State Papers, 1657
November (1 of 5)

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History of Parliament Trust

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Thomas Birch (editor)

Year published

1742

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'State Papers, 1657: November (1 of 5)', A collection of the State Papers of John Thurloe, volume 6: January 1657 - March 1658 (1742), pp. 585-600. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=55621 Date accessed: 28 November 2014.


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November (1 of 5)

A letter of intelligence from col. Bamfylde.

Vol. lv. p. 225.

[Paragraph contains cyphered content — see page image]

Sir,
I Have received yours yesterday of the 23d of October, stil. vet. Those whoe have informed you contrary to what you have received from me, touching the elect i on, may have wrote theyr affections rather then the truth of the thing: the state whereof you have had as perfectly as ma. Grammont himselfe coulde give it you, if he were your correspondent. The generall vogue there is, that the king of Hungary will be emperour; but such as knowe the secretts of things have very good reason to doute it, and to be of the oppinion, that you say Bamp. is of. Here is come a letter from the pope to all the ecclesiasticall electors, exhorting them to mediate with their uttermost instance for the peace betwixt France and Spayne; to which effect the elector of Mayence made an extraordinary speech on monday last to the essembly; wherein he tells them, that the best foundation, that can be layed for such an election, as may be for the tranquility of the empire, will be that accord, if it can be effected. The coppye of this speech I shall send you by the post that parts hence upon thursday next: I have it in Dutch, but did not thinke fitt to send it you, till I had translated it. The French prosess great forwardnesse herein, and desire, that it may precede the election; thowgh I doe not beleive either party mean it in good earnest; and yet it may very probably bee: if there happens a peace betwixt Sweden and Denmarke, and that the elector of Brandenburgh can be gayned to the French and Swedish party, I neither beleive the peace will be, nor the king of Hungary chosen emperour; and without that, both are likely, since none of the electors, whoe (out of aversions to the house of Austria, or from more publique considerations, or upon promises or hopes of advantage) are enclined to translate the empire to any other famely, will never attempt it, unlesse they finde themselves very substancially backed, at least by an equall, if not by a superior power, to that, which is visible in the service of the house of Austria. I expect nowe you should tell me, all this is conjecture; indeed moste of it, I confesse, is soe; but withall I muste tell you, that 'tis the sense of the wisest and neerliest concerned persons heere, and all the judgment they can make: and allbeit, in two or three of the cheif poynts, all men can be as yet but guessers, yet some (like good phisicians) may by a more perfect knowledge of the tempers and humors of persons and things, guesse nearer then ill ones can. In fine, if you will aske me, whoe will infallibly be chosen emperour? I must only answer you, that neither I nor any man liveing can resolve you without the spirit of divination. If you shall demand, whoe is likely to stand in competition with the king of Hungary? I shall say, the duke of Bavaria. If you aske, whoe will be for and whoe against? I must referre you to my last letters, wherein is contayned as exact an account as I am capable of rendring you; and without much indulgence to my selfe I may say, as you can have from any els. The newes wee have here from other parts is, that the count de Bouchaine with those troopes, which were upon the frontiers of Transylvania, are yet upon the borders of Silecia adjoyning to Poland, the Pole declaring he has noe need of them, nor is able to make provisions for them. 'Tis sayed, that many of the most considerable of the nobillity are much discontented at the Austrians, and fear their aristocracy, and the liberty of their electing their king, both which they have soe longe mayntayned, will be much endangered by theyr king's late bargayne. Hopes there are, that these embers raked up in ashes may in time be blowne up to something: however for the present, the Austrian invades Prusia, and the Pole has passed the Oder for certayne with 20000 men, as is suspected, to beseidge Stetin. For the business of Buck, if it falls out, as I have some time beleived, I am only afrayed, I shall grow a little supersticious of my owne augury for the future. I beleive, if I had jugled, I had succeeded much better then I have done or am like to doe. Upon this it may be depended, the great designe, which they say here must breake out in two months, is of that nature, as the protector himself cannot hinder, thowgh he knewe of it, and that some considerable persons about him are privy to it. Indeed if they would whistle the king in, and sett him upon the throne without blowes, they might peradventure finde theyr accounte therein; but since there must be a war for it, and the chance there is allways uncertayne; and thowgh the victory shoulde answer the wishes, I much doute they would be of Ciceroe's oppinion; Quod in bello civili miserius nihil quam ipsa victoria, quæ etiamsi ad meliores venit, tamen eos ipsos injustiores impotentioresque reddit; ut etiamsi natura tales non sint, necessitate esse cogantur. Multa enim victori eorum arbitrio, per quos vicit, etiam invito facienda sunt. But I fear this is ridicula serie tractare; and therefore, although you have accustomed your selfe to allow mee a little ralliery with you, yet I shall not weare out too much time upon soe flight and improbable a subject. In fine, I am come soe neer the French humor, whoe usually prefer particular frendships and obligations to any more publique concernments, that I thinke, I shall as well take the side that you take, as assure you, that I am with moste unseigned affection,

Sir,
Your most humble and most obedient servant.

Nov. the 1/11, 1657.

For sir John Hobart, these.

Lockhart, embassador in France, to secretary Thurloe.

Vol. lv. p. 201.

Right Honorable,
Yesterday's post broght me two of yours of the dates the 23d and 27th October. I should me more afflicted for your indisposition mentioned in the first, if the second, by reason of its being writt with your own hand, did not give me hops of your recovery. I pray God your health may answer my hops and wishes.

Upon thursday last mr. de Lyon gave me a visitt. After a generall discourse, he said the cardinall told him, he was to imploy him in some businesse with me, but had not then leisure to give him his commands, but ordered his waiting upon him next morning for that end, and concluded, he had resolved to pay his first visitt purely upon the account of respect, without any relation to businesse. After I had expressed my sense of the honor he did me, and entertained him with all the other civilitys I could, I told him (what I feare you will fynd too trew) how unhappy I should esteem my self, to be putt to treat on any businesse with one of his greatt parts and experience, who by his employs in Roome and Spain, had gained a perfytt knowledg in the nycest intrigues of all affaires. I rendered his visitt next day, and this morning he sent me word he would be with me this evening. My expectation of seeing him made me delay wryting to your honor, till its so late, as I feare this shall misse the post.

Sir, this morning his eminence sent me the inclosed, in return to that of his highness of Sept. 25, with this compliment, that tho' their ambassador at London, yet he would give me the troble of conveying of it. Yesterday he sent the master of the horse with a copple of very fyn barbs, who told me he was to bring me two more within a fortnight; the reason he had not broght them was, because they were not yet arryv'd from Marseilles. They are intended for his highness, tho' pretended to be given to me. I should send the two I have received imediatly for England, if one of them had not gott a little cold in his jorney hither. They are rarely well mannaged, and deserve to be so well looked too, that I hope his highness will give me leave to come over with them.

Monday next the parliament heare sitts. Its thoght they will come from their vacation with greatt zeale for vindicating their pretended priviledges. Mons. de Turein is arryved. Alsatia is lyk to be in a dangeros posture by reason of mons. de Harcourt's discontents and humors. His last letter to the cardinal is highly resented at court.

The clergy's passion for a peace with Spain is so violent, as it cannot be durable. Mademoselle Manchiny, the cardinal's neece, is to be marryed to prince Eugene, son to prince Thomas of Savoy. His mother was eldest sister to the count of Soissons. The forfeiture of that family is taken of in his favor, and he is made count of Soissons, and the whole estate restored to him. Another match is making up betwixt the duke of Bouillon's son (who is also to be mons. de Turein's heire) and another of the neeces: By this its desygned to serve mons. Turein's interest (upon whom new honors are to be conferr'd) and its thought Sedan will be restored to the duke of Bouillon. Tho' these newes be of no extraordinary importance, yett they declare how exactly this great and wyse man observs tyms and seasons, and how carefull he is to make hay whyle the sunn shynes. But I beseech you pardon this impertinency.

Right honorable,
Your most humble and obedient servant,
Will. Lockhart.

Paris, Nov. 11/1 1657.

Capt. R. Manley to mr. Ant. Rogers.

Vol. lv. p. 203.

Dear Ant.

I Have wrote a long and materiall letter to you in two English envoys pacquett: the direction is to your selfe. You will understand therby the difference betwixt the king and our states, the taking of Fredericksode by the Swades, the ravage of Charnisky in Pomerania, the treaty betwixt the king of Poland and the elector, and that I am
Wismar, 12/2 Nov. [1657.]

Yours for ever, J. B.

I sent you a cypher last week; if that be not come safe, send me answer, and forget not your frend and servant. The letters sent to the resident Romer came safely. Continue that way, wee will still know from

The king assisted at the solemne thanksgiving in the great church for his victorie at Fredericksode. All the canon about the towne and in the fleet fired for joy.

RECIPES of moneys out of his highness's exchequer, for the use of the publick contingencies, being from the 1st day of November 1656, to the 1st of November 1657.

Vol. lxii. p. 25.

l.s.d.
1656. December 3. Mr. Downing's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale bearing date the 11th day of September 1656, being for the payment of 1000 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies, the sume of030000
December 3. Mr. Lister's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privyseale bearing date the 30st day of June 1656, being for the payment of 350 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies,035000
December 6. Mr. Downing's office.Received in full of a privy-seale for 1000 l. dated the 11th Sept. 1656,040000
December 8. Mr. Bragg's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale bearing date the 9th day of August 1656, being for the payment of of 3000 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies,100000
December 9. Mr. Downing's office.Received more upon the before-mentioned privy-seale for 3000 l.100000
Decemb. 10. Mr. Stone's office.Received in full upon the said privy-seale for 3000 l.100000
1656. Decemb. 13. By mr. Noell.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale, bearing date the 4th day of November 1656, being for the payment of 1000 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies,100000
Decemb. 19. Mr. Lister's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale, bearing date the 4th day of November 1656, being for the payment of 600 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies,60000
Decemb. 31. Mr. Stone's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale, bearing date the 17th day of Decemb. 1656, for the payment of 250 l. to the councill's contingencies,25000
Decemb. 22. Mr. Stone's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale, bearing date the 11th Decemb. 1656, being for the payment of 5000 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies,136636
Decemb. 24. Mr. Lister's office.Received more upon the privy-seale above-mentioned,160000
165 6/7. January 3. Mr. Stone's office.Received more out of the exchequer, upon the privyseale for 5000 l.136100
January 9. Mr. Downing's office.Received more out of the exchequer, upon the privyseale of 5000 l.40280
January 17. Mr. Downing's office.Received more out of the exchequer, upon the privyseale for 5000 l.12000
January 23. Mr. Lister's office.Received more out of the exchequer, being in full of the said privy-seale for 5000 l.15080
Ditto. Mr. Stone's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale, bearing date the 2d of January 165 6/7, being for the payment of 1200 l. to the use of councill's contingencies,60000
February 6. Mr. Bragg's office.Received more, being in part of the last privy-seale for 1200 l.37600
February 14. Mr. Stone's office.Received more, being in full of the last privy-seale for 1200 l.22400
Ditto. Mr. Downing's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale, bearing date the 5th day of January last, being for the payment of 955 l. 11 s. 1 d. to the use of the councill's contingencies,15430
February 21. Mr. Downing's office.Received more out of the exchequer, being in part of the privy-seale for 955 l. 11 s. 1 d.9222
February 28. Mr. Stone's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privyseale, bearing date the 12th day of February, being for the payment of 800 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies,80000
March 14. Mr. Lister's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale bearing date the 25th day of February 165 6/7, being for the payment of 1750 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies,60000
March 16. Mr. Bragg's office.Received more out of the exchequer, in part of the privy-seale for 1750 l.55000
March 17. Mr. Stone's office.Received more out of the exchequer, in full of the said seale,60000
1657. April 7. Mr. Lister's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale, bearing date the 20th of March last, being for the payment of 400 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies,40000
April 22. Mr. Lister's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, being in full for the privy-seale for 955 l. 11 s. 1 d. the other part being made received, as by page the 9th appears,70900
April 25. Mr. Lister's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale, bearing date the 10th day of Aprill 1657, being for the use of the councill's contingencies.150000
April 22. Mr. Lister's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale, bearing date the 20th day of March last, being for the payment of 250 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies,25000
1657. May 16. M. Lister's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale, bearing date the 14th day of May 1657, being for the payment of 5000 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies.50000
May 25. Mr. Bragg's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer more, upon the privy-seale for 5000 l.63000
May 28. Mr. Bragg's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer more, upon the privy-seale for 5000 l.20000
June 5. Mr. Bragg's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer more, upon the privy-seale for 5000 l.81200
June 17. Mr. Bragg's office.Received more out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon the privy-seale for 5000 l.6800
June 19. Mr. Bragg's office.Received more out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon the privy-seale for 5000 l.15500
June 20. Mr. Stone 300 l. Mr. Bragg 600 l. Mr. Downing 300 l.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale, bearing date the 10th day of June 1657, being for the payment of 3000 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies,120000
July 2. Mr. Bragg's office.Received more out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon the privy-seale for 5000 l.28840
July 9. Mr. Stone's office.Received more out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon the privy-seale for 5000 l.32500
July 10. Mr. Bragg's office.Received more out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon the privy-seale for 3000 l.25000
July 11. Mr. Lister's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale bearing date the 10th day of April 1657, being for the payment of 535 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies,20000
July 16. Mr. Downing's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale, bearing date the 7th May 1657, being for the payment of 2023 l. 0 s. 11 d. to the use of the councill's contingencies, and is in part of the same.110000
July 17. Mr. Stone's office.Received more out of the exchequer, upon the privyseale for 2023 l. 0 s. 11 d.323011
July 26. Mr. Lister's office.Received more out of the exchequer, upon the privyseale for 2023 l. 0 s. 11 d. and is in full60000
July 29. Mr. Downing's office.Received more out of the exchequer, upon the privyseale for 5000 l.35000
July 31. Mr. Bragg's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon the privy-seale bearing date the 14th July 1657, being for the payment of 1669 l. 8 s. 10½d. to the use of the councill's contingencies,1669810½
September 12. Mr. Stone's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale, bearing date 31st Aug. 1657, being for the payment of 500 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies,15000
Ditto. Mr. Downing's office.Received more out of the exchequer, upon the said seale for 500 l.5000
Sept. 18. Mr. Stone's office.Received out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon a privy-seale, bearing date the 27th Aug. 1657, being for the payment of 1000 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies, the sume of70000
Sept. 18.Received from Martin Noell, esq. for the use of the councill's contingencies.55000
Sept. 22.Received from him more, for the use of the councill's contingencies,50000
Sept. 24. Mr. Bragg's office.Received more out of the exchequer, upon the seale for 500 l.10000
Sept. 25. Mr. Bragg's office.Received more out of the exchequer, upon the seale for 5000 l.1000
October 8. Mr. Downing's office.Received more out of his highnesse's exchequer, upon the privy-seale, bearing date the 14th of May 1657, being for the payment of 5000 l. to the use of the councill's contingencies,35000
Sum total is,28836410

Disbursements in reference to the government, being from the 1st day of November, 1656, to the 1st day of November, 1657.

Vol. lxii. p. 9.

l.s.d.
1656, Nov. 13.To mr. John Adams, assignee of mr. Benjamin Masters, being so much given him for publishing the proceedings against the Protestants in Piedmont, being printed in the Latin tongue500
December 3.To the lord president Lawrence, being for 3 months allowance for the same, and was due unto him the 9th of November last30000
ditto.To mr. secretary Thurloe, being in part of his highness's warrant, bearing date the 17th of July last, for the paying of 600 l. for intelligence35000
4.To mr. secretary Thurloe for the business of intelligence60000
12.To the servants of the council for one quarter's salary due the 29th June pass.1323129
12.To them more for one quarter's salary due 29th Sept. pass.1323129
ditto.To the serjeant at arms and his deputies for one quarter's salary due the 29th June pass.318100
ditto.To the serjeant at arms and his deputies for one quarter's salary due the 29 Septemb. pass.318100
13.To mr. Thomas Simon, graver of his majesty's mint, being for a jewel for the ambassador extraordinary from the king of Sweden863180
19.To mr. Ninian Williamson, merchant, being for the use of sir William Lockhart, his highness's resident in France25000
23.To mr. Isaac Dorislaus, being for one quarter's salary as sollicitor to his highness in the court of admiralty, due the 7th of July pass.5000
ditto.To him more for one quarter's salary for the same, due the 7th Octob. pass.5000
24.To the porters, gardeners, and chappel-keepers in Whitehall, being for one quarter's salary for the same, and was due 15 Aug. pass.72100
ditto.To them more for a quarter's salary for the same, and was due 15 Novemb. pass.72100
25.To Nathaniel Bacon, esq. one of his highness's masters of request, being for one quarter's salary for the same, and was due 25 March pass.16668
To him more for a quarter's salary for the same, and was due 24th June pass.16668
26.To Thomas Priestly, usher to mr. secretary's chamber, being for one quarter's salary for the same, and was due 1 July pass.920
ditto.To him more for a quarter's salary for the same, due 1 October pass.920
ditto.To mr. secretary Thurloe for the business of intelligence, being in full of a warrant for 600 l. 250 l. whereof was paid 3 Decemb. as by page 2d appears25000
ditto.To the master of the barges and the watermen for a quarter's salary due 24 June pass.5000
ditto.To them more for one quarter's salary for the same, due 29 Sept. pass.5000
27.To the messengers for the discharge of their bills for journeys108393
30.To mr. Charles Rich, his highness's avener, being for the charge of coaches and footmen upon the reception and audience of several ambassadadors30266
Janu. 2. 165 6/7.To Henry Hills and John Field, printers to his highness, being in full of a warrant for 221 l. 136 l. 4 s. thereof being paid the 18th August 1657, as by page 18 in the last account appears84160
ditto.To them more, being in full for their bill for printing from March the 24th to the 1st of August last,150160
Janu. 3. 1656/7.To mr. George Vaux, house-keeper in Whitehall, being for three quarters salary for the same, and was due from May the 15th 1655, to February 15th 1655112100
5.To him more, being in full of a warrant for 150 l. whereof was paid the 20th day of August last, as by page the 18th of the last account appears5000
To mrs. Dorothy Dury, wife of mr. John Dury, being towards her husband's exhibition for his employment beyond the seas, by two warrants.20000
6.To mr. Isaac Dorislaus for the use of dr. Walker, his highness's advocate, being for his salary for the same for three quarters of a year, from March the 30th 1655, to December the 30th 1655.7500
ditto.To Gabriel Beck, esq. being for half a year's salary for soliciting the dispatch of some publick business, due the 8th November pass.10000
9.To messengers and others, upon a warrant for journeys, and bills of charges434156
10.To mr. Richard Scutt for half a year's salary for setting up lights in several passages in Whitehall, due from the 12th of March 1656, to September the 12th 1656600
23.To Simon Beale and eleven other trumpets, who attended upon the proclamation of the peace lately made between his highness and the French king1200
Jan. 24, 1656/7.To mr. Gawen Hudson for the use of Richard Bradshaw esq. his highness's resident at Hamburgh, being for half a year's allowance for the same, due 29 Sept. pass.40000
February 7.To mrs. Ithamer Pell, for the use of her husband mr. John Pell, 200 l. being towards his exhibition for his employment beyond the seas, and 50 l. for a quarter's salary, due 29 Septemb. past as mathematick-lecturer25000
9.To mr. Ambrose Randolph, keeper of the paper-office in Whitehall, being in full of a warrant for 120 l. dated the 20th day of Novemb. 1655, 50 l. thereof being paid, as by page of the last account appears7000
12.To Thomas Burie and Stephen Seers, porters at Whitehallgate, being for the buying of firing for the use of the porter's-lodge600
16.To the lord president Lawrence, being for one quarter's allowance due the 9th instant30000
19.To Henry Hills and William Dugard, printers, being in full of a bill for printing18444
28.To mr. Robert Wanton, upon two warrants for cloth delivered for watermens coats7800
March 4.To mr. John Lockhart for the use of sir William Lockhart, his highness embassador to the French king, being upon account of his entertainment for the support of his charge and expence in that quality80000
16.To the servants of the council, being for one quarter's salary, being from the 28th day of September to the 28th of December last inclusive1323129
18.To the serjeant at arms and his deputies, being for one quarter's salary due318100
ditto.To mr. James Russell, being for half a year's salary due 28th of December pass.60134
19.To Thomas Priestly, being for one quarter's salary due 1st January pass.920
1657, April 8.To Philip Meadowe, esq. being so much advanced unto him for his journey into Denmark, as his highness's envoy thither40000
22.To sir William Lockhart, his highness's embassador with the French king6000
29.To Philip Meadowe, esq. being an arrear of the money due unto him, which he expended in his highness's service while he resided in Portugall20000
April 29.To mr. Samuel Morland, being for so much due unto him upon the foot of his account of his disbursements made while he resided at Geneva in the quality of extraordinary commissioner from his highness15511
30.To mr. secretary Thurloe for the business of his intelligence, by two warrants.150000
June 6.To Simon Beale, for himself and eleven other trumpets who proclaimed the peace betwixt his highness and the king of Portugal1200
ditto.To mrs. Ithamer Pell, for the use of her husband mr. John Pell, being in part of a warrant for 250 l. bearing date 2d Jan. 165610000
12.To mr. Gawen Hudson, for the use of Richard Bradshaw, esq. his highness's resident at Hamburgh, being in part of a warrant bearing date the 10th day of March last, and is for the payment of 400 l. unto him20000
20.To mr. James Wainwright, assignee of Richard Bradshaw, esq. his highness's resident at Hamburgh, being for the answering of a bill of exchange drawn by the said mr. Bradshaw upon his highness's council, by their order and direction120000
July 2.To mr. George Vaux, being for half a year's sallary due unto him as house-keeper in Whitehall, beginning the 15th of Febr. 1655, and ending 15 Aug. 16567500
11.To mr. John Lockhart, for the use of sir William Lockhart, his highness's embassador in France, being in part of a warrant, bearing date the 26th of May 1657, and is for the payment of 800 l.25000
14.To Edward Rolt, esq. being in part of a warrant, bearing date the 4th day of April 1657, and is for the payment of 535 l.20000
17.To mr. Isaac Dorislaus, being for so much due unto him for one quarter of a year's salary, ending the 7th of January present5000
20.To the porters, gardeners, and chappel-keepers, being for one quarter of a year's salary due unto them from November the 15th to February the 15th 1656/7.72100
24.To Thomas Priestly, being for one quarter's salary as usher to mr. secretaries office, and was due 1st of April pass.920
25.To the servants of the council, being for one quarter of a year's salary due unto them, and is from December the 28th to March the 29th inclusive1432011
ditto.To the serjeant at arms and his deputies, being for a quarter's salary for the same due318100
29.To the lord president Lawrence, being for one quarter's allowance due the 9th of May.30000
30.To mr. Samuel Moreland, being so much paid him towards his expences while he remained his highness's commissioner at Geneva252148
ditto.To mr. Isaac Dorislaus, being for the reimbursement of so much paid him upon a bill of exchange for his highness's service10000
ditto.To mr. Martin Noell, for so much paid to mr. Swist sent into France5000
Septemb. 18.To John Lockhart, esq. being in full of a warrant, bearing date the 26th day of May last, and is for the payment of 800 l. to sir William Lockhart, his highness's embassador in France, upon account of his allowance, 250 l. of the said warrant being paid the 11th day of July last, as by page the 16th appeareth55000
22.To mrs. Ithamer Pell, for the use of her husband mr. John Pell, being in full of a warrant, bearing date the 2d day of January last, and is for the payment of 250 l. unto him, 100 l. whereof was paid the 6th day of June 1657, as by page the 8th appears, 100 l. more on the 9th day of July last, but not then enter'd, and now more 50 l.15000
1657. Sept. 22.To mrs. Ithamer Pell, for the use of her husband mr. John Pell, 250 l. 200 l. whereof being towards his exhibition for his employment beyond the seas, and 50 l. for one quarter's salary, due unto him the 25th of March past, as mathematick-lecturer25000
ditto.To mrs. Pell more, being in part of a warrant, bearing date the 7th day of July last, and is for the payment of 250 l. unto her, as by warrant appeareth20000
24.To mr. Clement Kennersley upon account, being steward for the ordering of the entertainment of the lord embassador from Portugal30000
Sum total is2093882

Disbursements to severall pensioners, being from the first day of November 1656, tothe first day of November 1657.

Vol. lxii. p. 5.

l.s.d.
1656. Novemb. 28To mr. Samuel Hartlib, being for his industry and expences in severall publique services, for ½ a yeare due 24th June past,500000
ditto.To mr. William Reyley, being in part of a warrant for the paying of him 50 l. dated 21th April 1656, and is in part of a quarter's salary due unto him the 24th March past, for his imployment in the Tower,360200
December 3.To Gualter Frost, being soe much by him advanced to mr. John Hall in his life-time, upon account of a pension of 100 l. per ann. sometimes allowed unto him,28000
11.To mr. William Ryley, in full of the above-mentioned warrant for 50 l.131800
24.To mr. Hugh Peters, one of the preachers in Whitehall-chappell, being for ½ a year's salary for the same, due 17th Decemb. 1656,1000000
26.To mr. Peter Sterry, one of the preachers in Whitehall-chappell, being for one quarter's salary for the same, and was due 18th July,500000
To him more, for a quarter's salary for the same, and was due 18th Octob. 1656,500000
ditto.To William Williams, for presenting to the councill the weekly bills of mortality, being for one quarter's salary for the same, due 15th August past,21000
To him more, for one quarter's salary for the same, due 15th Novemb. past,21000
1657. January 5.To lieutenant-col. John Roseworme, entertained as an engineer, being in full of one quarter's salary for the same, due 2d of 1656,451000
17.To serjeant Sheppard, being in full of a warrant from his highness's councill, bearing date the 1st day of July last, for the payment of 150 l. 75 l. whereof was paid unto him, as by page the 18th of the last account appears,750000
To him more, in part of a warrant for 150 l. dated 25th December past,250000
20.To mr. William Ryley, being part of a warrant, bearing date the 4th of October last, and is for the payment of 100 l. unto him for ½ a year's salary for his employment in the office of records in the Tower, due from March the 29th to September the 29th 1656,500000
February 6.To the lord Sinclare, being for 28 weekes allowance of 40 s. a week, allowed him by his highness and the councill for his subsistance, and is from the 25th day of July 1656, to the 1st day of this instant,560000
March 19.To William Williams, being for one quarter's salary for printing the bills of mortality, and presenting them weekly to the councill, due 15th of February past,21000
May 25.To mr. Samuel Hartlib, for his industry and expences in severall publick services, being for ½ a year, ending 25th Decemb. past,50000
June 6.To mr. Hugh Peters, in Whitehall-chappell, being for one quarter's salary for the same, and was due unto him 7th June 1655,50000
To him more, upon a warrant, bearing date the 30th of October 1656, bearing date for ¾ salary due unto him 17th Sept. 1656, and is in part thereof,100000
To serjeant Sheppard, upon a warrant, bearing date 25th Decemb. 1656, being for the payment of 150 l. 25 l. being paid unto him 17th January, and now 50 l. more, being in part of the said warrant,5000
ditto.To mr. Ryley, being for ½ a year's salary, growing due unto him from Sept. the 29th to the 25th of March last, for his imployment in the records in the Tower,10000
ditto.To lieutenant John Roseworme, being for one quarter's salary as engineer-generall, from the 1st November last, to the 31st January last inclus.45100
June 9.To Anthony Hungerford, being for his pension of 20 s. per week, for 36 weeks, due from 30 Sept. to the 9th June instant, being the day of his death,3600
ditto.To mr. Marchamont Needham, being for one quarter's salary, due unto him from November 15th 1655, to February 15th 1655/6.2500
To him more, in part of a warrant for his salary, dated 20th December 1655,3500
June 10. By two warrant;To mr. Peter Sterry, one of the preachers in Whitehall-chappell, for ½ a year for the same, beginning the 18th day of October 1656, and ending the 18th day of April 1657,10000
July 2.To lieutenant colonell Reseworme, being for one quarter's salary due to him, as engineer-generall, commencing 31st Jan. exclus. and ending 2d May past inclus.45100
July 18.To lieutenant-colonell Edmond Ashton, being in part of a warrant, bearing date 14th April past, and is for the payment of 1 s. per diem, for the space of 6 months, comemncing 7th April past,530
July 31.To William Williams, being for one quarter's salary, for printing the bills of mortality, and presenting them weekly to the councill, due 15 May past,2100
August 21.To mr. William Ryley, being in full of a warrant, bearing date the 4th day of Octob. 1656, and is for payment of 100 l. unto him, for a year's salary, due from the 25th March to the 29th Sept. 1656, for his imployment in the office of records in the Tower, 50 l of the said warrant being paid the 20th January last, as by page the 8th appeares,5000
September 25.To the earl of Worcester, for 52 weeks pension, at 40 s. per week, being from Sept. the 25th 1656, to Sept. the 24th 1657, in all10400
To the lord Sinclare, for 25 weeks pension, at 40 s. per week, being from the 6th of February 1657, to the 31st July last, in all,5000
To mr. Allein of Weymouth, for 52 weeks pension, at 20 s. per week, being from Sept. the 29th 1656, to Sept. the 28th 1657, in all5200
To Robert Tatnall, for 52 weeks, at 10 s. per week, being from the 26th Septemb. 1656, to 25th Sept. 1657, in all2500
October 6.To lieutenant-colonell Edmond Ashton, For 80 days pension, at 1 s. per diem, being in full of a warrant, bearing date the 14th of April 1657, ordering the payment of 1 s. per diem unto him for 6 months, 5 l. 3 s. being paid unto him the 18th day of July last, in pursuance of the said warrant, as by page the 18th appears,40000
October 8.To mr. Nicholas Lockyer, one of the preachers in Whitehall-chappell, being for one yeare and three quarters salary for the same, beginning from the 24th of June 1655, and ending the 25th of March last,3500000
Sum total is18661300

Disbursements to severall uses, being from the first day of November 1656, to the first day of November 1657.

Vol. lxii. p. 1.

l.s.d.
1656. Novemb. 27.To mr. Teate, being for soe much allowed to mr. Joseph Teate, to transport him into Ireland, to preach the Gospel there,5000
December 27.To the lady Williams, being for one quarter's rent for her house in the pallace, and was due unto her the 25th of March last,7500
To her more, for a quarter's rent for the said house, due the 24th of June past,7500
To the serjeant at armes, being for soe much due for lodgings and dyett for prisoners,83140
1656/7 January 3.To major-generall Drummond, being for his present releife,10000
5.To Stephen Bowtell, and Richard Barton, for service done, and disbursments therein,40192
17.To Thomas Davis, being allowed unto him in consideration of his pains and charges in discovering certaine armes in the custody of severall persons enemies to the commonwealth,2000
22.To mr. Samuel Pepis, for the use of generall Montague, being for the discharging of some disbursments made for the marquesse of Budix and his brother,30000
24.To Humphrey Holden, for the charge of keeping cornett Day a prisoner,3115
March 21.To Alice March, widdow of John March deceased, being given her by the councill towards her releife,2000
1657. May 14.To Anne Swaine, being for two years rent and a half, ending the 25th of March next, for a peice of land of Richard Swaine's, adjoyning to the estate of Shrewsbury, and used for the fortification thereof,10168
June 6.To mr. James Willett, being so much paid him for a publique service,10000
9.To major-generall John Drummond, by warrant from the councill,10000
ditto.To William Wheeler, esq. being for a yeare and a halfe's rent, due unto him from September the 29th 1655, to the 25th of March last, for the passage into Chanon-Rowe,200
18.To John Newland, a private soulder in his highness's regiment of foot, being for 15 months pay for the same, which time he was beyond the seas upon the publick service, and out of the roll of the army,17100
30.To Humphrey Holden, being in satisfaction of his disbursments for dyett and lodging, linnen, &c. for don Diego de Villa Alva, and other Spanish prisoners,12583
July 15.To mr. Richard Spotswood, mrs. Grizell Spotswood, and mrs. Jane Spotswood, being given them by the councill for their present releife, and for their transportation into Ireland,4000
August 6.To Josua French, being soe much given him in respect of the charges and trouble sustained by him, by reason of some prosecutions of Thomas and William Marley against him,500
22.To the lady Williams, being for one quarter's rent for her house in Pallace-yard, due unto her the 29th Sept. 1656,7500
September 14.To mr. George Thomson, by warrant from his highness,5000
25.To Martha Arundell, being given her for her present support,1000
Sum total is133196

An estimate of the charge of the ensuing year, ending the first of November 1675.

In the possession of G. Duckett, esq.

l.s.d.
The charge at sea,99450000
The charges of the army in the three kingdomes,113248900
The government,20000000
Sum is232698900

The present revenue.

l.s.d.
The assessment in England, Scotland, and Ireland,146400040
The excise and customs, estimated at70000000
The other revenue payable into the receipt, estimated at19800000
Sum is236200040
232698900
Sum total is468898940

An abstract of the revenue of Ireland, as to the whole receipts thereof for 2 years, determining the 1st of November 1657, and how disposed.

Vol. lv. p. 205.

Charge.The whole charge of receipts out of the severall branches or the civill-revennue of Ireland, for two years, commencing the first November 1655, and determining the first November 1657 (as appeares by the accounts for the respective years aforesaid drawn up) the first determined, and the second ready for a determination by the commissioners of accounts, amounts to the sume of one hundred and thirty seven thousand, five hundred fifty eight pounds, thirteen shillings, and three pence,137558133

N. B. All tythes parochial and other are comprehended in the above charge, which are and were since excluded and set apart distinctly, and prove this year short of the present charge for maintenance of the ministry.

Which sume hath been discharged by payments made for

l.s.d.
Salaries to civill-officers,52947117
Ministers and schoolmasters,34141138
Pensioners,6931165
Civill surveys,1939150
Admeasurement of land,720000
Satisfaction made to widdows of their husbands debentures,3131182
Judges, for circuit-money,3458100
Adventurers, sollicitors, and others, in satisfaction of rents received out of their estates,753183
Speciall service,7385810
Navall affairs,3835193
Arrears for civill service, as commissioners of revenue, &c.88650
To Irish and delinquents, out of their estates, for the subsistance of themselves, and relations, and to other indigent persons for their releife,4740510
Rewards for takeing of preists and torys,670162
Building and repairs,481726
Store-charges,646182
Incidents relating to the councill and other officers, as the court of Claims at Athlone, surveyor-generall, commissioners for setting out lands to the army, and commissioners for letting the commonwealth's lands, &c.5574150
Incidents, not included any the foregoing heads,34461711
Total is,142509110
Speciall services, as to the auditors, for extraordinary clerks, in drawing up the whole account of the nation, encouragement to the officers going to Jamaica, and others for services pro tempore, not being in list a constant salary,200000

Major-general Jephson to the protector's privy-council.

Vol. lv. p. 162.

My lords,
I Have thus long forborn to give any interruption to your most serious affaires, because I have not found any thing fitt for publick view, which might afford sufficient excuse for such a presumption. What progress I have made in pursuance of my instructions, and what privat observations I have beeneable to make relating to the interest of our commonwealth, I have by the weekely post communicated to mr. secretary, who (I assure myselfe) hath done the same to your lordshipps, when he hath found any thing therein worth your knowlege. But now, having an opportunity to give you the relation of an action perhaps as extraordinary as may fall out in an age, I take the humble boldnes herein to present it. I will not trouble your lordshipps with a perticular enumeration of all the inconveniences which I suffer by my long absence from home; but doe earnestly desire, that my stay in these parts may be noe longer then the necessity of the publick affaires require; wherein whilst I must continue, I shall endeavour to shew myselfe a faithfull and diligent servant. So begging your lordshipps pardon and candid interpretation of this and all other my actions, I assume the liberty to subscribe myselfe,

My lords,
Your most faithfull and humble servant,
William Jephson.

Wismar, Nov. 2, 1657.

A letter of intelligence.

Wismar, the 12/2 Novemb. [1657.]

Vol. lv. p. 225.

Deare brother,
I receaved your's yesterday, of the 16th of October, with nothing but a courant and excuses in it. If I doe not write as often as you would have mee, you must impute it to my journeying, and not neglect; yet I have omitted nothing materiall. I wrote last week to you at large from this place, with a coppie of the king's declaration agaynst the states inclosed. You will thereout understand upon what termes the present affaires stand. His majestie secluded the Holland's ambassadors upon a false presumption, that Appelboom was putt of at the Hague. He was indeed limitted to six weeks time, and the buisinesse remitted to his masters examination; but the others were quite excluded, although there were nothing objected agaynst their persons. Upon their arrivall here, they demanded audience anew; which the king refused them, till he saw the states answer to his declaration; which being sent, his majestie declared to bee more offended therewith, then with any thing that hath happened before; and not only refused them admission, but sent them word by Coignet, his secretarie, that hee would have no further commerce with them, till hee had received satisfaction in honor for the injuries done him. I doubt not, but you will receave both declarations by this post: I gave coppies of both of them to major-generall Jephson, your envoy, who is a person of reall worth, and highly esteemed here. Undoubtedly the ambassadors will bee recalled, at least ordered to remove from court. There lyes a resolution of them of Holland to that purpose alreadie, that in case of none-admission upon this last addresse, their ambassadors should bee undoubtedly recalled. The way seemes open to a rupture, unlesse England and France doe interpose. 'Tis pittie the common enemy should alwayes laugh at the differences of the good partie. The Poles and Austrians appeared before Thorn: 'twas but to observe the place. They are againe retyred. If these last grow masters of Prussia, which is an old designe of theirs, and so gett footing on the Baltick-sea, adieu the Polish libertie, and the freedom of commerce upon that sea. Dansick, whom they would lull with the offer of being imperiall, and new priviledges, may share Polyphemus his favour, to bee last eaten. That towne is in the meane time miserable enough; the magistrates and cittesens at daggers drawing; the Holland auxiliaries returned home; and the plague forely rageing amongst them. The elector hath bin with the king of Poland at Bromberg; they are huge frends at present; but it is a folly to think, that the states of Poland will confirme what the king and a few senators have upon their owne authority concluded. In the meane time the articles are,

1. Pax sit inter omnia.

2. Pillaviam elector retineat, vectigabilis maris solus gaudeat.

3. Elector fiat Brombergii dominus & adjacentis districtus, ut in Marchiam extra regalis territorii sines per suas terras ire possit.

4. Episcopatum Ermlandensem regi cedal, & pro eo totam Pomerelliam capiat.

5. Annum nummorum bactenus regi solvi solitum evanescat.

6. Appellationem ad regem Prussia nesciat.

7. Feudum à rege per legatum elector expetat.

All this is nothing to the great victorie, which the Swedes have gott agaynst the Danes. Wrangel assaulted and tooke Fredericksode upon the 24th of October, early in the morning. A thousand were killed upon their entrie. The prisoners are above 2000. Bille, the rix-marshall, is sore hurt, and prisoner; as also Hans Hueck a senator. The spoyle was vast. and provisions of warr without number. There were above 50 brass guns. In a word, a more advantagious, though somewhat less glorious, victorie than that of Warsovie. This place was the only remora hitherto to the Swed's progress: They have now a passage into Fuenen, the best of the Danish islands: and is that king doe not hasten with his forces out of Sconen, where he hath been more succesfull, he may come too late, unless the Swede want a wastage for their transports, to save what remaynes. Coppenhagen itselfe is not defensible, I know it well; but that is summa rei. Wee shall shortly see, whether the states-general will only bee content to looke on. All this is noe wonder, if we consider the activenesse, the bravenesse, and the vigilance of the Swedish partie; and on the other side, the securenesse, the dissenting, and the unskilfullnes of the ringleaders. Adieu, and forgett not your's till death,

G. B.

I am offered faire conditions here: I would rather serve my country. Lett me know your advice, menager cette affaire.

Just now comes newes, but at random, that Wrangel is in Fuenen. The king had a list of 52 townes and villages, that the Poles have burnt on this side Stetin. Several troopes of horse passe dayly through this towne, to oppose those ravages. Wrangel his foot out of Cracovia, and others taken from the fleet, were at the takeing of Fredericksode. 4 men of warr are sent thither.

The superscription.

For mr. Isaack Dorislaws, at the post-office, London.

Col. Thomas Cooper to H. Cromwell, major-general of the forces in Ireland.

In the possession of the right hon. the earl of Shelburn.

My lord,
The inclosed is an examination, taken of one Phillip Croly, a priste, lately come out of Flanders, hee pretends, for his health sake; and, that though hee hath comission for vicar-generall of Clougher, yet hee is willing to burne that, if hee may be permitted to follow the practice of the civill-law, in which he hath, as hee saith, pro ceeded doctor. But it seemes to mee veary unlykely, that hee should have a comission for vicar-generall, and should bring it over with him; and now hee is apprehended, to say, hee is willing to destroy it, it may bee he hath more of the same: and that hee should come out of Flanders, whear they are soe plentifully maintained, into this country, whear, hee saith, hee hath noe maintenance, and hath noe money. For since hee was apprehended, major Pawdon, whoe was the cause of it, hath tooke order for his maintenance in the inne whear hee is, and a man to looke to him; for hee is very weake at present. I desire your lordship will please to give order, that out of the treasury heere, that chardg may bee payd, that soe major Pawdon may not pay it; and that you will please to signesye your pleasure, wheather hee shall bee sent up to Dublin, or comitted to prison heere. Which is all at present from,

My lord,
Your lordship's veary faithfull servant,
Tho. Cooper.

Carricksergus, November 2d 1657.

Secretary Thurloe to H. Cromwell, major-general of the army in Ireland.

In the possession of the right hon. the earl of Shelbern.

My lord,
I received two of your lordship's together, both concerninge mr. Brayfield, occasioned by what I writt to your lordship upon that subject; and doe perceive, that I tooke my measures very ill, as to what I apprehended in that busines; seeinge your lordship hath soe different a sence both of hym and his case from what I did conceive upon the papers, which I had seene of the proceedinges against hym. And yet truly, my lord, I may take the boldnes to say, that I did not, or at least intended not, to write as one, that hath any ill impressions made upon me from the insinuation of persons, who beare no good will to you. I could say to others, and give me leave to say it upon this occasion to yourselfe, that I am not capable of any such impressions. The sence I had of this buissnes I tooke from the papers, which were sent me by an undoubted freind, and conteyned nothinge but the bare matter of fact, which I thought was such as (consideringe what was sayd of the man himselfe here by noe ill-minded men) did give some occasion to your lordship to shew mercye towards a person, who would take it as an act of your favour and goodnes, and lay a certeyne obligation upon him and others. However these my thoughts were not but with all submission to your lordship's judgment; who beinge upon the place, could make a farre better judgment of it, then any much wiser then I could doe at this distance. And, secondly, in case you should enclyne to restore hym, it was alwayes intended (and soe I expressed it both to your lordship and to my lord Broghill) to be done without the least disobligation to the court-martiall who sentenced hym; and if that could not be accommodated, I then judged the matter not soe practicable: and I did not see the occasion, why the court should not be satisfied with your lordship's mercy; pardon after sentence beinge not soe very extraordinary, but, on the contrary, very usuall, especially when the cryme charged is personall upon hym who is to dispence the grant and give the pardon. But I doe very much preserre your lordship's judgment to my owne in this and all thinges else, but not any man's affection or sence of duty, wherein I persuade myselfe I shall never be sound wantinge. However I may mistake very grosly in my oppinion, which yet I shall alwayes take upon me the confidence to expresse in every thinge wherein I shall apprehend your service to be concerned, and freely submit myselfe to your censure, whom I am confident you will esteeme to have a very good and honest meaninge in all things, which I shall say to your lordship; and truly, soe I had in this.

Upon wednesday the affaires of Ireland were resumed, and the setlinge of a deputy and counsell were considered of: and after some debate, the counsell here have, upon his highnes's nomination, consented, that your lordship be the deputy: and they have alsoe advised, that all the late counsell of Ireland be againe of the counsell, save mr. Goodwyn, in whom there is noe satisfaction. All the other votes about Ireland were very unanimous, noe man dissentinge: but of this I pray your lordship make noe mention at all, nor that this buissnes is thus farre proceeded in. All possible care shall be used to dispatch away the comissions by an expresse; and I thinke it best, that he brings the first newes thereof. I shall not mention any thinge of this to my lord Broghill, nor any body else by this post. Many persons have beene thought of, as to an addition to be made to the counsell of Ireland; but I doe not perceive, that there is any great likelyhood of choseinge one, the persons spoken of beinge either such as will not accept the imployment, or else are not fitt for it.

Our alarums yet continue from the malignant partye; they are hatchinge some winterdesigne, to begin with the murder of my lord protector: but I trust the Lord will be a shield and buckler to hym, and keepe him from their malice and bloody intentions.

The newes beyond sea is not considerable, and therefore. I shall not trouble your lordship with perticulers. I suppose, I need not acquaint you, that my lord Fauconberge is a servant of my lady Mary: he is a person of very good abilityes, and seemes very sober. His estate is 5000 l. per annum. I beleeve it will be a match: but such perticulers as these, I suppose your lordship hath from better hands, and those who knowe thinges more inwardlye. I remeyne

Your lordship's most humble and faithfull servant,
Jo. Thurloe.

Whitehall, 3 Nov. 1657.

Lord Broghill to general Montagu.

In the possession of the right hon. John earl of Orrery.

Dear sir,
I am obliged to the Diurnal this week, in acquainting me where you are, that I might address my letters unto you; the ignorance whereof for some posts did occasion my silence. We are here in a country, that has no news but what we receive from the place where you are; where, if all things move at the rate our settlement of Ireland has done, I shall think the body politick has got the gout. As soon as his highness's resolutions are sent over for this country, I shall prepare to waite on you at London. All the last week I spent in waiting on my lord Harry at Kilkenny, who came there on purpose from Dublin to afford me that honour. I make, by conversing with him, and observing of him, every day new discoveries of eminent things in him; such truly as convinces us all he is fit to be our chief governor before he have a parent for it, which is both our trouble and satisfaction. He has indeed a great guist in reading of men; and amongst many other evincements thereof, one is the high value he places upon you, and the desire he has of a particular friendship with you: but of this, and of some other particulars, I shall, the Lord willing, discourse at large with you when I have the honour to wait on you at London: which is a contentment heartily longed for by

Dear sir, yours, &c.
Broghill.

Youghall, the 6th Novemb. 1657.