Index

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History of Parliament Trust

Publication

Author

Thomas Birch (editor)

Year published

1742

Pages

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32

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'Index', A collection of the State Papers of John Thurloe, volume 1: 1638-1653 (1742), pp. 1-32. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=55298 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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A.B.C.D.E.F.G.H.J.KL.M.N.O.P.Q.R.S.T.V.W.Y.Z.

A.

Abjuration, oath of, designed to be substituted instead of the engagement to the English commonwealth, 353.

Ackland, John, 80.

Adams, John, an intelligencer at the Hague, 599, 644.

Admiral, capt. John, 513, 539.

Admiralty, English, Judges of, their opinion relating to several Portugal prizes, 164. Dismissed 316. Reason of it, ibid. Desire the council's further orders about some wools claimed by the king of Spain and attached by mess. Richault, 608.
-, — of Amsterdam, send an Account of the ships sit to be employed in the war, 287. Refuse to take capt. Appleton and two other Englishmen into custody, 343. Represent the success of the last battle with the English, in favour of the Dutch, 396. Dispute between them and the deputies of the States General, about some captains suspended for neglect of duty, 401, 411. Complain of being over-charged, 438. 449.
-, — established at Brest by king Charles II. cashiered, 609. Another erected by the connivance of the parliament of Rennes, ibid.

Adrian, capt. 447.

African company, Swedish, complaint of their ships being taken by the English, 219. 222, 223. Proceedings thereupon, 223. 224.

Agen, burgers of, rise in arms against the parliament of Bourdeaux, 304.

Aiscough, sir Edward, 79.

Aitoun, laird, dies, 51. His regiment joined to the laird Wedderburne's, ibid.

Aitzema, Mr. resident of Hamburgh at the Hague, 649.

Alcmaer, disturbance there about the prince of Orange, 324. Quashed, 325. 327. 329.

Aldridge, capt. ordered to assist in preventing a tumult at Wickham, 67.

Aldus, Mr. 426.

Alexander, Mr. 597.

Allen, Mr. Francis, one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Allin, Alderman, 250.

Allyson, Thomas, 33.

Ambrun, bishop of, 344.

Amboyna, account of the Dutch proceedings there written by Granswinkel, 267. Article in the treaty between England and Holland, relating to that affair, insisted upon by the English, 607.

Ambrun, bishop of, 344.

Amelia, Frederica, princess, proposition relating to the arrears of her pension referred to the States General, 547. Resolution of the States of Holland thereupon, 549, and of the States General, 556.

Amiens, citadel of, surrendered to the French troops, 378, 446.
-, — mons. de, recommends an Irish nonjuror to queen Mary, 678. His journey to Paris defended, 690.
-, — bishop of, his journey to Rome, why delayed, 689.

Amsterdam, opposes the prince of Orange's being made capt. gen. 324, 334. Furnishes the Scots with ammunition, 463, 64, 531. Votes for revoking the commissioners in England, 485. 489. 531. Protests against sending commissioners to renew the treaty, 551. Merchants of Amsterdam favoured in the payment of the 1000th penny, ibid.
-, — admiralty of, See Admiralty.

Amville, duke de, refuses to deliver up his governments, 261. Comes into favour with the French court, 285. Courted by cardinal Mazarine, 336. Sent to endeavour to bring the duke of Orleans to court, 344. 388. Made a marshal of France, 373. Sent again to the duke of Orleans, 637. appoints mons. Memon the king's riding-master, ibid. His message to Orleans only complimental, ibid.

Amerongen, mynheer, 464.

Anabaptists, a great party of them in the first parliament called by Oliver Cromwell, 393. Headed by Harrison, 396. Divided amongst themselves, ibid. Aim at making great innovations in the constitution, ibid. Publish a libel against Cromwell, ibid. Decline in credit, 519. 523. Bitter enemies to Cromwell, 621. 641. Less powerful in the army than the house, 621. Frustrated in their designs by the voluntary dissolution of the parliament, 632. Begin to submit to the government in Ireland, 731. Prevail in England, 743. 754.

Andover lord, his submissive letter and advice to king Charles II, 684.

Andrews, capt. his ship fired in the last engagement between the English and Dutch, 428.

Angnon, earl of, 186.

Angoulesme, duke of, dies, 589. Buried with great pomp, 640.

Annandaill earl of, 25.

Annunciata, company of, succeeds to the prince of Pisani, 581.

Antonio, card. expected at Paris, 687.

Appleboom, Harold, the queen of Sweden's commissary at the Hague, 113. Made resident in the room of Spieringe, 187. Desires to be recalled, ibid. Executes a commission to the English parliament, 206. Complains of the English commanders taking the Swedish ships, and misusing the mariners, 222. Offers the queen's mediation betwixt England and the States General, 234.

Appleton, capt. 326. 327. Order to the Admiralty of Amsterdam for taking him into custody, not complied with, 343. His ship taken from him in the Straits, 447.

Appollonius, Mr. a Dutch minister, consutes Lantsbergen, 187. Comes to Westminster to assist and congratulate the Scots presbytery, ibid.

Aquilius, Mr. Thilman, sent by the States General with a message to the English parliament, 239.

Archbishops. See Bishops, and Church-government.

Archduke, See Austria.

Ardres, garrison of, driven out of the town by the inhabitants, 322.

Argyll, marquis of, 15. 16. His letter to the committee of estates at Edinburgh, 32. His party in the Scot's parliament endeavour the ruin of the king and monarchy, 73. Struggle betwixt him and the duke of Hamilton, 93. Sent by king Charles II. to the committee of estates, after the defeat at Dunbar, 163. Begins taxations in the Highlands, 206. Zealous for the interest of king Charles II. 514.

Armourer, offers to make some great discoveries to king Charles II. 695. Goes over to him, 717.

Armstrong, sir Thomas, a plotting royalist, 712. 713. 720.

Army, of the parliament of England, proposition relating to the payment of their arrears tendered to king Charles I. by the two houses, 79. Except against the new parliament called by Cromwell, 306. Change the form of government, 395. 632. Turn atheists, 749. See Militia.

Armyn, sir Will. a commissioner for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Arnot, col. 166.

Arras, city, a plot against the French king discovered there, 379.

Arscot, duke de, 405.

Arthur, Jo. 358.

Articles. See Treaty. Articles tendered to king Charles I. by the two houses, for settling a peace, 77.

Arundel lord, generalissimo of king Charles the first's army at Newcastle, 3.
-, — sir John, a royalist, 712. 713. In the popish design, 720

Ascham, Mr. Anthony, the English resident at Madrid, murdered, 148. Proceedings thereupon, 149, 99, 157, 189. Narrative concerning it delivered to the council of state, 202.

Ashburnham, Mr. John, one of king Charles the first's commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 56. Included in the first qualification of persons to be proceeded against by the parliament, 80. Suspected to have betrayed the king, 92.

Ashburst, Mr. one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Assembly general of Scotland. See Parliament of Scotland. Their declaration against the engagement entered into by divers of the Scottish nation against England, 105.

Aston, sir John, 81.

Aubigny confers often with Kingston, 732. Account of the governor of Arras, 733. Conference with Robinson, 737. Dislikes king Charles's ways, ibid. &c. Better reconciled to him, 738, 739, 741. Proposals to him for uniting his interest with that of the church of Rome, 740. 744. Offers to take the care of the duke of Gloucester's education, 742. & seq.

Aubion, viscount of. See Bonnes.

Aubry, mons. See Bertault.

Audley lord, 80.

Avelino, prince of, presents the Spanish gennet to the Pope, 309.

Avery, Sam. governor of the English company of merchants adventurers, 219.

Augier, Mr. 608, 609. His secretary at Paris sends intelligence to London, 608, 615, 621.

Augustin, Mr. justice against him demanded by Oliver Cromwell, 171.

Aumale, duke de, 504.

Aumont, duke de, reported to be taken prisoner, 736.

Austria, duke of, discontented with the court of Spain, 262, 287. Refuses a pass to king Charles II. 354. But afterwards grants it, 357. Recovers from an illness, 361. Some money designed for him, taken by the English, 361. Goes to the army, 406. Which is much reduced by sickness, 518. Goes into winter-quarters, 604. His army reformed, ibid. Conference and treaty with king Charles, 752.
-, — don John of, comes into Catalonia to the assistance of the earl of Oignate, 432. Occasions the raising of the siege of Gironne, 532. Marches to prevent marshal Hocquincourt's going to the relief of Roses, 615, 616. Proposed to command in Portugal, 687. Loses his credit in Flanders, 708. Is to meet king Charles there, 728. A grand conference with him and others discovered, 752. Receives 3,000,000 of crowns for his assistance, ibid.

Aymes, Mr. 117.

B.

Baas, mons. sent by card. Mazarin to Oliver Cromwell, 760. & seq.

Bacon, Mr. Justice, exception concerning him in the proposition tendered to king Charles I. touching the great seal, 78.

Badan, marquis of, 475.

Badenoch. See Glencairne, and Hill.

Badiley, capt fights eleven Dutch ships with four English, 219. Returns safe to England, 244.

Baillie, lieu. gen. his proceedings in reducing the northern parts of Scotland, 51. seq.

Balaquier, besieged by the king of Portugal, 356.

Balcarres, lord, difference between him and Glencairne, 495. 502. His letter to the earl of Atholl intercepted, 586. Resides at Paris, 726. seq.

Balsoure, sir Will. joins gen. Middleton, 49.

Balmerino, lord, 73.

Balthazar, Mr. brings some forces to Bourdeaux, 355. Retires to Montpelier, 380.

Baltimore, lord, his difference with the Marylanders composed, 724.

Bamff, shire of, letter from the committee touching an order for levying of forces, 169. Of the master of Bamff about the same, ibid.

Bampfield, Mr. 367. Goes into Scotland with commissions from king Charles II. 408. Goes by the name of Smith, ibid. Suspected by the king's party, 408, 480, 495. Goes to the king at Paris, 480. Discontented with his Reception, 487. Betrays him to the Parliament, 630.

Banckert, capt. Adrian, taken prisoner by the English, 429. His ship sunk, 452. Binds himself by an oath not to endeavour to escape, ibid.

Banckes, capt. Poppe, punishment inflicted on him for not doing his duty, 508.

Banni, lord, recommended by Aubigny, 741.

Barbarino, card. Antonio, leaves Paris in discontent, 262. Declares himself in the French king's interest, 432. Made bishop of Poictiers and great almoner of France, ibid.
-, — Maeffo, disgusts the Spanish adherents at Rome by marrying prince Justiniano's daughter, 274. Difference between him and card. Antonio, 432. In great favour with Spain, 741. Recommended to king Charles II. ibid. & seq.

Barcelona, a report of its being surrendered to mons. de Plessis, 303, 311. Contradicted, 337. Inclined to revolt, 337, 344, 345.

Barclay, Rob. 52. Dissents from the engagement formed in Scotland against England, 99, 104.

Bard, mons. de, governor of Rue, recompence proposed to be given him in lieu of his government, 349. Worsted by a party of prince Conde's Forces, 356.

Barlow, Mrs. an indiscreet woman, 683, & seq. Her shameful intrigue with Howard, 689.

Barnard, Mr. Edward, acquaints Mr. Strickland of a design to murder him, 120. His account of a victory gained by the English over the Dutch, 272.

Barnwell, sir Richard, 407.

Barriere, mons. the prince of Conde's agent at London, his memorial touching some ships of Bourdeaux taken by the English, 213. Negotiates the opening of a trade to Gascony, and other places, 216, 225, 226. His memorial relating to the capture of the St. Anne frigate, 217. Endeavours to remove all suspicion of his master's being in the interest of king Charles II. 224, 225. His papers referred to the committee for foreign affairs, 226. His memorial relating to the miserable condition of the city of Bourdeaux, 250. Congratulates the general and council upon their victory over the Dutch, 275. Negotiates a peace between France and Spain, 760.
-, — marquis of, his letter to mons. Brassel about the conditions demanded by the English from the Dutch, 362.

Barwis, Mr. Rich. one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Bass, garrison of. See Humby.

Bavaria, elector of, favours the French faction in the diet of Ratisbon, 238.

Bay, colony of, in New England, refuses to join in an expedition against the Dutch and Indians, 564.

Bayners, capt. 447.

Beara O Sullivan, sollicites the French king for money to carry on his designs in Ireland, 479. Carries commissions thither from king Charles II. 595. A letter concerning his designs intercepted, 619. Sends a small relief to col. O Brian in Ireland, 626, 631.

Beausort, duke of, kills his brother the duke de Nemours, 504. Designed to command the French navy, 640. His visit to Mazarine, 739.

Beauvoir duke, 740.

Bedford, earl of, his letter to secretary Thurloe about the affairs of the isle of Ely, 358. Complains of the Dutch prisoners refusing to work, ibid.

Beddingfield, sir Henry, 80.

Beecke, mynheer, 434.

Bessort, besieged by the marquis of Duxel, 639. Reported to be surrendered, 647.

Bellegarde, besieged by the French troops, 261.

Bellenden, sir Will. 495.

Belliere, mons. de Plessis. See Plessis.

Bellievre, mons 85, 86. Refuses to give the upperhand to the commissioners of the States General in his own house, 593. A house called Mon-trouge left him by mons. de Chasteauneuf, 638.

Belling, Mr. wounded, 698. Ordered to transact with bishop Drumore, 739. His instructions from king Charles II. 744.

Bellingham, Mr. one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Benefices, proposition relating to an act against plurality of them, and non-residence, tendered to king Charles I. 84.

Bennet, Humphry, esq. 80.
-, — Mr. Richard, one of the commissioners for reducing Virginia, 197.
-, — coll. one of the English council of state, 369. 395.
-, — sir John, his intelligence to king Charles II. 744. forced to stay longer at Paris, 686. His account of the taking of Mardyke, 687. Maintains two hundred horse for king Charles, 719.

BenningeVan, 426.

Benson, Mr. John, an intelligencer at Dantzick, 321. 333, 426, 443, 547, 579, 608. Desires an attestation of general Monck's account of the last battle between the English and Dutch, 444. His answer to secretary Thurloe's letter discharging him from his employment, 554. Extracts of several letters in his commendation, 555.

Bergen op Zoom, an insurrection there, 340. Occasion of it, 342. Appeased, 374.

Bergerac, accepts the French king's amnesty, 405.

Bernhard, Israel, two of his letters intercepted, 554. 578.

Berkeley, sir John, 95.

Bertau, monsieur, endeavours to persuade the Bourdelois to submit to the French king, 322.

Bertault, monsieur, accused, with messieurs Aubry and Ricou, of a design to murder cardinal Mazarin, 504. Beheaded, 525.

Berthete, monsieur, the French king's procureur, his opinion touching mons. Bertault and others, 504.

Betts, monsieur, kept prisoner in England in the room of capt. Schallinger, 453.

Berwick, garrison of. See Treaty.

Beveren, Cornelis Van, manner of his son's death, 452.

Beverning, madam, 401.

Beverning, mynheer, one of the deputies of the states of Holland and West Friesland, sent into England to negotiate a peace, 256, 266. Positively denies his having any instructions contrary to those of the generality, 299. Desires to negotiate a while alone, 302. Sentiments of the English council of state concerning him, 314. His instructions, ibid. Relation of what passed at his first audience, 315. Represents the necessity of secrecy, 339. And the obstructions arising to the treaty from the troubles in Holland, 340. Expresses great satisfaction in the choice of De Witt to be pensionary of Holland, 373, 382. His reflections upon the exorbitant demands of the English, 382. Offers to stay in England after the departure of the rest of the commissioners, 389. Stays accordingly, 401. His reflections upon the critical situation of the Dutch affairs, 416. His high commendations of Opdam, 417. Substance of a conference between him and Cromwell, 417, 418. His answer to some objections made to his conduct in the treaty, 430. Desires a safe conduct for the earl of Clare's two daughters, ibid. His reflections upon the proceedings of the English government against John Lilburne, 441. and upon the meeting at Blackfriars, 442. Represents the inconveniencies of recalling the Dutch resident in Sweden, ibid. Expresses hopes of the success of the treaty, 443. Desires farther instructions, ibid. and a copy of the advocate Rudolph's orders, ibid. Condoles with Beveren upon the death of his son, 452. Represents the English somewhat more moderate, 463. Presses Opdam to take the command of the fleet, 513. Holds correspondence in England unknown to Van Perre, 517. Advises to improve the good dispositions of the English for an Accommodation, 519, 529, 530. Ordered to give particular attention to the affairs between England and Sweden, 573. Recommends col. Doleman's business to De Witt, 576. Declares his dissatisfaction with the behaviour of Nieuport, 600.

Beverweert, mynheer, proposed for marshal of the united provinces, 327. Appeases a tumult at Bergen op Zoom, 374. Put in nomination for the office of admiral in the room of Tromp, 412, 22, 59. Declines it, 467–71.

Beuningen, mynheer Van, the Dutch ambassador in Sweden, substance of a conference betwixt him and the lord chancellor, 271. Makes overtures of a joint alliance betwixt Sweden, Denmark, and the States General, 305, 460, 61, 474. Observations upon the necessity of his continuing in Sweden, 444. Desires to be recalled, 461. His memorial relating to two Dutch skippers detained in the Sound, 472. Substance of what passed at his audience of the queen. His conjectures about the reason of the intended removal of the court to Gottenburgh, and the alteration of that design, 506. His objection to the placart about the convoys of Gottenburgh, ibid. Substance of several letters from him to the states-general. 517–24. His account of the English ambassador's audience, 652. His answer to the French ambassador's message relating thereto, 652–53. Obtains another audience, 653. Represents the demands of the English as exorbitant and unreasonable, and endeavours to dissuade the queen from treating with their ambassador, 653,–54.

Bewinthebbers, their opinion about the fleet, 314.

Bezemont, monsieur, card. Mazarin's secretary, sent to count Harcourt to try to content him. 615. Suspected of a design to make him prisoner, 615–22. Secured thereupon, 623.

Bezon, monsieur, made intendant of justice in Languedoc, 379. Complained of, ibid.

Bichi, cardinal, in a conspiracy with the bishop of Lanore to deliver the town to the duke de Lesdiguieres, 322. Their plot discovered, ibid. Forced to fly, ibid.

Bieule, count de, 587.

Bilderbeeche, mynheer, the Dutch agent at Essen in Westphalia, ordered to advertise the States of the resolutions taken there, 486.

Bingham Thomas, 624.

Biron, sir John, 80.

Bisdommer, Mr. his several letters to the Dutch deputies in England, 306, 317, 419, 439, 464, 499, 523, 529, 543, 655.

Bishop, sir Edward, 81.
-, — colonel, a plotting royalist, 711.

Bishops in England. See Church-government. Bill relating to them ordered to be reported, 65. Proposition for incapacitating such of them as adhered to the enemies of the parliament, 81. And sequestering a third part of their estates, 82.

Blackfriars in London, a meeting of several Anabaptists and other enemies of Cromwell and the government held there, 442–68, 621. Representation of its dangerous tendency to the state, 591. Proceedings in order to suppress it, 621.

Blackiston, Mr. John, 79.

Blake, general commander of the first English Fleet sent to the southward, his instructions, 134, seq. Commission to him and col. Popham, 137. Ordered to proceed to Portugal against prince Rupert, 138. Arrives at Lisbon, 141. Additional instructions to him and col. Popham, 142–45–55–56–58–68. Take several French and Portuguese prizes, 154. Are thanked by the parliament, 155. An account of their deseat brought to Madrid, 157. Ordered to send home their prizes, 167. Blake comes to the assistance of Monk in an engagement with the Dutch, 278. Reported to be killed, 286, 353. Thought unwilling to prosecute the war against the Dutch, 293. Unable to go to sea upon account of his ill state of health, 386. His encounter with the Turks, 688.

Blaney, John, esquire, 81.

Blondel, mynheer, an antiquarian at Amsterdam, becomes blind, 281. Salary allowed him, ibid. Writes an invective against the English and Spaniards, 307.

Boar, Richard, imprisoned by the king of Portugal, 155.

Boer, mynheer, commander of a squadron in the Straits, ordered home, 498.

Bohemia, queen of, present made her by the States General, 1, 122. Requests them to mediate with the English parliament the payment of the arrears of her pension, 184. Her letter referred to the deputies appointed to treat with the English ambassadors, 185. Answer of the ambassadors thereto, 189. Another letter relating to the same affair referred to the Dutch deputies in England, 546. Her congratulatory letter to king Charles II. 670. On other subjects to the same, ibid. & seq. Her reasons for turning Mrs. Greenville away, 673, seq. Complains of a libel sent her by king Charles, 679.

Boneel suspected of hatching designs at London against the Dutch, 442.

Bonel, Mr. Peter, sent to the States General with an answer to their letter to the English parliament, 244.

Bonnes, marquis of, killed in a duel with the viscount d'Aubion, 659. His friend wounded and disarm'd at the same time by a friend of the viscount's, ibid.

Bonteville, earl of. See Persan.

Boom, Mr. pensioner of Amsterdam, 114, 126, 174.

Boon, John Cornelius, 243.

Bordeaux, monsieur de, the French ambassador in England, extracts of his several letters to monsieur de Brienne, 233, 400, 444, 539, 545, 566, 616, 624, 630, 648, 650. Substance of a conference with some commissioners of the council of state, 283. His answer to their complaints of the reception of prince Rupert with his prizes, and the entertainment given to king Charles II. ibid. His character of Oliver Cromwell, 256. Ordered to mediate a peace between England and the states general, 264. Desires to be recalled, 286. Ordered to act in concert with the Dutch deputies at London, 310. Endeavours to cause animosities in England, ibid. His reflections upon the new parliament called by Cromwell, 312. Desists from making any applications to the English government, 344. Complains of the Dutch commissioners, 368. Opposes the manning of the ships designed for the relief of Bourdeaux, with Dutch prisoners, 370. Presents a draught of a treaty to the English Commissioners at their request, 400. Advises the Dutch deputies to send two of their number to make report to the states general, 410. Said to be recalled, 436. The true ends of his mission, ibid. Advises his court of the Progress of the treaty between England and Holland, 545. Dissuades from assisting king Charles II. 546. Reflected upon for not endeavouring to break the treaty betwixt England and the Dutch, 573. Dissatisfied with his abode in England, 612. His reflections upon the demands of the English in the treaty with the Dutch, 616. His account of the dissolution of the English parliament, 630. Means recommended by him for reviving an union between the

two nations, 648. Substance of some conferences with the Dutch deputies, 650. Ready to leave London in disgust, 685. Narrative of his negotiations with Oliver Cromwell, 762, & seq.

Bordeaux, monsieur de, sen. sent with money to the French army in Picardy, 626.

Boreel, mynheer, the Dutch ambassador at Paris, his letter to the States General concerning the act for freedom of the Dutch navigation, 185. Substance of his second conference with the French king's commissaries, 310. Desires copies of several letters and other papers between the states general and the parliament, 343. Four deputies appointed to treat with him, 354. His interest at the French court increases, upon news of the ill success of the treaty in England, 653. His account of the progress of the treaty, 365–400. Ordered to keep a constant correspondence with the Dutch commissioners at London, 400. Inveighs against the English for proposing a coalition of government, 422. Complains to the cardinal of two pirates at Toulon arming upon a cruise, 436. His account of the true ends of Mr. Bordeaux's mission into England, ibid. His negotiations at a stand, 438–461–54. His reflections upon the behaviour of the English to him and the rest of the Dutch commissioners when in England, 459. Desires an account of the conference between Beverning and Cromwell, ibid. Has frequent conferences with monsieur de Servient, 616. In the interest of king Charles II. ibid. Assures the French king of the prince of Orange's party, 640. His son wounded in a quarrel at Paris, ibid.
-, — Jacob, son to the ambassador, his letter to the Dutch deputies at London, 432.

Borthwicke, Mr. J. 104.

Bosell, major, 306.

Boswell, sir William, king Charles II's resident at the Hague, remonstrates against the states giving audience to Mr. Strickland, 112, 129.

Bougy, monsieur de, 303.

Bouillon, duke of, 343.

Bouillon, madam de. See Longueville.

Bourdeaux, See Barriere. An insurrection there appeased by prince Conti and the duke of Enguien, 276. Bourdelois favoured by the English, 286. Reduced to great extremity, 311, 312, 332, 333, 344, 350, 354. Proceedings of the council betrayed to the French court, 311. Desire to be supplied with some large English merchantmen, manned with Dutch prisoners, 317. Preservation of it of great consequence to prince Conde, 320. Relief designed for it ordered to Barcelona, 344. The English blamed for neglecting to relieve it, 344, 354–357. Its relief undertaken, 353. Bourdelois inraged against the Spaniards, 354. Persuaded by the clergy to accept the French king's amnesty, 355. Relief sent thither from Spain, 356–62. Begins to treat with Vendosme, 357. Offers to surrender upon granting an amnesty, 363. Surrenders, 377, 379. Conditions demanded by the Inhabitants, 380. Denied by the French court, 380–88, 404. Relief sent thither from Spain and England too late, 388. Much incommoded by the Spaniards, 532. Receives great benefit by the silencing of prince Conde's party, 578. Afflicted with the plague, 590. Reduced to a miserable condition, 623.

Bourdelois, refuse the relief brought by the marquis de Fiesque, 363.

Bourdelot, monsieur, the queen of Sweden's physician, present made him by her, 263. In danger of being proceeded against at Paris, but saved by the queen, 286.

Bourg, besieged by the French king's forces, 276, 311. Taken, 332.

Bouteville, count, governor of Bellegarde, supposed to have an understanding with the duke de Espernon, 285–86. Takes his sister, mademoiselle de Chastillon, from Mailou, and carries her to Brussels, 405.

Boynton, colonel, commander of Scarborough castle, declares for king Charles I. 98.

Brabant, president of, deprived of his offices for being a Jansenist, 332.

Bradshaw, John, president of the English council of state, 132, 158.

Bradshaw, Richard, the English resident at Hamburgh, purchases ammunition for the use of the government, 444. Complains of ill usage from the company, and desires redress, 445, 492. Represents the danger of the ammunition's falling into the hands of the Hollanders, 491. Desires the council's order for relief of some shipwreck'd English mariners, and a supply of money for ammunition, &c. 588.

Braidevell, laird, 80.

Bramhall, Dr. bishop of Derry, included in the first qualification of persons to be proceeded against by the parliament of England, 80.

Brandenburgh, elector of, demands a sum of money due to him from the emperor, before the election of a king of the Romans, but is refused, 259. Desired to come to Ratisbon to end the difference about the succession of Juliers and Cleve, 652. Requests the States General to maintain him in his right, ibid. Sends an envoy to Rich. Cromwell, 674. Forced to make a peace with Sweden, 675. His troops how to be paid by the Dutch.
-, — marquis of, talk'd of for captain general of the United Provinces, 326. Writes a sharp letter to the States of Holland, upon their neglecting to answer his proposal of renewing the ancient alliance, ibid.

Brasset, Mons. the French resident at the Hague, his reflections upon the change in the English government, and their quarrel with the Dutch, 239, 240. Becomes almost blind, 497. Sent with a message from Chanut to the commissioners of the States General, 593.

Brazil, state of the Dutch there, 371. Articles propounded by the States General to the king of Portugal, relating to their differences about it, 468.

Brechin, lord, 166.

Brederode, mynheer Van, refused entrance into Enchuysen, 317. Proposed to be made president of the United Provinces during the minority of the prince of Orange, 326, 327. Disputes about it, 329. Sent to the Busse to drive the Lorrainers out of the Dutch territories, 592.

Bregne, madame de, desires to correspond with K. Charles II. 686.

Brekevelt, mynheer, a Dutch printer, imprison'd for some verses about the prince of Orange, 652.

Bremen, citizens of, complain of a fort erected by some Swedish commissioners, 243. Conditions of their agreement with the duke of Oldenburgh and the Imperial Court, 472. Obliged to admit the Jesuits to be absolv'd from the interdict, ibid. III used by the Dutch, 497.

Bremen, agent of at London, order of council for admitting him to audience, 602.

Bremon, Mr. George, 81.

Brereton, Sir William, one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Brest, passage of, gain'd by prince Conde, 387.
-, — Harbour of, much frequented by pirates, 609.
-, — Admiralty of. See Admiralty.

Bretagne, states of, dispute betwixt them and the parliament of Rennes, 615, 622. Desire the king to abolish the Paulette, 615. Reason of it, 622. Give the king a million and half of livres, 634.

Bretonvilliers, madame de, her house garrison'd by order of the French king, 355, 356. Her offer to the court refused, ibid.

Bridgman, Sir Orlando, one of King Charles the First's commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 56.

Brienne, count, seconds M. de Servien in his reasons for the payment of Preston's money, 320. One of the deputies appointed to treat with the Dutch ambassador at Paris, 354.

Bright, col. 100.

Brisac, garrison of, demands extraordinary sums of the French court, 609.

Bristol, John earl of, included in the first qualification of persons proposed to be proceeded against by the English parliament, 80. Goes for Spain, 729, seq. 736.

Brittanie, merchants of. See Merchants.

Broadgate, a royalist, acquitted, but yet transported, 745.

Broche, Mr. W. 170.
-, — capt. James. See Council of state.

Brodie, Mr. W. 170.

Brooke, Sir Brazill, 81.

Broussel, mons. 623.

Browne, Mr. John, clerk of the parliament of England, his letter to M. Pierrepoint, 62.
-, — Mr. W. a letter from him intercepted, 480.

Bruce, Thomas lord, 79.

Bruges, city of, invites the English merchants to renew their residence, 129, 198. Answer of the merchants to the said invitation, 129, 202.

Brun, Mr. the Spanish ambassador in Holland, complains against the States General for breaking of articles, 254. Desires a passport for 3000 men coming from Ireland into Flanders, and complains of the rent-master Tempelaer's oppressing the nuns of the abbey of Postel, 261. Endeavours to hinder the treaty with France, 264, 283, 627. Substance of a memorial deliver'd to the States General, 281. Denies his knowing any thing of a pamphlet call'd, Complaints of the Spanish ambassador, &c. ibid. Secretly proposes a league with the States against Portugal, 284. Desires commissioners may be appointed to confer with him about means to protect the lands of Overmaaze, 365. Endeavours to prevent the Lorrainers quartering in the Dutch territories, 616, 617. Dies, 651. His character, ibid.

Bruyne, Mynheer de, pensioner of Zeeland, 522. His letters to Vand Perre, 525, 552, 561, 600. Thanks him in the name of the assembly for his care about the Zeeland prisoners, 600. And represents the States as desirous of peace, ibid.

Bruyushvelt, capt. penalty inslicted on him for not doing his duty, 508.

Buckingham, duke of, 306. Falls sick of a fever, 471. Goes to king Charles at Paris, 622. Disliked by him, ibid. Not suspected to be in Hewit's plot, 713, 14. But is deep in king Charles's interest, 715,–19.

Budde, John, 33.

Budes, inhabitants of, deny'd assistance by card. Mazarin, 405.

Bulkly, Mr. 98.

Burghly, lord, 551, 174.

Burton, Mr. See Phillips.

Bury, sent one of the judges into Ireland, 731.

Bushell, John, imprison'd by the king of Portugal, 155.

Butler, capt. sunk with his ship in an engagement with the English, 269.

Butler, Mr. Peter. See Council of state.

Buzancy castle, taken by a party of Turenne's army, 532.

Byron, lord, takes up arms for king Charles I. in North Wales, 98.

C.

Caarloff, Henry, director of the Swedish African company, sollicits the release of some ships belonging to the said company, taken by the English, 222.

Cadiz, governor of, order'd to admit the English ships into that port, 154.

Calais, mail, open'd by some troopers, 609.

Calander, earl of, his account of the disposition of the Scots forces in England after the surrender of York, 40. Urges the necessity of the general's joining him with the cavalry, for securing the northern parts against prince Rupert, ibid. Takes Hartlepool and Stocktown, 41. Sends a party to seize upon Gaittsyde, who are prevented, ibid. Takes all without the port, ibid. Again urges the necessity of the general's marching northward, 41, 42. Complains of the English soldiers having violated some of the articles of the treaty, 42. Desires a supply of provisions and money for the forces under his command, 42, 43, 45, 46. His account of the proceedings in the siege of Newcastle, 45, 46. His commendation of major general David Leslie, 46. Recommends a vigorous pursuit of the enemy, 50.

Calcedon, bishoprick of, difficulties about filling it up, 799 and seq.

Calvert, Mr. 402.

Campbell, col. 41, 173.
-, — Mr. 170.

Candale, duke of, join'd with Vendosme in the siege of Bourg, 311. Comes with a party of the French troops to Cape de Buck, 350. Hangs six of the inhabitants of Perigueux, 533. Returns to Paris, 615. Preparations for his marriage with the cardinal's niece, 634, 660. See more in Vendosme.

Canillack, marquis of, 647.

Cantecroix, countess of. See Lorrain.

Capell, lord, one of king Charles the first's commissioners in the treaty at Uxbridge, 56.

Capella, the Venetian ambassador, returns to Constantinople, 274.

Caponio, cardinal, president of the congregation de propaganda fide, in disgrace, 586.

Caracena, marquis de, routs the army of Savoy and Piedmont, endeavouring to oppose his passage towards Genoa, 493. Slightly hurt, ibid. The loss on both sides, 505. Appointed to assist king Charles II. 752.

Carante, prince of, 539.

Cardenas, don Alonzo de, the Spanish ambassador at London, his answer to a paper from the council of state, 132. Memorial relating to the ship Sancta Clara, 138. Desires liberty to transport a certain number of Irish to Spain, and the release of Hugh O Neil, in order to command them, 212. Congratulates the council upon general Blake's defeating the French fleet designed for relief of Dunkirk, 214. His proposals referred to the commissioners for foreign affairs, ibid. His memorial touching some ships laden with wooll and other commodities belonging to the king of Spain, taken by the parliament's fleet, 215. Desires leave to transport corn to the Canaries, ibid. And the release of col. Diego Geraldine, seized at Chester, ibid. Desires passes for ships laden with match, design'd for Spain, 216. His answer to the complaint of Mr. Dobbins and others touching the king of Spain's non-performance of a contract for transporting the Irish into Spain, 232. Caution given to the English government against him, 268. A letter deliver'd by him to the council concerning some English ships to be join'd with those of Spain, return'd, 331. Desires a passport for boats to carry oak trees from Dort to Ostend, for repairing that harbour, 348. Does ill offices to the Dutch, 389. Makes an overture to the English state to break jointly with the Dutch, 389, 396. Demands the restitution of the wooll belonging to the king of Spain, 534,– 78,–90,–92, 602. Desires the same privileges for the Spanish merchants, as those of England enjoy'd in Flanders, 537. No friend to king Charles II. 699. Yet pretends much to it, 703. Congratulates R. Cromwell on his succession, 705. Proposes a treaty to him from the court of Spain, ibid. & seq. Treats with king Charles II. 723. The particulars of it, 752. Narrative of his negotiations with Oliver Cromwell, 759, & seq. Engages that the English shall be protected from the inquisition, 761.

Carlisle, Scots garrison there order'd to remove, 105.

Carmichael, sir James, obtains a pass to attend the king in the isle of Wight, 103.

Carnegy, lord, a safe conduct desired for him and sir Alexander Carnegy by king Charles I. deny'd, 103. Reason of it, ibid.

Carnewath, earl of, cited to appear before the Scots parliament, 25.

Carpenter's account of the Spanish design in favour of king Charles II. 752. Treated as a spy in Flanders, 753.

Carre, a foolish preacher against the balls of the French court, 672.

Creton, William, a fictitious name assumed by lord Newburgh, 501. See Newburgh.

Carteret, sir George, 80.

Cary, Mr. one of the English council of state, 395.

Cary, sir Edmund, governor of Hartlepoole and Stocktown, surrenders them to the earl of Calander, 41.

Casals, taken from the French by the Spaniards, 492. Ordnance found there, ibid.

Cassagne, sieur de, elected general of the protestants of Languedoc, 454.

Cassenoue, Mons. de, 350.

Cassils, earl of, one of the Scots commissioners who dissented from the engagement against England, 99, 104.

Castlehaven, earl of, 80, 245.

Castlenau, Mons. de, continued in the government of Bergerac, 405.

Castle, Rodriguez, the Spanish ambassador at Ratisbon, presses the speedy election of a king of the Romans, 238. Opposes the negotiations of lord Wilmot, 258, – 97, 366.

Castrillo, Conde de, appointed viceroy of Naples, 434. Arrives there, 581.

Catalonia, nobility of, revolt from the king of Spain, 303, 311, 337. The occasion of it, 344.

Catechism of Holland for the year 1653, printed, 328.

Cathedrals, English, motion in parliament for suppressing them, 387.

Catholicks, Roman. See Papists. In great hopes from king Charles II. 741. Intend to compound with Rich. Cromwell, 742.

Catts, Mr. a Dutch correspondent in England, 293.

Cavaliers, in England, not averse to Cromwell's taking the government into his own hands, 387. More hearty in the Dutch war than the presbyterians, ibid. Disarm'd by R. Cromwell, 775. Many of them apprehended 695. The names of those concern'd in Hewit's plot, 707 & seq. Another list given in by Corker, 710. Informations about their private meetings, 712. About their designs against Cromwell, 713 & seq. And of their way-laying him to murder him, 716. Flock in crowds to king Charles, 717. Grow past all hopes, 718. Send Carlton to king Charles, 720. A pathetic letter to rouse them from their lethargy, 754. 756.

Causton, Elizabeth, ravished by two officers of the garrison of Dunkirk, 628.

Chambers, Mr. Laurence, his narrative concerning the murder of Mr. Ascham, 202.

Chambon, marquis of, in danger of being killed by the inhabitants of Bourdeaux for revolting from prince Conde, 304. Turns Oratorian fryar, ibid.

Chambré, mons. Menardeaux, appointed first president of the parliament of Bourdeaux, and intendant of the finances, 404.

Chambre-mipartie, order for erecting it, 533. Appointed to be held the first time at Mechlen, 543. And the next at Dort, 586. Advocates appointed to attend the judges of the said Chamber, 611. Dispute about the president-ship of it, 651.

Chancellor, Mr. 686. & seq.

Chancery, court of, bill for abrogating it, ordered, 577.

Chandenier, mons. de, refuses the recompence offered him for his place of captain of the guard of the French king's person, 647.

Chanut, mons. the French ambassador in Sweden, returns home, 263. Designed to be sent to the Hague, 436. His going thither deferred, 493. 549. Reason of it, ibid. A pass granted him to go thro' Flanders, 518. Sent to the Hague to obstruct the negotiations of peace between England and Holland, 562, 595. Suspected to stop at Brussels or Cambray, to negotiate a peace between the two crowns, 572. Arrives at the Hague. 593. Complies with the Demands of the States General touching the honours to be paid to their commissioners, ibid. Substance of his speech at his audience, ibid. His private instructions, 595. Refuses to give any propositions in writing, 598. Toasts king Charles the second's health, 599. Not in much credit with the States, 609. Continues in the character of an ordinary ambassador, 611. The chief end of his embassy, ibid. Not furnished with sufficient instructions, 625. Gives great hopes of the success of his negotiations, 626. His letter to Bordeaux in England, 627.

Charles I. king of England, sends a proclamation of pardon into Scotland, 2. The state and disposition of his army at Newcastle, 2, 3. His demands delivered to the parliament of Scotland, 8. His letter to the queen of Sweden in favour of the prince elector Palatine, 13. His answer to the proposition of the Scots commissioners appointed to mediate an accommodation between him and the parliament of England, 19. To their reply, 20. To their second reply, 23. Upon receiving the propositions presented to him at Oxford by the earl of Denbigh, 52. Desires a safe-conduct for the duke of Richmond and the earl of Southampton, to bring up his answer to the said propositions, ibid. Issues a proclamation for calling a parliament at Glasgow, 70. Persists in his resolution not to comply with the demands of the parliament, 85. Forms a design to escape out of the kingdom, ibid. Refuses to establish presbytery, and approve of the covenant, 87. His behaviour upon the arrival of the parliament's commissioners at Newcastle, 88. Substance of a letter sent by him to the queen, ibid. Disobliges the duke of Hamilton's party by the removal of the earl of Crawford, ibid. Writes to the earl of Loudon and Laneric to come to him with all expedition, 92. Not inclined to give Satisfaction in the articles agreed upon in the Isle of Wight, 93. Is taken from Holdenby by order of Oliver Cromwell, 95. Begins to hearken to the proposals of the army, 95, 96. Escapes to the Isle of Wight, 97. His letter to the committee of the parliament of Scotland, desiring an account of the condition of that kingdom, 103. Promotes the engagement in Scotland against the English, 105. Ordinance for his trial, and order for committing him close prisoner, 110. Proclamation, for bringing him to trial, made in Westminster-hall, 111. His children ordered to be sent out of the limits of the commonwealth, 158. English ambassadors at the Hague protest against his being styled Charles the first, 190.

Charles II. king of England, consents to the propositions tendered to him by the commissioners of Scotland, 147, seq. His letters to the committee of estates, after the defeat of the Scots army at Dunbar, 163, 164. Entertained in France, 233. Diverted from sending a minister to Rome for fear of losing his protestant party, 237. Betrayed by one of his privy council, 263. Declares his resolution of going out of France, 278. Reason of it, 311, 312. An instance of his interest at that court, 312. Prepares for Holland, 322. Reflection upon his and his ministers proceedings, 323. His Party at the Hague increase the hatred of the Dutch against the English, 342. Receives money for his journey from the French court, 314. 350. 354. Designs for the Palatinate, if disappointed of his expectations in Holland, ibid. Great confusion at his court, 345. Receives ten thousand crowns for his journey, 348. Refused a pass by the archduke, 354. Afterwards obtains it, 357. Intends for Scotland, ibid. Denied assistance by the diet of Ratisbon, 366. Stays in France to see the result of the treaty between England and Holland, 379, 389. His coming into Holland opposed by the States, 389. 405. Brought very low by a fever, 406. Some gentlemen suspected of designs in his favour, committed to the tower, 441,–42,–51,–52. His party in Holland animated by the news of commotions in the Highlands, 449. And dissuade the Dutch from making a peace with the English, ibid. Several officers sent to raise men for his service betrayed and committed to the tower, 453. Great endeavours used to prevail with the States General to espouse his interest, which succeed in part, 460. Proposals made to them by his agents, ibid. Recovers from his sickness, 480. His letter to the earl of Belcarres, representing the ill tendency of the diffension arisen between him and Glencairne, intercepted, 495. Expresses his satisfaction in Glencairne's taking the command of the forces in Scotland, ibid. and declares his suspicions of Bampfield, ibid. His commission to col. Hume intercepted, 503. And a letter to the earl of Athol, 553. Proposition in favour of him made by the king of Denmark to the States General, referred to a committee, 557. Endeavours to obstruct the peace between England and Holland, 562. Designs formed in his favour by France and Germany, 595. Establishes an admiralty at Brest, which is cashiered by the council, 609. Reported to be inclined to the opinion of the Jansenists, 618, Prepares to go into Germany, 625. Goes to the Jesuits chapel at Paris, 647. His court differently affected with the news of Cromwell's being appointed protector, 647. 650. He forms great hopes from it, 657. Is cheated by the French king, 660. His several letters, 661, & seq. On his return from the duke of York, ibid. Against his changing his religion, ibid. & seq. Apology for his own ill success, 662. To the princess of Orange, ibid. & seq. To the duke of York, 663. Private instructions to him, ibid. & seq. Abstract of his instructions to his several friends, 664. Is going to Bruges, 665. Arrival at Cologn, 666. Complimented by the archduke, 667. Censured for his kindness to Mrs. Barlow, 614. And for suffering his counsels to be betrayed, ibid. & seq. Warned against relying too much upon Spain, 685. Desired to meet the duke of York in Flanders, 690. Report of his being defeated before Mardyke, 693. Private departure from Flanders, 714. Speedily expected in England, 716. Receives money from Germany, 717. His descent into England deserred, 718, Meets Ormond and Hide at Antwerp, 728. Union with Spain, 741. The pope's great hopes of him, 742. Answer to lord Aubigny's proposal and instructions to Bellings, 744. & seq. A paper of advice to him how to be restored, 747. His conference with the archduke and others in Flanders, 752. A proposal for excluding him and his brothers from the crown, 753. Other treaties and negotiations with Spain, ibid. & seq.

Chartreux, abbey of, pillaged by prince Conde's forces, 387.

Chasteauneuf, mons. leaves mons. Bellievre his house called Mont-rouge, 638.

Chastillon, Madame de, concerned in some intrigues with prince Conde's party in the French court, 533. Set at liberty, 687. The conditions of it kept secret, 689.

Chastillon, besieged by the French troops, 349. Surrendered, 355, 356.

Chausne, chevalier de, proposes to deliver the citadel of Amiens to the French king, 349. Conditions of the surrender, ibid. The agreement made and executed, 449.

Chedle, sir Thomas, 81.

Cheisly, sir John. See Lothian. Dissents from the engagement in Scotland against England, 99. 104.

Chemish, sir Nicholas, 81.

Chesne, du, a shoemaker at Paris, apprehended for a design upon card. Mazarin, 532.

Chimilnisky, general of the Cossacks. See Cossacks. Imprisoned by his son in-law, 254. Distressed by the Transilvanians, 366. Sends relief to his son in-law which is deseated, 476.

Cholmley, lord, 81.

Christiani, Matheo, one of the Neapolitan banditti, executed, 434.

Christina, queen. See Sweden.

Church-government in England. See Religion. Votes of the two houses concerning it, 60. An order of the house of commons for taking it into consideration, 65. Propositions relating to an act for abrogating episcopal government out of the church of England, tendered to king Charles I. 80. And for establishing presbyterian government in England and Ireland, 83. With toleration of non-conformity under certain limitations, ibid. Reflections upon the English for want of church-government, 117.

Church lands in England, propositions relating to an act for disposal of them tendered to king Charles I. 80.

Chusac, a royalist officer in Holland, 752.

Cinque, Mr. Gerard, 339.

Clabourne, capt. William, one of the commissioners for reducing Virginia, 197.

Clanricar, lord, his death and character, 734.

Clare, earl of, 430.

Clayton, his conference with Wheeler, 714.

Clerecque, Nicolao, offers to put the English in possession of several towns in Zealand, 233.

Clergymen, proposition for incapacitating such as adhered to the enemies of the parliament, tendered to king Charles I. 81. and sequestering a third part of their estates, 82. Necessity of hindering the clergy from meddling with state affairs, 117.

Clerke, Mr. William, one of the judges of the admiralty in England, 165, 608.

Cleve. See Juliers.

Clye, capt. Jan, punishment inflicted on him for not doing his duty, 507.

Cockayn, George, 290.

Coen, Mr. Conradus, 430.

Coignac, marquis of, report of his being killed, contradicted, 638.

Colburne, Mr. one of the members of the first parliament called by Oliver Cromwell, 289.

Colchester, holds out against the parliament's forces, 98.

Cole, Sir Nicholas, 80.

Collins, Gyles, his letter concerning some affairs in Germany, 243.

Collison, Peter, his letter to Mr. Moulin intercepted, 426.

Cologne, elector of. See Treaty. Favours the French faction in the diet at Ratisbon, 238. Disputes with the elector of Mentz about the right of crowning the king of the Romans, 297. Presses the empire to be in arms, 505. Conjectures about the reason of it, ibid. Commissioners at the Hague, very ill satisfied. 597. Desire and obtain recredential letters, 611. Demand assistance against the troops of Lorrain quartered in the country of Leige, 651. but without effect, 651–52. Return home, 655.

Colpepper, sir John, one of king Charles the first's commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 56. Included in the first qualification of persons proposed to be proceeded against by the parliament, 80.

Comet, a surprizing one seen at Prague, 244.

Commissioners of accounts at Worcester-house, a particular of money discovered before them, 530,–31.

Common-prayer-book, use of it excepted out of the clause for toleration of non-conformity, 83.

Commons, house of, resolve to support the earl of Essex, 16. Concur with the lords in the instructions to the commissioners of both kingdoms concerning the king's propositions for peace, 65. Order major Rolph to be set at liberty upon bail, 98. Reflection upon that order, ibid. Vote the sending of a declaration to the general assembly of the kirk of Scotland, 99. Declare the Scots army under duke Hamilton, enemies to the kingdom, 99. Declare the people the original of all just power, and themselves the supreme authority of the kingdom, 110. See more under parliament of England.

Compeigne, garrison'd by prince Conde's forces, 261.

Conclubet, one of the Neapolitan banditti, executed, 434.

Conde, prince of, his letter to the English council of state, 237. The strength of his army, 287, 318, 327, 354, 389. Defeats the marquis d'Uxelles, 304. Proposition relating to him communicated to the French court by the pope's nuncio and Venetian ambassador, rejected, 336. Divides his army to make the French king do the like, 349,–88. Join'd by count Fuenseldagna, 354. Offers Turenne battle, 354, 355,–56, 576. Makes an attempt upon a castle between Picardy and Champagne, 356. Retires at the approach of Turenne's army, ibid. His picture burnt at Paris, 363. Reported to be taken prisoner, 379. His conduct censured of rashness by some, but applauded by cardinal Mazarin, 380. Gains the passage of Brest, 387. Commits great devastations, 387,–88. Desirous of peace, and fully empower'd to treat of it, 388. Marches to attack Turenne, 389,–97. Demands contribution of Budes, 405. Hires ten English ships to join the Spanish fleet, 408. Passes the Oyle to enter into Champagne, 446. Breaks the measures of the French court, 455. Dares Turenne to an engagement, ibid. Desires the king not to put some prisoners to death, and threatens, if he does, to do the like by all his prisoners, 504. Made governor of Rocroy, 505. Falls ill of a fever, ibid. Lies near Guise, 548. Disgusted with count Fuenseldagna for not furnishing him with money, 550. Marches to raise the siege of St. Menehould, 564, 570. But is hinder'd by indisposition, 613. Is in great want of money, 615. Quarrels with the duke of Lorrain about St. Menehould, 615, 618. His forces driven out of France, 625. Offers made him by the French court, ibid. Refuses to suffer his wife to come and live at Roctoy, on account of the air's not agreeing with her, 631. Talk of an agreement between him and the French court, ibid. Proceedings against him in the parliament of Paris, 634. 639. Recovers from his fever, and goes to take the air of Brussels, 646. The true reason of it, ibid. Report of his being gone for England, 660. And of his having proposed an alliance with the protector Cromwell's family, ibid. Offers his services to the princess of Orange, 701. Narrative of his negotiations with Oliver Cromwell, 759, 762.

Conde, princess of, embarks for Dunkirk after the taking of Bourdeaux, 379. Conducted to Valenciennes, 443. Desirous of coming to live with her husband at Rocroy, 631.

Coniers, his information to king Charles II. against lord Granard, 696.

Connell, Theodore, 407.

Constable, sir William, 79.

Constantinople, tumults there, occasion'd by the imposition of some new taxes, 434.

Conti, prince, 276, 379, 639, 747. Desired to join the Bourdelese, 347. Preparations for his marriage, 634. To have the rank of first prince of the blood upon the attainder of his brother, ibid.

Contreras, don Ferdinandez de, chief secretary of state to the king of Spain, 154.

Conway, lord, 598.

Cooke, Mr. one of the judges of the admiralty in England, 608.

Corbett, col. his proceedings in reducing the Highlands of Scotland, 478.
-, — Mr. Miles, one of the commissioners of Ireland, 631.

Cordeliers, celebrate a solemn mass for those that were kill'd in the battle in the suburbs of St. Anthony, 321.

Cork, bishop of. See Limerick.

Cornelys, capt. Adrian, 447.

Corsini, cardinal, the pope's nuncio at Avignon, 276.

Corver, mynheer, 447.

Cossacks. See Poland. Drive out their new hospodar, 254. Join'd by the Tartars, 321. Defeat a party of the king of Poland's forces, 333. Send commissioners to treat of peace, 346, 434. Reject the conditions offer'd by the king, 434. A party of them defeated by the prince of Transylvania, 476. Afraid to give the king of Poland battle, 476, 581.

Costa, abbot. See Longland.

Cottington, Francis lord, included in the first qualification of persons proposed to be proceeded against by the English parliament, 80. Resides at Madrid in quality of ambassador from king Charles II. 149. Disrespected by the court of Spain, 157.

Cotton, Mr. predicts great commotions in New England, 565.

Council of state, English, their memorial to the Spanish ambassador touching several injuries and abuses done to capt. Brooke and his company at Malaga, 175. Their order to the governor of the isle of Wight, upon information of the Scots army's marching towards England, 195. Appoint a committee to confer with the Dutch ambassadors, 201. Their several orders and resolutions relating to the same, 205, 206. Thank the king of Spain for the good offices done to capt. Badiley by the governor of Longone, 219. Their answer to a letter from the States General in relation to an accommodation between the two states, 239. Refuse to agree to a suspension of arms, 315. Their answer to a paper of the Dutch deputies relating to the release of prisoners on both sides, 354–93. Their number increased to thirty, 369–95. Names of some of them, ibid. Manner of addressing them, 369. Demand the release of Mr. Thomas Titus detained in Spain, 445. And the restitution of a ship belonging to Mr. Peter Butler of Boston in New England, 491. Disposed to a peace with the Dutch, 499, 521. A new one chosen, 576. Appoint a committee to take into consideration a paper of the Spanish ambassador, 579. Demand justice of the archduke against two officers of Dunkirk, 628. Order for the choice of a new council to be added to the lord governor, 632. Their names, 642.

Courtney, Mr. Hugh, extracts of several of his letters intercepted, 639, 640.

Coustures, family of, sent to the Bastile, 544. Petition to be tried by the great chamber, ibid.

Craven, lord, 237, 290, 313, 467. His report concerning Sestede, 704.

Craven, sir William, 313.

Crauford, earl of, removed by king Charles I. 88.
-, — Thomas, expelled Amsterdam, 114, 126, 128.

Crew, Mr. one of the parliament-commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 59.

Crisp, major, 478.
-, — Mrs. Grace, 484.
-, — Sir Nicolas, 81.

Crocker, Thomas, a letter of his intercepted, 645.

Crofts, Mr. King Charles II.'s ambassador in Poland, 554. His great services to him, 689–92–97.

Croissy, Mr. See Fouquet.

Cromwell, Oliver, his letter to Mrs. St. Johns, 1. Sequestred lands settled upon him by order of the house of commons, 75. Sent with Ireton to reduce the forces ordered to be disbanded, 94. Relation of their practices upon the army and the king, 94, seq. His maxims and principles, 97, 98. His letter to the lord Wharton, 99. To the marquis of Argyle and other Scots noblemen upon his approach with an army to the borders of Scotland, 100. To the commissioners of estates shewing the reasons of the same, ibid. Demands the restitution of the garrisons of Berwick and Carlisle to the parliament of England, 101. His letter to the earl of Loudoun after the defeat of duke Hamilton, ibid. Sends a summons to the garrison of Berwick, ibid. Marches into Scotland, 102. Promises justice for some disorders committed by part of his army, 103. Ordered to assist the Scots who dissented from the engagement, if desired, 105. Gives liberty to the ministers of Edinburgh to preach in their several churches, 158. Several letters between him and the governor of Edinburgh castle relating to that affair, 159. seq. Demands justice against two persons for divers murders committed upon his men, 171. His letter to general Lesly about the exchange of some prisoners, 172. To the register of Scotland about restoring the records of the kingdom, 177. Made commander in chief of all the parliament's forces, 212. Appoints major general Fleetwood his lieutenant in Ireland, ibid. Dissolves the parliament, 236. Publishes a declaration of the form of government he intends to establish, 240. His picture set up at the Royal Exchange, 249. Difficulties attending his administration, 254. Refuses to confer with the French ambassador Bordeaux, 260. His inclination to a peace with the Dutch, suspected, 267. Rallied upon account of the queen of Sweden, ibid. Summons col. Sydenham to attend the parliament called by him and the council, 274. Form of his warrants for that purpose, 289. Advised to endeavour to prevent king Charles II's leaving France, 312. Inclined to assist prince Conde, if assured of his really aiming at liberty, 320. Thought to have a design to lay down his commission of general, and receive another title, 323. Is for reducing the Dutch, in order to establish himself in his government, 325. Substance of his speech to the new parliament, 338. Chosen to sit in their assembly, ibid. Writes very civilly to cardinal Mazarine, 346–47–57. Suspected of an intrigue with him, 347. Does not answer prince Condé, ibid. Shews much affection to him at first, ibid. A burlesque-dialogue betwixt him and the parliament at their dissolution, printed at the Hague, 361. Highly applauded by the king and princes of Germany, 366–99, Subject of his speech to the Dutch commissioners at a conference, 367. Proposes a coalition of the two nations, 386–94. Dissatisfied with the new parliament, 384–85. Accuses the Dutch of insincerity, 395. Narrative of his proceedings in the change of the constitution, ibid. Substance of a conference between him and Beverning, one of the Dutch deputies, relating to the proposed coalition, 417, 18, 38. Promises; as it is said, not to send any ships to the assistance of the Spaniards, 422, 36. Grows more moderate with respect to the treaty with the Dutch, 460, 521. Parts with Newhall in Essex to the state for Hampton-court, 477. Libelled by the malecontents in the army, 501. Blamed for complying too easily with the Dutch, 559. Advised to provide against the prevailing factions in the kingdom by a settled form of religion and government, 591. His illness occasions a delay in the treaty, 584. Substance of his Speech at another conference with the Dutch deputies, 600, 601. Declares himself not bound to any parts of the treaty, if not signed before the departure of the Dutch deputies, 607. Receives great opposition from Harrison and the Anabaptists, 612, 621. His behaviour at a conference with Beverning, 616. Substance of what passed between him and some of the chief persons concerned in the meeting at Blackfryars, 621. His proceedings with the officers of the army in settling the government after the voluntary dissolution of the parliament, 632. Reports spread of his intending to call home king Charles II. 633. Is proclaimed lord protector, 639. Behaviour of the people thereat, 641. Orders relating to the manner of his being addressed by foreign ministers, 644. Said to be desirous of the title of king, ibid. Continued general of the three kingdoms, 645. Reflections upon his surprizing dexterity and success, 651. His policy to prevent all accommodation between king Charles I. and the Presbyterians, 754. His negotiations with France and Spain, 759–62. His picture, 766.
-, — William, his letter to lord Craven intercepted, 313. Employed by Oliver Cromwell about business of great secrecy in Denmark, 458. Shipwrecked upon the coast of Norway, ibid. Applies to Mr. Bradshaw at Hamburgh for relief thereupon, ibid.
-, — Henry, his congratulation on the victory over the Spaniards, 730, & seq. His thanks and profession of loyalty to king Charles II. 763.
-, — Richard, design'd to be murder'd by four Papists, 666. Reports about his warring against Spain, 668 & seq. Speech to the Brandenburgh envoy, 674. Characterized by the queen of Bohemia, ibid. & seq. Resolved to ruin Spain, 677. Ratification of the French peace, 690 Likely to agree with Spain, 690, 693. Yet suspected to amuse them, 698. Expected to besiege Zealand, 709. Articles of peace proposed to him from Spain, 705, & seq. A new design against his life, 716, & seq. Doubles his guards, 720. His instructions to the commanders of the expedition to the Manhatto's, 721. To the governors of the English colonies in America, ibid. & seq. To that of Virginia in favour of lord Baltimore, 724. To general * *, ibid. & seq. Leaves it to his discretion whether or no to fight the Spaniards, 725. Letter to Henry Cromwell in Ireland, ibid. & seq. Refuses to send more troops to the French, 740. Contrives new oaths to bind the Papists, 740. The many sects thriving under him, 743. Letter to Hamet Bassa, on the peace concluded with him, 745. His arbitrary proceedings against the parliament, &c. an argument for restoring K. Charles, 747. Account of the chief cavaliers concerned in the plot against him, 748—750. Vindication of his proceedings in a speech to the speaker, 751. Burlesqued in a Dutch book sent to him, 752. How he might wholly exclude the royal family from the crown, 753. In great want of men and money, 755. & seq. Speech to the committee of parliament, 756. & seq. His character drawn by Maidstone, 766.

Cruyck, capt. 33, 496.

Culpepper, lord, 705, & seq.

Cuningham, Mr. Alexander, list of arms brought home by him, 170.
-, — Thomas, 17.

Curtz, col. sent from the duke of Holstein into England, 404. Subject of his commission, 499, 523. Receives a pension from the queen of Sweden, 519, 523.

Cusack, Mr. sent by the duke of Lorrain to general Cromwell, with a proposal of joining against the Dutch, 318, 332.

Custaries, Mr. 172.

Cyprus, great alterations there, occasion'd by the imposition of some new Taxes, 434.

D.

Dacres, Francis lord, one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Dantzick, a tumult there, occasion'd by the Jesuits, 333. Much afflicted with the plague, 433, 490, 517. The magistrates protect the English against the king of Poland's order for seizing their effects, 654. Not included in the Koningsberg treaty, 702.

Darby, Mr. Henry, 79.

Darcey, sir James, short stay at Paris, 733.

Darcy, col. imprison'd at Madrid, 479.

Darmsted, count de, defeats a party of la Ferte's forces, and joins prince Conde, 349. His daughter design'd to be married to the duke of Newburgh, 399.

Davidson, William, corresponds with king Charles II. 508.

Davis, Mr. Edward, his petition, complaining of the governor of St. Sebastian's seizing his ship, referr'd to the English council of state, 631, 632.

Dean, col. inform'd against by Corker, 709. His design against R. Cromwell discover'd, 712. Makes his escape, 714, 717. A list of the persons concern'd with him in the plot, 750 & seq.

Deane, col. join'd in commission with Blake and Mountagu, 167. Honourably buried by the state, 316. Large provision made for his widow and children, 339.

Deans. See Church-government.

Debts, public, proposition touching the payment of them tender'd to king Charles I. 78, 83.

Dees, Mr. 407.

Denbigh, earl of, sent to king Charles I. at Oxford, with propositions from the parliament, 52. One of the parliament commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 59.

Denham, Mr. John, 81, 471.

Denis, capt. Robert, one of the commissioners for reducing Virginia, 197.

Denmark, king of. See Treaty. Seizes several English ships in the Sound, 266. Supported by the Dutch, ibid. Hesitates about lending them some of his ships, 266, 314, 321, 333, 342, 439. Conditions demanded by him, 267, 329, 42. In great fear of the English, 267, 321, 333, 342. Sends a plenipotentiary to his ambassador in Sweden, 287. Thanks the States General for their care of his interest in the treaty resolved upon with England, 304. His ships unfit for sailing, 329. Reflections upon his exactions in the Sound, 342. Makes preparations to oppose the English, 357. Grows cool in the business of king Charles and the Dutch, 367, 439. Suffers the English to trade to Norway, 410. His sea captains frighted with the apprehensions of the Swedish fleet being come against them, 423. But undeceived, ibid. Promises to grant letters of mart to his subjects against the English, ibid. Displeased with the Dutch for treating with the English, 439. Desires to be comprehended therein, ibid. The negotiation about his ships broken off, 450. Unwilling to engage farther against the English, but professes a constant friendship for the States General, 461. Jealous of the duke of Holstein's sending an ambassador into England, ibid. Desires his agent may pass among the retinue of the Dutch deputies, upon their return to England, ibid. Promises to assist the Dutch fleet with a convoy, 486. Begins to hearken to proposals of amity with the English, 497. Desires an answer from the queen of Sweden concerning the common alliance, and the adjusting of the dispute between her and the duke of Holstein, 506. Endeavours to break the treaty betwixt England and Holland, 514. Points relating to him referr'd to the consideration of the States General, 546. Resolutions thereupon, 548, 549, 557, 560, 561. Presses the States General to secure him against the resentment of the English, 572. Greatly embarrass'd by the disappointment of assistance from the Dutch, 608. A contribution made in Denmark towards maintaining a fleet, 617. Desires a pass for a minister to be sent into England, 651, 655. Sends a new embassy to Holland, 699.
-, — ambassadors of, at London, desire audience of leave, 217.
-, — in Sweden, sollicits the queen's assistance against the English, in vain, 426. Desires audience, which is deferr'd, 506. Reason of it, ibid. Obtains it, 654.

Derby, James earl of, included in the first qualification of persons proposed to be proceeded against by the English parliament, 80.

Derry, bishop of. See Bramball.

Desborough, col. one of the commissioners appointed to confer with the Dutch deputies, 308. His relationship to Cromwell, ibid. Chosen to sit in the first parliament call'd by Cromwell, 339. His orders touching some lands belonging to sir Gilbert Gerard in the isle of Ely, 358. One of the council of state, 369, 95.

Desson, mons. contrives a machine for destroying the English fleet, 521, 541. Compared to Don Quixot, 572. Laugh'd at by the French, 595. Insulted at Rotterdam for not perfecting it, 629.

Diamond, a venerable old gentleman, unjustly detain'd in a dungeon, 746.

Digby, George lord, included in the first qualification of persons proposed to be proceeded against by the English parliament, 80. His interest at the French court decreases, 354.
-, — sir John, 81.
-, — sir Kenelme, a letter to him intercepted, 274.

Dillon, sir James, surrenders the sort of Ormond to the duke of Vendosme, 286. Goes into Catalonia to draw the Irish into the design of invading Ireland, 619. Reported to be kill'd, ibid.

Dine, father, the French king's confessor, dies, 660.

Divines, assembly of, order for calling them deliver'd to the king's commissioners at Uxbridge, 62. Desired to send in what remain'd concerning church-government, 65.

Dobbins, Mr. Joseph. See Cardenas.

Doddington, sir Francis, 80.

Doleman, 296. col. several of his letters intercepted, 300, 302, –13, –38, –94, 420, –21, –31, –32. His affairs recommended to De Witt. 576.

Dona, earl of. See Holland.

Dorislaus, Dr. memorial relating to his murder, deliver'd to the States General, 174. His ghost introduced in a mock dialogue betwixt O. Cromwell and the parliament, at their dissolution, 364.
-, — Isaac, his letter to secretary Thurloe, 303. Sends him an intercepted letter, 480.

Dort, a city the most republican, 329, 334. Commonalty disposed to raise commotions in favour of the prince of Orange, 329, 364. Incensed against De Witt, 364.

Doublet, mynheer, one of the judges of the chambre-mipartie, 611.

Douglas, col. commendation of him, 46. One of the commissioners of war for the shire of Elgin, 170.

Doujat, Mons. endeavours to gain the discharge of Mons. Fouquet, 623.

Downing, Mr. scout-master general under O. Cromwell, 519, 523.

Dowthwaite, Nicholas, his examination, 409.

Drummond, sir John, brought off from the Irish rebels, 53.
-, — col. William, 174, 502. His letter to the earl of Glencairne intercepted, 585.

Drumore, bishop, his journey to Cologn, 734. His intelligence justly suspected, 736, 738. Great pretensions of zeal for king Charles, 739, 740.

Duels, declaration against them by the French king, 659.

Duir, col. goes into Ireland to transport men for the earl of Castlehaven, 245. Quarrels with Owens about it, 262.

Dumfermling, earl of, 6. Offers king Charles I. to assist him in his escape, 87.

Dunbar, battle of. See Leslie, David, and Charles II.

Dunbar, Robert, his account of the dispersing and disbanding of a troop raised by him at the command of the parliament of Scotland, 168.

Dundas, William, governor of Edinburgh Castle, 159. See Cromwell Oliver.

Dunkirk, complaint of several English prizes being brought in and sold there, and at Ostend, 115. Privateers do great mischief to the English trading to those parts, 117. Several flying reports concerning its siege, 693, & seq.

Dunsmore, lord, one of king Charles the First's Commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 56.

Dupplin, lord, brought off from the Irish rebels, 53.

Duras, marquis de, 504.

Dutch. See States General and Treaty. Represented as designing and insincere, 186. Form a design upon the Isle of Wight, 214. Beaten by the English, 235. Punishment inflicted upon some of their officers for not doing their duty, 236, 294, 340, 507. Reflections upon their vanity and confidence, 267. Worsted again by the English, 270, seq. Several accounts of that engagement, 272, 273, 279, seq. 284. Their preparations for fitting out another fleet, 279, & seq. Slow in their proceedings, 280. Discontented with the government, 281, 330, 558. Narrative of their proceedings and behaviour towards the English, 290, seq. Condition of their fleet, 296, 298, 299, 330, 341. Dutch styled the enemy of mankind, 298. Reasons assign'd by them for their defeat, 299. In general favour the house of Orange, 307, 329. Their fleet inferior to that of the English, 314. Guard their coasts for fear of the English, 317, 325, 328. Boors refuse to march without the prince of Orange's colours, 317, 329. Send to Dantzick for naval stores, 321. Extenuate their loss in the engagement with the English, ibid. Desire some of the king of Denmark's large ships, ibid. Resolve to hazard another battle, 325. Prisoners how treated in England, 331, 477. Sent to several parts of the kingdom, 338. Reason of it, 354. Their commerce greatly interrupted, 340. Reflection upon the humour of the commonalty, ibid. Grow more incensed against the English; 342. Magnify the strength of their new fleet, 346, 399. Reflections upon their views in treating with the English, 355, seq. Prisoners refuse to work, 358. Number and strength of the Dutch fleet, 359, 374, 383. Prisoners in England said to be sent to serve on board the fleet against their will, 369. Employ'd to man the ships design'd for Bourdeaux, 370. Encouragement given by the States to the Dutch seamen, 375, 384, 398. Beaten again by the English, 392. Glad of the surrender of Bourdeaux, 398. Various reports of the success of the last battle, 401, et passim. Several wagers laid about it, 443, seq. Jealous of the king of Denmark, 410. Their objections to the proposed coalition, 410, 436, 438, 471. Their loss in the last battle, 411, 421, 448. Proceed slowly in refitting their fleet, and building new ships, 411, 421. Reason of it, ibid. Condition and number of their fleet after the last battle, 411, seq. 460, 464, 466, 531, 239, seq. In great want of seamen, 414. Prepare a fleet to convoy their merchant-ships from the Sound, ibid. seq. Take several English prizes, 413, 447, 448, 490. Claim the victory in the last battle, 413, seq. Dutch congregation at London complain of the great burden of supporting the prisoners, 415. Representations of the miserable condition of the said prisoners, 415, 428, 429, 431, 441, 452, 453, 477, 499, 634. Proposal relating to the transportation of such of them as should be released, 415. Their number, 420. Boast of beating the English in the East Indies, 421. High wages given to their seamen, ibid. Order publick thanks for their success, 427, 475. Dissatisfied with the conduct of their deputies in England, 430, 490. Prisoners in England desire leave to go abroad upon bail, 431, 441. Commissioners at the Helder desire to be call'd home, 434. Sum appointed to be paid for the transport of every prisoner from England, 439. Fleet fails from the Texel, 447. Form great expectations from their treaty with France, 447, 450. Proceedings against the officers accused of cowardice, 447, 507. Spread reports of the king of Denmark's having declared war against England, 448. In great hopes of new troubles in England, 449. Many of them for espousing the interest of king Charles II. ibid. Prisoners in England carried about to be shewn, 453. Commissioners at the Helder propose the putting out of false lights to deceive the English, 460. Fleet unprovided of ammunition and men, 460. 483. People abused with false reports of Tromp's dying victorious, 463. Grow indifferent about a peace with England, 474. Sickness among the prisoners in England, 477, 484. Several of them escape, ibid. Some members of the state suspected of a design to return to the obedience of Spain, 493. Some provinces inclined to a league with France as well against Spain as England, ibid. Jealous of the Hollanders having underhand dealings with England, 494. Willing to contribute towards the war against England, 508, 514. They and Denmark form a design to hinder all trade betwixt England and Hamburgh, 508. Grow haughty upon the arrival of their merchant ships from the Sound, 513. Prisoners many of them released, 527, 530, 573, 582. Afraid of the queen of Sweden, 540. Jealous of the provinces of Westphalia, 541. Differently affected towards a peace with England, 550. Reflections upon their behaviour and designs in the treaty, 558, 560. Disoblige the Swedes by their attachment to Denmark, 558. In New England supply the Indians with fire-arms, 565. Fleet terribly damaged by a storm, 569, seq. 574, seq. Preachers rail against the English, and dissuade the people from a peace, 571, 574. Order'd to form their sermons and prayers according to the sea occurrences, 572. Number of Dutch prisoners remaining in England, 576. Particulars of the damage sustain'd by the storm, 582. Their answers to the reasons of the war alledged by the English; 587. Reasons inducing them to a peace, ibid. Desirous of an offensive and defensive league with France, 595. Render'd incapable of assisting Denmark, by the storm, 608. Strengthen the pirates at Brest, 609. Unwilling to engage in the defence of Liege, 611. Forbid to carry any provisions to the Lorrainers, 612. Afraid of the king of Spain, ibid. Different opinions about the change of the government in England, 655. Indifferent to king Charles's service, 699. Their settlements in Manhattoes to be invaded by England, 721. Dutch war dear to the English, 747, 754 & seq. To be frighted into a peace, 756.

Dutch, envoy to the Czar of Muscovy, his instructions, 196.
-, — ambassador at London. See Paw.
-, — at Paris. See Boreel.
-, — in Sweden. See Beuningen.
-, — Resident in Denmark. See Uries.
-, — at London. See Joachimi.
-, — Commissioner in Denmark. See Keyser.

Dutch, deputies sent into England to negotiate a peace, substance of their instructions, 299. Their first conference with the council of state, 308, seq. Their second conference, 316. Desire further instructions touching the bu siness of Denmark, ibid. Recommend secrecy to the States General, 317, seq. Resolve not to visit the Portugal ambassador, ibid. Reason of it. ibid. Substance of some conferences between them and the ministers of Sweden and the Swiss Cantons, 323. Some account of their other proceedings and observations, ibid. & seq. Desire letters of credence to the new parliament, 324. Condole with the Portugal ambassador upon the death of the king's eldest son, ibid. Return a present sent them by him, ibid. Desire a speedy answer to their proposals, 337. Their account of some proceedings in the English parliament, 338, 369. Their actions narrowly inspected, 339. Difficulties attending their negotiations, 340. Said to desire a pass to return home, which is denied them, 362. Oppose the manning of the ships design'd for Bordeaux, with Dutch prisoners, 370. Substance of some other conferences with the English commissioners, 370, 372. Desire to separate, ibid. Obtain no determinate answer, 371. Not properly instructed, 371, 374. Sollicit the release of the Dutch prisoners, 378. Substance of their answer to the proposal of a coalition, 381, 382. Desire leave to depart, ibid. Memorandum of some particulars of their negotiations, not comprehended in their general report, 394. Their account of the government and state of affairs in England, 395, seq. Two of them return home, 401. Those at London employ a person to inform them of the condition of the English fleet, 404. Substance of the report of their negotiations made at the Hague, 410. Their several representations of the miserable condition of the Dutch prisoners, 415, et passim. Their proposal touching the transportation of such of them as could be released, 415. Their account of the condition of the English fleet, 428, 441. Reason of their staying in England, 438. Report of their negotiations referred to commissioners, 439. Desire instructions relating to the proposal of the Portugal ambassador, 440. Their encomium upon Tromp, 441. Adjudged to have exceeded their instructions, 448. Complain of the opening of their letters, 451, 467. Have no orders to treat with the Portugal ambassador, 463. Write to the States General in behalf of an English merchant kept prisoner at Hoorne, 486. Acquaint them of the dispositions of the English towards a peace, 499. Agree upon an exchange of prisoners, 515, 523. Desire safe-conducts for them, 519, 529, 537, seq. The two deputies in Holland return, 549. Their instructions, 550. Conference between them and some of the English commissioners, 576. Their conference with the Swedish ambassador, 583, seq. Their advice touching his reception in case of his landing in any of the Dutch ports, 584. Substance of two conferences with Cromwell and the council of state, 600, 601. Sworn to secrecy, 614. Alledge that as the reason of their not communicating the particulars of their negotiations, ibid. Refuse to continue the treaty upon the terms proposed by the English, 616. Their conference with some commissioners of the protector's council, 643, seq. Demand a speedy and positive answer, ibid. Reason of their desiring commis sioners to conclude their negotiations, 644. An instance of their correspondence in the council, 646. Their letter to the protector desiring a safe-conduct for their return, 650. To secretary Thurloe about the same, ibid.
-, — commissioners to the king of Portugal, how received, 449, 461. Their letter to him recommending an amicable determination of the differences between them, 457. Their instructions, 468. Return without effecting any thing, 481.

Duxell, marquis of, besieges Beffort, 639.

E.

East India company, Dutch, take and destroy several English ships in the river God, 246. Refuse to unload their outward-bound ships, without advance-money, 329, 330. Order of the States General thereupon, 375.
-, — ships, appointed to serve as men of war, 340. Some of them unfit to fight, 383. Arrive in the Sound, 412, 415. Great part of them said to be taken by the English, 423. Unlade at Copenhagen, 433. Stay in the Sound for a convoy, 443. Part of them arrive in Holland, 513. Punishment inflicted upon several seamen for endeavouring to fire one of them, and preventing her engaging against the English, 523. Commander represents the English as very weak in the East Indies, 573, 574.

Eck, mynheer, sent with a commission from the States of Guelderland to Essen, 499.

Edinburgh, castle of. See Treaty.
-, — city of, instructions for putting the articles therein mentioned, for preventing disturbances there, in execution, 14, 15.

Edward, prince Palatine. See English ambassadors.

Elbeuf, duke de, defeated in attempting to intercept some convoys going to the Spanish army before Rocroy, 475.

Elgin, shire, proceedings of the commissioners of war in raising levies there, 170.

Elliot, Thomas, gentleman of the bed-chamber to king Charles II. His memorial to the king of Portugal, desiring the liberty of the ports of that kingdom, 139. Answer of the king of Portugal's secretary thereto, ibid.

Eltonhead, Mr. Edward, warrant for swearing him a master in Chancery, 85.

Ely, Isle of. See Bedford.
-, — bishop of. See Wren.

Emperor, Mr. W. an intelligencer at Rotterdam, 117.
-, — of Germany. See Germany.

Enchuysen, declares for the prince of Orange, 295. Tumult raised there by his party, 300. Refuses to admit the garrison of the States of Holland, 315. Or the deputies sent to appease the tumult, 317. Accepts a Frize garrison, 318. States of Holland desired not to quarter any soldiers there. 364. Stratagem used to get soldiers into it, 447. Further measures taken to secure it, 459. Proceedings against the authors of the insurrection, 459. 465. A great change in affairs there, 498.

Engagement, in Scotland against England. See Treaty, and Scots.
-, — to the new government in England, act for subscribing it, annulled in part, 583.

England, See Treaty.
-, — king of, See Charles I. and II. Declared bound to give his assent to such laws as the parliament judge to be for the good of the kingdom, 77.
-, — New, representation of the dangerous situation of affairs therein, 564, 565.

English, very formidable at sea, 244. Grounds of the War between them and the Dutch, 291. Refuse to agree to a cessation of arms. 307. Incensed against Denmark, 316. Block up the Dutch ports, 317, 324, 346. Miscarry in their attempt to surprise the fort of Delfsyl, 317. Let slip several advantages gained against the Dutch, 325. Strength of the English navy, 330, 359. Part of it thought to be in the interest of king Charles II. 331. English very quiet under their new government, 339. Form great expectations from the troubles in Holland, 340. Demand security and cautionary towns of the Dutch, 341, 342. Occasion the taking of Dunkirk, 344. Prisoners, ill-treated by the Dutch, 354, 393. Observations upon their interest to endeavour to weaken France, 355. Their Correspondence at the Hague discovered, 359, 377. Aim at a coalition of the two commonwealths, 362, 372, 382, 386. And the suppression of the house of Orange, 367. Prepare relief for Bourdeaux, 367, 370. Labour incessantly in equiping and strengthening their fleet, 370, 416. Account of the form and constitution of the English government after the dissolution of the parliament by Oliver Cromwell, 395. English commonwealth, by whom first acknowledged, 396. Observations upon the proposed coalition of England and Holland, 410. Objections to it, ibid. & 436, 463, 471, 520. English jealous of the prince of Orange, 410. Their loss in the last battle, 415, 416, 420, 427. Rewards given to their officers and seamen, ibid. Condition and strength of the fleet after the last battle, 427, 441, 583. Officers said to be bound by an oath not to suffer themselves to be taken, 438. Method used by them for guarding the sterns of their ships, 441. Take several of the Dutch ships coming from the Sound, 448, 471. Press seamen into the fleet against their will, 453. English fleet in the East Indies joined by the Portuguese, 461. Considerations upon their interest with regard to Holland, and the Orange party, 462. And in relation to alliances, 463. Put another fleet to sea, ibid, & 467. Very strict in relation to the exchange of prisoners, 477. Means used by the government for raising money, 477, 518. Fleet much damaged in a storm, 500. Grow disposed to a peace with the Dutch, 519. Complain of delays in their proceedings, 542. Blamed for boasting of their intelligence at the Hague, 542, 551. Threaten to invade France in case of a peace with Holland, 548. Cautioned against the designs of the Dutch in the treaty, 558, 560. Make reprisals upon the French, 561. Cautioned against card. Mazarin, 562. Weak in the East Indies, 573, 574. Seamen mutiny, 576. Punishment inflicted upon some of them, ibid. Appeased, 577. Many of them desert, 582, seq 585. Claim the sovereignty of the seas, 616. Endeavour to exclude the prince of Orange from being stadtholder of the United Provinces, ibid. Form of government established after the voluntary dissolution of the parliament, 632. Impoverished by the civil wars, but more by the loss of their trade, 633. In general dissatisfied with Cromwell's being made protector, 639, 640, 641. Remarks upon the change in the English government, 647, seq. Represented as imperious and unjust in their demands on the Dutch, 653, 656.

English, commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.
-, — ambassadors, at the Hague. See Treaty. Demand justice against the murderers of Dr. Dorislaus, 174. Remonstrate against Van Tromp's coming with a fleet to the Islands of Scilly, 177. Substance of several conferences between them and the commissioners of the States General, 179, 183, 188, 190. Demand justice against Edward, prince Palatine, for an abuse done to them, 179. Their orders to return countermanded, 181, 182. Their answer to the queen of Bohemia's letter, and the order of the States thereupon, 189. Their declaration at their audience of leave, 191. Recapitulation of their proceedings, 193, seq.
-, — ambassador at Constantinople. See Witch.
-, — — in Sweden. See Whitelocke.
-, — — in Denmark. See Wentworth.
-, — resident at the Hague. See Boswell and Strickland.
-, — — at Bruxells. See Thellwall.
-, — — at Lisbon. See Vane Charles.
-, — — at Madrid. See Ascham and Fisher.
-, — agent in Holland, complains of ships there for king Charles's service, 664.
-, — — at Lisbon, abused, 727.
-, — council of state. See Council.

Enguien, duke of, 276, 380.

Episcopacy. See Church-government.

Errington, Mr. Thomas, sends intelligence of some proceedings of king Charles's party in Scotland, 635.

Erskine, Charles, 52. Sent to king Charles I. with propositions from the parliament, 67.

Espernon, duke de, commands the French troops at the siege of Bellegarde, 261. A reflection upon him, 285. Made governor of Bourdeaux, 388. Offers to quit his government of Burgundy to have that of Guienne, 623. Is refused, ibid. Offered the government of Auvergne, ibid. Falls sick upon it, ibid.

Essen, council of, resolve to turn the Dutch garrisons out of several towns in Westphalia, 486. Proceedings of the States General and the States of Guelderland thereupon, 486, 499, 518. The affair slighted by the States, 541.

Essex, earl of, chosen captain general of the parliament-forces, 16. Letter to prince Rupert, 55.

Estrade, sieur de, equips a small fleet for the assistance of Vendosme, 548. Unable to fight for want of sailors, ibid. Made mayor of Bourdeaux during life, 590.

Etrick, capt. punishment insticted upon him for not doing his duty, 508.

Evans, Merlinus, pretends to predict the fall of the English government, 408, 409.

Evertson, vice-admiral, 236. In great danger in the last battle between the English and Dutch, 392. His encomium upon admiral Tromp, 411. Refuses to serve under de Witt, 411, 422, 497, 510. Hindered from going to sea by his son's danger of dying of his wounds, 447. Chosen lieut. admiral of Zealand, 449, 571. Declines going to meet de Witt, 499. Demands the second rank in the Dutch fleet, 558.
-, — capt. Cornelius, taken prisoner by the English, 429. binds himself, with others, by an oath, not to endeavour to escape, 452.

Examination impartial, a book so called, printed in Holland, 328.

Exton, Mr. one of the judges of the admiralty, 165.

Eynde, Vander, sent by the States General into Ireland, 114. Subject of his commission, 121.

F.

Faber, sent to quarter the Lorrain troops, 689.

Fairfax, lord, 47. Two regiments of his horse beaten out of their quarters at Ferry-brigs, 48. Desires some of the Scots forces at the siege of Newcastle to stop their farther progress, ibid. Breaks through the king's forces with his horse, 49. His foot march peaceably to Southampton, ibid. Joined by the earl of Manchester and Wallis's forces, ibid. His letter to the commissioners of both kingdoms, concerning a letter received by him from the prince of Wales, 72. One of the commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Fairfax, sir Thomas, 75.

Fara, marquis of, governor of Roses, 344.

Faro, don, thought too liberal of his promises to king Charles II. 699. Gives fresh ones to Sestede, 703.

Faure, marquis de, governor of St. Menehould, accepts the French king's amnesty, with consent of prince Conde, 608. Arrives at Paris, 631. Designed to be sent to his government again, ibid.

Fawles, Mr. complained of by Bradshaw, 492.

Feak, Mr. chief of the anabaptist-preachers at Black-friars, London, questioned before a committee of council, 621. His answer to the charge against him, ibid. He, and Powell, committed to the custody of the serjeant at arms, 641. Their bitter invectives against Oliver Cromwell, ibid.

Feeld, John, his letter to Mr. Franklin, intercepted, 386.

Felix don, 245.

Fenwick, sir John, 79.
-, — George, ibid.

Fere, garrison of. See Manicamp. Surrenders to the French king, 378.

Ferte, Senneterre, marshal de, besieges Rhetel, 319. Obliged to retire, 322. Challenges marshal Turenne, 478. Marches to hinder the duke of Lorrain's quartering in Lorrain and Alsace, 615.

Fiesque, marquis de, brings relief to Bourdeaux, 350. His harangue to the Bourdelois in order to prevail upon them to accept it, 363.

Fielder, Mr. letters from him intercepted, 516, 526.

Fienne, madame, 676. Corresponds with king Charles II. 686.

Finch, col. concealed at sir Stephen Lenard's, 749.

Fisher, Mr. George, his account of the murder of Mr. Ascham at Madrid, 148. Treated with great civility by the king of Spain, 149. Represents the necessity of sending some person in private thither, to transact the business of the state, 152. In great danger of his life, 152, 153, 157. Advises the parliament to an union with Spain, 154, 155. Desires leave to return home, 157. Letters between him and Mr. Kendall concerning the artillery of some men of war wrecked at Malaga, 180 His reflections upon the behaviour of the court of Spain in relation to Mr. Ascham's murderers, 181. Defers his return upon their condemnation, 189.

Fishery, English, said to be yielded to Dunkirk, 329. Article about it propounded to the Dutch deputies, 616. Stops the progress of the treaty, 624.

Fitzgerald, Richard, killed at the taking of Bourg, 332.

Fitzpatrick, colonel, 332. Imprisoned at Madrid, 479. Comes to Paris, 736.

Fleed, mynheer, endeavours to raise a tumult at Rotterdam in favour of the prince of Orange, 447. Cited to appear, under pain of banishment, ibid.

Fleetwood, major-general Charles, appointed Oliver Cromwell's lieutenant in Ireland, 212. One of the commismissioners of that kingdom, 631. Chosen captain-general of the forces of the three kingdoms, 767.

Fleming, sir Oliver, master of the ceremonies to the English council of state, 132, 201. & passim.

Fletcher, Mr. a letter to him intercepted, 367, seq.

Floyd, sir Charles, presents a book to king Charles II. 752.

Foard, Mr. declared a traitor by the parliament of England, 118. Proposed to be brought again into the company of English merchants at Rotterdam, ibid.

Forfar, commissioners of, their proceedings in levying forces, 170.

Fortescue, sir Edmund, 81.
-, — Mr. Anthony, the duke of Lorrain's resident at London, affronted, 137.

Forthia, monsieur de. See Poictiers.

Fortune-teller, a famed one recommended to king Charles II. 678. By lord Jermyn, 691.

Fortuyn, capt. Andries, taken prisoner by the English, 429.

Foster, John, a fictitious person, offers to make great discoveries to Thurloe, 75, seq.

Foucaut, marshal de, alias count d'Oignon, comes to Paris by order of the French king, 622.

Fouquet, Mr. procureur general of France, 261. Quarrel between him and his brother, which is with difficulty made up by the queen, 276. One of the deputies appointed to confer with the Dutch ambassador Boreel, 354.
-, — monsieur Croissy, proceedings against him, 261. An order of council touching him and other state prisoners, 379. Address to the French king about him resolved by the parliament of Paris, 621. Probability of his release, 623.

Fox, friar Francis, sent by the Popish clergy of Ulster to the king of Spain to represent their sufferings, 221. Dies 222.

Foxley, Mr. employed by Mr. Charles Gerrard to purchase his father's forfeited lands, 307.

Francfort, conclave of, assembled, 740.

Francis, of Lorrain. See Lorrain.

Frazer, Dr. goes to king Charles II. at Paris, 432. Indisposed, ibid. Negotiates an interview for him with the French court, 697. Causes some discords at Paris, 726.

French, Oliver, treaty between him and the States General offends the English parliament, 121, 123.

French, commit depredations upon the English, 144. Endeavour to obstruct the election of a king of the Romans, but in vain, 238. Some proceedings towards a peace between them and the Spaniards, 244. Displeased with the election of the king of Bohemia to be king of the Romans, 248, 259. French court excommunicated, 261. Willing to enter into an alliance with either the English or Dutch, 266. Promises to help king Charles II. 276. An order of council touching the winter quarters of the French troops, 319, 343. Artifice of the French officers to excuse their soldiers accused of committing robberies about Paris, 319. French court accepts the pope's bull against the Jansenists, ibid. Troops refuse to go to the army till they are paid, 322. French design to recall Bordeaux from England, and prosecute the league with Denmark and Holland, 333. Reject the propositions of the pope's nuncio and Venetian ambassador, 336. Officers taxed to pay the king some money for his necessity, 337. Desire the continuance of the quarrel between the English and Dutch, 337, 355, 387. Threaten revenge against the English for having occasioned the taking of Dunkirk, 344. Reflections upon their policy and behaviour with regard to England, 344, 345, 355, 357. Protect prince Rupert in the disposal of his prizes, 344, 345, 357. Regain some towns in Catalonia, 345. Occasion the disturbances in Holland about the prince of Orange, 355. Demand large sums of money of the Partisans, 355, 609. Refuse prince Conde's offer of battle, 356. Entirely in the interest of king Charles II. 357. Press the States General to contribute towards their war with Spain, 374. Strength of the French army, 377. French vain of their success, 380, 388. In great consternation at prince Conde's advancing towards Paris, 388. Displeased with the Dutch deputies in England for not communicating with Bordeaux, 390. Order publick prayers for the success of the king's arms, 404. Sorry for the success of the English against the Dutch, 405. Beaten by the Spaniards at Castella Novo, 434. French army enters Milan, 458. Privateers commit depredations upon all nations, but especially the Dutch, ibid. French raise an army in Picardy to invade Flanders, 473. Reason of their deserring to send Chanut to the Hague, 493. Army much reduced by sickness, 518. Receive a great overthrow in Italy, 525, 532. Seamen desert their ships for want of pay, 533. French endeavour to obstruct the peace between England and Holland, 562, 581, 595, 622, Frequent changes in their resolutions, 562. Desire to make an alliance with England, 595, 596. Otherwise resolve to make a league with the Dutch, and include the interest of king Charles II. ibid. Beaten out of all Catalonia, 614. Unable to arm by sea for want of money, 615. Ministry libelled at Paris, 622. Refuse to consent to the recalling of messieurs Broussel and du Portail, 623. Make a difficulty to acknowledge the vice-chancellor of Poland, 626. Their policy in regard to the sending of an ambassador extraordinary into England. 626, 631. Army goes into winter quarters, 628. French make great concessions to the Dutch, 629. Afraid of the Engglish making a descent, 630, 633. Precautions used to prevent it, 930, 634. Concerned to prevent the peace between England and Holland, 633. Troubled at the parliament's refusing to make prince Conde's process, 638. Conclude a peace with Cromwell, 666. Great rejoicings upon it, 677, 686. Alarmed at the landing of some Irish at Dunkirk, 723. In great serment and danger, ibid. Narrative of their negotiations with Ol. Cromwell and his successor, 760, seq.

French king publishes an act for freedom of the Dutch commerce, 185. In danger of being kill'd by a carbine casually going off, 290. Offers his mediation between England and Holland, 264. Dissuades the Dutch and king of Denmark from agreeing with England, and promises them assistance, 285. In danger of being killed by a wild hog, 303. Sends some regiments to Brye, to keep the passages against prince Conde, 319. Resolves to go to the army, ibid. His Journey to Nismes laid aside, why, 320. Publishes a declaration in confirmation of the pope's bull against the Jansenists, 321. His answer to the queen's remonstrance against his removing the princess Palatine from her apartment, 336. Banishes monsieur de Maisons, president a mortier of the parliament of Paris, ibid. Recalls some of the banished members, ibid. and 623. Orders a present to be given to the duke of Orleans, 336. Sets out for the army, 337. Changes the officers of Bois de Vincennes, 349. Admitted without resistance into la Fere, and forgives the governor, ibid. Reviews his army, ibid. Excuses his banishing monsieur de Maisons, ibid. Prevents a duel between marshal Grancey and Roquelaure, ibid. Sends a garrison to madame de Bretonvilliers's house, 355, 356. Reason of it, ibid. Willing to pardon the Bourdelois, 359. Leaves the army, 363, 377. In danger of being taken by prince Conde, 379. Sends a reinforcement to Turenne, 387. Returns to Paris, 390. Orders several bridges upon the Oise and Seine to be broke down, 404. Preparations for his coronation, 432. Insists upon his right to imprison French cardinals, 473. Sends monsieur Rovigni to pacify the protestants at Aubenas, 492. Issues a proclamation against free-booters staying in his harbours, 554. Entertained very gallantly by the bishop of Meaux, 618. Received at Paris with great demonstrations of joy, ibid. Visits the king and queen of England, 622. Promises to release cardinal de Retz, 630. Presses the parliament to make prince Conde's process, and declare prince Conti first prince of the blood, 631, 637. Said to have committed the business of his reconciliation to the pope's nuncio and the Venetian ambassador, 638. Sends provisional letters to Harcourt, ibid. Desirous, notwithstanding, to make his process, ibid. Gives express orders against molesting any person on account of religion, ibid. Interdicts twenty-four counsellors of the parliament of Guienne, 660. Proposes to erect two more parliaments in France, ibid. Comes to Fountainbleau, 676. Prepares for some long journey, 687, & seq. Expected back at Paris, 689. Prepares for the field, 740.

French ambassador at the Hague. See Bellievre and Chanut.
-, — — at London. See Bordeaux.
-, — — at Rome, ill satisfied with the Pope, 639.
-, — — at Ratisbon. See Vautort.
-, — resident at the Hague. See Brasset.
-, — in Sweden, endeavours to promote the affairs of the States General, 506. Excuses his civility to the English ambassador, 652. Communicates to the Dutch ambassador what passed at his audience, 654.

Fresne, monsieur du, 71.

Friesland, states of, insist upon sending a commissioner into England, and nominate Jongstall for that purpose, 266. Incline to separate from the rest, 318. Methods proposed by them for raising Money, 368. Declare they will make an admiral apart, 459. Join with Holland in the resolution of renewing the treaty with England, 543. Approve of a defensive league with England, but averse to an offensive one, 569.
-, — deputies of, in the States General, side with those of Zealand in the question about a captain-general, 364, 375.

Frost, Mr. secretary, to the English council of state, 114, seq.

Fuensaldagna, count de, disgusts prince Conde's officers, 262, 270. Treats for some forces brought from Ireland, 318. Joins Conde, 354. Prohibits the receiving of any more Irish soldiers into Flanders, 443. At variance with prince Conde and the duke of Lorrain, 604. His removal much wished for by every body, ibid. Expected at Antwerp, 698. His conferences with Sestede, 699, 701, seq. Much in king Charles's interest, 703.

Fuentes, don Antonio de, author of a treatise called, Tribunal Iniquitatis, 550.

G.

Gaitside, an attempt upon it miscarries, 41.

Gallæus, Robert, a popish priest in Scotland, letter from him intercepted, 538.

Gardiner, sir Thomas, one of the king's commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 56.

Garnet, Mr. letter from him intercepted, 402.

Garrard, sir Gilbert, chosen treasurer for Middlesex, 750.

Gaveline, capt. killed at the siege of Mouson, 478.

Geer, Laurence de, the Swedish commissary in Holland, 220.

Genlis, marquis de, dies of his wounds received at the siege of St. Menehould, 622.

Gennius, lady Diana, her information against her husband, and many other royalists, 748. Her extraction, character, &c. 749.

Genoa, state of, demands payment from the States General for two ships used in their service, 438. The amount of that sum, 462. Frauds discovered in building the said ships, 611.

Genoese, their partiality against the English, 492. Novellists refuse to insert an account of the English victory against the Dutch in their Gazettes, ibid. Bribed by the Dutch for that purpose, ibid.
-, — envoy at the Hague. See Spinola.

Geraldine, don Diego. See Cardenas.

Gerard, lord, accused of a design of poisoning king Charles II. 696.

Gerhier, Mr. George, his letter to his father intercepted, 352.

German, Mr. writes to Mr. Webster of Amsterdam about king Charles's coming into Holland, 449.

Germans, glad of the deseat of the Dutch by the English, 343.

Germany, great plenty of corn and wine there in the year 1653, 328.
-, — emperor of, sets out for Augsbourgh, 242. Espouses the interest of king Charles II. 242, 297, 377, 399. Arrives at Augsburgh, 246. Sends three couriers to Constantinople in favour of the ambassader Capello, 259. Promises to assist the Hollanders against the English, 285. Gives all his troops to the king of Spain, 356. Writes to the pope in behalf of king Charles, 377. Agrees to send a person to Rome to sollicit his affairs, 581. Money given him by the rixtaue, and by him to king Charles, 608. Stays at Regensburgh to decide the differences betwixt the princes, 617.
-, — empress of, delivered of a daughter upon the day of the election of a king of the Romans, 259.

Germany, states of, favour king Charles II. 238, 242. Their designs, ibid. Agreement relating to the title to be given the temporal princes by the French king, and the manner of their addressing him, 446. Their ambassadors how to be received at the French court, ibid. Complaint made by their deputies of disrespect shewed them by the French king, 526. Agree to furnish king Charles with a considerable contribution, 574. Endeavour to obstruct the peace between England and Holland, 581. Resolve to assist king Charles to recover his dominions, 596, 613.

Germayne, sir Thomas, 75.

Gerrard, colonel Charles, 33, 307.
-, — sir Gilbert, dispute about some lands claimed by him in the isle of Ely, 358.

Gibson, sir Alexander. See Carnegy.

Gidionson, mynheer, fails with a fleet from the Texel, to meet the merchant ships coming from the Sound, 508.

Girlington, sir John, 81.

Gironne, bishoprick of, beats off a Spanish garrison, 349.
-, — town of, repulses the French, 432. The siege of it raised, 454, 505, 525. Loss sustained by the French there, 614.

Glasgow, archbishoprick of, its yearly income, 722.

Glencairne, chosen general of the forces in Scotland in arms for king Charles II. 460, 463. Reports of his extraordinary success, ibid. A difference between him and Belcarras, 495, 502. Declaration of the forces under his command, 510. His summons to the gentlemen of Badenoch intercepted, 657. His letter to the governor, ibid.

Glendoning, William. See Lothian.

Glengary, lord. See Lorn.

Glenham, sir Thomas, 48.

Glocester, duke of, goes for France, 237. A letter about him and the princess royal intercepted, 397. Meets the duke of York at Cambray, 668. Comes to king Charles at Antwerp, 728. Proposed to be educated among the Roman Catholicks, 741. And to travel into France, Italy, &c. ibid.

Glynn, his opinion about the legality of an attachment of some goods belonging to the king of Spain, 604.

Godolphin, Mr. John, one of the judges of the admiralty in England, 608.

Goffe, colonel, 637.

Goodwin, Thomas, a letter to him intercepted, 381.

Gordon, Lues, offers to submit to the parliament of Scotland, 89.
-, — Lodowick, one of the commissioners of war at Elgin, 170.

Goring, colonel, 81. His letter and apology to king Charles II. 694.

Grace, colonel, 619.

Graffe, Vander, his letter to Beverning, 498.

Grancy, marshal, 355. Prevented from fighting with Roquelaure by the French king, 349. Made commander of the French troops in Piedmont, 432. Defeated by Caracena, 505. Reflections upon his conduct, 505, 525, 532.

Grandison, lord, desires to be recommended to king Charles II. 240.

Grandmont, marshal, 349.

Grandpré, count de, repulses prince Conde at Noyon, 387.

Granswinkel, mynheer. See Amboyna.

Graves, col. 95.

Gray, William lord, speaker of the house of lords pro tempore, 62. One of the commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79. Inform'd against, 749.

Greene, Mr. letter to him from king Charles II. intercepted, 233.

Greenvile, sir Richard, 80.

Greenvill, Mrs. occasions a quarrel by her indiscretion, 671. For which she is discharged by the queen of Bohemia, 673, seq.

Grenvile, sir Bevil, his letter to Mr. Morrice, 2. Attends king Charles I. to Newcastle, ibid. His account of the state, and disposition of the king's army there, 2, 3.

Griffeth, sir Henry, 81.
-, — capt. an honest royalist, 674. Complain'd of by Hamet Bassa, 745.

Grimaldi, cardinal, threaten'd by the pope for meddling in the intrigues of the French court, 615. Goes thither, 735. Quarrels with the parliament of Paris, ibid.

Groningen, states of, conform with the province of Guelderland in what concerns the alliance with France and Brandenburgh, 247. Recommened the choice of the prince of Orange for capt. general, and count William for his lieut. 456. Protest against sending commissioners to renew the treaty with England, 551. Erect a court for deciding differences between them and the Ommelanders, 612.

Groningen, deputies of, in the States General, side with those of Zealand and Friesland in the question relating to a capt. general, 364, 375.

Groot, mynheer de, resident of the prince elector at the Hague, 451. His opinion of the treaty betwixt the English and Dutch, 465. Represents the necessity of the States General having a minister at Ratisbon, 466. Recommends the business of the queen of Sweden and the lord Craven to Beverning, 599.
-, — Johan, a Swedish merchant, imprison'd at Amsterdam, 266, 595. Released, ibid.

Guard, William du, his request to secretary Thurloe, 624.

Guelderland, states of, their declaration touching a treaty with France and England, 252. Favour king Charles II. 462. Their declaration touching the sums demanded of them towards carrying on the war, and the manner in which it ought to be conducted, 469, 494. Agree to assist Middleton with money, 485. Advise the carrying on of a vigorous war against England, and espousing of the interest of king Charles, 487, 489, 494, 509. Concur in the choice of Opdam, 490. Advise the concluding of an alliance with France, and the improvement of the confederation with Denmark, 494. Their proceedings about the business of Essen, 499. Their resolutions touching the proposed coalition with England, and the prosecution of the treaty, 509. Their propositions tendered to the States General, 518. Refuse to continue the treaty with England, but in a neutral place, 541. Contest betwixt them and the other provinces about the presidentship of the chambre mipartie, 651.
-, — deputies of in the States General, side with those of Holland in putting off the question about a capt. general, 375. Agree to confer the command of the whole fleet upon Opdam, 488.

Gujac, mons. de, 587.

Guienne, bad situation of affairs there, 548. Much infected with the plague, 590.

Guise, governor of, endeavours to prevent prince Conde's having any subsistence thereabouts, 478. Accepts the command of some troops design'd for Naples, 609.
-, — duke, defeated in Italy, 726.

Gunne, lord, firmly attach'd to king Charles II. 246.

H.

Haes, capt. John, taken prisoner by the English, 392.

Hague, guarded by several companies of horse, 317, 328, 391. Tumult there upon account of the prince of Orange, 391. Reward promised for apprehending any of the persons concern'd in it, 419. A woman and two children whipt for it, 422.

Hale, sir Matthew, his opinion about the legality of an attachment of some goods belonging to the king of Spain, 604.

Hall, capt. Edward, commander of the standing convoys, 168.
-, — Robert, surprizes some goods in the Thames, 586.

Halsall, Edward, concern'd in the murder of Mr. Ascham at Madrid, 151.

Halstead, Laurence, 81.

Hamburgh, resident of, at the Hague. See Aitzema.

Hamburghers, supply the English with naval stores, 324, 330. Several of their ships going for Spain, taken by the French, 423. Demand the neutrality of the Elbe, 462. Their navigation greatly interrupted by the Dutch, 497. Hated by them for supplying the English with ammunition, 550, 551. Reflections upon the prejudice done them by the English publishing that affair, ibid. Desire to be comprehended in the treaty betwixt the English and Dutch, 649.

Hamet, bassa, complains against Flemish pirates under Dutch colours, 745.

Hamilton, marquis of, sent with a fleet to lie along the coast of Scotland, 3. Forbid to land, ibid. Exonerated of the great seal of Scotland, 13. One of the commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 15. Reflections upon the behaviour of him and his party, in the Scots parliament, 73. Protests against the resolution of delivering up the king to the English, 74. Reflection thereupon, ibid. Struggle betwixt him and the marquis of Argyle, 93. Insulted at Edinburgh, 94. Invades England, 100. Deseated by O. Cromwell, 101.

Hamilton, Mr. John, under-keeper of the great seal of Scotland, exonerated of the same, 13. Signs the engagement against England, 104.
-, — Sir George, 736.

Hammond, col. 96.
-, — Anthony, 358.

Hampton-court palace, order'd to be sold, 441. Given to O. Cromwell, 477.

Hans towns, invited to a common alliance with the States General, 455. Reason of it, 461. Agree to assist king Charles II. 596.

Harcourt, marquis of, disgusted at the French court, 492. Report of his agreement with the Emperor contradicted, 525. Terms of his accommodation with the French court, 548. Demands extraordinary sums, 609. His two Sons taken out of the Jesuits college at Paris, 615. Reason of it, ibid. His answer to mons. Bezemont, the cardinal's secretary, 622. The government of Provence proposed to be given him by the French court, ibid. Offers to quit the government of Brisac for that of Burgundy, 623. Secures mons. Bezemont upon a suspicion of his endeavouring to corrupt the garrison to betray him, ibid. Believed to have agreed with the Emperor, 625, 626. Makes unreasonable demands of the French king, 626. Proposed by the Emperor to be made great vicar of the Empire, 638. Enlarges the time allow'd mons. Bezemont to procure him an answer from the French court, 639. Treats both with the Emperor and French king, 648. Sends for his daughter out of the abby of Notredame de Soissons, 659.

Harley, sir Robert, 65.

Harnett, William, concern'd in the murder of Mr. Ascham at Madrid, 150.

Harris, Mr. protected by the Spanish ambassador at Ratisbon, against the cavaliers, 366.

Harrison, major general, reported to have laid down or been deprived of his commission, 306. Chosen by the new representation called by Cromwell, to sit in their assembly, 339. His disgrace much desired by the Dutch, 341. One of the council of state, 369, 395. The head of the Anabaptists, 396, 754. Declines in credit, 519, 523. Opposes Cromwell and the peace with Holland, 612. Suspected of a design to drop his party, 621. Frustrated in his intentions, by the voluntary dissolution of the parliament, 632. Refuses to act under the protector, 641. Deprived of his commission, ibid. Disturbances expected from him and his party, 650. Inform'd against by Tyler, 749.

Hart, Mr. Henry, a letter from him intercepted, 649.

Hartlepoole, surrender'd to the earl of Calander, 41.

Harvey, Edward, esq; commissioner of the customs, breviate of his receipts and payments, 209.

Hasselrig, sir Arthur, one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Hatton, sir Christopher, one of the king's commissioners for the treaty of Uxbridge, 56.

Haubois, mynheer, his letter of news to Jongstall, 368. One of the commissioners sent to the States of Guelderland, about furnishing their quota, 464.

Haward, Edward lord, one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Hay, sir John, taken prisoner at Selkirk, 72.

Heath, sir Robert, 80.

Hecke, capt. acquitted of the charge of cowardice, 447.

Heemflet, opposes the princess of Orange's going into France, 681. Recedes from it, ibid. & seq. His reasons for it, 684. Arrives at Antwerp, 700. Returns to Malines, 701.

Henckelom, mynheer, one of the deputies of Guelderland in the States General, 364, 390.

Henderson, sir John, 242, 246.

Hendrick, lieut. punishment inflicted upon him for not doing his duty, 507.

Herbert, sir Edward, attorney general to king Charles I. included in the first qualification of persons proposed to be proceeded against, 80.

Hern, a plotting royalist, 709. Points about which he was to be examined, 719, seq.

Herring-fishery. See Fishery.

Hertford, marquis of, one of the king's commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 56.

Hesdin, deliver'd up by Hocquincourt, 731. To be redressed by the French king, 740.

Heskol, a desperate cavalier, 709. A favourite of the duke of Buckingham, 716.

Hess, landgrave of, 675. See Darmsted.

Hewit, Dr. an account of his plot, and of the persons concern'd in it, 707, & seq. His frequent information to Corker, 708, seq. Makes a gain of the cavaliers, 713. His house dragooned, 718.

Hewson, Mr. 501, 503.

Hide, sir Edward, included in the first qualification of persons proposed to be proceeded against by the English parliament, 80. His letters and remittances to the royalists, 712, 720. At Antwerp, 721.
-, — Lady receives a present from king Charles II. 683.

Hill, capt. governor of the castle of Badenoch in Scotland, 657. His answer to the earl of Glencairne's letter, 658. His letter to the gentlemen of Badenoch, ibid.

Hobson, Edward, 577.

Hocquincourt, marshal de, commander of the French troops in Catalonia, 354. His ill conduct occasions the raising the siege of Gironne, 525. Obliged to leave part of his baggage behind him, 532. Abandons Rousillon, 544. Throws himself into Peronne, 545. His retreat not confirm'd, 548. Marches to relieve Rosa, 595. Gains a great victory against the Spaniards, 625. His affairs accommodated with the French court, 666. Broken off afresh, 682. How concluded, 689, 731. His fault excused, 734, 736. Takes Pont Dormy, 740

Hoeven, mynheer Van. See Dutch commissioners in Portugal.

Hogenroller, princess of, occasions a tumult at Bergen op Zoom, 342.

Holburne, major general, 89.

Holck, vander, 364.

Hollack, mynheer, against a treaty with the English, 419.

Holland, earl of, proposes king Charles the First's throwing himself into the arms of the Scots, 72.
-, — Mr. Cornelius, one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Holland, states of, give audience to Mr. Strickland, and press the States General to do the like, 114. Their resolution and protest thereupon, 116, 123. Their letter to the provincial states about the same, 124. Their advice relating to a treaty of alliance with France, and the treaty of peace with England, 251. Desirous of having only two deputies sent to treat with England, 266. But agree upon four, ibid. Nominate Nieuport and Beverning, on their part for that purpose, ibid. Are for sending only one of them first, 280. Their reason for it, ibid. Opposed by the prince of Orange's friends, 281. Said to have given private instructions to their commissioners to try to make a peace for themselves, if the general treaty should fail, 326. Agree to have a captain general, but disagree about the person, ibid. Give instructions for answering the marquis of Brandenburg's letter, ibid. Jealous of a treaty of commerce between Spain and Sweden, 329. Oblige the earl of Dona's troop of horse to take an oath to them and the States General, 330. Publish an edict forbidding the people to traduce their magistrates, 341. Reflections cast upon them by the common people, 343, 448, 449. Propose a voluntary contribution towards the maintenance of the war, 341, 342. Cause many of their resolutions to be published, 342. Willing to comply with the English demands as far as they dare, ibid. Desirous of making them friends and allies, 348. Give notice to all their publick ministers of the ill success of the treaty, 364. Determine to leave one of their commissioners at London, ibid. Demand the resolution of the 5th of June, 1650, to be put out of the registry of the States General, ibid. Desire the princess royal to dissuade her brother king Charles from coming into Holland, 371. Their resolution relating to the prohibition of foreign potentates coming into their country without leave, 371, 381, 389. Release the lord Schagen, arrested during the sitting of the assembly, 372. Divided about the prince of Orange, 374. Their resolution relating to the coming over of the commissioners in England, 381. Oppose the making of the prince of Orange titular admiral, 384. And the choosing of a capt. general at that time, 389. Motion for removing the assembly to Delst, 391. Not averse to the propositions of the English, 406. But afraid of the people, 410, 483. Inclined to a farther treaty with the English, 419, 420. In esteem with the English government, 431. Endeavour to clear themselves of the suspicion of favouring the English, 438. Refuse to agree to the sending of money to the royalists in Scotland, ibid. Means used by them for raising money, 440. Refer Middleton's proposal of furnishing the Scots with ammunition, to commissioners, 446. Many of the commissioners ordered to vote for recalling the deputies from England, 448. Refuse the payment of the land army, 449. Afraid of the Orange party, 450. Their resolution upon the report of the commissioners for affairs of England relating to the proposed coalition, 457, seq. 488, seq. Proceedings in securing the town of Enchuysen, and punishing the authors of an insurrection there, 459. Resolved not to submit to the prince, or to admit of a lieut. general, 459, 461. Jealous of the Hans-towns, 461. Remarks upon their conduct with respect to the prince of Orange's party, 461, 462. Resolve to summon the Hans-towns to a common alliance, 462. Declare their resolution to turn pirates, if they can't maintain their traffick, ibid. Their resolution upon Opdam's accepting the charge of their lieut. admiral, 473. Inclined to an offensive league with England, 483, 484. Resolve to continue the treaty. 485. Disagree to the proposal of giving the command of the fleet to Everts in case of Opdam's death while at sea, ibid. Their resolution touching the treaty with France, 489. Endeavour to persuade the other provinces to a peace with England, 498. Prohibit the meeting and writing of the Socinians, 508. Resolve to assist the Scots with a sum of money, 528. Gain their point in relation to the renewal of the treaty with England, 543. Their resolutions upon the report of Keyser and the commissioners for the Danish affairs, 548, seq. Zealously attached to the king of Denmark, 572. Reflections thereupon, ibid. Their declaration touching the treaty with Cologne, 611. Separate without coming to any resolution about the peace with England, 629. Some members advise a land, as well as a sea war, ibid. Refuse the princess royal a pass for some horses to be sent into France, without paying for the licences, 652. Resolve to put the prince of Orange under the 100th penny, ibid.

Holland, province of, in great serment about the prince of Orange, and the ill success of the fleet, 253, & passim. Desirous of a peace with England, 257, & seq. 629. Reflections upon the bad state of affairs there, occasioned by the war with England, 307, & passim. Their disposition with regard to a captain general, 359. Desirous of Opdam's accepting the charge of admiral, 449. Jealous of Tromp's design to set up the prince of Orange, 486. Infected with mice, 508. Jealous of the queen of Sweden's placart, 520, 521. Under a necessity of making peace with England, 550, seq. 585. Many Hollanders resolve to quit their country, and go into Flanders, 550.
-, — deputies of, in the States General, oppose the putting of the question for choosing a captain general, 364, 368. Their proposition about altering the stations of the ships in the Texel, over-ruled, 390. Move for an order to prohibit foreign princes coming into their territories, without leave, 391. And for putting the whole fleet under Opdam, 486.
-, — deputies of, in England. See Beverning and Nieuport.
-, — commissioner of, in England. See Schaep.
-, — treasurer of, busies himself in enquiring into the corruptions of the Gressier Musch, 652.
-, — pensionary of. See Witt.

Hollis, Mr. one of the parliament commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 59.

Holslein, duke of, sends col. Curts with a publick character into England, 404. Endeavours to persuade the king of Denmark to an alliance with England, 497.

Home, sir David, sent by the Scots commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, to Berwick, 26. His commission and instructions, 26, 27.

Honiwood, Philip and Thomas, 240.

Hooghe, Adrain Van, 428. His letter to Vand Perre, 509.

Hooke, Mr. William, his representation of the dangerous state of the colonies in New England, 564, seq.

Hopton, sir Ralph, 80.

Horne, Refuses to obey the state's commands, 318. Several attempts made there to stir up the people, 329.

Horne, earl of, 557.

Hospital, marshal de, governor of Paris, hinders the deputies of the town-house addressing the king, 589.

Houlthuyn, capt. punishment inslicted upon him for not doing his duty, 507.

Houme Castle, surrendered, 174.

Howard, sir Francis, 80.
-, — Thomas, discarded by the prince of Orange. 737.
-, — Mrs. made governess of the prince of Orange, 665.

Hoyle, Mr. Alderman, one of the commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Hugonots. See Protestants.

Humbly, lord, sent to the parliament of England after the surrender of York, to represent the necessities of the army, and to press the settling of religion, 39. Sent with the lord Angus, and sir John Smith, to the garrison of Bass, 166. Their instructions, ibid. Account of their proceedings, 171.

Hume, col. John, commission sent to him from K. Charles II. intercepted, 503.

Humes, promotes the princess royal's going into France, 681.

Humiers, Mr. governor of Compeigne, sends for relief to prince Conde, 261. The reason of it, ibid.

Humphreys, col. 358.

Hungary, quieted from the irruptions of the Turks, 581.

Hungary, and Bohemia, king of, elected king of the Romans, 248. Objections made to it by the French faction, ibid. Crown'd, 297. See Romans, king of.

Huntingdon, major Robert, his Reasons for laying down his commission, and account of the proceedings of Oliver Cromwell and Ireton with K. Charles I. and in the army, 94, seq.

Huntly, marquis of, imprisoned by the Scots covenanters, 3.

Hurst, Jo. 358.

Huson, col. and others, resolve to oppose Cromwell, 749.

Hussey, sir Edward, 81.
-, — Peter, 407.
-, — John, dies of the sickness at London, 407.

Huggens, mynheer, 611.

Hypsley, sir John, 98.

J.

Jacques, Mr. governor of Ostend, undertakes the relief of Bourdeaux. 353.

Jansen, Egbert, 523.

Jansenists, means used to end the differences about them, 238. Excommunicated by the pope, 319. A Dominican fryar put into the inquisition at Rome for being a favourer of them, 586. Furnish col. O Brian with a small relief by the advice of K. Charles II. 626. Troubles between them and the papists at Chalons, 640.

Janson, Nich. 330.

Janssen, capt. Claes, taken prisoner by the English, 429.

Jaxson, Mr. 728.

Jefferson, Thomas, 311.

Jenkins, Mr. David, included in the first qualification of persons to be proceeded against, 80. land, 80.

Jermine, Henry esq; included in the first qualification of persons to be proceeded against, 80.

Jermyn, lord, his recall desired by the princess of Orange, 664. Goes to king Charles, 666, 677. Sent by him to the queen mother, 680. His letters to king Charles, 687, & seq. Goes with the duke of York to Compeigne, 689. Sends to the king 2,000,000 of rixdollars, 690. Acquaints him of the great likelihood of a French war with England, 693, 726. Reveals all the queen mother's secrets to Mazarin, 737.

Jersay, marquis de, leaves prince Conde in discontent, 378. Arrested by order of the French king, 378, 379.

Jesuits, information of their numbers and practices in England, 403. Disperse themselves in the army and the Netherlands, 573.

Jews, motion in parliament for admitting them to trade in England, 387.

Incendiaries, in Scotland. See Parliament of Scotland.

Inchiquin, earl of, offers to join the Scots with 600 men, 93. Opposed in his designs at Paris by the Irish clergy, 562. Obtains a grant of two Irish regiments, 590.

Indemnity, act of, proposition relating thereto tendered to king Charles I. by the two houses, 79. Persons excepted, 80, seq.

Independents, very powerful in England, 72. Struggle between them and the Presbyterians, 93. Consulted about the calling of a new parliament, 395.

Ingles, capt. 39.

Ingoldsby, col. 312.

Innes, John, 17.

Inverness, sheriffdom, proceedings of the committee of war there in raising new levies, 172. Desire a commission for the laird of Mackintosche, or his brother, ibid.

Joachimi, mynheer, the Dutch resident at London, 116. Demands the restitution of a ship taken by the English, 120.

John, don of Austria. See Austria.

Johnson, capt. John, a Dutch prisoner in England, 429.

Johnston, Mr. Archibald, lord advocate of Scotland, dissents from the engagement against England, 99, 104. His answer to Oliver Cromwell's letter about restoring the publick records, 177.
-, — capt. killed before Blair-castle, 400.

Jones, Mr. deputy of the company of English merchants at Rotterdam, his character, 118, seq.
-, — Mr. John, one of the commissioners of Ireland, 631.

Jongstal, mynheer, one of the Dutch deputies appointed to treat with the English, 266. A friend to the house of Nassau, ibid. Jealous of Beverning's having instructions to treat to the prejudice of that family, 299. His reflections upon the behaviour of the English in relation to the treaty, 362. Cautioned to beware of his confraters of Holland, 399. Leaves England, 402. Returns, 549. Corresponds with count William, 600, 643.

Joyce, cornet, takes king Charles I. from Holdenby, 95. Committed to gaol, 470. A male-content, 749.

Joyeuse, duchess of, runs mad upon the death of her father, the duke d'Angoulesme, 589.

Irby, sir Anthony, 79.

Ireland. See Parliament of England. Proceedings of the commissioners at Uxbridge upon the article concerning it, 66, 70. Propositions relating to it tendered to king Charles I. by the two houses, 79, 83, 84. Persons concerned in the rebellion there excepted out of the act of indemnity proposed to be passed, 80.
-, — commissioners of, recommend Mr. Davis's petition to the council of state, 631.

Irish, take several English ships upon the coast of Holland, 115. Quit the Spaniards for not performing with them, 262. Ill-treated at Madrid, 323. Reflections upon their treachery, ibid. Discontented with the Spanish court, 337. Desert the Spanish service, 362. Come over to the French by order of king Charles II. 514. Refuse to receive any orders from Ormond, 562. Reflections cast by them upon king Charles, ibid. Liberally entertained by the Papists at Nismes, 587. Remarks upon their inveterate malice against the English Protestants, 587. Irish regiments in the archduke's army reformed, 604. A letter containing an account of the designs of the Irish in France, intercepted, 619. Their number, ibid. Promised assistance from the French court, ibid. Design for Scotland, 626. Wait the success of the French ambassador's negotiations at the Hague, ibid. Determine to venture upon the assistance promised from Germany, ibid.

Ireton, commissary-general. See Cromwell Oliver. Several caballings at his house, 715.

Isbrants, mynheer, 434.

Isinghen, count, 362.

Italians, in general enemies to the English, 437.

Italy, princes of, refuse to obey the Pope's command in suppressing the small convents, 238. Their ministers at Paris refuse to give place to those of the electors of the empire, 622, 625.

Judges of England, propositions relating to the censure and punishment of such of them as deserted the parliament, tendered to king Charles I. by the two houses, 81, 82.

Juliers and Cleve, dispute about the succession to them, 952.

Justice, high court of, erected in England, 612.

K

Keith, Mr. William, signs the engagement in Scotland against England, 104.

Kendall, Mr. Augustine. See Fisher.

Kenelmeaky, lady, expected at Paris, 685.

Kent, earl of, one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Ker, Mr. A. one of the commissioners of the general assembly of Scotland, 108.
-, — Robert and Henry, excuse their signing the engagement against England, and desire their submission may be recorded, 108, seq.

Keyser, mynheer, sent by the States General to the king of Denmark, 335. His commission and instructions, 335, 336, 374, 375. Reason of sending him, 371. Obtains audience, 439. Leaves off negotiating about the Danish ships, and applies himself wholly to the treaty of rescission, 450. Substance of his letter to the States General, 461. Concludes the treaty, 482. Returns home, 543. Points of deliberation resulting from his report, 546. Receives the thanks of the States of Holland, 548.

Killigrew, sir Peter, 55, 59, 515.
-, — col. William, 420, 515.

King, Mr. Robert. See Parry.
-, — doctor, a zealous royalist, 718.

Kingsale, besieged by the English forces, 115.

Kingston, earl of, one of the king's commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 56.
-, — Mr. his account of the betraying of Hesdin, 731. Of several flying reports at Paris, 732. Other intelligence from thence, 733–739.

Kinnoull, earl of, cited to appear before the commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 25. Part of his regiment routed by capt. Lisle, 636. Narrowly escapes being taken prisoner, ibid.

Kinschott, mynheer, occupies the place of raedt-pensionary of Holland, pro tempore, 364.

L.

Laces, gold and silver, &c. an edict against wearing of them passed in the parliament of Paris, 622. A large sum of money offered to the king by the merchants to suppress it, 640.

Lacy, lieutenant-colonel of an Irish regiment brought into France, opposes col. Napper's getting the command, 322.

Lagerfeldt, Israel, sent by the queen of England to mediate a peace between the English and Dutch, 224. Substance of some conferences with the Dutch ambassadors at London, 323, 583, 584. Demands some guns taken by the English as Dutch prizes, 368. Makes propositions prejudicial to the Hollanders, 396. Has audience, 453. Called home, 573. Goes away in discontent, 582, 583. Represents the queen as sincerely in the interest of the States General, 583, 584. Passes through the Hague incognito, 617.

Lambert, major-general, one of the English council of state, 369, 395. Retires, 393. Desired to sit in the new parliament called by Cromwell, 395. Assists him in the change of the government, ibid. Sent for to the council, 589. Comes to London, 610. His proceedings, with the rest of the officers of the army, in settling the government after the voluntary dissolution of the parliament, 632, 754. One of the protector's council, 642. Proposed to be made a duke, 645. Various conjectures about his intentions, 712, 713, & seq. 720.

Lampsius, Ade and Cornelius, request the English ambassadors at the Hague to procure them satisfaction for a ship taken by the English, and a debt due to them from the parliament, 178.

Lane, sir Richard, one of the king's commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 56. Included in the first qualification of persons proposed to be proceeded against, 80.
-, — Mrs. lampooned by king Charles II. 679.

Lanerick, earl of, cited to appear before the parliament of Scotland, 25. Desirous of a pension from France, 90. Proposed to be sent with the earl of Loudon to king Charles I. 92. Endeavours to set on foot a new engagement against the English, 109.

Laney, Dr. attends the king's commissioners at the treaty of Uxbridge, 57.

Langdale, sir Marmaduke, 80. His proposal to the States General, 463. His letter to Symons, 719. Made chief officer of the admiralty, 752. See Middleton.

Languedoc, Protestants of. See Protestants.

Lanore, bishop of. See Bichi.

Lantsbergen, confuted by Apollonius, 187.

Latham-house, in Lancashire, siege of it raised by prince Rupert, 36.

Lauderdale, earl of, president of the parliament of Scotland, 37. Sent with the earl of Traquair to persuade king Charles the first to establish presbytery, and approve of the covenant, 87. His reflections upon the parliament's message to the king in the isle of Wight, 98. Goes to prince Rupert in the Downs, ibid.

Lawrence, sir Edward, 81.
-, — sir John, contriver of a petition intended to be signed at Wickham, sent for by the commissioners of both kingdoms, 67.
-, — Mr. Henry, one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79. Reports the resolution of the late parliament for sending an ambassador to Sweden, 480. President of the protector's council, 642.

Lawarre, Charles lord, one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Laws, English, bill for contriving a new body of them ordered to be brought into parliament, 577.

Lawson, rear-admiral, sent with a fleet upon the coast of Holland, 440.

Lawyers, proposition for incapacitating such as had adhered to the enemies of the parliament, 81. And sequestering a third part of their estates, 82. Proposal made in parliament for banishing them from the town, 577.

Leay, colonel, 619.

Lebuce, monsieur, recalled from banishment, 336.

Leda, marquis, negotiates a peace at London, 688, 761.

Lee, sir Robert, 80.
-, — Thomas, esquire, 81.

Leicester, earl of, 158.

Lemere, mynheer, 563.

Lemster, province of, an act forbidding recusants to live there, passed, 407.

Lennox, duke of, 15.

Lenthall, William esquire, speaker of the House of Commons, 24, 85.
-, — sir John, questioned by the council of state, 249.

Lerau, marquis de, 588.

Lesly, general Alexander, his letter to the Scots parliament, 10. See Parliament of Scotland.
-, — John, 32.
-, — sir Robert, sent by the duke of Hamilton to king Charles I. 90.
-, — major general David, commendation of him, 46. Order'd to remain with his cavalry in Cumberland, 49. Accounts of his proceedings in the Highlands of Scotland, 89, seq. Desires the states to write to the queen of Sweden in his behalf, 92. A commission authorizing him to suppress the disturbances in the North of Scotland, 165. Submits the examination of his conduct at Dunbar to the states, 167. Order thereupon, ibid. His representation of the necessities of the army, 173.

Levant trade, in the hands of the Dutch, 376.

Leven, earl of, appointed commander in chief of the Scots forces in England, and of the British and Scots forces in Ireland, 34. His letters to the parliament and committee of estates of Scotland, 37, 39, 40, 46, 47, 49. Presses the sending of a reinforcement to the army in England, 39, 46. His answer to the parliament's directions concerning the disposal of the cavalry, 40. Advises to pursue the enemy, and prevent their marching northward, 47, 48. Is against settling a garrison at St. Johnstown, 49.

Lewellin, mons. 609.

Lewis, sir William, 65.

Leyden, deputies of, in the States General, join with those of Holland in opposing the question about a capt. general, 382.

Libourne, surrender'd to the duke of Vendosme, 344, 357. Groundless report of the siegé being raised, 355. Garrison takes on in the French king's service, 356.

Liddell, sir Thomas, sen. 81.

Liege. See Treaty, and Cologne. Boors of — routed by the Lorrainers, 655.

Liencourt, mons. withdraws with his effects, for fear of prince Conde, who burns the castle, 387.

Ligne, prince of, quits prince Conde's army, and joins the archduke's, 356.
-, — mons. sent to Oliver Cromwell by prince Conde, 760.

Lignville, earl of, commander of the Lorrainers quarter'd in the Dutch territories, offers to withdraw, 592. Substance of his letter to the States General, 617. Marches with the regiment at Luxemburgh to join the other forces, 644.

Lilburne, col. Robert, desires a convoy for a ship going to St. Johnstown, 478. His account of the proceedings in reducing the Highlands, ibid. Marches against the Scots in arms for king Charles II. 612. Report of his having received a great defeat, 641.
-, — John, order'd to be tried at the Old Baily, 320. Petitions and obtains an order for stopping all proceedings against him 'till the meeting of the parliament, 324. His behaviour at his tryal, 367. Precautions used by Cromwell, during that time, to prevent an insurrection threaten'd by the populace, ibid. Further proceedings in his trial adjourn'd, 368, 369. Is in great esteem with the people, ibid. & 441, 442. Divers petitions presented for his Release, 369. Differences in the parliament about him, 387. Brought again to his tryal, 429. Further precautions taken by the government at that time, 429, 430, 435, 441. Acquitted by his jury, 435, 442. Design'd to be brought before a high court of justice, ibid. Irritates the parliament by a book written in prison, 435. Hated by Cromwell, 441. Some persons thought to have held correspondence with him, committed to the tower, 441, 442. Behaviour of the populace upon his being clear'd, 442. Continued in prison, ibid. His jury call'd to an account for their verdict, ibid. Disorders apprehended from him and his adherents, 449. Committed to the tower, 451, 453. Sent to one of the British islands, 451. Suspected to be in a conspiracy against the government, 453.

Lilburne, col. kill'd in defending Tinmouth castle, 98.

Limerick, bishop of, with the bishop of Cork, seconds the Irish at Paris in their sollicitations, 619.

Lindesay, earl of, 15, 16. His letters to the privy council, and parliament of Scotland, 181, seq. Presses the sending of the rest of the Scots forces into England, 35. His account of the condition of the army before York, 36. Sollicits the renewal of the general of the artillery's pension, 37. His account of the defeat of prince Rupert at Marston-moor, 38. Desires the committee of estates to give orders to the absent officers to repair to their charges, 39. Presses them to make provision for recruiting the regiments, ibid. And complains of their neglecting the officers who had served in Ireland, ibid.
-, — Crawfurd, one of the Scots commanders at the siege of Newcastle, his letters to the committee of estates, 42, 43, 46. His advice touching the disposal of the forces upon the borders of that kingdom, 43. Desires a speedy supply of ammunition and meal, 44, 47.
-, — David, kill'd in a skirmish between the earl of Calander's and prince Rupert's forces, 41. Design'd to have gone over to the prince, ibid.

Lingen, Henry, esq; 81.

Lipe, Mr. 386.

Lisle, Mr. Daniel, sent by the English parliament to the queen of Sweden, 206.
-, — Philip lord, appointed ambassador extraordinary from the English parliament to the queen of Sweden, 227. His instructions, 227, seq. Preparations for his journey, 441, 442. To be join'd by two more of the council, ibid. Excuses himself from going, 518. One of the protector's council, 642.
-, — John, president of the council of state, 205.
-, — capt. defeats a party of Kinnoul's regiment in Scotland, 636.

Littleton, Edward lord, keeper of the great seal of England, carries it to king Charles I. 79.

Lloyd, Mr. Daniel, 641.

Loe, mons. with four other French counsellors, banish'd, 692.

Lockeir, lady, takes her leave of the French court, 740.

Lockhart, grows mistrustful of the English, 731. Order'd to meet Mazarin at Amiens, ibid. And to acquaint him of his master's inability to send him any more troops, 740.

Lodron, earl of, employ'd in raising forces at Cologne, 423.

London, city of, a saving thereto in the proposition concerning the militia, tender'd to king Charles I. by the parliament, 78. Petitions Oliver Cromwell for some of the members of the old parliament to sit again, 249. Sets up his picture at the Royal Exchange, ibid. Petitions in behalf of the ministers and the universities, 467.
-, — Lord Mayor and Sheriffs of, insulted by some anabaptistical soldiers assembled in St. Paul's church-yard, 545.

Londonderry, bishop of, receives and disposes of some small English prizes at Flushing, 464, 514, 585.

Longe, Richard, sends intelligence from Paris to the cavaliers in England, 723, seq.

Longland, Mr. Charles, the English agent at Leghorn, advises to send a fleet into the Mediterranean, to cruize upon the Dutch, 376, 437, 458, 656. His reflections upon the advantages which would accrue to the English thereby, ibid. And upon the false maxims of the Spanish government, 458. Meets with great difficulty in getting intelligence, ibid. Is recommended to one Costa for an intelligencer at Rome, 604. Desires Thurloe to give orders about the pension to be allow'd him, 610. His reflections upon the losses sustain'd by the Dutch in a storm, ibid. Complains of the want of intelligence from England, 656. Advises to publish the reasons of breaking off the treaty with the Dutch, ibid.

Longueville, duke of, opposes the quartering of soldiers in the county of Evreux, 319. Refuses to acquiesce in the French king's disposal of the said county to madame de Bouillon, ibid. Disgusted with the court, 492. Jealous of his wise, 504. Order'd to visit all the sea-ports in his province, 630, 633.
-, — duchess of, goes towards St. Ouge, 379, 380. Obtains leave of her husband to live in Normandy, but denied by the French court, 615. Reason of it, ibid.
-, — madamoiselle, to be married to the duke d'Aumale, 504.

Lords, house of. See Peers.

Lord's day, proposition relating to an act for the due observation of it, tender'd to king Charles I. by the two houses, 84.

Lorn, lord, sent by king Charles II. to the committee of estates of Scotland, after the battle at Dunbar, 164. Quarrels with the lord Glengary, 478. His letter to Mc Phersons intercepted, 657.

Lorrain, duke of, demands satisfaction for some affronts done to his resident at London, 137. Sells his troops to the king of Spain, 276. Said to have a design of joining with the English, and attacking Holland by land, 318, 332, 378. Supplies the archduke and the king of Spain with money for the campaign, 318, 337. Proposition relating to him rejected by the French court, 336. Sends for his Duchess by the pope's order, 343. And the countess of Canticroix, with his children, to a religious house, ibid. Raises difficulties about a pass for king Charles II. thro the archduke's dominions, 357. His ambassador at Ratisbon talks very high, ibid. Meets Conde and Fuenseldagna to consult about the operations of the war, 361. Threatens to take king Charles prisoner, 384. Raises difficulties about quitting the garrisons held by him in the Empire, 526. His expences per diem, 550. Marches to relieve St. Menehould too late, 604. Said to have promised his daughter to count Harcourt's eldest son, 615. Marches towards Lorrain and Alsace after the Rendition of St. Menehould, ibid. A quarrel between him and prince Conde, 618. Gives count Harcourt's son the place of coronet of the empire, 638. Sends some troops to the French, 666. Their arrival at the French army, 689.
-, — Francis of, sent into France, 666. His arrival there, 687.
-, — Resident of at London. See Fortescue.

Lorrainers, take up their winter quarters upon the Dutch frontiers, 570, 616, 617. Proceedings of the States General thereupon, 590, 593. Orders against furnishing them with any provisions, 612. Retreat out of the Dutch territories, 627. Take possession of some places in the country of Liege, 651.

Lothian, earl of, with sir John Chiestie and W. Glendoning, remonstrates against the proceedings of the parliament of England against king Charles the First, 109. Their letter to the parliament of Scotland, containing an account of the same, 110.

London, John, earl of, one of the Scots commissioners to king Charles I. imprison'd in England, 4, 5. Made lord chancellor of Scotland, 13. One of the commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 15. And for the treaty for the coming of the Scots army into England, 16. Sent by the commissioners of the Scots parliament to king Charles I. 92.

Love, Mr. sent for in custody by the house of commons, 65.

Lovell, his letter to Paris intercepted, 320.

Louisa, princess, expected at Paris, 734.

Louvestein's heeren, the adverse party in Holland to the prince of Orange, why so call'd, 466.

Lucas, sir Charles, taken prisoner at Marston-moor, 38.
-, — sir John, 81.

Ludlow, Mr. Edmund, one of the commissioners of Ireland, 631.

Lude, count de, to be made gentleman of the French king's chamber, 478. Sum to be given for it, ibid.

Luneville, sent into France, 666.

Luyck, taken by the elector of Cologne, 116.

Lycent, in Spain. See Merchants. The occasion and progress of it, 220. By whom first farm'd, ibid.

M.

Macbrech, James, a popish priest, imprisoned in Scotland, 527. Rejects the conditions offered for his release, 538.

Machault, monsieur, interdicted by the parliament of Toulouse, 622. Established in the quality of comptroller of justice in Languedoc, 647.

Mackintoscb, laird. See Inverness.

Macklaud, colonel, goes to king Charles at Paris, 480.

Mackronald, Alexander, submits to the parliament of Scotland, 89.

Macleir, sir John, 171.

Maestricht, fortified by the States General against the Lorrainers, 557, 560.

Magnus, lord, received by the queen of Sweden with great marks of favour, 507.

Maidston, Mr. his account of the breach betwixt king Charles the first and the parliament, 763, ad sin. His character and picture of Oliver and Richard Cromwell, 766.

Maisons, monsieur, banished Paris, 336. His reflections upon Mazarin, 343. Charge alledged against him by the king, 349.

Maitland, John, 33. Attends king Charles I. at Oxford with propositions from the parliament, 35.

Mallom, a plotting royalist, 752.

Manchester, earl of, speaker of the house of peers pro tempore, 24. Disposition of the forces under his command, 36, 40. Joins the lord Fairfax's army at Southampton, 49. Nominated one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79. Complained against, 749.

Manchi, killed in a duel, 738.

Manicamp, monsieur, governor of la Fere, revolts from the French king, and kills the mayor of the town, 343. Occasion of his discontent, 345. Pardon'd, 349. Receives a considerable gratuity, and a marshall's staff in lieu of his government, ibid. Has the government of Roye given him, 355. Forced to submit to the king by the officers of the garrison, ibid. Refuses to let either the king or Mazarin into the town before the payment of his money, 378. Obliges the latter to wait six hours at the gate, ibid.

Manican, monsieur, recommended to king Charles II. 694.

Manly, capt. John, post-master of London, 635.

Mannicans, marquis de, retires from court, 617. Escapes a party sent after him, ibid.

Manninge, Edward, an intercepted letter from him, 311.
-, — Richard, one of the petitioners about the Swan of Chichester, taken and carried into Ostend, 577.
-, — a villain, complained of by the queen of Bohemia, 672, seq.

Mansel, Bussy, his account of the voluntary dissolution of the English parliament, 637.

Mantua, duke of, refuses to meddle in the quarrel between the French and the Spaniards, 310. Imprisons the president of the senate of Casale upon suspicion of treason, 492.

Manwaring, col. Randal, proceedings in relation to an action brought by him against the goods of a Spanish ship called the Sancta Clara, 137, seq.

Many, sir John, 81.

Marcellis, Gabriel, sells a great quantity of English hemp seized by the king of Denmark at Copenhagen, 597.

Marlow, Mr. suspected to be a spy at London, 645.

Marly, sir John, 80.

Maro, col. 619.

Marriages, motion in parliament for annulling all since the year 1647, 387.

Marrihead, major, taken prisoner going to the Highlands of Scotland, 635.

Marsh, capt. 326.
-, — a Jesuit, sent into England, 752.

Marshal, Stephen, attends the parliament commissioners in the treaty at Uxbridge, 58.
-, — earl of, invited to set on foot another engagement against the English, 106.

Marsin, count de, retires from Bourdeaux, 379.

Marston, Mr. 152.

Marston-moor, battle of, description of it, 38.

Martin, colonel, raises commotions in the army, 37.
-, — Henry, one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.
-, — a plotting royalist, 711.

Mary, queen-mother. See Queen.
-, — princess, 662, & seq. See Orange.

Mason, Robert. See Parry.

Massey, general, offers his service to king Charles, 696. A zealous royalist, 752.

Maurice, count Palatine, included in the first qualification of persons proposed to be proceeded against by the parliament of England, 80.

Maxwell, a popish priest, 527, 539.

Maynard, John, his opinion touching the legality of an attachment of some goods belonging to the king of Spain, 604.

Mazarin, cardinal, an excommunication sent against him from Rome, 261, 276. His design of transporting all the king's treasure to Havre de Grace discovered, 303. A pretended difference betwixt him and the queen, to try the disposition of the people, 304. Made generalissimo of the forces, ibid. Buys madam de Senecey's place for his sister, 319. Opposes the payment of the money promised to Preston, 320. Reflections upon his insincerity and behaviour towards the English, 344, 345, 351, 355, 562. Writes to Cromwell, 347. Gives an order for money to . . . . ibid. Jealousy between him and the queen-mother, 357. Reconciled to the pope, ibid. Hated by the people, ibid. His letter to the States General relating to the treaty on foot betwixt the two states, 374. An arrest of council for the payment of a large sum of money by him disbursed in Germany, 379. In danger of being taken by prince Conde, ibid. His conduct applauded, 384. Augments his guard, 404. Denies assistance to the deputies of Budes, 405. Disappointed in his expectations upon bringing the king abroad, 479. Obtains a grant of the duke d'Aumale's benefices, 504. Supposed to have intelligence in St. Menehould, 548. Advised to agree with the English, 561, 587. Secretly against a peace with Spain and prince Conde, 562. Disappointed in his expectation of the surrender of St. Menehould, 570. His answer to the remonstrance of the pope's nuncio, and the Venetian ambassador against the expedition designed for Naples, 609. A sencer taken up for saying he was sollicited to make an attempt upon him, 615. Sends his secretary Bezemont to try to content count Harcourt, 615. Endeavours to be rid of the Neapolitan princes, ibid. Promises to assist the Irish, 619. Proposes to marry one of his nieces to prince Conti, 625. Talks of sending an ambassador to congratulate the protector, 657. Restores the English merchandizes, ibid. Remarks upon his conduct in that affair, ibid. His answer to the three propositions of the Pope's nuncio, 659. His assurances of a pension to the duke of York, 667. Great concern for him, 687. Answer to the pope's nuncio about a peace with Spain, 689. Expected at Paris, ibid. & seq. Civilities to the princess of Orange, 692. Present of a lottery to a hundred ladies, 733. Conference with the archbishop of Drumore, 740. Likely to reconcile the papists with Richard Cromwell, 742. Narrative of his negotiations with Oliver Cromwell, 760, & seq.

Mc Kenzie, Roderick, 168.

Medicis, cardinal de, visits the French ambassador, 238.

Meerstraton, Peter Van, the first farmer of the Lycent in Spain, 220.

Meghen, count of, beats the duke d'Elbeuf, 475.

Meilleraye, marshal, 186. Pressed by the cardinal to have his son married to his niece, 405. Terms demanded by him, ibid.

Meldrum, sir John, sent with two regiments to Manchester, 36.

Memon, mons. appointed riding-master to the French King, 637.

Menzies, col. 166.

Mentz, elector of, his seeming zeal for the interest of king Charles II. suspected, 246. Crowns the king of the Romans, 297. Agrees to the proposal of sending a person to sollicit the assistance of the court of Rome for king Charles, 581. A friend to him, 673, 686.

Merchants, English, company of at Rotterdam, complained of by Mr. Strickland, 118, 119. Answer of the merchants adventurers to the invitation of the city of Bruges, 129, 202. Petition of the English merchants at Lisbon, intended to be presented to the king of Portugal, 142. Merchant adventurers petition the council of state complaining of the Lycent, 199, 217. Desire an agent may be appointed to treat with the king of Spain about the removal of their staple to Flanders, 205, 217. Their petition referred to the committee for foreign affairs, 219. Heads of their proposals, 221. Resolution of the committee thereupon, ibid. English merchants bribe the French ministry in order to recover their goods taken by prince Rupert, to no purpose, 357. At Dantzick, complain of a liberty given to one Aldus at London to ship goods, for the use of Van Beuningen a Hollander, 426. Ships borrowed by the State of the merchants at London, restored without satisfaction for the damage done them, 441, 453. Complain of the seizure and confiscation of a ship and goods at Brest, 444, Articles offered to the company upon occasion of the treaty between England and Holland, 566. Great Sufferers in the Dutch war, 655.
-, — at St. Mallows differ about a sea prize, 367. Their effects seized, 545.
-, — of Paris, petition the king not to alter the money, 479.
-, — of Normandy and Brittany, petition the French king to prohibit free-booters bringing their prizes into any of the havens of France, 554.

Mercæur, duke of, 404, 622. Complains of the French troops plundering several towns in Montserrat, 432.
-, — duchess of, plays before the French king in a ballet, 618.

Mere la, quarrels with col. Stone, 671.

Merniville, mons. de, 587.

Merwin, a male-content, ordered to be secured, 726.

Middleburgh, endeavours used to raise commotions there, 339. Inhabitants set up the prince of Orange's colours, 363. Refuses to agree with the Towns of Zealand, 572.

Middlesex, earl of, sent to king Charles I. in the Isle of Wight, 98.

Middleton, lieut. gen. procures arms and ammunition to be sent into Scotland for the service of K. Charles II. 332, 450, 460. Disgusted at the admiralty of Rotterdam for seizing and selling some of them, 398, 450. Lands in Scotland, 400. Number of his troops exaggerated, ibid. His proposal to the States of Holland referred to commissioners, 446. Magnifies the commotions in the Highlands, 449, 460. Number of arms obtained by him, 450. He and sir Marmaduke Langdale use all possible endeavours to obtain assistance from the States General, 450, 460, 483. Sent for by them, 463. Their proposals, 483. Resolutions taken thereupon, 485, 489. Removes from the Hague, 514. Prevails with the States of Holland to furnish the Scots with a sum of money, 528. And arms, 531, 585. List of them, 594. Obtains a licence to transport them, 615. His letter to the earl of Atholl intercepted, 627. Engages to raise men for K. Charles, 749.

Militia, of England, proceedings of the commissioners at Uxbridge upon the article concerning it, 68. Resolution of the two houses relating thereto, 69. Amendment of the said resolution proposed by the parliament-commissioners at Uxbridge, 70. Propositions relating to the militia tendered to king Charles I. by the parliament, 77, 78. Excluded from sitting in the representative convened by Cromwell, 323. State of the militia under Cromwell, 395, seq. Different opinions in point of Religion and church-government, 396. Mostly anababtists, ibid. Not inclined to an accommodation with the Dutch, ibid. Their interest to maintain Cromwell's government, ibid.

Millington, Mr. Gilbert, one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Milton, a fine writer, 281.

Milward, Will. imprisoned by the king of Portugal, 155.

Ministers, question in parliament about sending commissioners to eject such as were judged unfit, and to put others in their stead, carried in the negative, 637.

Minshall, sir Richard, 81.

Miossent, marquis de, made a marshal of France, 319.

Modiford, col. Tho. offers his Service to Cromwell, 537.

Moldavia, prince of, joins the prince of Transilvania, 476.

Molleneux, Carrell, esq; 80.

Mompoullion, mons. de, 405.

Monk, general, commander of the English fleet in the Dutch war, reported to be dead, 277, 282. His account of the loss sustained in the last engagement, 401. Declares a woman of ill same his wife, and legitimates several children he has by her, 470. Returns to the fleet, 582. Desires Thurloe to communicate his intelligence relating to naval affairs, 635. And congratulates him upon his recovery from a dangerous illness, ibid. Sends an account of his proceedings, 636. Designed to be made general for Scotland, 641, 749. At the head of a large fleet, 755. Sent to threaten Holland into a peace, ibid. & seq. Great revenues settled on him by the council, 756. Why he declared for a free parliament against the army, 767. His reception at London, ibid.

Monroe, George, one of the commanders in the expedition against England under duke Hamilton, 102. Article for disbanding his forces, 104. Invited to assist in prosecuting a new engagement, 106.

Montagna, heads the protestants of Languedoc, 492.

Montagu, admiral, account of his fleet at Tangier, 726. & seq. Sails for Lisbon, 727. Arrival there, 729. In hopes of fighting the Spanish galleons, 730. Reception from the court of Portugal, ibid. & seq.

Montague, Mr. sent by K. Charles II. to sollicite for money at the French court, 571. Endeavours to pervert the duke of York, 661.

Montat, mons. made capt. of the French king's guard, 622.

Montbelliard, prince de. See Suze.

Montgomrie, lord, 41, 91.
-, — col. Robert, his instructions, 166.
-, — count de, killed at the siege of Mouson, 504.

Montreuil, mons. the French resident in England. Extracts of his several letters to Brienne, 71, seq. His conference with the Scots commissioners, 71. His accounts of the affairs of K. Charles I. and the parliament, 71, seq. His reflections upon the factions in the Scots parliament, 73, 74. His arguments to engage the Scots to stand by the king, ibid. His conversation with several Scots noblemen, 74. Abused by a Scots clergyman in his sermon, ibid. Reflections upon the proceedings of K. Charles, and advice to him, 85, seq. His reflections upon the behaviour of the Scots towards the king, 88, 93. Upon the divisions in England and Scotland, 93. And the duke of Hamilton, ibid. His letter to the queen, ibid. Proceedings about his passport to the Isle of Wight, 99.

Montrose, marquis of, the king's commissioner in Scotland issues a proclamation for calling a parliament at Glasgow, 70. Defeated at Selkirk, 72. Commissioned by K. Charles II. to raise forces for his Service. 117. Recommended by the queen of Bohemia, 670.

Moock, mynheer, mayor of Enchuysen, imprisoned by the states of Holland, 459.

Moore, sir Thomas, sent express to K. Charles, 715.
-, — O Sullivan, comes out of Flanders to Paris, 619.

Moray, sir Will. employed to assist K. Charles I. in his escape out of the kingdom, 85. Employs a barber in the affair, who discovers his design, 87. Offers to carry the king to Humby, ibid. Reflections upon his behaviour, 88, 92.

Morgan, col. takes part of the earl of Kinnoulle's regiment prisoners, 636.

Morice, Will, esq; 2.

Morin, taken by the Portuguese, 687.

Morlacchi, forced to retire with loss out of the Ottoman's country, 493. Fifty of them beheaded by a Turkish Bashaw, 581. Revenge taken upon that account, ibid.

Morland, Mr. his informations against sundry royalists, 711, 714. Against some newly landed from Flanders, 719.

Morosini, defeats a Turkish squadron, 209.

Morpeth castle, surrendered to the king's forces, 35.

Morton, earl of, cited to appear before the parliament of Scotland, 25. Protests against the resolution of delivering K. Charles I. to the English, 74.

Mottet, Mr. secretary to the king of Spain's ambassador at London, procures a warrant for restoring some goods belonging to the king of Spain, 603.

Mouson, besieged by the French, 471. Reinforced, 475. Proceedings in the siege, 478, 504. Surrendered, 505.

Moyer, Mr. one of the English council of state, 395.

Mulgrave, earl of, one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Munster, province of, an act forbidding recusants to live there, passed, 407.

Murfe, col. 604.

Murtagh, O Brian, to have a commission from K. Charles II. 562.

Muscovy, great duke of, expells all the English out of the country, 131. His titles, 196. Besieges Smolencho, Poloschi, and other places, 434. Inclines to conclude a league offensive and defensive with Poland, 517.
-, — envoy of, arrives at the court of Sweden, 656. His message, ibid.

Musgrave, sir Philip, 81.
-, — lady, in great concern about her son, 714, 740.

Milles, John. See Parry.

N.

Napper, col. brings a regiment from Ireland into France, 312. Opposed in getting the command, ibid. 319, 322. But obtains it by the interest of K. Charles II. ibid.

Narbonne, archbishop of, returns to Languedoc, 526. Ordered to visit the duke of Orleans in his way, ibid.

Nassau, house of. See Orange and William.

Navarre, secretary, disgusts prince Condé's officers, 262, 270.

Neal, sir Paul, 81.

Neil, O Brien, discontented at Madrid, 337.

Nemours, duke de, killed by his brother the duke of Beaufort, 504.

Netancourt, mons. count de, disarms his cousin, the count de Vaubecourt, in a duel, and gives him his life, 504.

Neuschaise, count de, resolves to fight Vendosme's fleet, 380.

Neusville, mons. See Bordeaux.

Newburgh, duke of, desires the duke of Lorrain to keep some of his troops disengaged, 365. Designs to marry the count of Hesse Darmsted's daughter, 399. To enter into an alliance with the States General and the prince of Liege, 629.

Newburgh, lord, several of his letters intercepted, 501, 503.

Newcastle, besieged by the Scots forces, 42. Taken, 50.
-, — earl of, included in the first qualification of persons proposed to be proceeded against by the parliament of England, 80.

Nicholas, sir Edward, one of the king's commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 56. Included in the first qualification of persons proposed to be proceeded against, 80.

Nieuport, mynheer, nominated one of the deputies of Holland for the treaty with England, 266. Departs for England, 299. Returns home, 401. Arrives at the Hague, 406. Represents the proposed coalition of the two States as impracticable and dishonourable, 411, 438. His letters to Beverning, 418, 440, 451. Declares England to be void of Religion, 438. Endeavours to clear himself of the suspicion of being in the interest of England, ibid. His commendation of Opdam, 440. Named one of the commissioners to Guelderland about furnishing their quota, 464. Returns to England, 549. His letter to mynheer Codde, 584. His account of some proceedings in their negotiations, 620. His reflections upon the affair of the Portugal ambassador's brother, ibid. Advises the publication of the business of Amboyna, ibid.

Nieustadt, mynheer, 434.

Nismes, council of, complain of the Hugonots, and desire a regiment to suppress them, 618.
-, — protestants of. See Protestants of Languedoc.

Nisse, Vanden, 411, 434.

Noailles, marquis, takes the oath of allegiance to the French king, as capt. of the guard of his person, 647.

Noirmontier, marquis de, reported to be dead of the plague, 322. Said to have revolted to prince Condé, 630

Nonan, marquis de. See Richelieu.

Non-conformity. See Church-government.

Non-residency. See Benefices.

Normandy, order for guarding the coasts for fear of the English, 639. In a great ferment, 734.
-, — merchants of. See Merchants.
-, — parliament of. See Parliament of Roan.

North, Dudley lord, one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Northumberland, earl of, one of the parliament commissioners for the treaty of Uxbridge, 58. Of the English commissioners for conservation of the peace, 79. Informed against, 749.

Norton, col. 75.

Norwich, a zealous royalist, 702.

Nugent, Peter, a letter to him intercepted, 407. Raises a regiment for king Charles, 739.

Nuns, sent for out of France into Poland, taken by the English, 431, 579. Order for seizing all the effects of the English at Dantzick thereupon, 579. Not complied with, 608.

O.

Obrian Murtagh, to have a commission from king Charles II, 562. Said to have defeated three regiments of the English, and taken Killmaillan, 659.

Officers, of state, proposition relating to the nomination of them, tendered to king Charles I. by the two houses, 83.

Ogiley, George, master of Bamff, made a col. of foot for that shire, 169. See Bamff.

Oignate, earl of, vice-roy of Naples, has the management of the Spanish affairs in Catalonia, 432. Sends reinforcements thither, ibid. Recalled, 434. His continuance desired by the people, ibid. His removal occasioned by the intrigues of the pope, 656. Made president of the affairs of Italy, ibid. Reflections upon him, 736.

Oignon, count de, 233. See Foucaut.

Oldenburgh, count. See Parliament of England.

Ommeland, States of. See Groningen.

Ommeren, lord, 174.

Omulkahigh, father Donough, an Irish priest. See Terry.

Ondedei, mons. a favourite of card. Mazarin's, in disgrace, 638.

Oneal, Bryan, sent by K. Charles II. to Webster for money, but is denied, 514.

Oneile, Torrlaghog, goes to the Highlanders in Scotland, 470.
-, — Daniel, his letters to K. Charles II. 681, seq. Ordered to buy some liveries for him, 682. Goes to give him an account of the princess of Orange's journey, 700. Returnes to Malines, 701. Acts by other hands in London, 710. Is blamed by king Charles, 713.

Onslow, sir Richard, 750.

Oostergou, opposes the payment of the 300th penny, 368.

Opdam, mynheer Van, opposes the choosing of a capt. gen. 365. Put in nomination for admiral in the room of Tromp, 412. Commended by Beverning, 417. Deputies appointed to offer him the charge of lieut. admiral, 439, 440. Deliberates upon the proposal, 440, 449. In great favour with the states of Holland, 449. Reflections cast upon him by the prince of Orange's party, 449, 498. Opposed in the States General, 451. Declines accepting the charge without being absolute and sole admiral, 455, 459. Hated by the prince of Orange's party, 462. Objections made to his demands, ibid. Refuses the command, 465, 471. Accepts that of Holland and WestFriesland, 473, 485. Condition of his accepting it, 486. Takes his place in the admiralty of Holland, 498. Accepts the command upon the same terms that Tromp held it, 507. Confirmed in the office by the States General, to whom he takes an oath of faithfulness, 507. Comparison between him and several English admirals, ibid. Ordered to take the command of the fleet upon the return of de Witt, 543, 558. And to sail towards the coast of England, 549. Clause in the resolution of the States General, forbidding his making any alteration in the standard, struck out, 551.

Orange, prince of, made a knt. of the garter, 237. Great tumults and dissentions in Holland about him, 253, & passim. His friends averse to a peace with England, 257, & passim. Oppose the proposal of sending only one deputy first into England, 281. Reason of it, ibid. Proposal for making him capt. general, ibid. & seq. His friends gain ground in Holland, 295, & seq. Beloved by the people, 314, seq. Four ministers banished Amsterdam for praying for him, 324. Groundless reports about the demands of the English concerning him, 342. Coloured papers, worn by the children at the Hague in honour of him, 359. Nominated for capt. general by the states of Zealand, 369. And Groningen, 456. Six of the provinces for him, 374. Sent for to the Hague, 398. Objections raised by his friends against the coalition, with the English, 410. Jealous of the power of Holland, 459, 652. Oppose Opdam's being made admiral, 449, 459. Curbed by the resolution of the states of Holland, 461. Elated with the news of the success of Glencairne in Scotland, 463. Endeavours to infuse a diffidence of the Hollanders into the English, 484. Disappointed by Opdam's accepting the charge of admiral, 485. Uppermost in Zealand, 558. Clause relating to him agreed to be a secret article in the treaty between England and Holland, 607. Substance of that article, 616. His party favoured by France and Denmark, 611. Displeased with the commissioners in England, and jealous of the Hollanders making a separate peace, ibid. Endeavour to forward the designs of the French ambassador, 626.
-, — princess of, resents K. Charles's severity to her, 662. & seq. Excuses herself in several letters to him, 664, & seq. Prepares for her journey to Cologn, 665. In hopes of a family reconciliation, ibid. Made guardian of her son, 670. Her reception in France, 678. Reasons for her earnestness to go thither, ibid. & seq. Goes by Zealand to settle her son's affairs, 683. Preparations for her reception at Paris, 691. Visited by the whole court, 692, 701.
-, — Amelia, her letter to K. Charles, 676.
-, — principality of, reason of their joining with the protestants of Languedoc, 479.
-, — bishop of, 492.
-, — house of, hated by the prevailing party in Holland, 625.

Orleans, duke of, 267. One of his valets committed to the bastille, 319. Present made him by the king, 336. Endeavours used to bring him to court, 344, 379, 388. Angry with his wife for pressing him to it, 388. Accepts the king's amnesty, but refuses to come to council, 404. His objections to it, 526. Sollicits for card. de Retz's liberty, 639. Expected at Paris, 693.

Ormond, marquis of, disliked by the Irish, 562. Commended by count Palatine, 675. Blamed by K. Charles, 713. Meets him at Antwerp, 728. Posts away to Lyons, 732. Gets safe away, 733. False reports against him, 735, 736. Informs cardinal Retz of K. Charles's measures, 737. Affirm'd by Mazarin to be in Scotland, 740. Suspected by the Spanish court of disaffection to the king, 752.

Ormont, a fort near Bourdeaux, betrayed to the French, 286, 320.

Ornana, madame de, refuses the protestants the exercise of their religion, 588, 590.

O Sullivan, col. Philip, come to the rest of the Irish at Paris, 619.
-, — Dennet, come to the rest of the irish at Paris, 619.

Oudart, Mr. the princess of Orange's treasurer, 683.

Overton, col. Charles, holds secret correspondence with R. Cromwell, 708.

Overyssel, states of, their resolution touching the prosecution of the treaty with England, 510. Excuse their backwardness in furnishing their share towards the sea equipage, 594.
-, — deputies of, in the States General, side with those of Holland in putting off the proposition relating to a captain general, 376.

Owen, sir Hugh, a stirring royalist in South Wales, 750.

Owens, Mr. undertakes to transport 3000 men to Brussels for the earl of Castlehaven, 245. Quarrels with col. Dwire, 262.

Owsley, sir Robert, 81.

Oxenstiern, Erick, the ryx-chancellor of Sweden's son, 433.

Oxford, parliament, propositions relating to the censure and punishment of the members thereof, tendered to K. Charles I. by the two houses, 81, 82.
-, — earl of, one of the principal persons in Hewit's plot, 707, 713, 748, & seq.

P.

Palatine, prince elector of. See Charles I. His obliging letter to king Charles II. 675.
-, — princess of, removed from her apartment in the Louvre by the French king's order, 336. Miscarries, 564.

Palden, a zealous royalist, 713. Goes to consult the duke of Buckingham at Windsor, 714. Expected at London, 718. Comes with bad news to the cavaliers, ibid. & seq. Betrayed by Symons, 719.

Palluau, count de, made a marshal of France, 319.

Palmer, Jeffery, one of king Charles the first's commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 56.
-, — William, a letter from him intercepted, 576.
-, — capt. John, petition relating to the Swan of Chichester, taken by two Ostend privateers, 577.

Papists, and popish recusants, in arms against the parliament of England, included in the second qualification of persons to be proceeded against, 80. Excepted out of the clause for toleration of nonconformity, 83. Propositions relating to several acts for suppressing them, tendered to king Charles I. by the two houses, 83, 64. Information given of their number and practices in England, 403. Many of them put to death in Ireland, 403. An act to prohibit their living in several parts of that kingdom passed, 407. Tax laid upon them, 518, 553. Mixed with the Anabaptists, 648.

Pardo, don Francisco, governor of Luxemburgh, defeats a party of French troops, 406.

Paris, a great bonfire made there which disobliges the citizens, 318, 319. Description of it, 321. Tax laid upon the tradesmen in Paris, 379. An insurrection there in favour of prince Conde feared, 388. Means used to prevent it, ibid.
-, —archbishop of, endeavours to stir up the people of his diocese to contribute to the support of king Charles I. 71. His house robbed after his decease, 211. Refuses to obey the king's order to retire, 343.

Parliament of Scotland, their declaration previous to their proceedings, 3. Their remonstrance presented to king Charles I. 5. Heads of a letter to him, 6. Agree to his proposals, 7. Refuse to accept the earl of Traquair's submission, 7, 76. Desire the general assembly to translate their meeting to Edinburgh, ibid. Their letter to general Leslie about the army, 10. Further instructions upon that head, 12. Their propositions touching the election of officers of state, 13. Pass an act against incendiaries, 25. Resolve to deliver the king to the English, 74. Recapitulation of their proceedings against incendiaries, 76. Their proceedings upon the articles of the treaty with the king, ibid. Further instructions to their commissioners, ibid. Press the king to establish presbytery, 87. Appoint a committee of dangers, 93. Recapitulation of their proceedings and engagements with the English, 109, seq. Pass an act for silling of vacant places, 111. Their propositions tendered to king Charles II. 147. seq.
-, — of England. See Treaty. Pass several ordinances relating to the Scots army in Ireland, 16, 17. Offer to furnish them with cloth or clothes made up instead of money, 18. Order of parliament relating to an intercepted letter from divers earls of Scotland, 25. Demand justice against them, ibid. Votes of parliament relating to the British and Scottish forces in Ireland, 32, 33, 34. Desire the further assistance of the Scots for the protection of the northern counties, 37. Impower their commissioners to levy a tax upon the said counties for the payment of the Scots army in England, 44. Votes of the two houses concerning church-government, 60. Their resolution concerning the treaty at Uxbridge, 64. Instructions to their commissioners in the said treaty, relating to several papers delivered in by the king's commissioners, 64, 65. Propositions concerning Ireland, 69. And the method of treating upon the several articles, ibid. The prevailing party in the parliament against making a peace with the king, 73. Their answer to his proposal of coming to Westminster, 75, 76. Their declaration touching his giving his assent to laws, 77. Their propositions tendered to the king for settling a peace, ibid. seq. Send commissioners to conduct him from Newcastle to Humby, 87. Desire him to come to Richmond, 95. Vote the sending of propositions to him at Hampton-court, 96. Agree to a personal treaty with him in the Isle of Wight, 98. Reflection upon that offer, ibid. Several members imprisoned and secluded by the army, 109. Continue the pension granted to doctor Usher for a certain time, 112. Release a ship belonging to the states of Holland, 131. Their answer to mynheer Scaep's notification of his arrival, 133. To the queen of Sweden's message about renewing the alliance, 206. To her complaint of the seizing of divers ships, 223. Dissolved by O. Cromwell, 236. Reflections thereupon, 250. New parliament called by Cromwell and his privy council, 289. Character of several of the members, ibid. & 312, 323, 386. Two subscriptions about the dissolution of the parliament set on foot in the kingdom, 306. The new parliament meets, 338. Their proceedings the first day of the session, ibid. great dissentions among them, 368, 386, 387, 393. No list of them published, 371. Remark thereupon, ibid. Displeasing both to Cromwell and the people, 384, 385, 393. Grant letters of safe conduct to count Oldenburgh, 385. Very enthusiastical, 393. Their number, 395. Their resolutions relating to the sending of Whitelock to the court of Sweden, 481. And the retinue of their ambassadors, ibid. Disposed to a peace with the Dutch, 499. Their proceedings in regulating several abuses in the government, 577. Repeal part of the act for signing the engagement, 583. Their answer to the queen of Sweden's offer of mediation, 584. Divided into two factions, 612. Vote themselves the supreme authority of the commonwealth of England, 630. Dissolve themselves, ibid. The occasion and manner of it, 637. Orders relating to the calling and sitting of parliaments for the future, 632. The late parliament burlesqued, 747, 754.
-, — of Toulouse, desire the king to remove the troops of monsieur de Plessis Bellievre, 262. Disoblige the council by their proceedings in relation to the choice of a president, ibid. And interdicting monsieur Machault, 544. Some of their members banished upon that account, 622. Proceedings thereupon, ibid.
-, — of Rean, their proceedings in order to secure Normandy against the payment of any additional taxes, 479.
-, — of Rennes, their answer to the complaints about cashiering the admiralty of Brest, established by king Charles II. 609. Suffer another to be erected, ibid. Disputes betwixt them and the States of Bretagne, 615, 622.
-, — of Paris, subject of their addresses to the French king, 609, 621, 622, 623. Some of their members recall'd, 623. Assist at the Te Deum sung upon the success of the French king's arms, 625. Refuse to proceed in prince Conde's process, 631, 637. Answer of their president to the king's message relating thereto, 634, 637. One of their members refuses to pay an arbitrary tax, and imprisons the serjeant, 634. Threaten'd for it by mons. Servien, ibid. Make an order for the trial of prince Conde, 639. Several of their members return, ibid. Suspected by the court, 685. Oppose an edict against altering the coin, 691. Threaten'd to be sent to the bastille, 692. Some of their members banish'd, ibd. & seq.

Parry, Mr. George, and several other persons opinions touching some prize goods belonging to the king of Spain, 603.

Paulette, what, 622.

Pauluzzi, the Venetian envoy at London, occasion of his being there, 338. His request to the Dutch deputies, ibid.

Paw, Adrian, the Dutch ambassador at London, his several letters to the council of state, 207, 208, 210, 211. Substance of a conference with their commissioners, 210.

Peers, of England, proposition relating to an act for preventing such as were made after the time therein specified, sitting in parliament, 79.
-, — house of, refuse to concur with the commons in sending a declaration to the general assembly of Scotland, 99. And in their votes declaring the Scots army enemies, ibid.

Pelham, Mr. Peregrine, commissioner for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.
-, — Mr. chosen speaker of the house of commons in the absence of Lenthall, 96.
-, — Mr. the king of Denmark's agent at Dunkirk, proposed to be sent into England for an intelligencer, 461.

Pembroke and Montgomery, earl of, one of the parliament commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 58. One of the English commissioners for conserving the peace, 79.

Penn, vice admiral, sent with a squadron to intercept the Portugal and Brazil fleet, 166, 168. His ship set on fire in the last engagement with the Dutch, 428.

Pereboom, capt. punishment inflicted on him for not doing his duty, 507.

Perigueux, governor of, kill'd by the French king's procureur, 504. Inhabitants turn out the garrison, and send for the duke de Candale, ibid. Six of them executed, 533.

Perre, Paulus Vande, commissioner for Zealand in the treaty of peace with England, 279. His observations upon the disposition of the English towards a peace, and their quietness under the new government, 339. Stays in England with Beverning after the return of the other deputies, 402. His reflection upon the situation of affairs between the two states, ibid. Censures the authors of the war, 430. His opinion of the success of the treaty, 453. Recommends the keeping the report of their negotiations as secret as possible, ibid. Desirous of Opdam's accepting the charge of admiral, ibid. Desires instructions from Middleburgh, relating to his continuance in England, ibid. Desirous of being recall'd, 477. His observations upon the refutation of the reasons of Holland against a captain general, ibid. His several letters to de Bruyne, 522, 575, 582, 601. Falls sick, 620. Dies, 624. A pass made out for transporting his corps to Zeland, ibid.
-, — Vand, junior, 430. Brings intelligence from England to the Hague, 540, 541, 543.

Persan, marquis of, dispute between him and the earl of Bonteville, about the government of Rocroy, 532. How ended, ibid.

Persia, king of, puts all the Muscovian merchants at Ispahan to death, 434. Reason of it, ibid.

Peters, Mr. Hugh, recommends peace in his sermons, 330. Danger apprehended from his correspondence with Mrs. Crisp at Amsterdam, 484. Acquaints the queen of Sweden with the reasons of putting the king to death, and dissolving the parliament, 583. His present to her, ibid.

Peters, Dr. of Hamburgh, occasion of his coming into England, 324.

Peterson, Mr. an intelligencer in Holland, 289, 299, 326, 334, 384, 486, 497, 498.

Philips, Mr. an intelligencer at Genoa, 492, 493.

Phillips, col. Robert, his examination, 409. Goes by the name of Burton, ibid. Denies his having any design to disturb the peace, ibid. Committed to the Tower, 427.

Phillipsburgh, garrison of, brought over to the French king's interest, 647.

Pickering, sir Gilbert, 313. One of the English council of state, 395.

Piercy, lord, arrives at Paris, 697. His letter of thanks to king Charles II. 705. Complains of the baseness of the prince of Orange's council, ibid. & seq.

Pierrepoint, Mr. one of the parliament commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 59. One of the English commissioners for conserving the peace, 79. Tamper'd with by Cromwell, 745.

Piementel, the Spanish ambassador at Sweden, to return to Spain, 329. Conjectures about his errand thither, ibid. & 389. Leaves his family behind him, 376. Nobly accommodated by the queen, ibid. Obliged to return, 497. Receives orders to continue at Gottenburg, 505. Visits the English ambassador, 652.

Pimentelli, cardinal, 238.

Pisani, prince of, dies, 581. His successors, ibid.

Plessis, Bellievre, assists the nobility of Catalonia, 303. Sends relief to the bishoprick of Gironne, 349. Takes two or three places in Catalonia, 354.
-, — Praslin, marshal, sent to reform and alter the siege of St. Menehould, 564.

Poictiers, people of, rise against mons. de Forthia, the French commissary, 533.

Poland, in danger of being overrun by the Cossacks and Tartars, 321. Much afflicted with the plague, 399, 426.
-, — king of, obliged to make a disadvantageous peace, 122. Desires aid of the Emperor and the princes of Germany against the Cossacks and Tartars, 258, 298, 351. Promises to assist king Charles II. 258, 351. In danger of being surrounded by the Cossacks, 334. Denied assistance by the diet of Ratisbon, 366. Obtains leave to levy men in Germany at his own charge, ibid. Desirous of entering into an alliance with the States General, 573. Orders the persons and goods of the English at Dantzick to be secured, 579. Reason of it, ibid. Strengthen'd by an alliance with the Moldavians, &c. against the Cossacks, 581. Assisted with 80,000 Tartars, 691.
-, — queen of, sends for some nuns out of France, 431. See Nuns. Sends a present to the princess Palatine her sister, 639.
-, — ambassador of, at Ratisbon, goes away in discontent, 399.

Poles, take the garrison of Monaslereth by storm, 274.

Pompadour, marquis of, the French king's lieut. in Limozin, commits outrages upon the protestants at Rochechouart, 609, 618, 619.

Pope, his character, 237, 733. Mediates a peace betwixt Spain and Portugal, ibid. And between France and Spain, 244. Excommunicates the Jansenists, 319. His bull publish'd at Paris, 350. Is reconciled to Mazarin, 357. Recommends peace between the two crowns, ibid. Recalls his nuncio from Paris, 455. Sides with the French, 458, 473. Sollicits the enlargement of cardinal de Retz, 473. Endeavours to reduce all the religious orders to eight, 586, 609. Plotted against by the bishops and other church-men at Paris, 619. At variance with the Spaniards, 656. His pacifick letter to the French court, 689. Encouragement proposed by him to be given to the duke of Glocester, if educated among them, 792. Offers three millions to promote the restoration, on that condition, 752.
-, — nuncio at Paris, his propositions communicated to the French king, rejected, 336. Complains of the court's arming troops to send into Naples, 609. Propositions tender'd by him to the king at an audience, 659

Popham, col. appointed commander of the second English fleet sent to the southward, 137. His instructions, 144, seq. See Blake.

Popish recusants. See Papists.

Porles, mistress, an enemy to the Protestants, 588.

Portcarre, mons. de, recall'd from banishment, 336.

Portail, mons. du, 623.

Porter, gen. major, taken prisoner at Marston Moor, 38.

Portugal, king of. See Treaty. Intercepted letters from his secretary to prince Rupert, desiring restitution of an English ship taken by his highness, 131. — Remonstrating against prince Maurice's design to seize some English ships on the coast of Portugal, 132. — Concerning the sale of some English ships taken by his highness, 136, 138. Answer of his secretary to Mr. Elliot's memorial, 139. Forbids the English fleet coming into his harbour, 141. Grants prince Rupert leave to continue in his ports, 147. Sends a publick minister into England, 168. Courted by the Dutch, 295. Proposition relating to him tender'd to the French court by the pope's nuncio and Venetian ambassador, rejected, 336. Besieges Balaquier, 356. Agrees to send plenipotentiaries to treat with the Dutch commissioners, 461. His fleet in the West Indies joins that of the English, ibid. Some of them taken by the Hollanders, ibid. Projected articles of accommodation between him and the States General, 468. Complains of their commissioners leaving him without effecting any thing, 481. Makes great preparations for attacking the Dutch settlements in the East Indies, 594. Besieges Ciudad, 618. His success against the Spaniards, 687.
-, — ambassador at London, distinguishes himself in celebrating the victory gain'd by the English over the Dutch, 317. Makes the Dutch deputies a present, which is return'd, 324, Desires to enter into a treaty with them, 370, 372, 440. Does them ill offices, 396. Two gentlemen kill'd by his brother at the New Exchange in London, 610.

Portugueze, commit several outrages upon the English at Lisbon, 146, seq.

Postel, Abby. See Brun.

Powell, Mr. See Feake.
-, — Mr. Hugh, deputy treasurer of the fleet under col. Blake, 144.

Prague, a surprizing comet seen there, 244.

Presbytery. See Church government. Struggle between them and the Independents in England, 93.

Preston, sir James, dispute in the French council about the money promised him for raising forces, 320. Payment of it delay'd, 337, & seq. His errand into England, 356. Disgusted at mons. Servien's answer to him, 388. Receives part of the money, 479. Disposal of it, ibid. Endeavours to draw the rest of the Irish from the Spaniards, 590. Reflections cast upon him, ibid. Goes with Hocquincourt to relieve Rosa, 595.

Prevost, Mr. governor of Pais de Maine, his son committed to the bastille for raising forces for prince Conde, 349.

Price, Mr. a minister at Amsterdam, abuses the English commonwealth in his sermons, 118.

Pride, col. opposes Richard Cromwell, 749.

Prideaux, Mr. Edmund, one of the parliament commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 59, 99. Abused by Lilburne, 367.

Procher, Henry, concern'd in the murder of Mr. Ascham at Madrid, 151. See Ascham.

Proger, Valentine, concern'd in the same, 151.

Protector. See Cromwell. None to be general and protector at the same time, after O. Cromwell, 645.

Protestants, of Languedoc, insulted and abused by the earl of Reiux, 446. Take arms to right themselves, ibid. Substance of their manifesto, 454. Charged with being mutinous, ibid. Means used to pacify them, 492. Refuse to disband, 532. Mistrust their deputy, 544. Fortify themselves at Vals, ibid. Depute mons. de Vestrie to represent their grievances to the king, 588. Heads of them, ibid. Lay down their arms upon a promise of redress, 590. Their deputies arrive at Paris, 622. Desire the performance of the king's promise, 659. But receive a very unsatisfactory answer, ibid.
-, — in France, in general desire a peace between England and Holland, 587. Glad of Cromwell's advancement to the protectorship, 657.
-, — of Rochechouart, barbarously treated by the marquis of Pompadour, 609. Complaint made of it by marshal Turenne's lady, 618.

Provisions, committee of, in Scotland, account of their proceedings, 173, 174.

Pudsey, Mr. Ralph, 403.

Purefoy, William, president of the English council of state, 214.

Pye, sir Robert, sent to suppress a disorderly meeting at Wickham, 67. His non-attendance at a muster excused upon that account, ibid. A treasurer of the royalists, 750.

Q.

Queen, Mary, of England, said to be impower'd by king Charles I. to settle the affairs of Ireland, 71. Goes to Challiot in France, 631. Her letters to Charles II. 676, & seq. Account of the reception of her daughter at Paris, 678. In great anxiety about the two dukes her sons, 679. Sick at Chaillot, 688. Her advice to king Charles about his two brothers, 690. Visited by the court, 693. Displeased that she cannot govern king Charles, 737.

Quincè, count de, commander in Piedmont, 355, 356. Recalled, 432.

R.

Racketts, Mrs. stabs her husband in his bed, 380. Occasion of it, ibid.

Radzisjouski, vice-chancellor of Poland, fails in his negotiations at Stockholm, 244.

Rainsborow, col. 96. Raises commotions in the army, 97. Brought over to the interest and designs of Oliver Cromwell, ibid.

Ramsey, col. narrowly escapes being taken prisoner in Scotland, 636.

Ratisbon, diet of, deferred in favour of the Austrian faction, 238. Their propositions, 313. Refuse to engage in the quarrel of either king Charles or the king of Poland, 366. Reason of it, 399. Nominate deputies to represent the grievances complained of by the emperor against France, 526.

Rave, marquis de, killed at the siege of Mouson, 504.

Readhead. See Roo-bal.

Recusants. See Papists.

Religion, explanation of the propositions relating thereto, delivered to the parliament of England by the Scots commissioners, 60. Proceedings of the commissioners at Uxbridge upon the articles concerning it, 63, 64, 68.

Rennes, parliament of. See Parliament.

Retz, cardinal de, offers a large sum of money to his guard to escape, but is prevented, 261, 262. His liberty requested by the parish-priests of Paris, 275. Ordered to be transported either to Amiens or Havre de Grace, 356, 639. A friend to king Charles II. 735. Assists him with his advice, 737. Refuses to be reconciled to cardinal Mazarin on dishonourable terms, 739, 741.

Revil, mynheer, opposes the putting of the question relating to a captain-general of the united provinces, 385.

Reynolds, Mr. 402.

Rheims, archbishoprick of, proposed to be given to the guard de Seaux of France, 631.

Rhetel, besieged by monsieur de la Ferte, 319. Surrenders to Turenne, 323, 332. The garrison joins prince Conde, 361.

Riba, John Baptista, murdered with Mr. Ascham at Madrid, 148. See Ascham.

Ribaledo, Conde, the Spanish ambassador in Denmark, 248.

Richards, Mr. his reflections upon the divisions in the English commonwealth, 500, 501.

Richardson, Mr. Peter, several of his letters intercepted, 367, 408.

Richault, messieurs. See Spain king.

Richelieu, marquis de, fights with the marquis de Nonan, 349. Reconciled by the queen, ibid. Arrives at Paris, 622.

Richmond, duke of, 52. One of the king's commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 56.
-, — duchess, goes to live in France, 734.

Ricou, monsieur. See Bertault.

Rieux, earl of, abuses the Protestants of Languedoc, 446. Refuses to obey the king's orders, 590. Desires to be reimbursed his charges, which is denied, 638. Ordered not to molest any person upon account of his religion, ibid.

Rigby, Mr. Alexander, 79.

Rillgotts, dies of the sickness at London, 407.

Riviere, abbot of, sollicits to be made archbishop of Rheims, 631.

Rivers, complains of being unjustly transported to Barbadoes, 745. And of others being in the same condition, 746.

Roan, parliament of. See Parliament.

Roberts, lord, informed against by Tyder, 749.

Robinson, his reflection upon sir Henry Vane, jun. 266.

Rochechouart. See Protestants.

Rochester, lord, receives intelligence from Armourer, 695. See Wilmet.

Rocroy, besieged by the Spaniards, 443, 446. Relief sent to it miscarries, 471. Proceedings in the siege, 475. Surrendered, 505.

Rogers, a dangerous cavalier, 707. A favourite of the duke of Buckingham, 716.

Rolle, earl of, the duke of Orleans's lieutenant in Languedoc, gives the Protestants leave to hold a synod at La Val, 446.

Rolph, major, accused of having undertaken to poison king Charles I. 98. Set at liberty upon bail, ibid.

Romans, king of. See Hungary. Proceedings in relation to the election of one, 238, 247, 248, 259. His guard settled, 259. Dispute betwixt the electors of Mentz and Cologne, about crowning him, determined in favour of Mentz, 297. Negotiation for a marriage between him and the infanta of Spain, 616.

Rome, court of, desire the continuance of the war between England and Holland, 237. Reflections upon the change in their politics, ibid. Issue an order about the price of corn, 434. Shy of the English, 610.

Roo-bal, put in nomination for admiral in the room of Tromp, 412.

Roothals, appointed to command the Dutch fleet in the Mediterranean, 499.

Roothoost, one of the commissioners at the Helder, 434.

Roquelaure. See Grancy. Marries count de Lude's sister, 478. His generosity to the princess de Guienne, ibid. His magnificent balls at Paris, 668.
-, — madame, plays before the French king in a ballet, 618. Her death, 679.

Rose, his release and repentance, 698.

Rosecarrot, a plotting cavalier, 712, seq.

Roses, a conspiracy to deliver it to the Spaniards discovered, 344. Besieged, 595. Relieved, 626. Loss at the relief of it, 634.

Rossi, one of the Neapolitan banditti, executed, 434.

Rotterdam, admiralty of, seize some arms and ammunition shipped by Middleton for Scotland, 398.
-, — town, suffers by a storm, 574.

Rovigni, monsieur, sent to pacify the Protestants in Languedoc, 492. Returns with the deputies of Nismes, 609.

Rouse, Mr. chosen speaker of the first parliament called by Oliver Cromwell, 338.

Rowe, scout-master-general of Oliver Cromwell's army, 100.

Roxburgh, earl of, cited to appear before the parliament of Scotland, 25.
-, — shire. See Tiviotdale.

Roze, general, marches with 4000 men into France, 379.

Rudolph, Gisbert, one of the Dutch commissioners in Portugal, 449. See Dutch commissioners.

Rupert, prince, his warrant for apprehending delinquents, 33. Raises the siege of Lathamhouse, 36. Endeavours to compel the inhabitants of Lancashire to join him, ibid. Defeated at Marston-moor, 38. Marches into Cumberland, 40. His army plunders Bishoprick, 41. Goes into Cornwall to the king, 48. His answer to the earl of Essex's letter, 59. His extraordinary freedom at taking leave of the king, 73. Included in the first qualification of persons to be proceed ed against by the parliament, 80. His message to the city of London, 97. Seizes several ships belonging to the states of Holland, 117. Several intercepted letters to him, 131, seq. See Portugal, king of. Commits depredations upon the English, 140, 141. Protected by the king of Portugal, 141. Declar'd a pirate by the par liament, 142, 145. His people commit several outrages upon the English at Lisbon, and hire persons to fire the vice-admiral, 145, 146. Entertain'd with his prizes in France, 233. In danger of being drowned, 306. Declared the duke of York's lieutenant-general by king Charles, 319. Proceedings at the French court in relation to his prizes, 344, 345, 357, 388. Retires to Nantes, 388. Offers his service to go into Scotland, 463. Cautions the king against trusting too much to Spain, 694.

Rutherford, capt. proceedings against him for delivering up the fort of South-sheels. 37.

Rutland, earl of, one of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Ruyter, vice-admiral, declares he will not go to sea without better ships, 296, 314. His commendation of Tromp, 411. Refuses to serve under De Witt, 422. Burns two English ships by means of some new-invented blunderbusses, 439. Joined in the command of the fleet with De Witt, 447. Made vice-admiral of Amsterdam and North Holland, 570, 571.

Ryetbeeck, a Dutch prisoner in England, makes his escape, 440.

S.

Sabran, Mr. opposes Montreuil, 71.

Salaway, major, an excluded member of parliament, 767.

Salisbury, earl of, one of the parliament commissioners at Uxbridge, 58. — For conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79. Inform'd against, 749.

Sallick, mynheer, one of the judges of the chambre-mipartie, 611.

Salmasius, author of a book against Milton, 267.

Sandys, Mr. justification of him, 278. Robb'd in his way to Paris, ibid.

Sanson, Mrs. taken prisoner by some of prince Conde's forces, 405.

Savoy, duke of, sides with the king of Spain, 262.
-, — duchess, sollicits the removal of the count de Quince, employ'd in Piedmont, 355, seq.

Saxby, incognito at Malines, 701. Apprehended as a royalist, 714.

Say, and Seal, lord, 33. One of the commissioners for conserving the peace, 79. Proposed to be made lord chamberlain to the protector, 645.

Scaep, mynheer, commissioner of the States of Holland at London, notifies his arrival, 133.

Scarsborough, castle, declares for king Charles I. 98.

Schagen, lord, arrested during the sitting of the States of Holland, released, 372.

Schatte, capt. taken prisoner by the English, 429.

Schellinger, capt. a Dutch prisoner, makes his escape, 452. Several persons imprison'd in his stead, 453. Dies during his concealment, 500.

Schellekens, a Dutch intelligencer at Frankfort, 617.

Schoppe, mynheer, representation of the low condition of the forces under his command, 562.

Scio, bashaw of, his son christen'd at Rome, 434.

Scobel, Mr. clerk of the English parliament, 338.

Scoeck, mynheer, his propositions to the States General, 518.

Scot, Mr. extracts of some letters in commendation of Mr. Benson's conduct, 555.
-, — capt. dangerously wounded, 400.
-, — major, a royalist inform'd against, 716.

Scotland, divided by the factions of Argyll and Hamilton 93. Rental of the revenue, 153, seq. New troubles there, suspected by the English government, 384. Precautions against them, 441.
-, — archbishopricks of, their yearly rents, and how disposed, 722.
-, — estates of. See Parliament of Scotland.
-, — general assembly. See Parliament. Their demands, 94. Excommunicate those of their body, who prosecuted the engagement against England. 99. Their declaration against it, 105, seq.

Scots, slight king Charles the first's proclamation of pardon, 2. Nobility in general incline to assist him, 92. Proceedings in relation to the engagement against England, 99, seq. 102, 104, seq. Invade England under duke Hamilton, 100. Defeated by Cromwell, 101. — at Dunbar, 163. March towards England, 195. Number of Scots highlanders said to be in arms for king Charles II. 400, 449, 467, 487, 610. Many of them desert, 442. Reports of their extraordinary success, 463, 467. Proceedings in order to reduce them, 478. Their declaration, 510. Make inroads upon the low-lands, 620, 623. Demand unreasonable contributions of the country, 635. Rob the post-boy, ibid. Spread reports of the king's being in Scotland, to forward their levies, ibid. Said to have defeated col. Lilburne, 641.

Scots, commissioners for managing the treaty with England, their instructions, 8, 9, 11, 12.
-, — for conserving the peace, 15. Their proceedings against incendiaries, 25. Commission sir David Home to remonstrate against the English sending troops to the borders of Scotland, 26. Justify the expedition into England, 34, seq.
-, — for the treaty with the parliament of England, 16. Impower'd to mediate a peace between the king and parliament, 19. Their reply to the king's answer to their propositions, ibid. Answer to his reply, 21. Copies of their instructions order'd to be given to Mr. Weldon, 26. Their last propositions to the king, ibid. Explanation of the propositions concerning religion, 60.
-, — commissioners appointed to treat with the lords and others, who sign'd the engagement against England, 99. Order'd to report their proceedings, 100. See Treaty.
-, — army in England. See Parliament. Propositions touching the payment of it, 11. Complaint of exorbitant demands made by the English commissioners for stating the debts of it, 76. Proceedings in relation to the satisfaction to be given for it, 84.
-, — in Ireland. See Parliament. Provisions for it sent to the committee of estates at Edinburgh, 33.

Scroock, mynheer, one of the commissioners at the Helder, 434.

Seal, great, proposition relating thereto, tender'd to king Charles I. by the two houses, 78.

Seguier, baron de St. Brisson, made provost of Paris, 615.

Segures, in Catalonia, refuses a Spanish garrison, 349.

Senecy, madame de, sells her place to cardinal Mazarin, 319.

Senlis, bishop of, his sudden death, 344.

Senneterre, marshal de. See Ferte.

Serra, marquis of, falls sick of a sever, 614.

Servien, mons. urges the payment of Preston's money, 320. One of the deputies appointed to conser with Boreel, 355. Obtains a grant of a commission of guard de Sceaux, 504, 631. Desirous that the French should arm by sea, 615.

Sestede, Hannibal, in favour with K. Charles II. 674. Goes to meet the princess of Orange, 699. Desires to be recommended to the queen of Bohemia, 700, & seq. His great professions to K. Charles, 701. Goes for Antwerp, 704.

Sesto, duke of, commands the van-guard of the Spaniards at Estei, 493.

Seymour, lord, one of the king's commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 56. Grows suspicious of Overton, 708.

Shaw, capt. goes to K. Charles II. at Paris, 480.

Ship, a new-invented one at Rotterdam, 521. See Dessox. Length of some to be built in Holland, 629.

Siara, mines, prove unsuccessful, 563.

Simonis, Mr. envoy of the elector of Cologne at the Hague, 541.

Simonssen, Gerrit. See Tromp.

Sinclair, lord, one of the Scots commanders at the seige of Newcastle, seconds the earl of Leven's advice for pursuing the enemy, 47, seq. Is against settling a garrison at St. Johnstoun, 50. Complains of a deficiency in many of the regiments, 50, 51. Desires several lords may be sent to assist in concluding some matters with the English commissioners, ibid.

Skelton, capt. an agent for K. Charles II. 711.

Skip, capt. acquitted of the charge of cowardice, 447.

Slanning, sir Nicholas, his posts in K. Charles I's army, 3.

Socinians, their meeting and writings prohibited in Holland, 508.

Soldiers, common, exempted from any penalty for adhering to K. Charles I. 82. Grow unruly, 368, 399.

Somerset, house, a tumult there, 368.

Sovian, father, preaches before the French king against the peace with Cromwell, 686.

Sound. See Treaty.

Southampton, earl of, 52. One of the king's commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 56.

South-sheills, fort, surrendered to K. Charles I's. forces, 35.

Souvray, marquis, sells his place to count de Lude, 478.

Spain, king of, desirous of cultivating a good understanding with the English parliament, 153. Gives order for admitting their ships into his ports, 154. Condemns Mr. Ascham's murderers, 189. His message to the French king, ibid. His answer to the popish clergy of Ulster, 221. Thought to hold secret intelligence with England against the Dutch, 360, 367. Revokes his orders for levying Irish, 362. Offers to treat with the Dutch against Portugal, 371, 374. His friendship to the English suspected, 387. Violently incensed against the Pope, 458, 656. Protects Languedoc, 544. Proceedings in relation to some wool belonging to him, attached by messeurs Richault, 578, seq. 602, seq. Publishes a confirmation of all the ancient privileges of the Catalans, 614.

Spaniards, disguise their hatred to the English parliament, 152, seq. Prevail in the election of a king of the Romans, 238. Retire from Bourdeaux, 363. Resolve to block up Paris, 389. Levy an army to march under the archduke into France, ibid. Take Casale from the French, 492. Defeat a party of French marching towards Milan, 493. Form designs against the United Provinces, 528. Furnish the duke of Lorrain with some regiments, 572. Defeated by marshal Hocquincourt, 625. Particulars of their loss, ibid. Declare war against Cromwell, 663. Willing to assist king Charles, 663, 667. How far it is their interest so to do, 678, 688. Uncertainty whether they will carry on the war, 689. Though much for their interest, 690. Begin to treat again with Cromwell, ibid. & seq. Make new overtures, 693, seq. Yet are mistrustful of him, 698. Declare war against him, 702. A confirmation of it, 703. Ready to break off with France, 740. Their measures and agreements discovered, 752, & seq. Narrative of their negotiations with Oliver Cromwell, 759, & seq.

Spanish fleet, retreats to St Sebastians, 446.
-, — plate fleet, sum reported to be brought in it, 322.
-, — dominions, greatly reduced by their false maxims of government, 458.
-, — ambassador at the Hague. See Brun. Complains of king Charles II's councils being betrayed, 684. Promises him great matters from his court, 703, seq.
-, — — at London. See Cardenas.
-, — — in Sweden. See Pimentel.
-, — — at Ratisbon. See Castle-Rodriguez. His magnificence, 297.
-, — advocate, arrives in England to reclaim some silver, 316. Agreement touching the restitution of it, made, 553.

Sparkes, Mr. murders Mr. Ascham, 149. See Ascham.

Sparrow, Mr. a commissioner of prize-goods at London, 603.

Speakers, of the parliament of England. See Manchester, Lenthall, and Pelham.

Spensfield, John, an Irish priest, desires Dr. Tyrrel to get his privileges renewed, 407. Particulars of them, ibid. His letter to Peter Nugent intercepted, ibid.

Spiering, Peter, the Swedish resident at the Hague, 113. Recalled, 115. Sent thither again, 187. Subject of his commission, ibid. Sent into England, 206. Dies, ibid.

Spinola, John Stephano, sent to procure satisfaction for two ships belonging to the Genoese used by the States General, 438. His declaration touching the satisfaction offered for the said ships, 509. Takes his leave, ibid.

Spotswood, Sir . . . . taken prisoner at Selkirk, 72.

Squib, Mr. a member of the parliament called by Oliver Cromwell, 289.

Sta Clara, ship. See Manwaring and Cardenas.

Stadtholder of Holland, great debates about the nomination of one, 253, 326, 329.

Stagg, Mr. one of the commissioners for reducing Virginia, 197.

Stamford, earl of, a commissioner for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Stainer, Jacomo, an intercepted letter from him, 298.

Stapley, col. one of the English council of state, 395.
-, — Mr. expects a pardon and commission from king Charles II. 708. Receives six commissions for Sussex, 718.

Stapylton, sir Robert, his account of the reception of Whitelocke in Sweden, 645, seq. Cautions the protector against some of the council, 646.

States General. See Dutch and Treaty. Refuse audience to Mr. Strickland, 114. Reason of it, ibid. Their answer to the protest of the states of Holland thereupon, 124. Appoint commissioners to confer with the English ambassadors, 174. Their declaration touching the renewal and improvement of the alliance with England, 176. Concerning some of the articles of the treaty with England, 189. And upon the discontinuance of the said treaty, 191. Grant leave to export contraband goods under certain limitations, 234, 273. Their answer to the queen of Sweden's offer of mediation betwixt them and England, 234, seq. Their order touching some guns embargoed in Sweden, 243. And upon the proposal of an alliance with France and Brandenburgh, ibid. Their resolution concerning a treaty with England, 255. Questions deliberated upon, previous to the said negotiations, 257. Their order upon the memorial of the Swedish resident, 265. Resolve to treat with England, 268. Their account of an engagement with the English, 273. Differ about the manner of beginning the treaty, 277. Extracts of some instructions to their deputies, 282. seq. And their ambassador Boreel, 283. Aim at destroying Cromwell's government and setting up the Presbyterians, ibid. Order one of their deputies to depart immediately for England, 284. Narrative of their obligations and ill-behaviour towards the English, 290–292. Resolve upon an extraordinary deputation to Denmark, 332. Subject of it, ibid. & 335, & seq. Considerations upon their interest to drop the king of Denmark, 342. Divided about the choice of a captain-general, 359. Propositions tendered to their consideration, 360. Their proceedings upon the question for chusing a captain general, 364, seq. Order all English prisoners to be detained, 373. Refuse to engage in the war between France and Spain, 374. Desirous of getting Spain, into a league with them against England, ibid. Encouragement given to their officers and mariners, 375, 398. Forbid the officers leaving the fleet upon pain of death, ibid. Order a general fast, 382. And posts to be settled along the coast for sending information to and from Tromp, 390. Their answer to the proposition of the States of Holland for prohibiting foreign princes coming into their territories, 391. Persons nominated by them for the charge of admiral in the room of Tromp, 412. Form of the order for a fast, ibid. Their proceedings upon the report of the deputies, returned from England, 418, 439. Their order relating to the funeral of Tromp, 423. Order the particulars of the last battle to be published, 427. Their answer to several memorials of the Swedish resident, 436. Give 5000 guilders to the Dutch Church at London, 439. Send a private man of war to surprize the English at Barbadoes, 447. Incline to a league with Spain against Portugal, 449. Are for recalling the two deputies in England, 451. Oppose Opdam's being made sole admiral, ibid. & 455, 486. Resolve to invite the Hans Towns to a common alliance, 455. Unsuccessful in their treaties, 460. Jealous of the Hans Towns, 461. Their proceedings in relation to the renewal of the treaty with England, 489, 522, 528, 535. Jealous of one another, 493. Agree to the transportation of contraband goods, 497. Offended at the Hamburghers supplying the Engglish with ammunition, 498. Continue the ships in the Mediterranean, 499. Order a fast to be kept every week, 507. Method proposed for raising money, 508, 510. Their resolutions touching the Genoese ships used in their service, 509. Upon the propositions of the deputy of Guelderland, 518. Concerning Opdam's taking the command of the fleet, 528. About erecting a chambre-mipartie, 533. And the renewal of the treaty with England, 535, 542. Order the English prisoners to be released, 538. Issue a proclamation for the payment of the 1000th penny, 539, 551. Resolve to send commissioners to Regensburgh, 543. Their resolutions upon the report of their commissioners for the affairs of Denmark, 556. Their proceedings upon the return of the fleet under De Witt, 557, 560, seq. Endeavour to oblige Denmark, 558. And resolve to assist him against the resentment of the English, 572. Proposal for raising the 200th penny, 573. Resolve to call in their fleet, 575. Oppose the passage and quartering of the Lorrainers upon their borders, 592, seq. 617. Their demands touching the respect to be paid to their commissioners by the French ambassador, 593. Proceed vigorously in their preparations for carrying on the war against England, 594. Complain of the French taking their ships contrary to promise, 609. Dismiss the commissioners of the elector of Cologne, 611. Offended at the secrecy observed by their deputies in England, 614. The prevailing party afraid of the house of Orange, 625.

States provincial of Holland, agree to build thirty new frigates, 585.

St. Aulnes, sends ammunition into Leucate, 455.

St. Croix, marquis de, ordered to Barcelona to prevent a revolt, 344.

Steel, recorder of London, manages the charge against John Lilburne, 367.
-, — lord chancellor, made one of the protector's council, 731.

Stellingwerf, mynheer, opposes the putting of the question in the States General about a captain general, 364.
-, — captain, a Dutch prisoner in England, dies, 484.

Sterry, Mr. opposed by Oliver Cromwell to Feake, 621.

St. Estienne, marquis, the prince of Conde's ambassador to the emperor, 279.

Stewart, Dr. one of the king's commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 56.

Stewarts, family of, an account of their misfortunes printed in Holland, 127. Proposal for excluding them from the crown, 753.

St. John, Oliver, one of the parliament commissioners for for the treaty at Uxbridge, 59. His letter to O. Cromwell, 75. One of the English commissioners for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79. One of the ambassadors to manage the treaty of union begun at the Hague, 187. Lord chief justice, 205. Congratulates Mr. Thurloe upon his being appointed clerk to the council of state, ibid. made lord treasurer to the protector, 645.

St. Johns, Mrs. 1.

St. Mallows. See Merchants.

St. Menehould, besieged by the French, 332, 544, 548. Reinforced, 533. With what view invested, 544. Siege not rightly laid, 564. Garrison fires upon the French king, 570. Surrenders by composition, 595. Governor bribed, ibid. Loss sustained by the French in the siege, 609. Two persons imprisoned for insinuating that it was taken by bribery, 615.

Stockart, commissioner from the Swiss cantons in London, his conference with the Dutch deputies, 323.

Stockholm, two houses there infected, 472.

Stocktoun, surrendered to the earl of Calander, 41.

Stone, Samuel, his account of the proceedings of K. Charles's agents at Ratisbon, 247.
-, — sir Robert, several letters to and from him intercepted, 384, 421, 431, 467.
-, — capt. quarrels with la Mere, 671. The consequences prevented by K. Charles, 672, 674.

St. Paul, — sent by a German with offers to the French king, 348.

St. Quintin, said to be besieged by prince Condé, 332.

Strickland, sir William, a commissioner for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.
-, — Mr. Walter, the parliament's resident at the Hague, 112. See States General, and Holland. His memorial to the states of Holland, complaining of the delay of his audience, 113. His letters about one Crawford expelled Amsterdam, 114. 126. Substance of what passed at his audience of the states of Holland, 114. Presses the restitution of a Dutch ship taken by the English, 115, seq. Advises the parliament to preserve their interest in the states of Holland, 115, 117, 118.—122. His high commendation of them, 118, seq. Complains of the English merchants at Rotterdam, ibid. Receives information of a design to murder him, 120. His answer to the states of Holland touching their ship taken by the English, 122. Expostulates the wrong done to the parliament by their treaty with Oliver French, 123. Writes to Amsterdam about salt-petre, 126, 128. His opinion of a coalition, 130. One of the ambassadors for the treaty of union begun at the Hague, 187. And one of the council of state, 395.

Strode, sir George, 80.

Stuart, adjutant general, taken prisoner at Selkirk, 72.

Sutherland, capt. William, censured and imprisoned, 173.

Suze, count de, with prince Montbelliard, and others, raises forces to oppose the duke of Lorrain's passage, 618. Said to be declared count de Beffort, and of the empire, 630. Reconciled with Harcourt, ibid.

Swartzenburgh, count de, 245, 284. Disliked by the Spaniards, 361.

Swearing and cursing, proclamation against it in the province of Utrecht, 328.

Sweden, See Treaty. Well inclined towards England, 130. Considerations of the usefulness of an alliance with Sweden to England, 226. Resolve to observe a neutrality between England and Holland, 236, 271. Project of an alliance between them and Spain, 329. Resolve to keep the peace with Denmark, 341. And to make England their magazine, instead of Holland, 463. Disgusted with the Hollanders for their union with Denmark, ibid.

Sweden, queen of, Her remonstrance against the treaty carrying on between the Danes and Hollanders about the Sound, 112. Well-affected towards England, 130. Complains of the English commanders taking the ships of her subjects, 219, seq. Offers her mediation betwixt England and Holland, 224. Concludes a peace with the elector of Brandenburgh. 246. Promotes the election of the king of the Romans, 259. Remark upon her policy, 267. Her answer to the proposal of a joint alliance with Denmark and Holland, 305. Her remarkable civility to the Spanish ambassador, 376. Talk of a marriage between her and the king of the Romans, 389. Expresses her dislike of the king of Denmark's engaging with Holland, 410, Rejects their proposal of an alliance against England, ibid. & 426, 439, 461, 472, 524, 573. Proposes an alliance with Denmark to maintain the Sound, 411. Advises him to drop the Dutch, ibid. Her declaration relating to convoys, 424, — 426. Declines the Dutch resident's proposal about Bremen, 461. Accused of ingratitude by the Dutch, ibid. Her further answer to the Dutch ambassador upon the proposed alliance, 474. Alters her resolation of removing the court to Gottenburgh, 506. Sends commissioners to conser with the Danish ambassador, ibid. Though not unwilling to engage against the Dutch, 528. Her real design in continuing the court at Gottenburgh, 559. Desirous of entering into an alliance with England, ibid. Seizes upon the estates of the Dutch in Sweden, but releases them upon certain conditions, 595. Her letter to the prince of Sweden concerning the great treasurer, 636. Excuses the mistake in the English ambassador's credentials, 646. Declares she will not treat with England to the prejudice of Holland or Denmark, 652, 654. Receives all the overtures of the English ambassador herself, 656. Has an interview with K. Charles, 676. Her character drawn by lord Aubigny, 742.
-, — king of, his grand embassy to Denmark, 699. His high demands on Dantzick, 702.
-, — queen, brought to bed of a Son, 673.

Swedish, ambassador, at London. See Lagerseldt.
-, — resident at the Hague, his memorial against the placart, 264. Order thereupon, 265, 308. Answer to that and several other memorials relating to the same, 436. His memorandum touching the said answer, 536. Sea Appleboam and Spiering.

Swiss, cantons, offer their mediation between England and Holland, 323. Roman catholic peasants, revolt from their landlords, 618.
-, — commissioner at London. See Stockart.

Sword, James, 43, & seq.

Sydenham, col. governor of the Isle of Wight, 158. Appointed by Oliver Cromwell to serve for the county of Dorset, 274, 275. One of the council of state, 369, 395.

Symonds, his sundry informations about Hewit's plot, 708, seq. 712, — 720.

T.

Taelman, capt. Cornelius, taken prisoner by the English, 429.

Talbot, Thomas, warrant issued to apprehend him, 407. His cabals, 732. Receives a commission from K. Charles II. 752.
-, — father Peter, consulted by K. Charles, 662, 752.

Tambonneau, mons. absconds, to avoid the payment of a tax imposed by the French court, 607.

Tarente, prince of, joins prince Condé with some German troops, 356. Makes his peace with the French court, 532. His cold reception at Paris, 687.

Taylor, Mr. K. Charles II.'s agent at Ratisbon, 238, 467.

Teelince, Maximilian, the Dutch minister at Middleburg, 468, 477.

Telliere, mons. secretary to the French king, 312. Inveighs against general Preston, 590.

Temple, sir John, conference proposed to be held with him about the affairs of Ireland, 66.

Terranova, duke of, sent ambassador to Rome, 586.

Terry, father William, an Irish priest, employed with father Donough O Mulkahigh, to draw the Irish in Flanders over to king Charles II. 619.

Texel, blocked up by the English fleet, 317, 324.

Thelwall, Mr. Peter, the English resident at Brussels, desires satisfaction may be given to the duke of Lorrain's resident affronted at London, 137.

Thomlinson, col. chosen to sit in the new parliament called by Cromwell, 339. One of the council of state, 369, 395.

Thou, mons. one of the banished members of the parliament of Paris, returns, 639.

Thurloe, John, esq; his reflections upon the Dutch, 186. Chosen secretary to the council of state, 205. Recovers from a dangerous illness, 635. An information offered to be made to him of a conspiracy against the protector. 757. Conditions of the discovery, 758, seq. His account of the negotiations between England, France, and Spain from Oliver Cromwell down to the Restoration, 759, seq.

Thysius. See Tromp Van.

Tillier, major general, taken prisoner at Marston-moor, 38.

Tilly, lieut. gen. defeats 2000 Spaniards, 349.

Tinmouth, castle, declares for K. Charles I. 98, Retaken, ibid.

Tirell, doct. resident for the Irish at Paris, supported by prince Rupert against K. Charles's chancellor, 337. A letter to him intercepted, 407.

Titus, col. memorial relating to the detention of his son in Spain, delivered to the Spanish ambassador, 445.

Tiviotdale, shire of, answer to a letter from the privy council concerning the levying of forces there, 18.

Toleration, act of. See Church-government.

Toll, Mr. 79.

Tolson, Mr. ibid.

Tomson, Will. his advice to Oliver Cromwell, 311, seq.

Torre, don Geraldino, secretary of state to the K. of Spain, 148.

Toulongeon, count de, governor of Bayonne, 349.

Toulouse, parliament of. See Parliament.

Trade, committee for it in England, only nominal, 498.

Transplantation, act of, the only cause of the attachment of the Irish to king Charles II. 562. Translated into several languages at Paris, ibid.

Transylvania, prince of, joined with the prince of Moldavia, defeats a party of Cossacks sent to succour the prince of Walachia, 476.

Traquair, earl of, the king's commissioner to the parliament of Scotland, 3. Complaint and proceedings against him, 3, 7, 76. Sent to king Charles I. to dispose him to comply with their demands, 87. Chosen one of the committee to govern the kingdom in the absence of the parliament, 89.

Treaty. Instructions to the Scots commissioners appointed to manage the treaty between the king and parliament of England, and the Scots, 8, 9, 11. Article touching the removal of the English garrisons out of Berwick and Carlisle, 8, 11, 26. Explanation of the article concerning the castle of Edinburgh, 9 —Heads of the treaty for the coming of the Scots army into England, propounded by the English commissioners, 27, seq. Articles agreed upon, 29, seq. Separate articles relating to the garrison of Berwick, 31.—A paper relating to the treaty at Uxbridge, 54. Safe-conduct for the commissioners to meet, 56. Lists of them and their attendants, 57, seq. Their proceedings in the treaty, 61– 64, 66, 68, 70. An omission in the ordinance, impowering the commissioners to treat, 61. Supplied, 62. Time of the treaty enlarged, 68. Method of conducting it, 69. — Proposition concerning the treaties between England and Scotland, tender'd to king Charles I. 79. — Instructions to the commissioners appointed to manage the treaty with the Scots lords, who sign'd the engagement against England, 100. Articles agreed upon, 104. — Treaty between king Charles I. and the parliament, set on foot in the isle of Wight, 103. — Treaty of redemption of the tolls in the Sound, concluded, 127. Reflections upon it, 226. Annulled by the treaty of Rescission, 266, 482. Articles of that treaty, 482. Ratified, 558. — Proceedings in the treaty of Union between England and Holland, begun at the Hague, 179, 183, 188, –190. Articles propounded by the English ambassadors, 182. Discontinued, 191. Recapitulation of the proceedings therein, 193. Renew'd at London; 201. Further proceedings therein, 205, 206. Broken off, 211. — Heads of a treaty between England and Sweden, propounded, 229, seq.— Proposal for a treaty between the States General and elector of Cologne, for the defence of Liege, 243, 541. Proceedings in it, 593. Objections made by the States of Holland against the article of forces, ibid. Reply of the commissioners of the elector to that objection, ibid. Treaty broken off, 611, 655. —State and progress of the treaty between France and Holland, 269, 283, 310, 365, 374, 400, 411. Articles propounded by the French court, 365. Treaty at a stand, 422, 446. Reason of it, ibid. — Proceedings in the treaty of peace between England and Holland, 308, seq. 315, seq. 337, 370, 372, 381, seq. 394. Substance of the introduction to it deliver'd by the English commissioners, 372. Article of coalition propounded by the council of state, 382. Treaty at a stand, 395. Objections to the proposed coalition, 410. Substance of some propositions sent from the Hague to Oliver Cromwell, 517. Conditions demanded by the English upon the renewal of the treaty, 566, 570. Articles offer'd to the consideration of the merchants upon that occasion, 566, –569. Further proceedings therein, 576, 582, 584, 600; seq. 620, 643. Answer of the protector and council to a paper of the Dutch deputies, touching several articles of this treaty, 607. Violently opposed by a faction in the kingdom, 612. Carried on with the utmost secrecy, 614, 621. Reflections upon some of the articles propounded by the English, 616, 653. Points in dispute, 624, 643. Safe-conduct for the deputies, to make report of their proceedings therein, desired, 650.—Treaty between England and Portugal concluded, 350. Conditions of it, ibid. & 396. Execution of it, why retarded, 499. — Treaty between Holland and Portugal secretly carry'd on, 360. Obstructions to it, ibid. Articles propounded by the States General, 468, seq. Treaty unsuccessful, 481. — Treaty between England and France very far proceeded in during the long parliament, 396. Heads of one propounded by the French ambassador, 400. Concluded, 666. Peace proclaim'd, ibid. New difficulties started against it, 685, 687, & seq. Ratified, and proclaim'd afresh, 690. Article touching the exclusion of king Charles and his two brothers, 761. —Treaty between France and the protestant princes of Germany set on foot, 446. —A secret treaty for a truce between France and Spain begun, 514. Treaty proposed by the Spanish ambassador to the protector, 705. Several articles of it, 706. Account of the treaties between England, France, and Spain, 759, — 763.

Tregoes, a tumult raised there by the prince of Orange's party, 300. Refuses to obey the States command, 318.

Trelauny, a plotting royalist, 313, & seq.

Trevor, a male-content, order'd to be secured, 726.

Tribunal iniquitatis, a treatise reflecting upon the English parliament, forbid to be publish'd, 550, 604.

Trivulsio, cardinal, appointed to succeed cardinal Caponio, 586.

Tromp, Van, a remonstrance against his coming with a fleet to the islands of Scilly, 177. Sails northward, to observe the motions of the English, 239. Declares for the prince of Orange, 253. Returns with the fleet, 257. Reinforced, ibid. & 260. Sails for the Downs to surprize the English, ibid. Forbidden to land men in England, 258. Motion for recalling him debated, 260. His account of an engagement wherein he was worsted, 269, 270, seq. In want of powder in that engagement, 280. His memorials relating to the condition and reinforcement of the fleet, 288. Declares he will not go to sea without better ships, 314, 328. Number he expects, ibid. Thought to have a design upon some part of England, 327. Character given of him by the English, 331. Method intended to be pursued by him to oblige his officers to do their duty, 341. His fleet, and plan for action, 359. Desires a further reinforcement, 364. His orders, ibid. Charged with being the occasion of the war, 367, 394, 462. His ruin sought by the English, 367. Strength of his fleet, 382, 406. Order'd to fight the English, 391. Kill'd, 392, Honours done him by the Dutch, 406, 411, 413. Orders relating to his funeral, 420, 423, seq. And the promotion of his servant Gerrit Simonssen, 424. Ceremony observed by the burghers of Delst at his funeral, 439. Accused of rashness, 441. Much lamented by the Orange party, 450. Reward given to Thysius for his funeral oration, 592.

Tromp, jun. takes an English ship, and retakes a Dutch prize under the castles of Trappa, 345, seq. Order'd home, 346. Longed for in Holland, 398. Made commander in chief of the ships in the Mediterranean, 437, 461. Stays on the coast of France, 548. Sails from Rochell, 564. Made rear admiral of Holland, 570.

Turenne, marshal, disgusted at cardinal Mazarin's being named generalissimo of the French forces, 304. Desires to retire, ibid. Makes light of prince Conde, 311. Complains of the French officers having spent the money they received for recruits, and quitted the service, 318. Gets between prince Conde and the archduke's forces, 319. Deceived in his opinion about the prince's army, 320. His troops disband for want of pay, 322. Endeavours to intercept prince Conde, 337. The strength of his army, 354, 388. Declines giving prince Conde battle, 354, & seq. Endeavours to surprize him, 356. His army much weaken'd thereby, ibid. Inferior to prince Conde's, 387. Reinforced. ibid. Order'd to stand upon the defensive, 388. Goes to make a diversion towards Ardres, 455. Besieges Mouson, 473. Quarrel between him and marshal de la Ferte, 478. Takes Mouson, 503. Opposes the execution of several gentlemen at Paris, 532. Puts his army into winter quarters, 615. Arrives at Paris, 618. Meets the king and cardinal at Nugent, 619. Visited by the Dutch ambassador, 634. Returns the visit, 639.
-, — lady, promises to intercede for justice to the protestants of Rochchouart, 609. Complains to mons. de Servient about the barbarities used towards them, 618.

Turks, make an inroad into Hungary, and are well beaten, 366. Their fleet block'd up by the Venetians, 432. Sail to the relief of Canea, 434. Surprize fort Selino, 458. Put the garrison to the sword, 493. Prevail against the Venetians, 570. Their bloody skirmish with admiral Blake, 688.

Turkey, trade, ingrossed by the French and Dutch, 437.

Twisden, Thomas, his opinion about the legality of an attachment of some goods belonging to the king of Spain, 604.
-, — Mr. a royalist treasurer, 750.

Tybau, mynheer, desired to take upon him the government of Middleburgh, 363.

Tyder, his account of a plot against the protector, 749.

Tyson, major, commander of a company in the isle of Ely, 358.

Tysson, capt. punishment insticted upon him for not doing his duty, 508.

Tythes, how to be apply'd, 83. Great debates about them in parliament, 368, seq. 387. Referr'd to the consideration of a committee, 368, seq.

V.

Val, du, recommended to king Charles II. 687.

Vane, sir Henry, junior, 59, 79. His answer to a letter from the council, inviting him to London, 265. Why discarded from fitting in parliament, 767.
-, — senior, a commissioner of the revenue, 66. — For conserving the peace, 79.
-, — Charles, esq; the English resident at Lisbon, his memorial relating to prince Rupert, 140. Order'd to prosecute his instructions, 141. His second memorial about prince Rupert, ibid. Instruction to the generals at sea, concerning him, 145. His third memorial relating to prince Rupert, ibid.
-, — sir Walter, several letters to and from him intercepted, 384, 394, 610, 612, 627.

Varde, mons. de, succeeds mons. de Monmege, 688.

Vassal, Samuel, a commissioner for conserving the peace, 79.

Vaubcourt, count de. See Netancourt.

Vaughan, sir Henry 80.
-, — sir George, 80.
-, — Edward, a powerful royalist in Wales, 749.

Vautort, the French ambassador at Ratisbon, his errand, 297. His first audience without pomp, 313.

Velson, capt. his ship blown up in an engagement with the English, 269.

Vendosme, duke de, ordered to publish the act for freedom of the Dutch commerce, 185. Difference between him and cardinal Mazarin, 285. Ordered to make himself master of Bourg, 311. Takes two Spanish frigates, ibid. Takes Bourg and Libourne, 344. Enters Bourdeaux, 379. Disgusted with the court, 526. In want of sailors, 548. Beats the Spaniards in the Garonne, 564. Retires from Bourdeaux on account of the sickness, 590. Returns to Paris, 615. Ordered to guard the coast of Guienne and Rochelle, 634.

Venetians, mediate a peace between Spain and Portugal, 237. Block up the Turkish fleet in the port of Rhodes, 432. Take several of their ships, 434. Worsted by them, 570. Make a present to the duke of Mantua, 580. Desire leave to raise forces in France, 625.
-, — ambassador, at Madrid, refuses refuge to Mr. Ascham's murderers, 149.
-, — — at Paris, mediates a peace between France and France, 244. His propositions rejected, 336. Remonstrates against an intended expedition to Naples, 609.
-, — envoy at London, negotiates a peace, 698. See Pauluzzi.

Vernon, Henry, engages to raise forces in Cheshire, 749.

Vestrie, monsieur de, sent by the protestants of Languedoc to the French court, substance of his instructions, 588.

Veth, burgomaster, his death, 266.
-, — Jacob, his instructions relating to the choice of a captain-general, 359. Proposes the question to the States General, 364.

Vic, mynheer de, compliments king Charles II. in the name of the archduke, 677.

Vickers, a royalist treasurer for London, 750.

Vien, Chasteau, garrison'd by the governor of Clermont, 639.

Viencourt, monsieur, withdraws with his effects for fear of prince Conde, 387.

Vienville, monsieur de, designed to be sent ambassador to Rome, 631.

Villa, marquis de, wounded at Estei, 493.

Villeroy, marshal de, courted by the cardinal, 336. One of the deputies appointed to treat with the Dutch ambassador, 354.

Vincent, sir Francis, to raise a party for king Charles II. in Surrey, 748.

Virginia, instructions to the commissioners appointed to reduce it, 197.

Ulefield, count de, proceedings in relation to a paper delivered by his order to the court of Denmark, 357. His estate confiscated, 473.

Ulster, see Papists. Clergy apply to the king of Spain for relief against the English, 221.

Voisin, monsieur, falls sick in the bastille, 379.

Uries, monsieur de, the Dutch resident in Denmark, his reception and negotiation, 287. Thanks the king for the favour shewn to the Dutch fleet, 617.

Urilliere, monsieur de la, secretary of state to the French king, 479.

Vrybergen, mynheer van, raedt-pensionary of Zealand, correspondence between him and Vand Perre, 373, 490, 528, 553.

Usher, Dr. his pension continued, 112.

Utrecht, magistrates of, chosen by the burgesses contrary to the usual method, 187.
-, — states of, issue a proclamation against cursing aud swearing, 328. Determine to act in concert with Holland in the affair of a captain-general, 368. Their resolution for renewing the treaty with England, 533.

Uxbridge treaty. See Treaty.

Uxelles, marquis de, defeated by prince Conde, 304.

W.

Waldgrave, sir Edward, 81.

Wales, prince of, his letter to general Fairfax, 72.

Walker, William, one of the judges of the admiralty, 165.
-, — doctor, sent for to a committee of council, 579.

Walleis, general, joins the lord Fairfax's army at Southampton, 49.

Waller, sir William, in the plot against the protector, 749.

Wards, and Liveries, courts of, proposition relating to them, tender'd to king Charles I. 79.

Warmont, capt. taken prisoner by the English, 302.

Warwick, earl of, a commissioner for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79. Inform'd against, 749.

Waterford, said to be taken by the Scots, 630.

Wauchape, sir John, 43. Appointed governor of Newcastle, 51.

Waughe, Mr. John, imprison'd at Edinburgh for praying for king Charles II. 478.

Webster, Mr. 121. Advises against king Charles's removing to Holland, 449. Dissuades the Dutch from agreeing with the English, 514. Refuses to lend money for the use of king Charles, ibid.

Weims, earl of, king Charles's commissioner in the parliament of Scotland, 7.

Welden, Michael, sent into Scotland by the parliament of England. 24. Subject of his message, 25, 26.

Wenman, lord, one of the parliament commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 59.

Wentworth, lord, sent by king Charles II. to Denmark, 237. Received with great solemnity, 272. Remonstrates against their obstructing the trade to the Baltic, 341. An enemy to chancellor Hide, 726.

West-Friesland. See Holland, states of.

Westmeath, mons. de, gain'd to the French court, 311.

Westphalia, province of, gives umbrage to the Dutch by pretending to arm against the Lorrainers, 541

Wharton, lord, his letter to the parliament of Scotland, 37. One of the English commissioners for conserving the peace, 79.

Wheeler, his information concerning Hewit's plot, 713, seq.

Whitelocke, Bulstrode, esq; one of the parliament commissioners for the treaty at Uxbridge, 59. Sent with a message to the two houses, 69. Declares the parliament not dissolved, 249. Appointed ambassador to Sweden, 470. Order of the house relating thereto, 480. His attendance and allowance, 500. Sets out for Sweden, 575. Dignified with the title of constable of Windsor, 577. His dangerous voyage, 601. Received with great marks of respect, 602, 645, seq. His coaches said to be eaten by rats, 627. A mistake in his credentials 646. His first audience, and the manner of his reception by the queen, 652. Signifies his arrival to the Spanish and French ambassadors, but not to the ambassador of Denmark, ibid. Visited by the Spanish ambassador, ibid. Represents the English government as very powerful, 654. Obtains two private audiences, 656.

Whitmore, sir George, a royalist, treasurer for Norfolk, 750.

Wichcoat, Mr. another for the Inner Temple, ibid.

Wickham. See Pye, sir Robert.

Widrington, sir William, 80.
-, — sir Thomas, a commissioner for conserving the peace between England and Scotland, 79.

Wilde, dr. holds a royalist conventicle, 715, & seq.

William, count, lies with his company in the Texel, 317. In danger of being murder'd at Amsterdam, 318. Hated by the Hollanders, 329. Nominated for the prince of Orange's lieutenant by the states of Zealand, 369. And Groningen, 450. Made president of a court for deciding the differences of Groningen and Ommeland, 612. Goes to Friesland, 627. His saying of Desson's machine, and admiral Opdam, 629.

William, capt. concern'd in the murder of Mr. Ascham at Madrid, 149. See Ascham. One of Deane's Associates, 712.

Wilmot, lord, king Charles Il's ambassador at Ratisbon, 238. His proceedings in his negotiations, 242, 246, seq. Secretly opposed by the Spanish ambassador, 258, seq. Receives a denial from the Diet, 366. His business referr'd again to the assembly, 399. Proceedings in it, 581. Inform'd against by lady Gennings, 748.

Wilson, Matthew, his letter to Mr. Goodwin intercepted, 380.

Wines, French, forbidden to be imported into England, 117, 132. Observations upon it, ibid.

Winton, marquis of, orders for settling his lands in Hampshire upon Oliver Cromwell, 75. Included in the second qualification of persons proposed to be proceeded against by the English parliament, 80.

Wirtemberg, duke of, dismisses all his wife's French servants, 343. Joins his forces with the achduke, 349. Returns home from the Diet, 433.

Witch, sir Peter, the English ambassador to the grand seignior, 2.

Witt, de, vice admiral, sides with Amsterdam against the prince of Orange, 253. Declares the Dutch fleet inferior to that of the English, 314. When to join Tromp, 359. Order'd to get the East India ships ready, 375. His account of the last battle with the English, 392. Complains of the cowardice of some of his officers, ibid. His character, 411. Groundless report of his being stabb'd, 412. Appointed admiral of the fleet sitted out after Tromp's death, 412. An enemy to the house of Orange, 413. Disliked by the seamen, 414. Sets sail with De Ruyter, 449, seq. Arrives in the Sound, 466, seq. Returns with part of the fleet, 513. Desires the rest of the fleet in the Texel may be sent him, 520. Arrives in Holland, 557. Bad state of his fleet, 558. Declared next in rank to Opdam, 559. Blamed for coming into the Texel, 560, 561. Made vice admiral of the Maeze, 571. Difference between him and Everts, how decided, 573. In disgrace, 598.

Witt, John de, 339. Chosen pensionary of Holland, 350. Accepts the office, 359. Sent for by the states of Holland, 364. Opposes the prince of Orange's being made captain general, 364, seq. Sworn into his office, 365. His reflections upon the proposal for chusing a captain general, 369. His propositions relating to the fleet under Tromp, over-ruled, 390. Presses the States General to make an order to prohibit foreign princes coming into their territories, ibid. His house in danger of being pull'd down by the boys at the Hague, 391. Displeases the States General by communicating Middleton's business to Beverning, 496. His advice to him thereupon, ibid. His opinion about the renewal of the treaty with England, 528, 529. His answer to Beverning and Newport's letter about their proceedings in the treaty, 600. Harangues the States General against the English, 629. Proposes an alliance with France, Poland, and Denmark, ibid.

Wogan, col. several of his letters intercepted, 305, seq. Brings men with him out of England into Scotland, 638.

Women, preach at London, 368, 393.

Woodhouse, Mr. William, appointed consul at Tunis, 2.

Wooll, Spanish, considerations of the advantages thereof to England, 200.

Worcester, earl of, his lands in that county settled upon O. Cromwell, 75. Included in the second qualification of persons proposed to be proceeded against, 80.

Wotton, Mr. his letter to lieut. Hickeringil intercepted, 546.

Wrangel, lord, field marshal of Sweden, 524.

Wray, sir John, 79.

Wrenn, Matthew, bishop of Ely, included in the first qualification of persons proposed to be proceeded against, 80.

Wurts, col. See Curts.

Y.

York, city of, besieged by the parliament's forces, 36, 37. Surrenders, 39.
-, — duke of, goes to serve under marshal Turenne, 319. His speech to the king at his departure, ibid. Declared admiral of Great Britain, ibid. Some of his regiment worsted by a party of prince Conde's, 478. Much esteem'd in the French army, 590. Publickly goes to hear mass, 619. Tamper'd with to turn Papist, 661. His letters to king Charles, 665, & seq. Account of a design'd assassination of Oliver Cromwell, 666. Leaves the French court, ibid. & seq. To meet the king at Cologn, 667. Treats with Conde and Caracena, 668. Prayers supposed to have been used by him, ibid. & seq. Recall'd by the queen mother, 677. Stayed by Mazarin's fair promises, 687. Uncertain whether, or whither to go, 688. Follows the French court to Compeign, 689. Resolves to go to king Charles, 690. And to take his sister in the way, 691, Meets her at Peronne, 692. The pope's singular hopes of him, 742.

Younge, Thomas, a letter from him intercepted, 623.

Ysselmuyden, mynheer, 365.

Z.

Zaen, capt. vander, his account of the proceedings of the fleet gone to the Sound, 513.

Zealand, province of, most averse to the English, 127, 128. Delious of having a capt. general, 359, 439. Reflections upon their vanity and false maxims, 449. Factions embroil one another, 611.
-, — States of, their resolution touching a negotiation with England, 248. Advice relating to the same, and a treaty of alliance with France, 252. Concerning a capt. general, 364, 368, 375. Nominate the prince of Orange for that office, and count William for his lieutenant, 369. Debate about making him stadtholder, 411. And recalling the lords Veth and Vander Nisse, ibid. Accuse the English of falsly claiming the victory in the last fight, 438. Desire money to be sent to the royalists in Scotland, ibid. Favour Middleton's proposal, 449. Urge the payment of a sum of money disbursed by the deceased prince of Orange, ibid. Choose Everts for their admiral, ibid. Declare themselves pleased with the continuance of Vand Perre in England, 453. Jealous of the power of Holland, 459. Oppose Opdam's being made admiral, ibid. Much inclined to assist king Charles II. 460, 464, 487. Their resolution relating to the reception to be given to the commissioner of the reformed Swiss cantons, 480. Authorize Vand Perre to furnish the prisoners with wooll and linen, ibid. Their deputy in the States General move for an order to put the fleet under John Everts, in case of Opdam's death while at sea, 486. Proceedings upon the report of the negotiations with England, 489, 490. And upon the refutation of the reasons of Holland against a captain general, 489. Offended at some expressions used by the deputies in England in some of their propositions, 490. Displeased with Vand Perre for not writing to them weekly, 525. Agree to the continuation of the treaty with England, 542. Release the English prisoners, 552. Their representation for a convoy, 629.

Zierickzee, town of, obliges the burgomasters daughters to wear orange-colour'd knots, 364. Refuses to agree with the other towns of Zealand, 572.

Zuliestein, mynheer, proposed to succeed Tromp in the command of the Dutch fleet, 459, 467.

End of the Index to the First Volume.