Pleas and evidences
Fos. 63-68

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

John Brownbill (editor)

Year published

1914

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Pages

138-149

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'Pleas and evidences: Fos. 63-68', The Ledger Book of Vale Royal Abbey (1914), pp. 138-149. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=52597 Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


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Fo. 63.

[The Abbey's right in Delamere Forest.]

Pleas of claims at Chester before Richard de Willughby, Richard de Stafford, John de Delues and John de Brunham the younger, appointed on the eyre for the pleas of the forests of Mara and Mondrem, on Saturday next after the feast of St. Michael, 31 Edw. III [30 Sept. 1357].

The abbot of Vale Royal claims for himself and his successors that all the lands and tenements of himself, his men and tenants, being as well in wood as in plain, are deafforested and outside all power of the foresters, verdurers, regarders and agisters, and all other bailiffs and officers of the forests of Mara and Mondrem and he claims to have to him and his successors pasture and his reasonable estovers with all other his easements in the forests aforesaid, and also right to quarry and all other things which may be necessary for erecting and maintaining the buildings in the abbey aforesaid, and for making glass. And he claims that his men and tenants of the manor of Darnhale, Weverham and Conewardesley shall have pasture and their reasonable estovers, with other easements, in the forests aforesaid, as they were accustomed to have in the time of Earl Randolph and of other former lords of Chester, excepting in fence-time in the lord's demesne coverts. And he says that Lord Edward, formerly King of England, grandfather of the now Lord the King, founder of the abbey aforesaid, granted to the then abbot of Vale Royal, predecessor of this abbot, and the convent of that place, and their successors, that all their lands and tenements, and the lands and tenements of their men and tenants, to wit, bondtenants and tenants at will, being as well in wood as in plain, should be deafforested and outside all power of the foresters, verdurers, regarders, agisters, and all other bailiffs and officers of the forests of Mara and Mondrem. And also he granted to the same abbot and convent and their successors, the predecessor etc., pasture and their reasonable estovers with other easements, that is to say, to carry those estovers as often and whensoever they shall please in the forests aforesaid; and also to have a quarry and other things which may be necessary for erecting and maintaining the buildings in the abbey aforesaid, and for making glass. And also that their men and tenants, that is to say, bond-tenants and tenants at will of the manor[s] of Darnhale, Weverham and Conewardesley should have pasture and their reasonable estovers, with other easements, to wit, to carry those estovers in the forests aforesaid, as they were accustomed to have in the time of Earl Randolph and of other former lords of Chester, excepting in fence-time in the lord's demesne coverts, by the charter of the same Lord Edward, formerly King of England, grandfather etc., which he produces here and which witnesses this, the date whereof is at Stepney on the 15th day of May in the 27th year of his reign [1299]. The which liberties and profits the said abbot who then was [had], and all abbots of the place aforesaid etc. have in like manner had without any interruption the aforesaid liberties and profits in his claim contained from the time of the making of the charter aforesaid. And he says that his last predecessor, abbot etc. (fn. 1) in the last eyre of the justices of the forest, to wit, Thomas de Ferrers and his associates, justices appointed for the eyre to hold pleas of that forest in the 21st year of the reign of the now Lord King [1347] claimed to have such liberties and profits in the forests aforesaid, which were adjudged to him and his successors; and concerning this he vouches the record of the rolls of the justices of the eyre aforesaid in the time aforesaid, and demands that the liberties and profits aforesaid should be allowed to him in this behalf.

And William de Wakebrug, who sues for the lord in this behalf, as regards his claim that all his lands and tenements and the lands and tenements of his men and tenants are deafforested, and to have to him and his successors pasture and his reasonable estovers etc., and also a quarry for constructing and maintaining the buildings in the abbey, and for making glass, and likewise as regards his claim that his men and tenants of his manors of Darnehale, Wevereham and Conewardeslegh shall have pasture and their reasonable estovers, as they were accustomed to have in the time of Earl Randolph and of other former lords of Chester [fo. 41d (278d)], says that the same abbot did not obtain full allowance of the same liberties and profits as he claims, and concerning this he likewise vouches the record of the rolls of the justices aforesaid.

Thereupon, after examination of the rolls aforesaid, being in the hands of the justices, it is found therein, as regards the said abbot's claim that all his lands and tenements and the lands and tenements of his men and tenants are deafforested, and to have to him and his successors pasture and reasonable estovers, and also a quarry etc. for constructing and maintaining the buildings in the abbey, and for making glass, that the liberties and profits aforesaid were allowed to him. Therefore it is granted, as regards the liberties and profits aforesaid, that the said abbot shall have and enjoy the same, always saving in all things the right of the Lord Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall and Earl of Chester. And as regards having pasture and reasonable estovers for his men and tenants of the manors of Darnehale, Wevereham and Conewardeslegh, it is found therein that the said men and tenants did not have or receive the aforesaid estovers in form aforesaid, as the said abbot claims. Therefore as regards this it is considered that the said abbot shall take nothing by his claim, but shall be in mercy, and those estovers shall remain in the lord's hand.

And the same William, who sues for the lord, as regards the claim that the men and tenants of the said abbot of his manors aforesaid in the forests aforesaid should have pasture outside the covert, excepting in fence-time, as they were accustomed to have in the time of Earl Randolph etc., he says that in the time of the said Randolph the said manors were in his seisin and the seisin of other lords, at which time such men and tenants did not have pasture except within the metes and bounds of the vills aforesaid in which they dwelt, and not in the forests aforesaid at large, nor in the charter of the said Lord Edward, the grandfather etc., is it contained that the men and tenants aforesaid shall have pasture in the forests aforesaid, except as they were accustomed to have in the time of the said Earl Randolph and the other lords; and the aforesaid men and tenants in the time of the said Randolph did not have pasture as the said abbot surmises, except within the bounds of the vills aforesaid. He says, moreover, that the said abbot, who now is, has a greater number of men and tenants there, whom he has put there, than there were at the time of the making of the charter of King Edward, and who also have pasture in the said forests to the injury of the lord's game in those forests and the great destruction thereof. And this he offers to prove on behalf of the lord etc.

And the abbot says that the aforesaid men and tenants of the manors aforesaid in the time of the said Randolph and the other lords were accustomed to have pasture in the forests aforesaid, and that he has not, nor has he put in those manors, more men and tenants than there were in the time of the said King Edward, the grandfather etc., as the said William de Wakebrug', who sues for the lord, asserts. And this he offers to prove, and William likewise.

Therefore let a jury come before the aforenamed justices at Chester on Monday in the second week in Lent.

On which day there came before the aforenamed justices at Chester as well the aforesaid William, who sues, etc. as the abbot by his attorney, and a further day is given to the parties here until Monday next after the Assumption of the B.V. Mary at Chester etc. And then came the judges, jurors etc. And a day is given to the parties here, until Friday in the second week in Lent, in the same state (statu) as now.

On which day (fn. 2) at Chester there came before the aforenamed justices the aforesaid abbot in his own person; and the aforesaid John de Delues and Master John de Brunham, the justices aforesaid, produced here in court the privy letters of the Prince, which he had directed to them in these words: (fn. 3)

Edward, eldest son of the noble King of England and of France, Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall and Earl of Chester, to our wellbeloved and trusty John de Delues, lieutenant of our justiciar of Chester, and to Master John de Brunham, our chamberlain there, greeting. We command and charge you to survey the bounds which Master John de Wyngfeld and you, our said chamberlain, rode out some time since between us and our well-beloved in Christ the abbot and convent of Vale Royal, for common of pasture of the men and tenants of the said abbot of his manors of Merton, Conewardeslegh and Weverham and of Ollerschawe, and ordain some bound in the midst between the bounds ridden out by the said Master John and the wastes of Ollerschawe [which we have given to the said abbot in the fields which were ours aforetime, and permit the men and tenants of the said manors and of Ollerschagh to common with their beasts in all the neighbourhood thereabout up to these bounds in this behalf appointed and by you to be appointed, without hindrance from us, our justices, sheriffs, escheators, foresters or other ministers whomsoever. And this our letter shall be your warrant therein (fn. 4) ]. Given on the 23rd of August in the 33rd year of the reign of our dearest lord and father the King in England, and the 20th in France [1359].

By pretext of which letters the said John and John, the justices etc., went in person to the common of pasture appointed for the said men and tenants of the said abbot of the manors aforesaid, to survey the bounds and metes which Sir John de Wyngfeld, knight, and the aforenamed John de Brunham, chamberlain of Chester, had theretofore set forth and ridden out by command [fo. 42 (279)] of the said Prince; which begin, to wit, from a place where Paytefynsty descends to the commons of Codynton, to the stone put and ordained there, and from there to a certain heap of stones towards the south on the high way which leads from Chester to Northwich, between Blakemere and Harebachecrosse, (fn. 5) and from there straight towards the belfry of Acton, as far as the bounds of Merton, as pasture for the men and tenants of the said abbot of the manors aforesaid for ever, on the north and east side of the bounds aforesaid, to hold to them without challenge by the lord or the lord's servants of the forest aforesaid. And the said abbot, for himself and his convent aforesaid, holds himself for ever content with the bounds aforesaid thus put and ordained for his men and tenants abovesaid, without challenge henceforth to be made by himself or his successors, his men and tenants of his manors aforesaid.

Therefore let nothing further be done concerning the taking of the inquest aforesaid upon the claim aforesaid, because the said abbot, for himself and his convent, has remitted his claim in this behalf.

Fo. 65.

[Rudheath.]

Inquisition taken in the full county [-court] of Chester by the oath of Sir Hugh de Venables, Sir John de Arderne and Sir Geoffrey de Werburton, knights, William de Praers, Henry de Beston, Thomas Daniers, John de Cotton, William de Swetenham, William de Venables, Thomas de Venables, brother of the said William, Richard de Sumerford and Richard le Skot, who say upon their oath that Ruddehetgh and Ouermersh in the county of Chester are of the proper soil of the lord the Earl of Chester, and that they are outside any (omnem) vill.

View and riding-out of the bounds and metes of the aforesaid moor of Ruddeheth made on Monday, the morrow of St. Valentine, (fn. 6) by the same jurors, and likewise by Richard de Crauneche, Stephen Dandy, Hammond Lether, Henry de Lache, John de Cotton and Richard de Moresbarowe, jurors, whom the men beforesaid had begged for their assistance, etc. Who say upon their oath that the first bound and meet of Ruddeheth begins at Holden next Shurlach, following Holden as far as Lostokebroke, and then following Lostokebroke as far as Loweforth, and from there as far as Portforth, and from Portforth following the said path [? dictum illum] as far as Rynesforth, and from Rynesforth as far as to Hardeshagheforth, and from Hardeshaghforth as far as Ormesforth, following up Lostokbrok, and from Lostokbrok to Rogereswey, and from Rogereswey to Shaghesyche, and then following that little brook (sichet) as far as le Sondyforth, and from there following that brook leaving [? diuititend' (sic)] Chikenshagh in Ruddeheth, as far as to the bounds between Twamlowe and Ruddeheth, following those bounds as far as Goldewey, and from Goldewey following a certain old ditch Saghemor, and from there going back along (redeundo) a certain old ditch next the house of Thomas Hardy, which is in Ruddeheth, as far as the wood of Twamlowe, and then following the end of the wood of Twamlowe as far as the wood of Craunache, and then following the end of that wood as far as a certain alder grove at the head of the vill of Craunache, and from there as far as Redlache, following le Oldedyche as far as Whystelhaghe, and from there following a certain brook to a marl-pit next Jurdanes-rydding, and so following that rydding along a certain old ditch as far as Legheslone, and beyond Legheslone ascending by a certain ditch to Bynelegh-lydeyate, and beyond that following a certain ditch le Bouhous, and from there following a certain old ditch as far as Ravenescroftes-lach, and from there following that ditch as far as Lynstrete, [then] following a certain ditch as far as to le Hethlach, and from there following a certain old ditch as far as Alstan Thornsyche, following that brook as far as the head of the lane of Wodehouses, and beyond that lane following a certain old ditch as far as Pertreleghes, and from there as far as to le Whitesych, following that brook as far as the garden of Hulkok de Vernoun, and then following a certain old ditch defaced (prostratiua) through the middle of the garden of the aforesaid Hulkok, leaving [?] the half of that garden and the houses thereof in Ruddeheth, as far as a certain dividing [dirt'e] oak, and from that oak as far as another oak standing in a ditch of Nicholas de Vernoun, and following that ditch as far as Whatcrofteslone, and then beyond Whatcrofteslone following a certain old ditch between two fields, one of which is in the bounds of Ruddeheth, as far as Shipbrokesmos, and following that moss thus dividing Ruddeheth as far as Polsych to Shipbrokeslone, and following that brook as far as to a certain old ditch stretching as far as the house of Walter Page in Shipbroke, and from there beyond the high way as far as the house of Reginald Legg, where a certain old cottage is raised in Ruddeheth, and then descending to the head of the grange of the said Reginald, following a certain ditch as far as le Morstal, and from there following a certain old ditch round the same croft to the head of the old field, and then [fo. 42d (279d)] along the head of that field following that bound along Simmesfeld as far as a certain marlpit, and from there as far as Bradefordeswey next "le Lauedyfeld," and from there crosswise through the midst to the head of the same field as far as a certain marl-pit, following that as far as the ditch round "le Leuedysfeld," and from there crosswise through the midst to the head of the same field, as far as a certain marl-pit in Ruddeheth, and from that marl-pit following the old ditch round "le Leuediesfeld" as far as Walter Page's marl-pit, and from there descending as far as Oldefeldesdyche, following that ditch as far as Bradefordesbrok, and so across Bradefordesbrok ascending along Shurlache-dyche, following that ditch on the left-hand side as far as Bradeford moor, and from there leaving that moor in Ruddeheth, following a certain old ditch as far as the vill of Bradford, and then across the way between the house of William Fox on the one side and Ranulph de Wynynton on the other as far as to another way, leaving the house of the aforesaid Ranulph in Ruddeheth, and so from that way leading beyond the field of Bradford along a certain old ditch in decay there as far as a certain headland (forera), and from there straight to Goslache, following Goslache as far as the lane of Stephen le Hunte, and from there following a certain old ditch as far as the bounds of Wytton, following those bounds to le Longacre, which is in Ruddeheth, and so straight between the bounds of Wytton and Ruddeheth as far as the way which leads to Wytton chapel, and across that way straight to Holden, where the first bound begins etc. (fn. 7)

Fo. 67.

Lampaderuaur'.

The charges of the church of Lampaderuaur are these:

To the archdeacon of Cardigan for procuration 22s. 3d. payable at Christmas.

To the lord bishop of St. David's for his pension 66s. 8d., payable to the dean of Ultra-Ayron at Lampaderuaur on the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist.

To the chaplain of the church of St. David 18s., payable to the commissary (? commar') of the same chaplain at St. David's on the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist.

Synodals with procuration of the official 9s.

To the dean of Ultra-Haroyn for procuration 40s., but not of right nor by true title; payable at the feasts of Christmas and Easter equally.

Item, to the archdeacon of Bangor 15d. yearly, but the payment thereof belongs to the vicar of Castlewalter and not to the rector.

Assessment of the said church according to the assessment of Northwych 28 marks, and as regards the tenths payable to the King it is assessed at 100 marks.

Ordinary charges [fo. 43 (280)] of Lampadern-vaur:
The vicar there for his yearly pension at the 4 terms xx li.
Item, to the bishop of St. David's for indemnity, with synodals v marks ixs. vjd.
Item, to the archdeacon of Cardigan for procuration 22s. 3d., and for indemnity ijs.
Item, to the chaplain of St. David's xviijs.
Extraordinary charges:
In payment of rent to the Prince 1s.
Item, to the King for one whole tenth, when it is due, x marks.
Sum total: xxxijli. xijs. ixd.

Inquisition taken by the steward of the abbot of Vale Royal on Thursday [fo. 42d (279d)] next after the feast of SS. Fabian and Sebastian [21 Jan. 1360–1] at Lampadern', to wit, by Rees Bougham, Griffith ap Rees, John ap Eneas, vicar of Castelwalter, Gronogh, chaplain, William Thloyde, David Vaghan, Jevan Thloyde Vaghan, Griffith ap Robin, David ap Pillogh, Gurgwene Bole and David Seyre, who say upon their oath that the said abbot of Vale Royall is true rector of the church of Lampadernaur, and their lord; and after these things, the abbot himself being present, all the men aforesaid and the other tenants did their fealty in full court, and acknowledged the said abbot to be rector of Lampadern' and their lord. These things were done on the aforesaid Thursday in the year of our Lord 1360, and the 34th year of the reign of King Edward the Third after the Conquest.

[Collections of Tenths.]

In the Great Roll [fo. 43 (280)] of the first year of King Henry the Fifth in reg' (sic) London, after Item Devon.

The abbot and convent of Vale Royal in the diocese of Lichfield, impropriators of the parish church of Lampdern Vaur, [appointed] collectors of a tenth and a half granted to King Henry the Fourth by the clergy of the province of Canterbury in the church of St. Paul, London, on the 26th of January in the 2nd year of that King's reign, in the archdeaconry of Cardigan, diocese of St. David's, owe £71, 18s. 3¾d. of the same tenth and a half. But he ought not to be summoned thereupon, by the King's writ enrolled in the Memoranda in the second year of this King in Michaelmas term, rot. 4, in which it is contained that the King of his especial grace pardoned the now abbot of that place £71, 18s. 3¾d. for which he was accountable of the aforesaid tenth and a half in the archdeaconry aforesaid to the King at his exchequer, and by reason of the appointment aforesaid. And moreover the King wills and grants that as well the aforenamed now abbot as his successors shall be quit and wholly discharged for ever to the King and his heirs at the exchequer aforesaid as to the said £71, 18s. 3¾d. for the tenth and a half aforesaid in the archdeaconry aforesaid, provided always that from this time forward no sums of money shall be raised or collected in any way on account of the tenth and a half aforesaid in the archdeaconry aforesaid by the aforenamed now abbot or his successors, or their servants or deputies whomsoever. And they are quit.

The abbot and convent of Vale Royal, collectors of the moiety of a tenth granted to King Henry the fourth by the clergy on the 6th day of October in the fifth year of his reign in the archdeaconry of Chester for the county of Chester in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield, render account of ljli. iijs. 6¾d. of the same moiety in the Michaelmas term, and £51, 2s. 6d. (fn. 8) pardoned to the said abbot and convent by the King's writ enrolled in the Memoranda of the second year of this King in the Michaelmas term, rot. iiij, and by direction of the Barons noted in the Memoranda of the Treasurer's Remembrancer in the said second year, to wit, among the records of Michaelmas term, ro. xij. And they owe 12¾d.

[The following are the royal pardons referred to:]

Fo. 63.

The King to all to whom these present letters shall come [greeting]. Know ye that whereas Stephen, late abbot of Vale Royal in the diocese of Lichfield, impropriator of the parish church of Lampadarn vaur, was appointed collector of a tenth and a half, granted to Henry, late King of England, our father, by the clergy of the province of Canterbury in the church of St. Paul, London, on the 26th day of January in the second year of the reign of the aforesaid late King, in the archdeaconry of Cardigan, diocese of St. David's, and although some sums of the money of the tenth and a half aforesaid could not be raised by the aforesaid late abbot on account of the rebellion then existing in the archdeaconry aforesaid, nor, as we are more at large informed, can they yet be levied by our well-beloved in Christ the now abbot of Vale Royal, nevertheless the said now abbot is heavily distrained and frequently annoyed by distresses of our exchequer to render an account to us of the tenth and a half aforesaid; we, considering the premises, of our especial grace have pardoned to the said now abbot £71, 18s. 3¾d. concerning which he is accountable to us at our exchequer for the tenth and a half aforesaid by reason of the appointment aforesaid. Willing and granting that as well the aforesaid late abbot as the aforenamed now abbot and his successors shall be quit and for ever wholly discharged as regards us and our heirs at our exchequer aforesaid of the [fo. 43d (280d)] said £71, 18s. 3¾d. for the tenth and a half aforesaid. Provided always that no sums of money shall from this time forth be raised or collected in any way on account of the tenth and a half aforesaid in the archdeaconry aforesaid, [by] the now abbot or his successors, their servants or deputies whomsoever. In witness whereof etc. these our letters etc. Witness myself at Leicester on the 21st day of May in the second year [1414]. (fn. 9)

The King to all to whom these present letters shall come, greeting. Know ye that of our especial grace and in recompense for xxti barrels of wine being in arrears to our well-beloved in Christ the abbot and convent of Vale Royal of those two barrels of wine granted to them by the charters of our progenitors, formerly Kings of England, which we have confirmed as is said, to be received every year out of our right prise at our city of Chester by the hands of our justiciar there for the time being, as we are more at large informed, we have granted to the same abbot £51, 2s. 6d. for which he was accountable to us at our exchequer for half a tenth, granted to Henry, late King of England, our father, by the clergy of the province of Canterbury in the church of St. Paul, London, on the 6th day of October in the 5th year of his reign [1403] in the archdeaconry of Chester. Willing further and granting that the aforenamed abbot and his successors shall be quit and wholly discharged for ever as regards us and our heirs at our exchequer of the said £51, 2s. 6d. for the said half of a tenth in the archdeaconry aforesaid. In witness whereof etc. Witness myself at Leicester on the 20th day of May in the second year etc. [1414].

[Claims against lords of Dutton and Lostock.]

Order was given to the bailiff of the liberty of Weverham on behalf of the Lord Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester to cause liiijs, to be raised from the land and chattels of Sir Peter de Dutton, knight, in his bailiwick, to the use of the Prince aforesaid, for free rent which he owes for divers lands and tenements which he holds in Dutton from the abbot of Vale Royal and the convent of that place by knight's service and by a rent of 2s. yearly, payable every year at the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, which rent is in arrears and unpaid for twenty-seven years now last past; and also £26, 13s. 8d. from the land and chattels of Thomas le Grosvenour, chivaler, to the use of the Prince aforesaid, for free rent which he owes for divers lands and tenements (fn. 10) which he holds from the abbot and convent aforesaid by knight's service and by a rent of 17s. by the year, payable at the four terms of the year, to wit, at Christmas, iiijs. iijd., at the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary 4s. 3d., at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist iiijs. iijd., and at Michaelmas 4s. 3d.; and likewise 5s. yearly at the feast of St. Martin for pannage, which rent and pannage are in arrears for the time aforesaid. And also to cause 10li. 12s. to be raised from the land and chattels of the same Thomas for divers fines and amercements for his suit which he owes at the court of Weverham, as appears in the court rolls of Weverham of his own time. And also to cause to be raised from the lands of the coparceners of Acton in his bailiwick 27s. for free rent being in arrears for the time aforesaid, to wit, for every year 1s. And also to cause to be raised from the lands and chattels of Hugh de Knuttesford (fn. 11) in his bailiwick £6, 9s. which he owes for divers lands and tenements which he holds in Twemlow at the yearly terms, to wit, the terms of St. Martin in the Winter, the Nativity of St. John the Baptist and St. Martin last past; and also 27s. of the free rent of Weverham being in arrear for the time aforesaid, to wit, every year 1s. And to have those sums at Weverham on Tuesday next after the feast of the Conception of the B.V.M. now next coming, to give to Richard de Manley, escheator of the aforesaid Prince and one of the said Prince's commissioners, and to inform the aforenamed escheator at Weverham at the term aforesaid what he shall have done herein, sending this precept there at the same time. Given at Weverham on the 12th day of November in the 10th year of the reign of King Henry the Fourth after the Conquest of England [1408].

There is due to the abbot of Vale Royal for free rent of Allostock from the feast of the Annunciation of the B.V.M. in the fourth year of the reign of Richard the Second late King of England until the same feast in the fifth year of the reign of King Henry the Fourth, for 22 years past, every year 22s. Total: £24, 2s. Out of which sum Thomas Hobson has paid for 5 years past every year 7s. 4d. Total paid by him: £22, 5s. 4d., which sum Sir Thomas le Grosvenor, knight, who now is, is bound to pay to the aforesaid abbot of Vale Royal [1404].

Item [fo. 44 (281)], on Saturday next after the feast of St. Edward the King in the 33rd year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Henry the Third [1305], Robert le Grosvenour did his homage and fealty to John, abbot of Vale Royal, for all the lands and tenements of Lostock, and acknowledged that he held the manor of Lostock wholly from the manor of Weverham for homage and service and fealty, and by the service of one knight's fee, and suit at the court of Weverham every fortnight, and 17s. yearly [to be paid] to the manor of Weverham at the four terms of the year, to wit, at Christmas 4s. 3d., at the feast of the Annunciation of the B.V.M. 4s. 3d., at the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist 4s. 3d., and at the feast of St. Michael the Archangel 4s. 3d.; and 5s. at the feast of St. Martin every year.

Item, on Thursday next after the feast of the Conversion of St. Paul the Apostle in the 47th year of the reign of King Edward the Third after the Conquest [27 Jan. 1372–3], Robert le Grosvenour did his homage and fealty to Stephen, abbot of Vale Royal, for all the lands and tenements of Lostock, and acknowledged he holds the manor of Lostock as in form abovewritten. See previous entry, fo. 31 above [p. 62].

Item, the same Sir Thomas le Grosvenour gave to the aforesaid abbot of Vale Royal for the service of one knight's fee, 100s.

Item, the same Sir Thomas le Grosvenour, knight, gave to the same abbot for his divers amerciaments and defaults in the court of Weverham, and because he had not done suit at the aforesaid court every fortnight for five years past, as appears in the court rolls of Weverham, £10, 12s.
Grosvenor, total of debt, £26, 13s. 8d.
From Sir Peter de Dutton, knight, for the free rent of Dutton for 27 years, to wit, 2s. every year, 54s.
For the free rent of Acton for the same time, 27s.
For the free rent of Nether Pever for 2 years, 2s.
For the free rent of Weverham for 27 years, 27s.

Footnotes

1 Robert de Cheyneston.
2 This concluding part of the record is given a second time in the MS. on fo. 4d/241d of the transcript.
3 In French.
4 The portion within square brackets has been restored from the duplicate entry.
5 Harebachecrofte in the other copy.
6 Monday was 13 Feb. not 15 Feb. in 1345–6, the date suggested at the end.
7 "This is inrolled in the prothonotoryes office in the castle of Chester more at large with all that held landes in Ruddeheth—anno 20 E. 3."—H.
8 Cal. Pat. 1413–6, p. 197.
9 Cal. Pat. 1413–6, p. 201.
10 In Lostock or Allostock.
11 Kuttesford or Ruttesford in MS.