edward III. [6th October, 1376], and afterwards recorded on the Quindene of Easter Day, 51 Edward III. [12th April, 1377].

Between Thomas de Accris, chaplain, and Roger de Fasacrelegh, plaintiffs, and Nicholas de Faryngton and Katherine his wife, deforciants of a messuage, 78 acres of land, and two acres of wood in Walton, near Kyrkedale.

Nicholas and Katherine acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Roger, for which Thomas and Roger granted them to Nicholas and Katherine for their lives, rendering a rose by the year at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist for all service, &c., pertaining to Thomas and Roger, and to the heirs of Roger. After their decease to remain to William, son of Thomas, son of Thomas de Fasacrelegh, and to the heirs of his body, in default to remain to the heirs of the body of the said Katherine, in default to remain to John, son of William de Mawdeslegh, and the heirs of his body, in default to revert to Thomas and Roger and to the heirs of Roger.

Footnotes

1 It is extremely doubtful if the Fine on page 1, pt. i., of Lane. Fines, can be rightly assigned to Ribchester. The place appears in the Roll (Duchy of Lanc., Miscellanea, bundle i., no. 36, m. 4), as Ribbec', and in the margin "Villa de Ribbec'." In the same Roll there is an abstract of a deed, found in Pontefract Castle in A.D. 1325, by which "Robert de Lascy demised (sic) to Robert, son of Henry, the moiety of Ribbecestre with the appurtenances, to hold to him and his heirs of the said Robert and his heirs in free thanage by rendering to him yearly seven shillings, saving to the said Robert and his heirs the gift of the church of the same town and the forest of buck and doe, wild boar and sow." The date of this charter was before 1193. This Robert appears to have been the father of Agnes, who before 1202 married Alan de Windhull (Cf., pt. i., pp. 13 and 21). They had issue a daughter and heir Amabel, who married Walter de Moton, and so brought this manor to that family. In 1219, Syrith, Wynniva and Matilda, the three daughters of Godwin released an oxgang of land here to Walter Mutun. (Ibid., p. 40). Before 1232, John, Constable of Chester, gave "the farm, aid and service which Alan de Wyndhull and his predecessors had made for Ribchester and land in Dilworth," to Walter Mutun and his heirs for a pair of fur gloves or 4d., at Clitheroe (Dodworth's MS. liii., fol. 23). The Constable also gave him the other moiety of Ribchester and the mill there, to hold as freely "as my father and my brother held it" (Kuerden's folio MS., Chetham Lib., p. 77). Walter and Amabel were living in 1230 (Fine Roll excerpts, p. 201), about which time Walter gave land in Ribchester, and the mill with the suit thereof to Stanlaw Abbey, "saving the multure of my own house after the grain which may then be found in the hopper"; and he gave his body for burial at Stanlaw Abbey, charging his heirs with the expenses of conveying it thither (Coucher of Whalley, p. 868, et seq.). He was living in 1243, when he was defendant in a plea touching the advowson of the church of Ribchester, in the King's Court. William, his son, confirmed his father's gifts about the year 1250 (Ibid., p. 872, et seq.). Amabel, his relict, who afterwards married Robert de Riblecestre, also confirmed. William de Motun was succeeded by his son Robert, who released to Mr. Richard de Hoghton the service of land in Ametehalgh, which William his father had given to Sir Adam de Hoghton in 53 Henry III. (1269). He appears to have survived until 11 Edward III., when Robert Moton is mentioned as lord of Ribchester. (Inq. ad quod damnum, 11 Edward III., 2nd nos., no. 10). William Moton, son and heir of Robert, calls himself lord of Ribchester in the 12 to 15 Edward III., but in the 20 Edward III., Robert, his brother, is named lord of Ribchester, and again in the 23 Edward III. (Ribchester deeds, Addit. MSS., no. 32,106, passim). The subsequent descent of the manor is not clear. By deed dated 29 Edward III., 1355, Robert, son of William Moton, gave his manor of Ribchester to feoffees (Kuerden's folio MS., Chetham Lib., p. 250). From Robert the manor apparently passed to Katherine, who married William de Lynales. In the above Fine the deforciants, who may be Robert Moton's feoffees, settle the manor upon William and Katherine, and the heirs of Katherine. In the 8 Henry IV., 1406, Katherine, widow of William Linalx, lady of Ribchester, granted to Sir Richard de Hoghton, knt., that he might give 9 messuages and other lands in Ribchester, which he held of her, to a chaplain celebrating divine service in a certain chapel built on the north side of the church of Ribchester (Kuerden's folio MS., Chetham Lib., p. 246).
2 The early history of the manor of Ellel has been briefly noticed in Lanc. Fines, pt. i, p. 167 in notis. Roger de Sline, who married Juliana, youngest of the three daughters and coheirs of Grimbald de Ellel, had issue four sons, Thomas, William, Richard and Roger (Assize Roll, no. 418, m. 8d and m. 10). Thomas de Sline succeeded his father, and held the third part of the manor in 19 Edward II. (Inq. ad quod damnum, no. 157). He was living in 1332, when he contributed to the subsidy which was collected that year. In 1357, Roger de Sline, son and heir of Thomas, was a defendant in a plea at Lancaster brought by Jordan, Abbot of Cockersand, touching common of pasture in Ellel (Duchy of Lanc., Assize Roll no. 6, m. un-numbered). William, son and heir of the said Roger, is the deforciant in the above Fine. He held the manor of Ellel jointly with Richard le Molyneux, and Richard Talbot and Anabella his wife, of Thomas de Thweng at the time of the latter's death, viz., 28th May, 1374 (Chetham Society, xcv, p. 5).
3 We are indebted to the Rev. T. E. Gibson, the learned author of Lydiate Hall and its Associations (pp. 84–5) for a corrected pedigree of Blundell of Ince-Blundell, in place of the unsatisfactory production of the early heralds, which had previously done service. John Blundell succeeded to the manor of Ince-Blundell after the death of his brother Henry, who died s.p. before 1371. Katherine, widow of the said Henry, who married secondly John de Chatherton or Catherton, and her said husband, are deforciants in this Fine, remitting her right of dower in consideration inter alia of 100 marks.
4 A younger branch of the family of Gernet held Heysham and Caton in the twelfth century, the former by serjeanty and the latter in thanage. Adam Gernet held these manors temp. Richard I. By Agnes his wife he had issue Thomas Gernet, who held them in 1212, and died in 1221 (Fine Roll, temp. John, pp. 74, 89; Rotuli Curiæ Regis, ii, p. 163). He was the father of Vivian Gernet of Heysham, who died in 1246, the inquest after whose death was taken at Lancaster on May 19th of that year (Inquisitions, 30 Henry III., no. 20). Roger Gernet was son and heir of Vivian by Godith daughter and coheir of William de Kellet, and had livery of his father's estates on June 4th, 1246 (Fine Roll i, p. 453). This line appears to have become extinct, for in the time of Edward I. Heysham was seized by the chief lord and given to Ranulf de Dacre. Another branch of the Gernet family held Caton under the Gernets of Heysham. In the time of Richard I., Matthew Gernet (probably a brother of Adam Gernet of Heysham) held Littledale in Caton of the King by the service of 6s. 8d. (Charter Roll, temp. John, p. xl). He was the father of John Gernet of Caton, who having been enfeoffed of one third part of Caton by Thomas Gernet of Heysham, was described circa 1220 as one of the lords of Caton (Reg. of Lanc. Priory, p. 164). Roger, son and heir of John Gernet of Caton, made fine with the King by 40s. to have the lands which his said father had held of the King in chief, and had livery by writ dated 5th Nov., 1241 (Fine Roll, i, p. 360). Roger Gernet of Caton died shortly before 5th Oct., 1251, the date of the writ of diem clausit extremum directed to the escheator to make inquiry, by which it was found that he died seised of Littledale, which he held of the King, 6 oxgangs of land in Caton which he held of Roger de Heysham, the third part of the corn mill and the third part of the fulling-mill in Caton and other estates in Burrow and Leck. John his son was his heir, aged 2 years at the ensuing feast of St. Martin. Subsequently two further inquests were taken, both in the 44 Henry III. (cf. Fine Roll, ii, p. 319). John Gernet, who came of age in 1270, held two ploughlands (i.e. the manor of Caton and the pasture of Littledale) in Caton of Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, at the latter's death in 1297, by the service of 26s. 8d. yearly. No doubt the manor had been granted to the said John after the estates of the Gernets of Heysham had escheated to the chief lord. Thomas "de Caton" succeeded, and was probably son and heir of John Gernet, who was styled "John de Caton" in the inquest of 1297. By Fine made in 5 Edward II., 1312 (p. 10 supra) the manor of Caton was granted to Thomas, apparently as son and heir of John, but a life interest in it was reserved to John, the father, and Roger, his younger son. The Extent of 1322 records that "Alice and Agnes, daughters and heirs of Thomas de Caton hold the manor of Caton by homage and service of 20s.," and the pasture of Littledale by the service of 6s. 8d. Alice, the elder daughter, married before 1330 William de Lancaster of Howgill, co. Westmorland, son of Sir John de Lancaster, of Howgill and Rydal, chivaler (Reg of Lanc. Priory, p. 460 et seq.). Agnes, the younger daughter, married after 1330 John de Curwen, who was probably a cadet of the house of Curwen of Workington. His descendants were seated at Stubhall in Aughton, par. of Halton, and Gressyard in Caton until the seventeenth century. Roger de Curwen, plaintiff in the above Fine, was no doubt son and heir of John de Curwen and Agnes, his wife, who held the manor of Caton in 1346 jointly with William de Lancaster of Howgill and Alice his wife (Chetham Society, lxxiv, pt. ij, p. 73).
5 Of Leversedge, co. York; and Nevill Hall, near Ulverston. Ellen, wife of William Mascy, was evidently the relict of William de Nevill, father of Sir John. See p. 105, supra.