State Papers, 1644
July-September

Sponsor

History of Parliament Trust

Publication

Author

Thomas Birch (editor)

Year published

1742

Pages

38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50

Citation Show another format:

'State Papers, 1644: July-September', A collection of the State Papers of John Thurloe, volume 1: 1638-1653 (1742), pp. 38-50. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=55233 Date accessed: 02 October 2014.


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July-September

Letter from lord Lindsay, —directed thus:

To the right hon. the committee of estates of Scotland at Edinburgh. Orig.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

Right honorable,
Since our last to your lordships, the condition of our affairs heer are not a little changed; for on Monday last upon notice of p. Rupert's march from Knaisburgh towards ws, wee resolved, and accordingly drew out the armyes to have met him; and for that end did march the same night to Long–Marston–moore, about four myles on the west side of York; bot he haveing notice thereof did passe with his army at Borrowbridge, and so put the river of Ouse betwixt him and ws, whereby wee were dissabled to oppose his passage into York; the bridge wee built on the west side of the toun being so weak, that wee durst not adventure to transport our armyes upon it. This made ws resolve the next morning to march unto Todcaster for the stopping of his passage southward; and the armyes being so far on their way as the vann wes within a myle of it, notice wys sent ws by our horsmen, who were upon our reare, that the prince his army horse and foote were advanced the length of Long–Marstoun–moore, and wes ready to fall upon them; whereupon wee recalled the whole armyes, and drew them up on a corne–hill up on the south west side of the Moore in the best wayes wee could, so far as the straitnes of that feild and other disadvantages of the place could permitt. Before both armies were in readines, it was neer seven a clock at night; about which tyme both armyes advanced each towards other, whereupon followed a very hot encounter for the space of two houres, whereof by the great blissing and good providence of God the issue was the total routing of the enemies army, and their losse of all their ordinance to the number of twenty, ammunition, baggage, and a hundred colours, and ten thousand armes. There were killed upon the place about three thousand of them, and above fifteen hundred prisoners; whereof many cheif officers, among whom there are above one hundredth officers, in which number is sir Charles Lucas, lieutenent generall to the marquise of Newcastle's horse, . . . Porter, generall major, and general major Tillier, with diverse other colonells, lieutenant colonells, and majors. The prince in great distraction, with a few horse and almost no foot, marched the next morning from York northward. Our losse, God be praised, is not wery great, being onely of one lieutenant colonell, some few captanes, ane about two or three hundreth comon sojors. Wee have now lyne down again in our old leaguer before York, which wee are confident within a few dayes by Gods help to gaine; and have sent a great part of our cavalry after p. Rupert. The glorie of all this belongs unto God alone, and the benefite thereof wee hope shall reredound to both the kingdomes; for which cause wee have appointed this next sabbath for a day of solemne thanksgiveing throughout thir armyes; and wee hope your lordships will appoint a day for the same, to be keept throughout the kingdome, and notice sent to us therof, that wee altogether may joyne in it. Wee are informed, that the generall of artilleries traine in Ireland has resaved no part of that money sent thither, wherof wee mervaill; and theirfore wee desire, they may have proportionall pay, since they have done service as the rest. Wee hear lykewyse, that some of that victuall, which wes ordained to be sent hither for our army, is disposed upon for the use of the earl of Calander's army; and therefore wee desire, that als much may be sent hither in place thairof, and tymeous provision made of als much more as possiblie can be had, seeing wee have ressaved none from thence, since our outcomeing more then wes provided befor. Wee rest

From the leaguer before
York, 6th July 1644.

Your lordships assured freinds and servants,
Lindesay I. P. D.

Wee hope your lordships will not forget the great paines and trubell of this bearer, so oft runing up and doun in the public affaires.

12 July 1644.

Produced be the lord chancellor, and red in audience of the haill parliament.

Letter from the earle of Leven,—directed thus:

For the right hon. the lords and others of the comity of estaits within the kingdome of Scotland these. Orig.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

My lords,
As in my former letters, I must likewise by this intreat, that your lordships will take into consideration the weakness of the severall regiments of this army, occasioned by much service and very hard usage, since our coming from Scotland; and that yow will be pleased to further the bearer hereof, captaine Ingles of Inglisstoun, for the bringing up of all such as were wanting of the lord Maitland regiment at there first setting furth; as also for seasing and apprehending of all such, as are run away of late; that condigne punishment may be inflicted upon some, and the rest sent to there cullors. My request is not only for this, but for all other regiments, which are come out of our country upon this service; the performeance whereof will verie much encourage those that are heir, further the service, and tye me to remaine

York, July 18, 1644.

Your lordships most humble servant,
Leven.

26 Julii 1644

Produced be the laird of Inglestoun, and red in audience of parliament.

Letter from lord Lindesay,—directed thus:

For the right hon. the committee of estates of Scotland at Edinburgh. Orig.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

Right honourable,
It is now almost thre monethes, since wee have heard any thing from your lordships there. Howbeit wee have at all occasions sent your lordships an accompt of our proceidings and desires, which constranes ws agane to mak this addresse by thir noble bearers, who will more fully aquaint yow with the particulars.

Wee find so great prejudice in all our services of consequence, and so many inconveniencies in the government of the regiments by the multitude of absent officers, who contrary to thair duety so long desert thair charges, that wee have thought it absolutely necessary for the good of the service and standing of the army, to desire your lordships to mak proclamation at the mercat croce of Edinburgh, and all other places neidfull, commanding all officers, of what quality soever, to repare unto thair severall charges at or befor the fifteint day of August next; ester which time it is fund, that without evident losse to the army the places cannot be suffered to vaike any longer; and who come not before that, are not to expect to returne to thaire charges. And this being done, we hop your lordships will conceave it tyme after seven moneths continuall service to think upon recruting the regiments heir; and that your lordships may proceid with the greater cleirnes, we shall send yow a list of the dead and killed men of each regiment horse and foote; as also of such as have not sent out thair men in this expedition at all; that speidy order may be taken by each shire and division for recruiting of thair owne regiments; and wee shall send an officer from each regiment to be ready, and attend at any rendevous yow shall appoynt in each shire for thair meiting, who shall bring them up to the army. And where any regiment or troupe hes beene levyed, and not put out by any shires, they expect proportionably to have money for thair recrues. And for that end also wee desire your lordships to tak exact tryell of any runnawayes from this army, and cause exact punishment to be inflicted upon some of them, to the terror of others; and the rest to be sent hither. Wee cannot but acquaint your lordships, that no greater discouragment to many of our cheiff officers nor greater disadvantage to the army can befall, then your neglect of such officers, as have beene employed in Ireland, and are now hazarding thair lyves here; and that yow have not so much as thought upon them or thair service there, when yow have beene dispatching moneyes unto thair fellow officers. The enconveniences, that are like to ensue heirupon by the great and just discontentment of these officers, and the trane of artillary, and lord generall's troupe, constranes ws to have our recourse to your lordships in thair behalff; and wee desire, that thair obedience to your commands in coming hither be not a meanes to prejudge them of the fruit of thair labour there.

For our present condition, York wes surrendered upon the 16th. Wee are marching toward Doncaster for fresh quarters to our sojors, and have sent the lord Humby to London, part ly for the representing the necessities of the army, and providing for them; and partly to learn the parliaments advice anent the future disposall of their forces, and from ws to desire the parliament to be more sedulous in the satling of maters of religion, the only cause of our coming this length. This is the account of our present condition and desires; wherunto and unto all the particulars formerly represented, and especially anent the observeing of a regiment for our leiutenent generall, a present and satisfactory answer is expected by

York 19 July 1644.

Your lordships humble servants,
Lindesay, I. P. D.

27 Julii 1644.

Produced be me lord chancellor, and red in audience of the parliament, and remitted to the commity of estatts.

Letter from the earle of Leven, — directed thus:

For the right hon. the lords, barons, and burgesses in parliament at Edinburgh. Orig.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

May it please your honours,
I Receaved your letter of the 20th instant, and therein your lordships directions anent the disposall of our cavallry, upon information yow have receaved of the prince his march into Cumberland, and being at Kendall. My lords, the earle of Manchester his forces and ours are now divided; and wee are lying heere for the refreshing of our soldiers, who have ben much wearied with six months continuall service; so as in that posture without evident danger I cannot separate our horse from our foot. But if wee shall find any truth to be in that information (which as yet doeth not appeare) or if the prince shall have any designe either against that kingdome, or our forces in Bishopwrik and Northumberland, no consideration whatsoever shall hinder me from marching with our whole army towards those parts, being therunto obliged by the dutty I owe both to our native countrey and to your lordships commands. But if the prince shall make his southward (which is rather supposed) wee shall, God willing, so dispose of ourselves, as may best witnesse our desires to prosecut that worke, for which your lordships have sent us hither; and in all conditions shall ever bee most ready to obey such commands, as shall come from your lordships to

Leeds the 27th of July 1644.

Your lordships most affectionate freind and servant,
Leven.

Letter from the earle of Calander, — directed thus:

For the richt hon. the earle of Lawderdaill, president of the parliament of Scotland. Orig.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

May it please your lordships,
Since the closeing of my last, I resavit be captane Robertsone from your lordships several letters, one of the 18, ane other of the 20, and two of the 25 of this instant. As to the first of the 18, such is the affection of the most part of all thir countrie people, as I may litle relye wpon thair intelligence. And David Leslie, generall major of the horse, being now neere Leeds, that distance betwixt us makes our intelligence wncertaine. And as for the haveing of a catche for keeping intelligence, it is most necessarie.

And as to your lordships of the 20, showeing prince Rupert's armie and himselfe to be at Kendall raising the countrie, your lordships will perceave by this inclosed the last word I hade from these pairts. Whairssor it is necessare, that the countrie be putt in a present posture. The generals owne letter to your lordships will answere the rest of your letter, which makes me remitt my answere of it to his lordships.

And as for these of the 25, the generals intention is not to divyd his horse from his foote; albeit still it hes bein and is my desire, that wee may joyne for securing thir northerne parts, and speciallie our owne countrie, whiche now I hope his excellencie will doe, when he resaves yours sent be captane Robersone to me, which I have poasted awaye to him this morneing.

I shall obey in makeing myselfe reddie to march according to the necessitie of the service, thoe my danger will be verye great, being so weake in horse; and if the enemies should interpose themselfes betwixt the generall and me, our dangers then will be greater, whiche I muche feare. Howsoever our resolutions will be still for preserveing our countrie. I have not harde from the governour of Berwick of any forces as yitt come up, and I will be forced to call the foure companies of foott, and troupe of horse that ar at Merpethe hither, if without danger, for feare of the enemies cutting them off, and for strenthening myselfe, and supplying the garrisons of Sounderland, Hartlepoole, and Stocktowne, in caise of my marcheing towards your lordships: and if the enemies should fall in strong betwixt your lordships and me, I shall give ordors to Walden and his regiment to retire towards Scotland; and if shippeing can be had at Sounderland, I intend to imbarke some foote, and come myselfe to Scotland with them. But I hope the generall will remove thir difficulties by our speedie joyneing. The copye of colonell Walden his letter to me is heere likewayes inclosed, whairby our danger may be easielie perceaved.

Your lordships would be pleased to advert to the Merse and Teviotdaill, as weell as to Annandaill and Nithsdaill, for the enemies strenthe consisting in horse and dragowners, these forces, whiche ar supposed to come this waye, may as weell enter these as Montrose and the rest the wther.

I intreat that yor lordship would send wp meall to Hartlepoole, for the better interteining of that garrisone and that of Stocktowne. So attending your lordship's further ordors and commands, which shall be reddelie obeyed be

Osworthe Leaguer,
penult. Julii 1644.

Your lordships most humble servant,
Calander.

Letter from the earle of Callander, — directed thus:

For the right hon. the earle of Lauderdaill, president of the parliament of Scotland.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

May it please your lordship,
Since my last I have prosequuted my intentions against Hartlepoole and Stocktowne, whereof I doubt not but the earle of Eglingtowne has informed your lordships. As for the event, wee have reasone to thank God, who still makes it appeare, that this work is his owne; for upon Wedinsday the twentie fourt of this instant being thair in persone, after I had drawen some forces both horse and foot neere the said toun closse to the outworkes, and after fyre given upon both syds, I summoned the towne. The governor, sir Edmond Carye, did accept of my summoneds and entered into capitulation, which continued till Thursday at two or three a clocke in the efternoon; at which tyme (haveing aggreed, that it should be surrendered upon the same tearmes and conditions that were given to York) he marched out, and at the same time the castle of Stoktowne was given up to me, being comprehended within the partie, he being governor of both. There was in the towne nine piece of canon with some small quantitie of ammunition, and in the castle there was only one canon. I have put garisones in both, and appointed governors to keepe the same wnder me; which I trust your lordships will approve off. Hartlepoole is the most fitt place for a magazine; wherefor I intend to make it thair, and not at Sounderland, albeit it be a greater distance from ws.

The tyme of my being this imployed the enemies insulted by comeing out of Newcastle and plundering Bishoprick; and at my returne to Lumley castle the report of the enemies intention to fall in upon Scotland, and the hopes I had of the generalls speedie march northward, made me command the generall major Ramsay, the lord Montgomrie with his regiment, and colonell Cambell with eight hundereth comanded men, to march in the night, and seize upon Gaitsyde; bot they were prevented by the appearing of the day, and the enemies drawing out both horse and foot to the windmylne. Upon the knowledge hereof, I marched with the armie within two myles of Newcastle, and gave ordors for beating of the enemies, (fn. 1) in which was done, so that before the soune sett they were verie neir the port at the bridge end, and at night made the port unusefull for the enemies falling out by barricadoeing of it, so that there is nothing without the port in Gaittsyde unpossessed by ws. Notwithstanding whereof if the generall resolve not to march hither, or that I be pressed by a powerfull enemie, which I verie much doubt, I shall be necessitat to quitt it, and reteir to Sounderland.

The ingageing before the towne will hazard thir forces, and divert the enemies from yow; which I raither choyse to doe, nor that they should fall in upon our countrie, or that any deanger com to it.

The tyme of our skirmishing with the enemies upon Saturday thair was only on killed, who was of the Colledge of Justices troupe, named David Lindsay, who it seemes was goeng to the enemies, as appeares be an letter found upon him written to the earle of Crawford; the copie whereof is heir inclosed.

I will not represent any more my weakenes and wants, thair being great forces of the enemies in Cumberland, Westmureland, and Lancashire. Which way they tend, it is not weell knowen. I pray God avert thair malice and strength from our countrie and ws, for if they come doune strong, it will be impossible for me bot be sea to gett home with any forces. I have diverse tymes represented to the generall the necessitie of his marching northwards for secureing of both the armies, preventing of deanger to our countrie, and if possible the gaining of Newcastle.

Thir inclosed I receaved from the generall with ane answere of my last to him, which seemes thair feare is not of the enemies falling into our countrie, bot to attend my lord Humbies returne from London, whilest they refresh thair armie.

Notwithstanding God hath blissed ws with the gaining of Hartlepoole and Stocktowne; yeet the English comissioners wold seeme to violat some of the articles of the treattie, as some of the English souldiors have alreadie done; whereat I am much offended. So expecting your lordships comands I rest

Oseworth Leaguer penult. Julii 1644.

Your lordships most humble servant,
Calander.

Letter from the earle of Calander,—directed thus:

For the right honorable the earle of Loudowne, lord chancellor of Scotland; and, in his absence, To the president of the committee of estaite thairof, at Edinburgh.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

Maye it please your lordships,
Haveing resavit thir inclosed this nicht late sent from the earle of Lindsaye, requyreing a speedie dispatche to your lordships, I have sent them to yowe poast, whairby your lordships will be certified of all bussinesse concerning ws, and whairfor I will be spairing to trouble your lordships. Only lett me remember your lordship the necessitie this armie will be in, when the wther is joined to it; for generall major Leslie is to be in Durhame with thrie regiments of horse and one of dragowners the morowe at nicht; and I am uncertaine when the foote moves this waye. Whairfor meill wold be sent heere in the expedition.

I wische your lordships comands had bein as possitive for the speedie advancing of the foote heere, as it was for the horse; for this worke being of great difficultie, a river divyding the armie without a bridge, the enemies being masters of all the boatts and keills, the wncertaine approache of an enemie, and certaintie of the winter requyres thair present marching northward.

Likewyse your lordships would consider and prevent the danger, whiche may ensewe, being occasioned by the cloatheing of the foote of the wther armie, and gaitting moneyes, and thir haveing gottine nothing at all; nor doe I knowe of whom to call for any, except from your lordship.

If this seige shall continewe, greater store of powder, ball, and matche, both for cannone and musquett, must be hade.

Thair be daylie questions arising anent the precedencies of regiments, which your lordships will be pleased to take to your considerations and cleare; for I am ignorant bothe of thair commissions and daitts thairof. Your lordships also wold be pleased, sieing the commissioners ar comeing up (the waye being all frie to Mortpethe, which, I hope, ere it be long, shall be cleered also) to advertise me befor, that I may send a convoye thair to meett them; and what else yor lordship shall think fitt to comand shall be obeyed be,

Osworthe Leaguer 4 Augusti 1644.

My lords,
Your lordships most humble servant,
Calander.

Letter from Crawfurd Lindsay,—directed thus:

For the right honorable the committee of estats of Scotland at Edinburgh. Orig.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

Right honorable,
Your letter of the 15th wee have receaved, and with it a copy of a letter sent to the lord Chancellor from Carlile. Wee past the river of Tyne upon Wednesday last at Newburne, and have now besieged this city on all quarters. Wee shall carefully have an ey upon any forces from Cumberland or Westmerland, that may have any designe upon ws, or for releiff of this town; and shall no sooner receave advertisement from yow, that any forces shall enter into that kingdome, but wee shall mak it appeare, how much wee think ourselves interest of the peace of that kingdome, and how readie we wil be to preferre it to any other thing. The lord chancellor his information from Carlile, according to our intelligence, seemes not to be very weell grounded; bot however wee shall doe the best wee can, by keeping correspondence with our freinds in the south, to get constant and sure knowledge of the enemies strength and motions. Wee have given ordor, that the postmasters betwixt this and Berwic make ready horses to ansswer any that shall be sent to your lordships, and have appointed a new stage from Morpeth and Kenton, from whence they are to come to the lord generall's quarters. Wee intreat your lordships to cause your acts against runawayes be effectually put to execution, and wee shall continue

Elsewick 16th Aug. 1644.

Your lordships affectionat freinds and servands,
Crawfurd Lindesay I. P. D.

Letter from the earle of Calander and others,—directed thus:

For the right honorable the lordes and otheris of the committie of estates at Edinburgh, these.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

May it pleis your lordships,
Wee conseawing it necessar and incumbent, that in quhataver posture or condition wee be in to acquaint your lordship, have thairfore at this tyme tane occasioun to show yowr lordship, that this part of the army since the cuming up of the lord generall's army, they being on the other syd of the river, hes not mutch bene takin notice of be thame, but any thing concerning the same, as money, proviant, or quhat els requisite remittet to ws, the wants quhairoff wee find to be so many, as without your lordship's assistance cannot be supplied, wee resolvet to have gevin sum small proportioun of pey to the officers and sodjors, and sutch of the stalff as wee thocht necessarlie required, to witt ane shilling star vther sodjors half monethis meanes to the officer, and syve shillinges star to ilk trowper; but hawing takin particular accompt of the commissarie of his haill intromissioun and depursmentes reveiset and approven, wee find our selffes to be wanting and short to compleit that calculatioun ane thowsand pund star.; tho' nothing wer in cash for incident charges as daylie occures be this extraordinarie service. Wee have assayed and wsed all meanes with the Inglish comissionares and James Sword for getting advance of so mutch, but can be assured of nothing from thame; quhairfor wee ar necessitate to intreat your lordships (notwithstanding of the excessive charges wee know the estate is daylie put to at home) that yow would be pleiset to tak to your consideratioun, how mutch wee ar straitet and ingaged at this tyme to give sum satisfactioun to this part of the army, and speciallie seing the generall brocht doun foure thosand pund star. quhiik is distributing to that part of the army; and that your lordship to that end may presentlie supplie ws with that money, leist the non–sending thairof may be a greater prejudice. Wee also thocht fitt to show your lordships, that wee have modefeid the severall fies of the officers of the stalff not formarlie modifeid, upon supplicatioun gevin in befor the joyning or cuming up of the other armie, conforme to the incloset, with reference alwayes to your lordship's approbation. And seing both armies ar now joyned in on, wee have gevin in that commission wee had for establishing of this committie of the army, quhairby wee accordinglie may conforme ourselffes; and quhat els sall be your lordships farder ordors and pleisour anent our disposeall, the same sall be punctuallie observed by

Caitsyd 16 Aug. 1644.

Your lordships affectionat freindes,
and humble servandes,
Calander,
Forrester,
Wauchape,
John Ker Louchtour.

Letter from Crawfurd Lindesay,—directed thus:

For the right honorable the committee of estats at Edinburgh.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

Right honorable,
The army being now come this length northward, and the committees being met and joyned together, wee conceaved it our duty to represent unto your lordships our opinion anent the disposeall of the forces you have upon the borders of that kingdome; which is, that you give orders to them all to marche into this, whereby not onelie will the countrey be eased of a great burden in entertaining them, bot also we hope in cace of necessity, or of any attempt in or against that kingdome, they may be als ready for succurse and as sistance, as if they were still lying in and upon it. And your lordships may rest assured, that no consideration or respect whatsumever shall ever hinder ws from comeing or sending such supplies, as shall be able, by God's blissing, to give a good accompt of any forces, that shall offer to invade or molest that kingdome. Our present ingadgement before this toun, and the service wee are like to have about it, will, no questioun, put us to the expence of a great quantity of amunition, which hes made us lay it as ane instruction upon the lord Wariston, to cause considerable proportions to be provided and sent us from London; bot because by relying upon hopes of supply from them wee may want, when wee stand in greatest need, wee must have our recourse to your lordships, and desire that ten thousand weight of poulder, with the like weight of leid, and double weight of matche, may be provided there and sent to Sunderland; and when our provisiones shall come from London, or yow shall have any thing to doe ther, such shall be our care of that kingdome, and the peace and happiness thairof, as wee shall preferre nothing worldly thereunto. And as in this particular, so for the meanes of our subsistance also wee must rely upon your lordships, and entreat that considerable quantities of meall be provided and sent also to Sunderland; for without it wee have bot small hopes of any maintenance from these who are obliged to it. Wee doe againe intreat your lordships, to cause your acts against runawayes be put to strict execution. Wee are

Elswick 19th Aug. 1644.

Your lordships affectionat freinds and servants,
Crawfurd Lundsay I. P. D.

Copy of instructions anent the payment of the Scotts army in England.

At Sunderland 20th August 1644.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.;

Whereas at our last meiting with this honorable committie at Gateshead upon Saturday the 17th of this instant, it was desired wee should declare how far the parliament hath inabled ws for the mantinance of this army under the command of his excell. the earle of Leven, generall of the Scottisch forces now in England, which are come in in a brotherly way for our assistance; wee the committies and commissioners from both houses of parliament are authorized to mak knoune unto our breithrene of Scotland, that it hath not beene possible in regard of the great straits and extremities under which this kingdome labors (notwithstanding all the diligence, which hath beene and still is used) to send as yit the remander of the hundred thousand punds, according to the treatie for the supplie of the forces of our brethren of Scotland now entered in this kingdome for our aid and assistance. And yet forasmuch as the parliament is desireous to testifie, how ready they are to give all maner of encuragments to those forces, which through so many hardships and difficulties are come into thair aide; wee are authorized therfore further to acquaint our brethrene of Scotland, that the parliament hath sent us full and ample instructions to inable the mantinance and payment of those forces aformentioned, besids what is provided in our former instructiones out of the sequestrations, to the end that no meanes may be omitted, which lyes in thair power, for the monethly payment of 31000 lib. according to the treaty, nor any sitting encuragement may be wanting, which they can give them. For which purpose, they have given ws full power and authoritie, in such places and comityes, where we shall come, to receave such voluntary loanes and contributions from any person or persons, that shall be willing to lend or contribute any soume or soumes of money for the good of the kingdome and parliament, and as in our former instructiones of the first of November 1644 (fn. 2) , full power was geven ws to sequester the estates of all such persons, as by any ordinance of parliament are, or have beene declared to be sequestrable, or shall hearefter be declared in all such places as by that 6th article of these instructiones more at large it doeth and may appeare (and wherof an accompt was geven long since to this honorable comittie) so likewise now in these last instructiones of the 9th of March, wee have further power and full authority geven ws to rate, tax, and levy upon the severall countyes of Notingham, York, Bishoprick of Durhame, Northumberland, Cumberland, and Westmureland, the toun and county of Newcastle upon Tyne, the city and county of the city of Yorke, the toun and county of the toun of Notingham, such moderate taxes and rates, as wee shall hold fitt and requisite weekly to be collected, or otherwise; and for the more equall and indifferent rateing and taxing any soume or soumes of money upon every or any of the countyes aforsaid, wee are to call to our assistance sex or more persones of integrity of every county as aforsaid, which shall be so raited and taxed; which said persones, or any sex or more of them by ws called or nominated, are thereby authorized to be a standing comittie in the county for which they are called, and are required to distribute and proportion the soumes by ws rated and taxed as aforsaid upon that county into the several limites and divisions thereoff, with all equality and faithfulnes, which we have already done for the county palatine of Duresme. And wee are further authorized to cause the several ordinances of excise, which are or shall be made by the parliament, to be put in execution in the countys and places aforsaid (where the same is not already satled) according to such comissiones and directiones, as wee shall receave from the commissioners of excise for the time being, or in default thairoff, by such officers, and according to such directiones, as wee shall think fitt and find requisite for the service, and as shall be of most advantage to the state. And wee likewise have power and authority geven ws to demand and receave by ourselves, or such as shall be by ws authorized therunto, from the receavers appoynted or to be appoynted by the committie of parliament for the revenue, thair agents or deputyes within the countyes aforsaid, all such soume or soumes of moneys, as shall arise or grow due out of any of the revenews whatsoever, of or belonging to the king, queene, or prince in these countyes; and all the moneyes ariseing out of the forsaid collection, taxes, and assesments whatsoever in the countyes aforsaid, are by ws to be employed for the payment of the monethly pay of the Scottisch forces, and such other forces, as are or shall be raised by authority of parliament in the said countyes, and otherwise, as is or shall be directed by both houses of parliament. And to the end the said countyes be not overburthened by the free billiting of the souldiers, whilst they are subject to the rates and taxes abovementioned, wee are to tak care, that whatsoever the souldiers shall ow upon free billet, be duely brought to accompt, and that the countrey receave satisfaction by defalcation out of thair assesments or otherwise, as wee shall see cause; and that the said free billet or provisions be accompted as money in part of pay to the soldier. And in cace the cuntrey be not able to pay thair reates and assesments in money, wee are to allow the same in whole or in part, as wee shall see cause, in such free billet or provisions, as shall be taken up for the soldier by our direction, or by the direction of the commities of both kingdomes. And forasmuch as the parliament hath thought it necessary, that the tuo kingdomes should be joyned together in thair councells as well as in thair forces, in this common cause; wee are therfor further authorized and appoynted as a joynt committie with the committies of our brethren, to advise and direct concerning the premisses in all things, that may conduce to the better carying on of this service, and to consider of any other wayes or meanes (if these before mentioned shall not be fund sufficient) to manteane the forces aforsaid, and those to present to both houses with all convenient speede. And we have further power and authority geven ws to nominat and appoynt collectors and receavers of all the arreares of recusants estates in the said countyes, upon leases theroff made upon seizures or compositiones hertofor due or compounded for with his majestie, or any other arreares remaining in the charge of the court of Exchequer, or shirreives accompts; the which will appeare by the estates, which wee have latlie receaved; and the moneyes ariseing therfrom, wee are to employ for the uses exprest in these instructiones.

Sic subscribitur,
Willm. Rous sec. commis.
Vera copia. Ja. Primrose.

Letter from the earle of Calander,—directed thus:

For the richt hon. the president of the committee of estates of the kingdome of Scotland at Edinburgh. Orig.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

May it please your lordships,
I doubt not but zee have heard of the generall's comeing heere withe the armie, who hes croced the river, and quarters himselfe at Elswick wpon the west end of the towne of Newcastle at the watersyde; and that the east end thairof is assigned to me for my quarters, by and attour gatesyd, and the most part of the bridge, whairof I am in possession alreddie. Wpon Thursdaye the 15 of this instant I croced the water likewayes a little beneathe the towne at the glasse workes, takeing with me the lord Sinclaire and the earle of Marachells regiments, withe some commanded men, whom I ludged that nicht (notwithstanding of many cannone shott from the towne and Sheilfeild fort, and musquett shott upon bothe syds) in the Sandgaitt, whair I am now bussied about the making of approaches towards the towne, and I have recovered as many keeles and boats, as hes maid a bridge over the water a little beneathe the glasse houses.

The seiging of this towne is much hindered for want of materialls, as spaids, shooles, mattockes, &c. And as the beleaguering of it will be great charges, so the souldiors are putt to extraordinare dewtie. And wee cannot gaitt so mutche money, as will be halfe monethes meanes to evry officer, foure merks to every trouper, and a shilling to ilk foot souldior, for the comissaree heere hes it not. Whairfor seeing thair paines and labour is great, your lordships would be pleased to send up money heere for thair farder encourage ment, and give ane speciall comand and ordor to the thesaurer of the armie or his deputs, that thir forces may gaitt some satisfaction, and not to be distinguisched in that only from the armie; for it seemes they ar by paye and proviant, thoughe nothing short and inferiour in dewtie.

The last meall, whiche was sent heere, was directed to Hartlepoole, which is now returned back to Sunderland for the wse of this armie, in respect of our necessitie and of the evillnesse of the victuall, whiche was heere; yitt seeing that is a place very fitt to be a magazine, your lordships wold take it to your consideration, and send victualls thair.

This daye some peeces of batterie ar sent over to the wther syde of the river; and I have intercepted a letter yisterdaye, sent from sir Thomas Gleinhame out of Cairleell to the major of Newcastell; the coppye whairof your lordships shall resave heere inclosed.

Generall major David Leslie his good carriadge deserves your lordships notice, and that something be done anent his paye and pensione; for it may be he hes gottine nothing since his wndertaking. I am not desyred to mediate for him, nather need I; for his service gives sufficient testimonie of his merits, nather doe I knowe his condition; but suche as he should be cherisched.

I must lykewyse showe your lordships, that the schippe, whiche was seized upon be the parliaments shippes, notwithstanding of the articles of treatie at Hartlepoole, and of my assurance givne hir for hir saife loadineing and passage to Holland, is ordained to be redelyvered to the maister and owner thairof be the parliament of England; which I hope your lordships will take notice of be your letter to our comissioners at Londone; for suche courses will make no forts or townes willing to yeeld to ws, as the major of Newcastle hes signified no lesse by his letter.

I doubt not, but the publict letter from the committee hes sufficiently informed your lordships of our wants. Whairfor it is necessare, that meall be sent heere for the souldiors, as also ammunition of pouder, matche, and ball; for this bussinesse requyres more, nor I think your lordships may weell spaire; for I wold have evir that respect to our owne countrie, that it be not altogither emptied of suche provision. So remitting this to your lordships better judgement and discretion, I rest

Gatesend 21 Aug. 1644.

Your lordships most humble servant,
Calander.

Letter from the earle of Leven,—directed thus:

For the right honorable the lords and others of the committee of estates of the kingdome of Scotland at Edenburgh. Orig.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

Right honorable,
As I have written before by several officers that are come home, I must by this againe put yow in mynd to be pleased to grant your orders and warrant, for sending to the army all such as have run awaie from there cullers, and are come home; as also all such as have beine wanting of the numbers, that were appointed to come away at first out of the severall shires of the kingdome. And seing colonell Douglas of Kelheid is shortly to returne, whose cariage with his regement hath beine nothing inferior to those of the best in this service, he may be so taken to your lordships consideration, that all the furtherance, which possibly may be affoorded, may be granted to him for recruting of his regement. The doeing whereof will much encourage him, and others of his quality, and still oblige me to remaine

Elswick 22 August 1644.

Your lordships affectionat freind and servant,
Leven.

Letter from Crawfurd Lindesay,—directed thus:

For the right honourable the comittee of estats at Edinburgh, haste, haste, post haste Elswick 27 August, 3 a clock in the morning. Orig.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

Right honourable,
Wee have beene acquainted by the lord chancellor with the condition of your sorces and affares there, and since have resaved your letters of the 22 and 23 of this instant, with the information from Cumberland. As wee did formerly, so do wee still conceave it most fitting, that your lordships give orders to the forces of the north both fourt and eight man presently to advance towards the borderes, wher they shall meit thair directions what way to enter.

And sicklike that the earle of Lothian's regiment may be ordeaned to march into England; for which purpose, wee have written also to his lordship, and are content, that the garison of Dumfreis shall remane still there for the keeping of that cuntrey in order. Howbeit wee conceave, that little could be expected from them in the keepeing of the toun, it being so untenable, if by any considerable enemy assaulted.

Wee cannot but hartily acknowledge your lordships care in the causeing provisions of meale and amunition be made for ws. And because wee are in scarcity of both, and within a very short time will be in want, if not supplied, wee desire your lordships to use your best diligence to have these provisions speedily dispatched unto ws.

Wee shall with the nixt occasion send yow a list of the absent officers from this army, that yow may see how just reasone wee have to proceid against them, if the second dyet shall not be more strictly keept then the first hes beene.

For our present condition, wee are useing our best diligence for advanceing of our designe against this toune, and shall dispose of our cavalrie as they may be most usefull for the good of the cause and that kingdome, and have meanes of subsistence for themselves.

Yow have herewith a copy of our intelligence from the lord Fairfax. Wee rest

Elswicke 26 August 1644.

Your affectionat freinds and servants,
Crawfurd Lindesay I. P. D.

Letter from lord Sinclare,—directed thus:

For the right hon. the committee of estates at Edinburgh. Orig.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

Right honourable,
Wee have received your letters of the 7th yesternight late; to which at present wee can only returne this answer; that the condition of your affairs there doeth so neirly touch us, that according as wee shall receive advertisments from you (which wee desire may be frequently sent us) wee shall apply ourselvs and our forces to the best advantage of your designes there; and have thought it incumbent unto us to second the lord generall's advice unto yow, that seing our horsemen are lying at Perth, and so ther is no danger of invasion from these parts, without delay the regiments may be called from Kelso, and a bodie drawne together with als much expedition as is possible, who may still perseu the enemy upon the feilds, and not suffer them to grow by not being followed; for wee cannot bot looke upon the enemyes designe to march northward, as that which will prove of most dangerous consequence to the wholl kingdome, yf they shall be suffered to ravell at thair pleasure in these parts. And that wee may the better be usefull unto yow there, we shall lett no tyme slip, bot rather double our diligence in our designes against this toun; which being once setled, wee will be the more able to give yow such effectuall supplyes, as may by God's blissing upon thair endeavours, yf yow shall have neid of them, make a quick dispatch of that bussines, which shall ever be the hearty prayer of

Elswick 10th Sept. 1644.

Your most affectionat frinds and servants,
Sinclare I. P. D.

Letter from the earle of Leven,—directed thus:

For the right honourable the lords and others of the committee at Edinburgh. Orig.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

Right honourable,
I Receaved your lordships letter directed to the committee and myself, which represents to me the distemper of your affairs, and the slow progress that is made in right ordering the same. Wherefore yow will give me leave (though at this distance) to present my humble advyce. I conceave it necessary, that my lord Calander be furthwith ordered to advance with those regiments of horse and foott, which came from the army, and as many more as the weell of the business may require, leaveing my lord marquis of Argyle and his forces to make sure the hills, and cutt off their retreat, and follow the enemie close, and carefully watch over all his motions, and fall on them, before they acquire strenth in their march northward; for that course may prove dangerous, and it is more easy to stop the spring in the beginning, then afterward when it comes to be a flood. The countrey gentlemen and others may be appointed to keep the passages at Stirling or other places needfull, and have a care to order all things aright among themselves. Truly I suppose that the power and forces, which were dispatched from hence, were able to have overcome all those beginnings, if they had then speedily fallen to action. But I hope your lordships will happily redeem the tyme, and our countrey too, from the many miseryes, which the insolency of a barbarous enemy fastning himself in the hart of our nation may cause. Neither shall yow need to fear any alarme from the south, for the litle remanent of forces, which our cavallary has left unrouted in Westmoorland, and now retired to sir Thomas Glenham in Carlile, is altogether unable for any attempt upon your borders. I shall desire to perswade yow likewyse, that the enemy can expect no supply from the king nor prince Rupert; for he is gone to Cornwell, where they are both sufficiently engaged, and not in that condition to lend them any assistance. Yow may therefore the better resolve to goe on speedily and hopefully, weighing the danger of delay, and the dissaffection of that countrey, whether the enemy seemes to bend his course. If there be any further help your lordships doe desyre or expect from this army, let me be advertised thereof, and your lordships shall sie my readines, though wee should be the more streightened about this toun, against which, blissed be God, wee have fairly proceeded, and shall hasten the bussines the more, that wee may be usefull, and apply ourselves for your desired happines. Thus hopeing that every man will bestirr himself actively, and keep his station loyally and christianly, and above all things purge the countrey of malignancy, I continew my hearty wishes for the peace and tranquillity of that nation; and hoping your lordships will pardon me for my srie expressione, I will never cease to approve myself,

Elsweek 10 Sept. 1644.

My lord,
Your lordships humble servant,
Leven.

Letter from the earle of Leven and lord Sinclare,—directed thus:

For the right honourable the committee of estates at Edinburgh.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

Right honourable,
As the other wes ready to be dispatched, wee have received your letter of the 9th, and do againe most sincerely intreate your lordships to make use of the regiments at Kelso, and all the others forces yow can make, against those vipers to thair countrey, who have now risen in rebellion against it; and do desire to assure your lordships, that wee shall have such an ey upon Carleil and the forces about it, as yow may without any fear of danger from those parts, go cheirfully and seriously about the crushing of that unnaturall rebellion in the begining; unto which nothing shall be wanting of supplee or advice, which is within the power of

Elswick 10th Sept. 1644.

Your most humble servants,
Leven,
Sinclare.

Letter from lord Sinclare,—directed thus:

For the right honourable the committee of estates at Edinburgh. Orig.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

Right honourable,
The lord generall hes this day communicat unto us severall letters, sent unto his excellency by the lord Fairfax and the committie of both houses at York; all intimating, that upon the marching of the earle of Manchester's forces southward, 1500 horsemen have made an incursion from Cheshire into the west riding of Yorkshire, where they have beaten the quarters of two regiments of the lord Fairfax his horse at Ferribrigs, and now remaine there, expecting the assistance of the garrison of Newark, who are to joyne with them for the reunquieting of that countrey; and therefor earnestly intreating his excellency the lord generall to spare them a regiment or tuo from this seige; wherunto his excellency for the present hes returned answer according to the inclosed copie.

Wee are so ignorant of the condition of your effaires, howbeit there be nothing wee are so desirous to have the knowledge of, that in such exigents as these wee know not what way to cary ourselves, or order the forces here, which make us again become instant with your lordships to send us frequent intelligence of your proceedings, and with the first occasion your advice concerning the assistance of Yorkshire; and whither your bussines be in such a posture, as yow may spare any of the forces that wee sent yow. For your lordships may rest very assured, that so long as wee have the least apprehension of any danger there, that wee will be so farre from desireing any forces from that, or sending any southward from this, that yf occasion shall require, or your lordships desire, wee will make use of our whole forces for your assistance there, so as yai may see, that very much in relation to the good of the cause will depend upon your advertisments unto us.

Wee have thought it incumbent unto us to acquaint your lordships with what wee have heard concerning the effaires of the south. The kings forces being very strong, and betwixt the lord generall and all supplees either of force or victuall, the lord generall resolved to break throw the enemy with his horse, and leave the foote to make the best conditions they could. And the lord generall himselfe with the lord Roberts shipped for Plimouth. The horsemen under the command of sir William Balfoure have now joyned with lord generall Middletoun and the rest of Waller's forces, and the foote desended themselvs in the advantage of a ground, so that the enemy wer pleased to condiscend, that they should march peceably to Southamptoun, providing they would leave their armes, ammunition, and ordinance, which wes accordingly done. Wee hop now the parliament's forces ther are in no worse condition then they were, by the addition of Manchester and Walleis forces, who are now joyned with them. Wee are

Elswick 15 Sept. 1644.

Your lordships affectionat freinds and servants,
Sinclare I. P. D.

Letter from the earle of Leven,—directed thus:

For the right honourable the committee of estates at Edinburgh. Orig.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

Right honourable,
The committee has ressaved your letter of the 12th, wherin yow desire thair advice and mind concerning the settling of a garrisoun in the toun of saint Johnstoun, which I shall freely give your lordships. And it is this, that it would be no small greiff unto me to conceive any such forces of enemeyes to be now into the body of that kingdome, as besides the forces that are already leveyed for the defence of it, would require the settling of garrisouns in the royall brughs of it; which I do the rather apprehend unnecessary, because scarce are any of these touns fortisiable or to be made tenable in a short tyme either by the enemie or us. And I am so confident of God's assistance to your endeavours against these godles rebels and unnaturall enemeyes of ours, that there shall be no necessity for makeing preparations against thair turning southward; which I do not say in any measure to lessen your diligence there, bot rather to animat yow speedily, cheirfully, and effectually to persew them in the feild with the forces yow can make: which is the best advice can be given yow by

Elswick 17th Sept. 1644.

Your lordships most humble servant,
Leven.

Letter from lord Sinclare,—directed thus:

For the right honourable the committee of estates at Edinburgh.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

Right honorable,
Wee have receaved your letter in answer to ours of the 15th; and upon your lordships advertisment of the affairs of the north, and apprehension of danger from the south, order is sent to generall major Leslie to remane with his whole cavalrie in Cumberland, and have an ey upon the borders of that kingdome; for the affairs in Yorkshire are not (God be praised) in so ill condition, as they were first represented unto us; and we hop the lord Fairfax will be able to beate any enemeys out of that county: So as wee most still prosecute our former advice to your lordships, that without feare of any incursion from the south, wher according to our best intelligence ther is no danger, your lordships will wholly apply your thoughts, endeavors, and forces for satling of the north, wher the danger is reall. And by God's assistance wee shall so look to the south, as ther shall be no neede of the present levying of more troupes to be a burden upon that kingdome, but that they being designed, may be in readines upon occasion; and do earnistly desire (if it be not troublesome to your lordships) to send ws frequent and particular adverteisments of the strength and motions both of our enemeys and of our freinds there.

The thesaurer of this army is returned hither, bot nather provisions nor money with him as yit; and when wee shall begin to distribute the shoes among our sojours, such a number thereof shall be sent unto yow, as may be spared from this.

And for your lordships desire to know our advice concerning the satling of a garrison in saint Johnstoun, wee do fully go along with the lord generall's opinion already sent yow, as the most fitting and necessary to be taken by your lordships at this time; that all other respects of touns or any things els sett aside, yow go with all your forces against the enemey in the feilds.

And for the present condition of this army, wee have thought sitting to represent unto your lordships, that many of the regiments, especially of those that came last up, are very farre short of the half numbers that ought to be in a regiment, and yet notwithstanding have compleit officers, which will be a heavy and unreasonable burden upon the state; and do desire your lordships to think upon the remedy.

The lord generall desires your lordships to cause William Freir be dispatched, and some course to be taken for the assureance of payment to Francis Queale, another of the lord generall's servants, whose wholl fortune is bestowed above two years ago upon provision for the army in Ireland.

Wee find so great want of officers, that wee have resolved to fill the places of all such as have violat and transgrest thair forloffes.

Elswick 18th Sept. 1644.

Your lordships affectionat freinds,
Sinclare, I. P. D.

Letter from the earle of Calander,—directed thus:

For the right honorable the committee of estates at Edinburgh. Orig.

From the public records of Scotland in the laigh parliament house at Edinburgh.

Right honorable,
Wee receaved your letters of the 21, containing the condition of your affairs in the north, and your desires in the behalff of the regiments that are come from this, and the absent officers from other regiments. Wee are still of opinion, that the more effectually and vigorously the enemy be now purswed, the busines will be the sooner brought to a period; for which purpose nothing will be more necessar then expedition; and do offer to your lordships, that it will be very expedient for the ease of that kingdome of an heavie burden, that so soon as these regiments sent from this shall be no more usefull to your lordships there, yow will cause them be dispatched hither.

When any money or cloaths shall come to this army, the proportion due to the regiments that are there shall be preserved unto them, or delivered to any they shall appoynt to receave them here.

Wee do not apprehend any necessity of sending yow a list of such officers as have transgressed thair forloffes, seing all that are there are in the same condition; and most tell your lordships, that the absence of so many and so long will be a great prejudice to the service. Wee intreate your lordships, to cause provisions of meall be made in place of these that you have made use of there, that it may be sent hither for the use of the army. Wee rest

Elswick 24 Sept. 1644.

Your affectionat freinds and servants,
Calander, I. P. D. Com.

Footnotes

1 This Word in is enterlined but in blacker ink than the rest.
* It is so in the copy; but as it is dated at the top 20 Aug. 1644, I believe it should be here 1 Nov. 1643.