Letters in possession of the Archbishop of Canterbury
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1742

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'Letters in possession of the Archbishop of Canterbury: 1 of 3', A collection of the State Papers of John Thurloe, volume 1: 1638-1653 (1742), pp. 661-675. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=55290 Date accessed: 20 October 2014.


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The following LETTERS were communicated by his grace the lord archbishop of Canterbury, when the work was in such forwardness, that they could not be placed in order of time. We shall therefore insert them here, together with some other letters and papers, which having no dates, it was difficult to determine where to place them, or which were omitted in their proper order.

A Collection of LETTERS from his grace the archbishop of Canterbury's library at Lambeth.

From king Charles II.

Bruges, 29th Sept.

Being come to towne late last night with my brother the duke of Yorke, and haveing very little to say, I desire you to make my excuses to the queene and my sister, that I do not trouble them with my letters this post. I know not, whether my brother has any thing to say to me, from whence he comes. We have yet had so little leasure to speake together, yesterday being the day we mett, that I have not spoke to him as yett one worde of businesse; only according to his desire I have sent you the note for the nine hundred pistols, which I intende to be out of the arrears due to me; for I do not purpose to receave any pention for the time to come by the cardinal's means, till I shall be better understood than I find I am.

King Charles II. to the duke of York.

Cologne, Nov. 10. 1654.

Dear Brother,
I have recieved yours without a date, in which you mention, that Mr. Montague has endeavoured to pervert you in your religion. I do not doubt, but you remember very well the commands I left with you at my goeing away concerning that point, and am confident you will observe them. Yet the letters, that come from Paris, say, that it is the queen's purpose to doe all she can to change your religion, which, if you hearken to her, or any body els in that matter, you must never thinke to see England or me againe; and whatsoever mischeife shall fall on me or my affairs from this time, I must lay all upon you, as being the only cause of it. Therefore consider well what it is, not only to be the cause of ruineing a brother, that loves you soe well, but alsoe of your king and country. Doe not let them perswade you either by force or faire promises; for the first they neither dare, nor will use; and for the second, assoon as they have perverted you, they will have their end, and will care no more for you.

I am also informed, that there is a purport to put you in the Jesuits colledge, which I command you upon the same grounds never to consent unto. And whensoever any body shall goe to dispute with you in religion, doe not answere them at all; for though you have the reason on your side, yet they being prepared will have the advantage of any body, that is not upon the same security, that they are. If you doe not consider what I say to you, remember the last words of your dead father, which were to be constant to your religion, and never to be shaken in it. Which if you doe not observe, this shall be the last time you will ever hear from,
August 28th, 1704.

Deare Brother,
Your most affectionat brother,
Charles R.

I have at present in my custody the original of this letter, which was found among the papers of Dr. Berwick, a physician.

A. Boyer.

To Sir Marmaduke Langdale.

Sir Marmaduke Langdale,
I receaved yours of the 3d of this moneth, and forbore answeringe it presently, because I knew not on the suddayne, what to say to the information. I have since receved another letter from the same party, who, it seems, is gone to the campania, so that I know not how to direct a letter to him; but I suppose he will acquaint you, how you may sende. Therefore I pray convay the inclosed safely to him, and put it under a cover from yourselfe. I confesse to you, though the information be of importance, I know no other use to make of it, then to hearken the best I can, how they proceede. I shall be glad to know your opinion what I am to doe upon it, and which way I may make advantage of the spiritt and humour of that people, who seeme nothinge inclined to my interest. I have no more to say, but that I am
Your affectionate friende.

King Charles II. to father Peter Talbot.

I have recieved both yours of the 3d and the 17th, and give you hearty thankes for the information, which, assure yourselfe, shall remayne as much a secrett, as it ought to doe; and for the present I know no other use to make of it, then to hearken the more carefully, what that people doe, and what frends they finde abroade; and I doubte not you will advertice me of all you can discover. I would gladly know, (which methinkes you should not be ignorant of) what the name of this person is, and whether he had any letter of creditt to the earle, and from whom it was; upon which I should be able to make some judgment. Let me know, if this comes safe to your handes from
Your frende.

King Charles II. to M. N.

I receaved yours by Sir John Marlay, and thanke you for your advice, though I must differ with you in one conclusion, beinge resolved by the grace of God never to make any promise, which I do not intend absolutely to performe.

I pray doe not give creditt to those people, who take upon them to censure whatsoever I doe, and have no way to appeare wise, but to find faulte with whatsoever is done; the reason and grounde whereof they do not in any degree understande, and hope to get information by findinge faulte. Trust me, however I have for the present bene disappointed in my hopes in Englande, it hath not proceeded from any of the reasons you guesse; nor could I have hastned any thinge ther more then I did. They, who will not believe any thinge to be reasonably designed, except it be successfully exequted, had neede of a lesse difficulte game to play, then myne is; and I hope my frends will thinke, that I am now to olde, and have had to much experience of things and of persons, to be grosly imposed upon; and therefore they, who would seeme to pitty me for being often deceaved, do upon the matter declare what opinion they have of my understandinge and judgement; and I pray discountenance those kinde of people, what affections soever they pretende, as men, who do me more hurte, then my avowed enimyes can do.

I hope we shall shortly see a turne, and that your donns will finde they have mistaken ther way; and (though it be differred longer then I expected) that I shall lyve to bidd you wellcome to Whitehall, wher you will receave all kindnesse from
Yours.

Indorsed, The copy of myne to M. N. 13. June, 1653.

King Charles II. to the princess of Orange.

I have instructed my brother so fully with my opinion and advice, as I shall not enter into those particulars, which have given me so much trouble, as this unhappy businesse hath done; though I must confesse, I am sorry to see you take it as you doe, and think that my severity is the only thing to be satisfied, when I assure you, what I sayd and councelled you in the thinge, was meerly out of kindnesse to you; and if I had been in your place, the advertisement would have been very wellcome to me, and pray God we doe not finde, as you have ordered it, the malitious scandal rather augmented then abated. And it appears to me very strange you should thinke, that the continuing of that, which is the cause of the reporte, should be a means of taking it away. I shall say no more, but referre all to my brother; and only add, that I hope you cannot imagin I am so little carfull either of your honour or my owne, as to shewe to the world I know any thinge of this businesse, much less to make any publick discourse of it; and that what I advise you in this matter, proceeds purely out of that kindness, which I will ever have for you.

King Charles II. to the princess of Orange.

I shall referre to my brother all I have to say in answer to your last letter, having tould him my opinion, how we ought to governe ourselves, as matters now stand.

Only I cannot chuse but tell you, I am sorry you changed the resolution we tooke before you lefte this place, which was then my opinion, and which I am still confident had been a better means of avoyding all inconveniences, which might follow, then that which was taken. That, which I conceave now to be the only means to shunne any future inconvenience, and best, and can have no objection against it, is your imediate coming hether, which will take away the cause of any farther malice.

Indorsed, K. Charles II. to the prince of Orange, with respect to the report about H. Jer. late lord Dover.

King Charles II. to the duke of York, in the hand of H. Bennet.

Because yours of the 4th sayes nothing to mee of any alteration in your condition, I doe not hearken to the divers opinions, that come hither in particular letters of it, some of which saye you shall bee presently pressed to come away, and others, that the court now begins to thinke of staying you. In my affaires I am able to sende you some better hopes then I could ever yet doe. In Spaigne the warre is declared against Cromwell, and I looke every day it should bee soe in Flanders. The ministers there have it in their power to doe it; and I am assured they will presently shewe it. Besides this many discrete persons, that are but lookers on, beleeve as I doe, that I shall finde my account very well in this change. I reserve the letting you knowe, what circumstances leade mee into this beleife, till I send H. Bennet to you, they being more propper for such a messinger then a letter. In the meane time let mee heare constantly from you, for I confesse the uncertainty of your condition gives mee much trouble. As any change happens in mine, I will write it to you.

King Charles II. to the duke of York.

Beleeving you might bee obliged to shewe my other letter of this same date, I write this to bee seene by yourself only, to let you knowe, that I have more particular assureances of the good dispositions of Spayne to my businesse, then they are willinge should be yet publique. Only to you I would not conceale it. The use I would have you make of it is (without seeming to doe so) to put yourselfe in the best readinesse you can to come away, when I shall call for you, if at least you can bee suffered to stay soe longe. If you are sooner pressed, you knowe my minde. One thing only you must suffer mee to warne you off, to take heede of obliging yourselfe to any thing, or of entertaining any propositions, that you thinke may in any kinde prejudice our publique businesse, which I beleeve will be presently put into a very faire way by a conjunction of our interests with those of Spayne. Now considering what your dependance in France must bee for the establishment of your present subsistance, they may possibly offer some conditions to you, and aske some promises from you, to which you may fairly answer, that not knowing the condition of my businesse, you cannot promise any thing, for fear of doing it prejudice, or what else you think fit to this purpose.

If the things I looke for fall out, our ill fortune will forsake us, and then wee shall bee happy together.

Abstracts of letters written in the account of K. Charles II.

To Middleton, relative to Mr. Blague's instructions and credentiall.

To Glencairne, regraiting the mistakes, that as said to be betwixt him and Middleton; expressing the confidence your majesty has in him, and your earnest desire, that ther may be a perfect right understanding betwixt them.

To the E. of Atholl, Seaforth, the ld. Lorne, L. Kenmore, W. Drummond, Th. Dalyell, Sir Geo. Monroe, Sir Arth. Forbes, expressing kindness and confidence, and credentiall to Mr. Blague; likewise to the laird of Mackloud, Loghiell, and Glengarrie; the tutor of Lovat, and tutor of Macklean.

A private instruction to Mr. Blague, to advise with lieutenant-general Middleton, and then to say in your majesty's name whatever he shall find fitt upon the place, to all or anie of the persons named, or anie other, with whom he may have communication, towards their incouragement to constancie and perseverance in your majesty's service.

A instruction to take the most exact information he can have of the treu condition of your effairs in Scotland, and of the inclinations and affections of your majesty's subjects there as to your service; and by his own returne, or some expresse, to give you a speedye accompt thereof.

To L. Middleton concerning Mr. Knox.

To presbiterie, concerning his tryals and admission to the ministerie.

To the ministers, concerning his returne, and signifying your majesty's sense of their loyal deportment in this hour of temptation, your constancie in your professions, and your sincerity therein, from which no adverse fortun or consideration of interest shall divert you; and your majesty's earnest desire, that they may continue in their affection and loyaltie, and to support you by their prayers, &c. The letter may be credentiall as to your majesty's condition and resolutions; and what you have determined concerning the bearer, who may have two or three instructions therabout, and be allowed to staye in Scotland, or to returne, as lieutenant-general Middleton and Mr. Blague shall think fit.

Princess of Orange to K. Charles II.

Breda, 2. February.

Now that you see how exactly you are obayed, I hope you will give me leave to desire you to considere, what consequences your severity will bring upon me. To justifie any of my actions to you in this occasion were, I think, to do as much wrong to both my brothers as my own innosency, since they have been witneses to what some persons insolency has dared to represent unto you as faults. Therefore I will leave it to them, and only think of what will now reflect upon mee; which, as I have the honour to bee your sister, you ought to consider to, and not to make a publick discourse of what can neither prove for your honour nor myne. I am so willing to thinke you only try, to what a degree my obedience is to you, that I cannot but perswade myself, you will now give my brother the duke of Yorke leave to send for Mr. Jermyn backe, which will not only stop malisious tongues, but give me that hapines of seeing you take a kindly as well as brotherly interest in mee; otherways I shall conclud you hav absolutely abandoned mee.

Princess of Orange to K. Charles II.

Breda, 14. March.

I RECEIVED the honnour of your letter from Antwerp so latte, that I could not sooner tell you, that with much joy I shall this day have the honnour of being your partner. My lady Hide desired my sone to be anothere godfathere, with assuring me, you would not thinke it to much presumtion, if he were without your leave, because it 'twould be to long to stay for it, that I was glad not to deny her. Besydes you are so partially kind to him, that I feare at last my desiring your kindness to him will turne to jealousie hee may take some from me; for I must assure you, that I shall obay all your commands, except that of loving him (though he is my ownly child) above all things in this world, as long as you are in it, which I beseech you beleeve, that their is nothing truer. They say, that Cromwell's agent at the Hage has complained to the states, that their is in their havens ships with amunition for your use. Therefore I thought it fit to let you know of it, for feare that they may show their good will to you in that, as they have done in othere occasions.

Princess of Orange to K. Charles II.

Hage, 20. May, [1655.]

I have received your note of what Italian books you would have, and hope to get them to send you by the chancellour, though it will not be so easy for mee to do now, because Ouclart is not in toune.

The letters from France this post gives us as good neuse, at the other did bad; for 'tis beleeved now, that there will bee noe peace between that crown and England; which I am extremly glad of, though I do not think our lords and masters will; for it will, there is no doubt, bee of great prejudice to thesse provinces. I have not had this weeke a letter from my brother the duke of Yorke; therefore am not able to tell you what hee thinks of his condition; yet I am sure it must bee much better then last weeke wee beleeved.

Your wife is resolving whither shee will writ or no: therefore I am to say nothing to you from her; but will keepe open my letter as long as the post will permitte, to expect what good-nature will worke, which I find now dos not at all; for 'tis now eleven of the clock, and noe letter comes.

Princess of Orange to K. Charles II.

Hounsterdike, 21. June, 1655.

I doe now absolutly beleeve, that Cromwell will have peace with France, and fall out with Spain, which will be better then nothing, for some friends are better then non. The states are sending out troupes against the king of Swed, before thay know hee is there enemy. I am more sorry for theire neighbourhood, because 'twill bee in my waye to Cullen; but that cannot hindere mee, for sure I shall not be denyed a convoye. I am not yet able to tell you possitively the day I go from hence, but next weeke I shall; for there is nothing I am so impatient for as the happines of seeing you. Your wife desires me to present her humble duty to you, which is all shee can say. I tell her, 'tis because shee thinks of anothere husband, and dos not follow your example of being as constant a wise as you are a husband: 'tis a frailty thay say is given to the sex; therefore you will pardon her, I hope.

Princess of Orange to K. Charles II.

Hounslerdike, 24. June, 1655.

I do now with great joy tell you, that the queen has receeved my letter, and commanded my brother to tell mee, that shee is so sick, that she could not writ; but that when shee is well, I shall heare from her; and hee withall assures mee from himself, that I shall have a kind answear, which in earnest is an extreme sattisfaction to mee. I hope now there will bee a good understanding amongst us all in spit of all hot heads, which has studied nothing but how to make the queene angre both with you and mee. I can think of nothing but my journy: therefore I hope you will pardon mee, if I trouble you with telling you againe, that till the next weeke, I beleeve, I shall not be able to let you know sertainly the time of my removall from hence.

Duke of York to K. Charles II.

Paris, May 21. 1655.

I have receved yours of the 10th of last month, and have not much to say, but that the court went from hence to Chantilly on tuesday last, and to-morrow they go to Compigne. I can say no more to you concerning my owne businesse, then what my ld. Jermine write to you last weeke; and for the treaty, for all the reports that go about the towne, that it is broken, I dare not slatter myself so much as to beleve it, nor to assure it you; but before this day sevenight we shall know the truth on't. This is all I have to say at present, besids assuring you, that there is no body living, who is more truly yours, then I.

Duke of York to K. Charles II.

[Decypher'd by the king's own hand.]

Paris, May 14. 1655.

[Paragraph contains cyphered content & see page image]

There is a proposition has been made to me, which is to long to put in a letter; so that I will, as short as I can, lett you know the heads of them. There are fower 61 55 51 29 53 33 75 Roman-catholiks, that have bound them 641 31 55 67 99 25 525 63 37 93 113 83 109 selves in a sollemn oath to kill Cromwell, 55 29 65 43 663 370 33 61 147 51 and then 618 to raise all the 79 75 65 19 89 Catholiks in 45 93 109 414 664 33 the city 111 71 and the 443 army, which they pretend to be a number so considerable, as may give a rise for your recovery, they being all warn'd to be ready for something, that is to be done, without knowing what it is. They demand ten thousand livers in hand; and when the business is ended, some recompence for themselves ackording to their severall qualitys, and the same 49 45 31 37 61 65 71 liberty for 121 111 43 55 371 63 414 38 444 Catholikes in England as the Protestants have in France. 414 40 19 20. I thought not fit to reject this proposition, but to acquaint you with it, becaus the first parte of the desine seems to me to be better layd and resolved on, then any I have knowen of that kind; and for the defects of the second, it may be supply'd by some desins you may have to join to it. If you aprove of it, one of the sower, intrusted by the rest, will repaire to you, his charges being borne, and give you a full account of the whole matter. In the mean tyme, he desirs in his owne name and theirs, that you would lett but one or two, whome you most trust, know it, and enjoyne them secrecy. This is all I can say of it at this tyme. I have not much more to say at present, theire being no certain newse of the treaty with Cromwell, though it is much reported, that it is agreed on, though not sign'd. For my owne busines, my lord Jermine, who coms now from speaking with the cardinall, will give you an account of it; so that I need not trouble you with it, or the other newes of this place; only this, that it is so hot wether, that I have been a swiming this afternone, and never found the water warmer. I send you some songs of the last ballett inclosed with the Gazette burlesque. This is all I have to trouble you with at present.

Duke of York to K. Charles II.

Paris, Nov. 26. 1655.

I am at length come heither, and arived here on teusday last from Compiegne, where I stay'd a weeke, having left the army so sone, as I certainely knew, that the peace was sign'd, thinking it not fitt to stay there after it; especially when I heard, that there was a likelyhood of warr betweene Cromwell and Spaine, of which I long to heare the certainety, and to know what you intend to do, if that be; for till I know how you thinke to dispose of yourself, I cannot propose any thing concerning myself to you; and yet I do not know what the cardinall will propose or do for me, he having refer'd it till his coming hither, which I beleve will be by next weeke, the mareschall d'Oquincourt's businesse being accommodated; so that by next weeke, I hope, I shall be able to give you a better account of what they intend to do for me here. I beleve, before this you have heard of the prince Francois his being come in with the count de Luneville, and all the Lorraine troupes, they having had, as they say, an order from the D. of Lorraine to do it. I will trouble you with no more, because my lord Jermine will more at large give you an account of all things here; so that I will say no more, but that I am, most realy
Your Majestie's.

Duke of York to K. Charles II.

Paris, Dec. 10. 1655.

I thought to have sent Harry Bennette, as you commanded me this weeke; but his passe being not come, he could not go, and he only stays for it. I have so little to say, that if it had not been for to let you know the reason, why he did not go, I should not have write; for except the proclaiming of the peace with Cromwell yesterday, there is no newes at all worth troubling you with. You will be informed of the particulars of it by others; so that I have nothing more to say, but that I am in very great impatience, till I know what the Spanierds intend to do for you. I receved yours of the 30th of last month, yesterday.

Duke of York to K. Charles II.

Paris, Jan. 14. 1656.

I have received yours of the fifth, and will not faile to wait on you at Cologne so sone as I leave this countrie; but I am not able to say how sone it will be, for they do not presse my going yett, nor do I beleve they will for some tyme; so that with my sister's coming will keepe me some tyme longer here; but as much as I can gesse now, it will be the later end of next month, before I am like to have the happyness of wayting on you. For the cardinall, he has assured me, that when I leave this countrie, he will have the care himself to see my pension pay'd, but he has not yett named the some. I go next weeke to meette my sister as far as Perrone; so that I shall not trouble you with a letter that weeke, except I have something new to say: for that you write about Md. de Fienne, I shall not faile to obay your commands. I have ryme to say no more, but that I saw the ballett practis'd yesterday, in which there is some very fine enteris; it will be danced on sunday, and I will send the book on't, and the tunes of Baptist making, so sone as I can gett them.

Duke of York to K. Charles II.

Paris, Feb. 4. 1656.

I RECEVED your majesty's letter but yesterday, after we were come heither, of the 25th of last month; and if it had not beene to have answered your lettere, I should have had hardly any thing to say but the relasion of my sister's reception here, which was as well as one could desire; but I will not trouble you with it, because you will have it from so many severall hands. For my owne businesse, I know no certainety; and when I do, I will not faile to lett you know it so sone as I cann. I will not faile to obay your commands concerning the pistols and the tuns of Baptist's making. I shall ever be
Your Majestie's

Duke of York to K. Charles II.

Paris, Feb. 25. 1656.

I have receeved two letters of the 15th, by which I am glad to see you have so good hopes of the Spaniards being dispos'd; and for my being in a readinesse, when you shall send for me, that depends so absolutly upon the cardinal, that I can do no more but presse him to settle my businesse, which is yett farr from being done. And for my staying here, I know nothing certainly of it; and whatsoever they intend to do with me here, you may be sure I will engage myself in nothing, that may be prejudicialle to the maine businesse; and I do not beleve, that though I should be obliged to go from hence by the treaty they have made, or by the Spaniards declaring in good ernest, and imbracing your interest, that they would lay any such obligation on me, that might be prejudiciall to you, or so much as endeavour it. And I will not faile to let you know any change, that shall happen to my businesse here; and in the mean tyme I will not omit writing to you the newes of this place, which is now full of divertisments, there being no night, that there is not some good balle or other up and downe the towne. I beleve you will have heard of that at the chancellor's on sunday last, where there was the greatest supper I have seen since, I have been in this country, and the best order'd colasion at the balle; and ever since we have not gon to bed till sower a clock in the morning; but there was a private balle at Md. de Rocalaure's, wheither the king and Monsieur came in masked, where there was but a dousain women, all very hansome, and of our quarter, which was the pickest ball I have yett sene, or shall see this great whille, or shall see this yeare; for the [king] both he and Monsieur are very constant in their loves; but Monsieur Rocalaure's has tould M. he will suffer him to make love to his wife but till Ester; but M. dos all he can to gett the tyme prolonged. I am affraide, I have already troubled you to much with these lettle newes; so that I will say no more, but to assure you, that I shall ever be, &c.

Duke of York to king Charles II.

Sauchy Cauchie, July 19. 1657.

I have not heitherto given your majestie an account of the endeavours I have made with Monsieur le prince, about making a settlement concerning the souldiers, that have deserted, and that we have on another's troups; but not being able to have made such a one, as I could have desired, I send your majesty the prince of Condé's demands, and the reglement he will stand to, which, though it may cost us some few men, yett, methinks, that were better then to come to have any demelé with him, since I find by Monsieur l'Aisne, who is the man has had to do in this businesse, that Monsieur le prince thinks he has the greatest reason in the world in what he desirs, and will opiniatre he thing; and at the same tyme he makes the greatest profesiens to your majesty's person and service that can be, and says, that both his troups and himself are at your service, whensoever you shall have need of them for England. He presses much to have a speedy answer to the payper, so that I have sent this by an expresse to know your majesty's pleasur. I had delay'd sending one day, and would have defer'd it this day, but that I was prest to send; but, by to-morrow, I hope I shall be able to send you an account of what men wee have of his in our severall regements. He desirs a speedy answer; and the soner I receeve your majesty's commands in it, it will be the better. In the meane tyme I will endeavor to make some settlement with Monsieur de Caracen about their Ierish regements, by which I hope we shall gett some men; of which I shall give your majesty an account so sone as I have advanced any thing in it. My brother came hither last night, and I went to meette him as far as Cambray, where we din'd, and drunke your majesty's health, with madame and madamoiselle de la Salazar, dans du vin à la glace: nous demeurerons encore deux ou trois jours ici. For newse we have none at present, but what your majesty must know as well as we.

Duke of York to king Charles II.

Coukerk, Sept. 27.

Though my lord Rochester, who will give your majesty this letter, is fully inform'd of all the newse of this place, yett I could not lett him go without writing by him, that you might see I lose no occasion, whereby I may shew, that when I do not that, it is not my fault. I am very glad, that we shall have your majesty so neare us as Brugge, since it is likely we shall yett stay some tyme hereabouts; for if it be treu we heare, that the enemy fortify Borbourg, it is likely they will stay some tyme there, which will still obleige us to keepe in this post. There came upon this cost, the day before yesterday, more ships, which, when they came neere, we saw to be their admiral by his flag in the maine top. We don't know who it is; but beleve it to be Montegu. There was before twelve or fowerteene lying before Dunkerk; so that now we see about twenty or thirty from the sand-hills by Mardike, over-against which place the admirall now lys. The admirall is a brave shipe, and by what we can juge, beleve hir to be bigger then the Constant Reformation. I presse Don John every day for some thing for the English, that are come over, but can gett nothing yett but promisses of monys for them, which shall not want folisiting till I gett it. In the mean tyme, it would be necessary your majesty should hasten to send downe Tom Blague to have a care of these men. This is all I will say at present; but that I am
Your Majesty's.

Prayers us'd probably by the duke of York.

For the Morning.

O Lord God eternall, whome to know is the greatest wisdome, and to serve the greatest happyness; give unto me, I pray the, an understanding to discerne, and an heart to imbrace thy truth. Thou art able, even out of the mouths of babes and sucklings, to perfect thy prayse. I beseech thee then, let not the weakness of my nature, or tenderness of my years, be any hinderance to the workeing of thy grace within me. I have been taught, O Lord, and doe allready too much find it true, that all mankind is corrupted, even from the verie wombe. Though, therefore, in many things I know the good, yet I follow it not; and though I know the evil, yet I shunn it not; being more carried by the inclination of my nature to please myself, then by the sence of my duty to please thee. Yet, with thee there is mercy and forgiveness, through the blood of thy Sonn, whome thou madest to be a sacrifice in our stead, that by his death wee might be cleans'd from the guilt, in which wee were borne, and by his grace might have the decays of our sinfull nature repaired. I beseech thee then, let the power of his death and resurrection appeare in me, not only to the washing away of that original guilt, but to the strenghtening of me against all my corruptions, that I may be able, in some degree, to master both that unaptness to good dutys, and that proneness to all evil, which I finde to be in me. Helpe me, as against the faults of my nature, so against those likewise, which are incident to my age. Keepe me from pride and obstinacy, and evermore bowe my heart to good counsailes. Keepe me from lying and falshood, and cause me evermore to reverence thy truth. Keepe me from all actions and affections, in which I may any way displease thee; and graunt me evermore to delight in the ways of thy commandments. In thy good time have mercy upon these divided and distracted nations, settling truth in the church, justice in the state, and a peaceable and quiet government in both. Once, at length, be pleas'd to have pitty on that afflicted family, whereof I am one; bless the queene my mother with all those graces and mercys, which may make her happy in this life, and be a means of her eternal salvation. Blesse my elder brother with a religious heart, and wise counsels, and a patient waiting upon thee, that he may at length finde thy favour ether in the enjoying of those kingdoms, which by thy providence he was borne to, or else in the assurance of greater glorie with thyself in heaven. Let thy goodness also be extended to my other brother, and my sisters; plant in all our hearts the feare of thy name, and make us so assuredly to love thee, that whatsoever befalls us in this world, all may worke together for our good.

Be pleas'd to goe along with me this day, and before me, in all my ways, that I may with heede consider of my duty, and with care performe it, and serve thee with such faithfullness here in this world, that when I shall leave it, I may but exchange it for eternal glorie in thy heavenly kingdome, which I trust one day to have, through the merits and mediation of thy Sonn Christ Jesus; in whose name and words I farther call upon thee, saying,
Our Father, which art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive them that trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation. But deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.

For the Evening.

O Almighty God, and in thy Sonn Christ Jesus a most mercyfull Father to all, that seeke unto thee, behold, I am one, that seeke: O then graunt unto me, that I may finde thy favour and loveing kindness. This day, indeed, thou hast been pleased to vouchsafe me some measure of it, in keepeing me, though not from all sinn, yet from many evills, that I might have runn into, and the just punishment of those, that I have beene guilty of. Thou mightst have dealt otherwise with me, and yet have been just in thy dealeing; for if I have not offended against thee with a strong and high hand, yet my provocations have been many, and I have just cause to feare, that the only reason, why I have not exceeded all others, has been the restraint ether of thy power, or my own weakness. Should I now reckon up before thee all my several actions this day, no one thing could I alledge for myselfe, against which thou mightst not have a just displeasure; for in the dutys of religion, and thy service, I have been alltogether cold and formall; with my body I have come before thee, when my heart has been farr from thee. To those other dutys also of my life and education, I acknowledge, I am in the general too averse, and too careless in performeing of them, not much desireous of that, which is most to be sought after, and too impatient of the means, by which it must be attained unto. But as for those things, which sute the vanity and foolishness of a corrupt and sinfull nature, those I can persue with an unwearied earnestness, and continue in with an incessant delight. Thus, O Lord, doe I straye from thee, in all my thoughts and actions, and that continually; but, I beseech thee, be thou pleas'd in time to reclaime me from following the ways of my own heart, to walke in thy ways, and from following the fight of myne own eyes, to walke as in thy fight. Comfort me against all my finns past, and my many continued infirmities, by assureing me of the riches of thy mercy in thy Sonn Christ Jesus; and for the time of my life, that is to come, strengthen me, I pray thee, by thy grace and Holy Spirit. Plant in my heart a just feare of thy holy name, for that I know is the beginning of wisdome, and the fountaine of all religious actions. Make me carefull of my time, how I spend it; of my words, and thoughts, and all that I doe, that all may be agreeable to thy holy will.

And thou, who art that good sheepherd of Israel, whose eyes are continually upon thy little flock, be pleas'd to take care of me this night, whilst I sleepe; do thou, who never slumberest, nor sleepest, watch over me. As much as is possible, I pray thee, let me finde the motions of thy grace within me, even in this resemblance of death: night and day, let my thoughts be upon thee, till that day comes, which has no night, and wherein I shall be to enjoy thee for ever in the kingdome of thy Sonn Christ Jesus; in whose name and prayer I farther call upon thee, saying,

Our Father, which art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive them that trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation. But deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.

Queen of Bohemia to king Charles II.

The Hague, this 3. of June, [1655.]

My dearest Nephue,
I have receaved your majestie's leter by Jack. I am extreme glade to finde by relation, that you are in so good a condition; which I beseech God to continue and encrease to make you victorious over all your enemys. If I had knowen your sister had desired the Amboina papers, and that they had so much concern'd her, I had not desired them of your majestie. I cannot wish them in better handes, being so confident of her affection to me, as I know I shall not be prejudiced in anie thing, that is in her power. If Robin Long woulde have taken the paines to have tolde it me, I shoulde not have troubled you about that business by my last. Your majestie will understand by this dispatch, how my deare neece has gotten just sentence of being declared absolute tutrice to her sonne. Most of the people of this toune were as much joyed with it almost as we were; but, indeed, I heare of none, that were not satisfied with it, except those, that lost their defeins by it. There is an apeale and revision threatned; but I beleve they will not be hastie in it. I had letters this post from Paris, that asures me, Rupert sett saile the 14. of May, . . . . . . came thither from both the queens the day before, to invite him to Paris; but being readie to sett saile, he thought it better for your service to go on, then to accept of the favour they did him. I beseech you, lett no bodie know what I writt to your majestie concerning . . . . . . by my last, with a poignett I sent you from him. I leave it to your majestie's owne judgement to doe in it as you shall finde best for your service, though, I confess, I much desire to have him as neere you as I coulde. I will trouble you no further at this, but beseech God to send you a happie victorie over all your enemies, which would be the greatest joy to

Your Majestie's
most humble and most affectionat
aunt and servant,
Elizabeth.

I am extreme glade your majestie takes so well the usage I have shewed to . . . . . I give you humble thankes for it. He is verie much troubled, that he cannot waite upon you so soone as he woulde, for lack of money to make his equipage; but as soone as he can gett anie, he will waite upon you. His frends in England are so ruined, as he cannot gett money from them, and yett he has not receaved what you ordained for him . . . . . Lett me know what you commanded him concerning my S. V. Montrose, who has yett found little kindness from his grandfather and uncle. Those of his father's kindred, it may be, will doe more for him at your command. Cockran has not payed him the moneys you ordained for his father: it would now do him much good; or, that your majestie woulde give Will. Crosts order to lett him have some money of that, which he brings out of Scotland. Meere necessitie forceth the poore youth to stay still at the Grave, not having means to goe anie-where else.

Queen of Bohemia to king Charles II.

Hagh, Sept. 27. 1655.

My Dearest Nephue,
This bearer, Mr. Odart, I hope will finde your majestie well return'd from your journey. The queene went wednesday last from Brusselles; you will hardlie escape meeting her. It is reported at Bruselles, she is turned Roman catholick; but I rather beleve, she has not yett chosen her religion. This bearer can so well informe your majestie of all the things here, as I need not trouble you further; but onlie to beg the continuance of your favour to
Your Majestie's most humble and most affectionat aunt and servant, Elizabeth.

Queen of Bohemia to king Charles II.

Hagh, Nov. 2. 1655.

My dearest Nephue,
I Had obeyed your majestie's commands to Mrs. Mohun, but being at this present out of her favour, I shall stay till she return to grace me with it. In ernest I will take the boldness to acquaint your majestie with a foolish business, which may falslie be represented to you, which I beseech you to take no notice off, except others tell it you; for I onlie have told it to my dearest neece, and my lady Stanhope. When Grenville was last in England, people did talk oddlie of her carriage; and when the ambassadour Yongstal returned into Friesland, they talked theire pleasure, which one captaine La Mere heard, (he had heretofore served me, and is a verie honest man) writt hither a letter to Mrs. Lane, (whome I beseech your majestie not to name) to desire, that I may know how ill a name she had, without writing any particulars, doing it out of his affection and care to me, that I should not receave againe one of so little reputation. I shewed it to none but to Sir Charles Cotrell, desiring him to tell no body of it; and it was burn'd as soone as he had read it; for I did not beleve, nor not anie, ill of her, that was but onlie her indescretion in her cariage, and so thought of it no more. But Sir Charles Cotrell, contrarie to my desire, told it to Stone, at his returne hither from England. He did speak and report worse then La Mere writt; but Grenville being returned to me, Stone and she growing great frends, he, like a goose, told her of this of La Mere's letter, who had bene here at least eight weekes; onlie the night before Sir Charles Cotrell went towards . . . . hence, she fell upon La Mere most stranglie, and the next day made Stone aske him, if he writt such a letter or not. He answered, if she would tell her authour, he would satisfie her, else not. I knew nothing of this; but my lord Craven percieving, by some speaches of Stone to him, that he might fall to quarrelle with La Mere, tolde me of it; and I, upon this, made Stone to promise me not to medle in it, which he did both to Dr. Morley and myself; but, contrarie to his promise, he was with La Mere the next morning, being Sunday, to satisfie Grenville, which made him write a letter to her, where he neither affirmed nor denied the letter; onlie assur'd her, he had no ill opinion of her, which he shewed to Stone, at his going out of the church in the afternoone. Stone did like it, and woulde have had him asigned a paper of his writing, which the other woulde not. Without giving him anie ill words, Stone struck him in the face in the street; La Mere did a little pomell him for it, but we parted. I got Stone to be putt up, but La Mere gat awey. Stone was up a week, but La Mere could not be gotten; at last Stone got loose, and, wee all in a great feare, they meet and fight; but, God be thanked, there was no such danger, for Stone was safe at Mrs. Mohun's lodging. At last I heard it, and tolde it the captaine of the gardes, that had the watch, who sent soldiers to catch him; but he was gone out a little before. This is my crime. Mrs. Mohun complained the soldiers were insolent to her. I assured her I was verie sorrie for it, if it were, and did complaine of it to the captaine, who protests the contrarie; and she is verie angrie with me; but for Mrs. Lane and Broughton, Lord have mercy upon them, for she will spitt in their faces. The next day the soldiers, upon the same score, did search Mr. . . . . . . . house, because they saide Stone was seene to goe in there; but I protest to your majestie, I knew nothing of it till it was done. Stone is gone towards Collein, whither La Mere, without doubt, will follow him, to fight with him; but where La Mere is, none here knows. Wherefore your majestie will do a charitable office to stay the first of them you shall finde. There are manie odd circumstances, that are too long to relate; and I ask your majestie's pardon for this monstrous long letter; but fearing your majestie may have tolde you a wrong storie, I put you to this trouble to tell you this truth, there being nothing in this world I desire more then to stand right in your majestie's good opinion; which is always the greatest comfort off

Your Majestie's
most humble and most affectionat aunt and servant,
Elizabeth.

Queen of Bohemia to king Charles II.

Hagh, Dec.13. 1655.

My Dearest Nephue,
I Give your majestie humble thankes for commanding of Stone to returne hither. I hope, when he comes, that foolish business will be agreed. The right reverent Dick Harding did acquaint me with that base action of that villain Manning. I have seene him twice heere, when he came first out of England, and when your majestie went from Collein. Dick Harding writes, he faith he keepes corespondance with me and Dr. Morley; but he lyes: wee never did receave anie letter, nor writt to him anie, though wee might have been as well deceaved by him, as so manie others were. I wish there were no more spies then he; and if they be, that they be found; but I feare he has some companions. I can tell your majestie no great news from hence. My sister, the electrice of Brandebourg, asures me, she will not faile to write to her daughter the langravine about your majestie, and wonders it is not yet.

The princess of Tarente has not yet receaved her answer from her brother. I am verie glade your majestie has an imployment for my deare godsonne. I am sure he desires more to be imployed by you then any thing else. My dear neece recovers her health and good lookes extremlie by her exercises; she twice dauncing with the maskers, has done her much good. We had it two nights. The first time, it was deadlie colde; but the last time, the weather was a little better. The subject, your majestie will see, was not extraordinarie; but it was verie well danced. Our Dutch ministers say de nothing against it in the pulpet; but a little French preacher, Carré, saide in his sermon, we had committed as great a sinne as that of Sodome and Gomora, which sett all the church a laughing. For lack of better stuff I write this; but humblie beseech you to continue your so great favours to me, which is the greatest comfort I have in this worlde; who ame ever most pationately

Your Majestie's
most humble and most affectionat
aunt and servant,
Elizabeth.

Queen of Bohemia to king Charles II.

Hagh, Dec. 27. 1655.

I Have Stone sent me your majestie's letter, because till he and La Mere be made frends, it is not the fashion, that he should goe out of his lodging, which is now all the restraint he has; and I hope, either this day or to-morrow, the agreement will be made betwixt them. Then I shall obey your majestie in receaving Stone as before; for though you are pleased not absolutlie to command me in it, yett I ame so absolutlie yours, as I will always, in all that I can, follow and obey you, though you do but let me know your opinion. The peaking countess is now by me, and desires me to say some good of her to you. Good I cannot, but ill I can; for she sinns more Sodome and Gomora like in playing at cards, then we did at the maske. Wee have now gotten a new divertisment of little plays after supper; it was heere the last weeke, and now this weeke at your sister's. I hope the godlie will preach against it also. I am verie glade to heare, that Manning has had his deserved end. I wish all his fellow-villains with him. I receaved now a letter from Germanie, where I am informed, that your majestie's frends there, the electour of Mentz and others, woulde take it verie well, if you woulde acquaint them with Manning's villanies, as farr as your majestie thinks fitt to have knowen. I thought it my dutie to tell you this. It is as colde in tha wing heere as at Colein, with the frost. I have receaved a letter from Seistat, who is much satisfied with your majestie's favour to him and his ladie. Trulie, I think him verse honest. This thaw has done great wrong in melting the snow, our galants being hindred going in sleids, which is great pittie, which your majestie will have more need off, if I make this scribling longer, but onlie to tell you, that I am ever
Your Majestie's most humble and most affectionat aunt and servant, Elizabeth.

The queene of Sueden is deliver'd of a son. That king's good fortune comes fast, if it holde.

Queen of Bohemia to king Charles II.

Hage, March 2. 1655/6.

My Dearest Nephue,
I Must trouble your majestie againe, to lett you know the suite of what I writt to you last post concerning Grenvile. Having done all I coulde to get her frends to help her away, so as I shoulde not be forced to doe it myself, which could not but disgrace her, I could not prevaile with them; who answered, they would not meddle with her business. I seeing that, and not being able to suffer anie longer her ranting, upon tewsday night last I made her goe out of my house in a coache, which had order to sett her doune where she desired to be. I did it at night, to avoide a noise, and that they shoulde not say I putt her into her creditours handes, if I had done it in the day. She went to Mrs. Mohun's. I thought to have sent to the court of Hollande about it, but some of my frends counselled me not to doe it, but keepe them for to helpe, if I had neede of them. Yesterday came to me some gentlemen of her frends, who, in civil terms, expostulated with me her putting away in that fashion; and that they had hindred fortie English gentlemen from coming to me that morning upon that matter. I assure your majestie, there are not by half so manie gentlemen of this nation in our toune; am confident they could not have five more besides themselves to have done it. Those, that never came further than Ned Wood's, might, it may be, have been perswaded. I answered, that it was their fault, that I did it, since they would not helpe her away otherwife. I had suffered her humour as long as I coulde, because I doe not love to affront anie, but I coulde not suffer it always; and since they saide they woulde not medle with it, I must be mistress in my owne house, and woulde not be braved there. I beleve they woulde as little suffer the same of their owne servants. They answered, it was a great disgrace for her to be sent out so, and in the night. I answered, I did it for the best, to make the less noise: they, it woulde make people beleve it was for La Mere's letter. I tolde them, it was not for that, for then I shoulde have done it presentlie; but her inquietness and disrespect to me. They desired me, that I woulde give her creditours assurance for her debts, else she woulde be arrested. I saide, I should be sorrie for it, but could not help it. They woulde not take my worde, for I owed some of them much more than she did; besides, I woulde never medle with my servants debts. There passed more discourses, which woulde be too long to relate. At last I told them, I shoulde be verie glade they could finde a way to content her creditours, so I were not ingaged in it: if her creditours woulde aske me about it, I shoulde perswade them to lett her alone; but I woulde not be ingaged to them for her. I will not name the four: your majestie will have it without my naming. The one is her cozen, the other her countrie-man, the third was her galant, before his matrimonie, the fourth is none of these, but, I thinke, came in for companie's sake, to make up the foure. For the fortie hectors, that should have come to have terrified me, they did send to my lord Grandeson, and collonel Cromwell, to have ledd on the van of those most furious knights; but they verie hansomlie refused it, saying they would not medle with anie in that kind, that had used me so ill. I must now, with great reason, beg your majestie's pardon for this trou ble; it is to lett you know the truth, if you heare anie false reports of this. I will always give your majestie an account of my actions, there being nothing I desire more then to be right in your good opinion, being ever
Your Majestie's most humble and most affectionat aunt and servant, Elizabeth.

Sir,
As I had written this long letter to your majestie, Mrs. Lane brings me a verie sorie libel your majestie gave my lord Neubourg for her. I never read so simple, a foolish, malitious thing. Sure it must be with your majestie; for Mrs. Mohun tolde Mrs. Lane, she lay with your majestie. But in ernest I beseech your majestie to command my lord Taff to tell you, who writ it. I beleve it will make no quarell the telling of it, except it be with women; for both the hand and wittie expression shews it to belong to women. But Mrs. Lane is much joyed to finde your majestie's favour and kindness to her, as she will tell you herself.

Queen of Bohemia to king Charles II.

Hage, Jan. 3.

My dearest Nephue,
I Trouble your majestie againe to give you humble thankes for your goodness to me, in taking what I write to you, which is nothing but what is my dutie. Our gladiators are now frends, and Stone is now with me againe. It is his first fault, and your majesty's command is above all to me. All the news of consequence is, that of all the sides of my house there is nothing but weddings. Yesterday Somerdike's eldest daughter did committe matrimonie with one Weaver, and my landlord Vandermil's daughter the next week goes the same way with ..... On my right side madame Tielien's brother, Ealkenbourg, follows the weeke after; so as the fire is round about, but it cannot catch anie of my pucelles. And now to end this serious business, I will tell your majestie, that the electour of Brandebourg has an envoy with Cromwell, and has had audiance of him. He tolde the envoye, he wondered, that princes tooke so much paines to raign as the king of Sueden did. You see how impudent an hipocrite the rogue is become. I wish his raine may end with this olde yeare; and God send your majestie hapiness this new yeare, and manie more, which shall ever be the prayers and wishes of

Your Majestie's
most humble and most affectionat
aunt and servant,
Elizabeth.

I receaved a letter from Seistat the other day to us. I now answere it, and let him know your majestie's favour to him. I ame sure it will give him no small content.

Queen of Bohemia to king Charles II.

Hage, Jan. 17.

My Dearest Nephue,
I GIVE your majestie humble thankes for letting me know your pleasure concerning captain Griffith. I am verie glade of it, because I ever beleved him an honest man, and I hope he will continue so. Though I beleve you had more meat and drink at Hannibal Seistat's, yett I am sure our fidlers were better, and dancers. Your sister was verie well dressed, like an Amazone; the princess Tarente, like a shepheardess; madamoselle d'Orange, a nimph; they were all verie well dressed: Mrs. Hare was a Suiser's wife. But I wish of all the sights your majestie had seene Vanderdus; there never was seene the like: he was a Gipsie; Nan Hide was his wife; he had Pantalon close to him, in red and yellow, striped with ruffled sleaves: he looked just like Jack-a-Lent. They were 26 in all, and danc'd till five a clock in the morning. We had a great feast at P. William's child's christenin. It was at supper; and there we had dancing also, as upon friday last at the princess de Tarante. My deare neice went this morning away, which makes this place verie solitarie. I am sure to me it is, for she is all the contentment I have heere. I beseech you to continue your favour and good opinion to

Your Majestie's
most humble and most affectionat
aunt and servant,
Elizabeth.

The match betwixt Mademois. d'Orange and the prince of Oost-Frise is quite broken by both their consents; neither of them ever lov'd each other, but had always an aversion one for another.

The queen of Bohemia to king Charles II.

Hague, Feb. 7. [1655/6.]

My dearest Nepheue,
I GIVE your majestie humble thankes, that you are so well pleas'd with my smale service concerning the landgrave of Hesse: it is but my dutie; I ame onlie forie I ame in so unfortunat a condition, that I cannot doe your majestie no greater service. I shall not faile to obey your majestie's commands concerning Seistat and his ladie. I beleve they will be shortlie here. The poor elector of Brandebourg was forced to make peace with the king of Sveden; for, not being assisted by anie bodie, he coulde doe no other to save his estate. The articles are not certainlie knowen, but I feare they are not so good for the electour, as it is saide by some. It is here reported, that the king of Spaine is giving out letters of mart against Cromwell, and is a-felling the English marchands goods. I wish it were true: this night or to-morrow morning the truth will be knowen. I am sure you have heard, how that monster Cromwell has desarmed all Englande almost, and forbiden the good divines to gett their living by preaching and teaching. They say, all lawyers, phisitians, and pothecaries, that have served your majestie and your partye, shall have the same commande. Everie night he drinkes himself drunke to sleepe, and forgett his feares, which doth hinder his sleep. This is reported heere for a truth. For lack of better stuff I send this; and still beg the continuance of your favour and goodness to

Your Majestie's
most humble and most affectionat
aunt and servant,
Elizabeth.

Count Palatin to king Charles II.

Sire,
Je ne merite pas l'honneur, qu'il plaist à votre majesté me faire en me confiant, comme elle faict, ses interêts, & ce par la personne de Monsieur le marquis d'Ormont, lequel me servira de tesmoin du zele, que j'ay pour son service, & que je ne cherche plus grande gloire, que d'employer tout ce que j'ay de credit & de force à l'execution de ses ordres. Je me remets, Sire, à l'expression, qu'en sera mon dit sieur marquis, pendant que j'invoque le ciel de benir la justice de la cause de vôtre majesté, pour laquelle sera tousjours prompt de sacrifier sa vie & son sang,
Sire, De V. Majeste, le très-humble, très-fidel serviteur & cousin, Philippe Guilliaume, Conte-Palatin.

Dusschdorf, ce 15. de Juin, 1655.