State Papers, 1658
October (1 of 4)

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History of Parliament Trust

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Thomas Birch (editor)

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1742

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'State Papers, 1658: October (1 of 4)', A collection of the State Papers of John Thurloe, volume 7: March 1658 - May 1660 (1742), pp. 417-429. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=55680 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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October (1 of 4)

Mr. Downing, the English resident in Holland, to secretary Thurloe.

Vol.lxi.p.210.

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Right Honourable,
Yours by the last post, of 24. Sept. old stile, is come safe to me, together with the inclosed papers, and I hope by the next I shall receive a draught of the treaty of Portugall, as is therein mentioned, least something should be offered by the Portugall embassador heere in the prejudice of England, which he is very willing to prevent, if he had a copy of that treaty. The Spanish embassador's secretary upon monday last brought to the president of the states general the letter, which was sent from his highness to the states, with a compliment, that a letter being come to the hands of Don Jean, directed to them, he would not open it, but sent it forthwith; but for your letter to me, and the instructions, that they keepe; and they did also risle the last pacquet but one, and are resolved to make frequent use of this course in this conjuncture of affaires, being much enraged to finde noe consolation out of England. Upon monday last, the French embassador and myself had a conference with the deputies of the states general about the Portugall peace, at which conference the said deputies gave to each of us a whole volume of paper, concerning all, that had passed betweene Portugall and this state since the businesse of Brasile, desireing us, that we would employ our endeavours, that their lands in Brasile might be restored to them, and other just satisfaction made them by the crowne of Portugall. Since that, we have had a conference with the Portugall embassador, and, in pursuite thereof, he is resolved this day to give in another memoriall to the states generall, farther declareing, that it is not in his master's power to restore any lands in Brasile; but increaseing the offers of money to the sume I formerly gave you an accompt of; and also engageing, that his master shall employ every yeare twenty sayle of Dutch ships to Brasile, or other his plantations; and that those said ships shall have liberty of carrying comodityes upon their owne accompts. The Spanish embassador doth his utmost to hinder the Portugal peace. The fleete destinated for the reliefe of Copenhagen is yet in the Vlye, kept there for want of a winde to get out. I did direct captain Mims, commander of the Vulture friggat, who was driven into Medenbleck by the late storme, to goe himself to the Vlye, and take a view of the fleete, and send me an accompt thereof; as also himself, upon his arrivall in England, to send another copy of the same accompt to the commissioners of the admiralty, from whome, I hope, you may ere this have had it, although, for more sureness, I have also sent you a copy thereof. Since that time, there are not above 3 or foure sayle more aded to the fleete. All men did beleeve, that it had bin gone this day se'nnight; but it seemes, that though the winde was then faire, yet the seas were so greate, by reason of the late storme, as that though under sayle, they were forced againe to come to an anchor; and by this may be seene a greate want of this country, that they have noe roade at the Downes, or Yarmoth-roades, for their shipping to fall downe into, and to lye, unlandlockt, for the first puff of a faire wind; so that though the windes are and have bin continually faire to goe to the Sound, for want thereof they are like to loose their designe. The king of Sweeden yet continues to doe his utmost by all manner of wayes to disingage them from succouring the Dane, as you may perceive by the many memorialls of late given in by Mr. Appleboom to that purpose; as also by the king of Sweden's letters to them, and late discourse with La Mer, their late resident at Cronnigburg; but yet notwithstanding, there is as yet noe answer given to Mr. Appleboom, but the fleete yet waites for the first occasion of a winde, and the states of Holland have yet continued together, to see the issue of this business, though it's said, they begin now to be weary, and will goe home. This is the some of that business: they do not think it their 339 interest. 287 147, that the k of Swede have the Sound. 459 155 110 38. They could 314 invern the k. of Denmark as they would; and therefore, if it be possible, 231 431 143 141 334 358, they will recieve Copenhagen; 155 40 254 426 108 319 311 110; but if that bee lon, 144 151, they will 503 make use of their fleete, 358 289, by its 254 155 countenance to make their peace, 376 468 72 136 427, and all their endeavours 16 against the k. of Swed. shall be as nothing; and I beleeve, that the k. of Sweden will give them even then very good termes 317 466 135 100 287 to keepe them from joyning with his 55 500 327 enemies; 381 287; and so far as I can finde, the k of Swed. courts them. 141 468 90, even rather more then the lord protector. This is true, that the minister of the elector of Brandenb. 408 and the k. of Spayne, and the emperour, 426 443 154 133, doe endeavour their utmost to engage the states generall, 468 525 downe-right to engage with them; 500 468 103; but soe greate is their concernment in their trade, 437 263, that they must follow 304 83 365 162 Copenhagen; 109 319 311 110; and this will, I beleeve, be the issue of the business, unless that the k. of Swed. should finde himself in a condition not to feare them, 52 45 213 468 100, which yet is hardly probable.

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As for any succours of souldiers gone, or going, from the states generall for Flanders, 38 286 143, I dare assure you, there is noe such thing; but withall it's as true, that the states gen. embassadour is 140 449 416 346 labouring might and maine to exchange some 109 311 460 places, 355 30 287, or to sell or pawn them, 416 120 13 161 468 103, of which I shall endeavour, from time to time, to give you an accompt, and to doe what further I can for prevention thereof.

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I was the occasion of the king of Swede his writing 109 58 both to the protect. and k. of France, complaining much to his resident heere, that in a matter so important as that was, he should have fayled to have done it; and I doe finde by the Fr. embassador, that the cardiual 132 33 339 199 is much offended, that the king of Sweden left the business of Germany. 371 393, and undertooke this unexpected atteque, 426 27 147 279 221, and that without 184 127 155 acouninting them therewith; 468 101 468 136 500; yet withall, that upon the accompt of the keeping him from engageing with the house of Austra. 312 109 59 500 468 544, they will make but very little shew 324 162 thereof; but it's certaine, and so I found by discourse at large with Mr. Delton, 412, that they are much discontented 254 104 466 104 145 279 with him. Opdam's instructions were only what I formerly gave you an accompt of, to wit, not to treate, 477 150 132 43 15 466, but to put the succour 157 30 254 156 135 into Copenhagen, 426 110 319 311 105, and in case of opposition 149 345 from the k. Swed. shipps, 140, to fight them, 55 63 148 468, but not otherwise; but instructions doe dayly change with all accidents, of which I shall endeavour, from time to time, to give you an accompt; but I beleeve you will finde that matter steere itself much as I have above hinted.

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My former letters, and the memoriall thereupon given to the states generall, did give you an accompt of Ch. Stuart his having bin in this country. I knew every place he was at, and what company came with him, and to him; but it being the first time I had complained in that kinde, I did not thinke it necessary to mention all places. He was at Amsterdam, but very privately. He was also at the old princesse dowager's, 106 251 143 270 483 311 136 144, and most nobly enterteyned by her; 137; but I doe not finde there was much more in all that, then taking his pleasure; 16 143 156 134; and I can assure you, that hee was not at the sea-coast, 468 143 41 16 254 217 148, and that upon his highnesse death, hee repayred forthwith for Don John. 305 150 60 500 305 585.

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The states gen. have this last week given an oath of secresy 45 27 136 42 140 170 to all their clerks, 358 137 10 287, and other officers and members; 144 207 379 89 20 286 138; which puts a new trouble and difficulty, and, I feare, chardge 34 311 also upon me.

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The inclosed will give you an accompt of what I have from Ch. Stuart's court, 132 145, to which, I am confident, you may give creditt. I finde not in yours any mention of the papers 14 426 134 141 I lately sent you concerning Suffolke Tom. Howard. 83 350 477 100 328 483 136 38. I much want the copy of the treaty with Portugall, which I hope, according to your last, to receive by the next post, and have in the meane while endeavoured to keepe things in as generall termes as I could.

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Middleton hath 477 108 322 been a good while, and is yet, at Amsterdam, and I am sure, that there are divers Scottchmen which do attend him, 493 270 219 149 282 326, and I am very apprehensive, that hee is upon some designe. 263 144 71 56 390. I doe finde also, that there are some armes bought at Amsterdam. 59 66 151 219 566. I shall endeavour to penetrate farther into the business, and give you an accompt thereof. Ormond is not gone 147 for England 547. Harry German is gone for France, to trye what is to be done there. I am,
Right Honourable,
Your most faithfull humble servant,
G. Downing.

Hague, 11th October, 1658. [N. S.]

I have already putt my whole family, and two coaches,
and one apartement in my house, into mourning, and for my life could not have been a better husband.

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There is very great jealousy betweene Charles Stuart and the 150 161 40 43 390 572 207 d. of York, upon the accompt, that the d. of York hath sent 43 107 151 one Talbot 82 19 112 into Spayne, 477 550, (who is a priest 441 287 149) for to prosecute his particular affayres 298 171 133 287, and to obteyne a settlement of them, as to his own employment in the armie, and his pension, 426 108 142 345, &c. and this makes great worke among them.

Mr. Downing, the English resident in Holland, to secretary Thurloe.

Vol. lxi. p. 221.

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Right Honourable,
Yours by the last post is come safe to my hands, together with the inclosed; and haveing this oppertunity, and considering the continuall rifling of packquetts, I think it fitt to be at a little charge so often as possible, and as any thing of concernment comes, to send to you by the way of Skevling. The Hollands fleete is not yett put out to sea, so far as we know, of which the best account I have, is in an inclosed letter to me from Amsterdam, as also in another paper, which you will finde inclosed, which was an accompt taken of the said fleete by captain Mims, who being driven by the late storm into Medenbleck, I writt to him to go and view the fleete, and send me one accompt of its condition, and carry another with him for England; so that it's possible you may, long ere this, have had the same from the commissioners of the admiralty, whom I directed him to send the said accompt unto; since which time there are but 3 or foure men of warr more come to the fleete. I belieeve I need not tell you, how much many are troubled, that there fleete cannot yet get to sea; and many reports there are, as if Copenhagen should be taken; but there is no ground thereof to be given creditt unto, farther than the generall supposition, that it can hardly hold out; and for the states generall, this is most certaine, and the longer I search into their temper, the more I shall be of that opinion, that whatever their principles 105 252 120 358 139 be, yet that they are wholly guided 336 279 by events; 152 41 105 146 140; and if that they can doe nothing against the k. of Sweden, but that Copenhagen bee taken, 311 105 231 464 106, then they will presently, and that by the countenance of their fleete, 358 289, which, they say, shall go however, 160 291, make their peace with the k. of Sweden; and to deale plainly with you, the k. of Sweden doth now most extreamly court them, 182 146 468 102, and I am apt to believe, that even then he will be willing to give them very good termes, for feare of his other enemies, and thereby give advantage to the Imperiallists of transporting themselves into Zeeland and Funen, which is certainly the main thing intended. The inclosed papers will also give you an accompt, and truly I think that, which is to be credited, (and I am confident thereof) from Charles Stuart's court, the two persons, from whom I have the said advices, knowing nothing of each other. Ormond is not yet gone for England; but it's certain they are sending severall, of which I shall endeavour to give you an accompt. Harry German is gone for France, to sound and trye, what is to be done there; which may possibly hinder Gerrard's going. By a memoriall, which I sent you, which I presented to the states generall, you had an accompt of my haveing therein complained to the states of Charles Stuart's being to and fro in their countryes. He was highly enterteyned by the old dowager of Orange. 483 311 134 408 416 205 311. He was also at Amsterdam, and severall other places; but I thought it not needfull to mention them all in my memoriall. But I am sure, that he was not on the coast-side, in order to any designe for England; for I had an accompt of every place, where he was; neither were any of the states with him, but only one Zulerston of Utrecht, who is much affected to him, and count William, 202, at the first mentioned place, where he was so well treated; but this I am confident, that Midleton, 358 150 412, who is now, and hath bin for a good while together, at Amsterdam, hath some designe in hand for Scotland. 254 150 82 207. This is certaine, that he hath ordered many of the Scots 254 151 144 officers to attend his orders. I shall endeavour to give you a more particular accompt, but the tide will not suffer me to be more large at present; and am,
Right Honourable,
Your most faithfull humble servant, G. Downing.

Hague, 11th October, 1658.
12 a clock noone, [N. S.]

General Monck to secretary Thurloe.

Vol. lxi. p. 224.

My Lord,
Sr. John Scott of Scottis-Tarvutt having guist from the late king under the great seale, for the place of director of the chancery in Scotland for life, and the said place being disposed of by the comissioners from the parliament in the year 1651. hee made sower severall addresses to his late highness, at the last whereof it was found by the comissioners of the great seale, Sir Thomas Widdrington, the lord Mountague, the lord Whitlock, and col. Sydenham, to whom his highnesse referred the cognition thereof, that they found no cause, why hee should have bin displaced out of that office, the same being only ministeriall. But uppon his last petition, seeking to be restored, his highnes would give no determined answer, till hee had advised with his councill, the cause whereof was, because he had given a guift of the same before to one Alexander Jaffray, (not having understood of Sir John Scott his right thereto) and now Mr. Jaffray being very sicke, Sr. John and myself made itt our request unto you, that your lordshippe will be pleased to stand his friend to his highnesse, that, in case Mr. Jaffray should dye, his highnesse will not dispose of the said place of director of the chancery, till he hath heard Sr. John Scott speake for himself. I crave your lordshipp's pardon for giveing you this trouble, and remayne
Your Lordshippe's
Most humble servant,
George Monck.

Dalkeith, 1. October, 1658.

Mr. Downing, resident in Holland, to secretary Thurloe.

Vol. lxi. p. 250.

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Right Honourable,
Upon friday last I wrote to you by the post, and, for more surenesse, by a Skeeveling boate, since which, little of concernment hath occurred. The post this day from Hamburgh brings no assureance of Copenhagen's being taken, thow for severall dayes heere hath been a report of it. I suppose the Dutch fleet will now gett to sea from the Flye, the wind being now come to the south-east, which is as fayre for them as can blowe. If the k. of Sweden carry Copenhagen, he will be very formidable. 260 18 358. If states general relieve it, they will be insupportably insolent; 358 104 145; so it is an unhappy businesse, let it goe either way. And of a peace I see no hopes; for the king of Sweden hath declared, hee will hazard all for the carrying of it.

Heere is great expectation of what will be the issue of my lord Newport's transactions; but in the mean while I see very little remedy of the prankes played heere by the Flanders men of warr. I have obtained restitution of two or three ships to the proprieters, but with such a trouble, as would weary any one, and of many others no restitution to be had; and this is a businesse, which, if some way or other not rectifyed, will in time be the ruine of all English shipping.

It's written from Flanders from very good hands, that Henry Germin is gone for France, with propositions for promoting a peace between France and Spayne; and if any probability thereof, then to try, whether any thing may be done for Charles Stuart, or the duke of Yorke. The bearer, captain Baskett, cannot stay, the wind being fayre. I am,
Right Honourable,
Your most faithfull humble servant,
G. Downing.

Hague, October 15. 58. [N. S.]

I send you the inclosed papers, as they are, not having time to translate them. If Holland sett foote in Zeland, they will not easily quitt it, and soe they say plainly; and I apprehend, that then may nearly touch England.

Lockhart to secretary Thurloe.

Vol. lxi. p. 248.

May it please your Lordship,
I know not by what preface to introduce a discourse of coals to your lordship, whose thoughts are so continually employed upon other subjects; but being our necessities put us upon such kind of commodities, and your lordship's care is universall, I take the boldness to let your lordship know, that we have contracted with Mr. Symball for 500 chaldron of coals, which he hath here delivered; but by that contract he was to be freed from all sorraine duties. Therefore I humbly beseech your lordship to move the councell, that he may be discharged of the said duties, and the same may be discounted to Mr. Noel. This will be a great favour; but I must beg another almost as great, that your lordship would pardon this importunity from,
My Lord,
Your lordship's most humble,
and most obedient servant,
Will. Lockhart.

Dunkerk, the 5/15th of Octob. 1658.

General Monck to secretary Thurloe.

Vol. lxi. p. 262.

Honourable Sir,
In regard of the manifould occasions, which require daily use of the publique seales of this nation, not only for infeofing of persons in their estates, but likewise for the writts issueing from the council here, upon differences between party and party as to civil rights, it will be very necessary, that while new publique seales for the country are in makeing, there be a declaration or proclamation, that all writts, letters, enfeoffments, guists of any kinde, and busines whatsoever, that by law ought to passe under the great seale of Scotland, quarter seale, privy seale, or signet, may and shall passe under the respective seales of his late highness here, untill new seales be made and appointed. And therefore his highnes councell heere desire you will please to take a sitt opportunity to represent theire humble desire in this matter to his highnes and the councill's consideration, it being much conduceing to his highnes service, that such authority may be given concerning it, as in theire wisdomes shall be thought fitt.

Signed in the name and by order of the councill,
George Monck.

Edinburgh, the 5th of October, 1658.

The elector Brandenburg's agent to secretary Thurloe.

In the possession of the right hon. Philip lord Hardwicke, lord high chancellor of Great Britain.

Honoratissime Domine,
Commodum hoc ipso mane dominus Cuperus, verbi divini minister, ad me venit; ac cum antehac sermo mihi cum ipso fuisset de quodam intimo meo viro egregio domino Bokelio, ejusque summo in serenissimum quondam principem vestrum affectu ac veneratione, quam dedicatione alicujus opusculi testatam sacere voluit, renunciavit mihi non ingratam fore dominationi vestræ libri istius inspectionem. Mitto itaque eum statim, sed exemplar aliquod mecum retineo, celsitudini suæ serenissimæ, quæ jam imperii vestri res moderatur, debita cum submissione exhibendum, ubi dominationi vestræ visum illud fuerit. Certum interim dominatio vestra habeat, dulcissimum illud simul ac flagrantissimum inter me ac dictum illum amicum meum certamen esse, uter majora publico, ac speciatim, si quando res ita ferat, Angliæ vestræ servitia præstare queat; ac si dominatio vestra dignata fuerit eum inter clientes suos recipere, provocaturum meipsum quoque ad istud, utrum majore ac sinceriore reverentia ac observantia prosequi possit honoratissimam dominationem vestram
Omni studio ac obsequio ipsi addictissimus,
J. Schlezer.

Die 5. Octobr. [1658.]

Secretary Thurloe to Henry Cromwell, lord deputy of Ireland.

In the possession of the right hon. the earl of Shelburn.

May it please your Excellencye,
I AM, blessed be God, able to write againe, though not much; nor will it be needfull for me by this to trouble your excellency with any thinge, intendinge to dispatche away an expresse with your comission to-morrow, or next day, by which I shall write at large, if the Lord enable me; and in the meane tyme crave leave to subscribe
Your Excelency's
Most humble and faithfull servant,
Jo. Thurloe.

5. Oct. 1658.

General Fleetwood to Henry Cromwell, lord lieutenant of Ireland.

In the possession of the right hon. the earl of Shelburn.

Deare Brother,
I have had some discourse with my lord Russell, by whom I perceive, you have a desire to return for some time into England, whearin I have given some thoughts to his lordship, who will acquaint you with it accordingly. Doe not think you have unkindnes heare; no, you may finde thos most suspected, best freinds. I confesse, I desire to have one or 2 houres discourse with you, and it may be the Lord may please to let us to understand things as formerly I have thought we have don; and why showld we not have the same love? I can with much affection remember the dearnes, playnnes, which was betwixt us. If it wer to be bought, I could part with a great dell to regayne it. The Lord teach us both, whearin we have either sayled! I have that hopes we may agayn embrace with the former love. Excuse my playnnes and freedom. I hope ther is a true honesty in it. Let you and myselfe tell our unkindnesses each to other, and not to others; but let's labour to overcom with love. We have nothing of newes considerable, only we have coll. Barry com over from Jamecah, who hath brought us a relation of a very good successe against 700 of the Spanyards landed on the island, with a generall, as governor of that place. Our forces fell upon them, wheare they were fortefyed, killed above 300, tooke about a 100 prisoners, besids officers, 6 pieces of ordynance, their amunition, and what else was ther; the rest dispersed, and supposed will not know how to live in wild woods and rocks. The Lord, I trust, will own that small begining to his prayse. I have one small sute in the behalfe of lieutenant-collonel Duckfeild, that you would please to be tender to him. He is honest, I am perswaded, though in some things he may hesitate, of which I know not; but having writt to him my minde, I begge your kindnes in this, till I hear from him. I am
Your most affectionate brother.

Oct. 5. [1658.]

Dr. Thomas Clarges to Henry Cromwell, lord lieutenant of Ireland.

In the possession of the right hon. the earl of Shelburn.

May it please your Excelency,
It is commonly rumour'd, that the Spanish marchants have moved his highnes to an accommodation with Spaine, and, for an inducement to it, have offer'd to pay the arrears of the armyes and navy.

The king of Sweden's friends are in some confusion of feare for his majesty's affaires, in regard very great forces are draweing towards him, under the command of the duke of Brandenburg, to the number of six-and-thirty thousand horse and foot, viz. seven thousand horse, and as many foot, and two thousand dragoons, under Mountecuculi, of the Austrian forces; nine thousand foot, four thousand horse, and three thousand dragoons, Brandenburgers; and five thousand good Poland horse, under Czarnesky, which are all to be commanded by the duke of Brandenburg, whoe has lest his lady at Berlin, and the prince of Anhalt governor of his country in his absence. Yet notwithstanding all these preparations, if the Hollanders have not good winds to bring them in, the rest are lesse fear'd; and there are whispers, that the Holland fleet is yet in the Vlie; but it is certaine, that private orders are emitted heere for the rigging of seventeen ships, to be set out under general Mountegue, which are supposed to be for the Baltique sea, to observe the Hollanders motions. By the later part of the inclosed print, your excelency may perceive, in what termes your excelencie's servant generall Monck is as to his addresse from Scotland. He sent to his highnes both the addresse he intended himself, and that also sent to him by my lord Fleetwood, both of them signed by his officers; and because some were absent, he hath since caused every regiment to signe a perticular addresse, of which I have this day delivered his highnes those from generall Monck's regiments of horse and foot, and the rest will followe. I have only now to intreate your excelencie's pardon for this long letter, and to assure you, that I ever shall be,
London, this 5th of October, 1658.
May it please your Excelency,
Your excelencie's most humble, and most obleig'd servant,
Tho. Clarges.

I am not able to expresse the testimonies of faithfullnes, duty and affection, which I had commands from my brother Monck to deliver to his highnes, which are not very sitt to be put in paper at this distance; but I know your excelency aprehends as much as I can say. As I was sealing my letter, I had intimation from the French ambassadour, that the French army in Flanders are drawn towards Lisle.

Coll. John Clarke to H. Cromwell, lord lieutenant of Ireland.

Whitehall, Oct. 5. 58.

In the possession of the right hon. the earl of Shelburn.

May it please your Excellencye,
I know your excellencye has much better intelligence of affaires then I can give; yet I presume to give your excellencye the trouble of the enclosed narrative of the late successe, wherewith God was pleased to blesse the handfull of our forces at Jamaica, the newes whereof came yesterday by the Marten galley, who brought over coll. Barry from thence, by whome came also the royall standart and ensignes taken from the enemy. And in regard, that the enclosed containes much more particularly then any thing that came from thence, I thought it not altogether unacceptable to your excellencye. There are some probable reports, as that the Swede had taken in Copenhagen; but nothing yet certaine. 'Tis certaine great opposition is against him by the conjoined army of the Brandenburgish, Austrian, and Polish, which the duke of Brandenburgh has brought toward Holstein; and the Duch speake high of giving releese to the Dane; but there fleete was not gone ten dais agoe, and 'tis questionable, whether it be gone yet or not. Affaires here, blessed be God! are in a quiett and peaceable posture, beyond what could be imagined upon the losse of so choice a head and governor, as indeed did much in himselfe concenter the peace and quiett of these 3 nations; but the will of the Lord is done, and it becomes us to lay our mouths in the dust, whom the Lord hath not thought worthy longer to enjoy so great mercy; and yet, blessed be his name! he hath not left us without hope, in that he hath established a successor out of his loines, that may leave upon him his name and spirritt, and maintaine that cause and interest, which God so eminently owned and blessed in the hands of your late blessed father, whose memory will be blessed and precious in the esteeme and remembrance of all good men. But, my lord, I feare I doe not so well to renew any thing before you, that may minister sadnes to your spirritt; but the Lord sanctify all these tryalls to your excellencye. I shall adde no more, save the humble and thankfull acknowledgments of all your excellencyes favour and respect towards me, and subscribe
Your Excellencye's
Most humble servant,
John Clerke.

Col. Tho. Cooper to H. Cromwell, lord deputy of Ireland.

In the possession of the rt. hon. the earl of Shelburn.

My Lord,
I Have been long silent, fearing to give your lordship any unnecessary trouble; and of late unwilling to ad affliction to your trouble, by giving you any accompt of his highnesse's death, being assured you would receave that sad newse from many hands, which affects not onely so near a relation as your lordship, but hath its stroke of deep and astonishing sorrow upon the hearts of all good men in these nations. To read the sad letters from all quarters would break a heart of stone; and sure this stroke in the head is for some head sinne amongst us; and it will be our mercye to bee made truly senseable of it; and the edg of this blow falls chiefly upon the people of God, which may intemate the sinne chiefly to lye there; and good men heere are layeing this to hearte, and inquireing into the mynde of God about it, and I think it not without a signal blessinge, which appears in the peace and quietness wee are in under soe great a dispensation; and I hope the many prayers and tears powered out before the Lord, as to the spareing of his highnesse's life, tho' not answered in kynde, will have their effect upon the head and heart of his present highness, and he will experience how far the dew of heaven exceeds the fatness of the earth. I am very much troubled to hear my lieutenant colonell hath refused to signe the late address to his highness; but I humbly begg your pitty and patience towards him, for the man is, I am persuaded, one, that truly fears God, and a good officer; and I am well persuaded will soone bee recovered out of his mistake, if your lordship would be pleased to send for him, and speake with him. I dare say hee will never prove unfaithful to your lordship: if hee receaves not satisfaction to serve your lordship in his capacity, he will desire to be dismist, being a man of a veary plaine as well as honest hearte. I have writt to him, and I hope hee will be satisfyed to give your lordship (and his highnesse, if need be) such satisfaction as may render him a person fit for your lordship's further service and favour; and if your lordship gaines him by love and forbearance, the publicque will have advantage by it. Alsoe I beg your lordship's favour for this long trouble, but more especially for my long absence, though it hath not been occasioned by myself or my concernments, being detained by his hignesse's commands, untill the tyme of his sickness, and put upon with some of the counsell and officers of the army to consider of some things previous to the calling of a parliament, and am now waiting his highnesse's commands, or such as I shall receave from your lordship, whoe am,
My Lord,
Your Lordship's
Veary faithfull servant,
Tho. Cooper.

October the 5th. 1658.

H. Cromwell, lord deputy of Ireland, to secretary Thurloe.

Vol. lxi. p. 263.

Sir,
I Understand by your last, that the commissions are renewing; and amongst the rest mine under a new title. Truly, Sir, the very thought of it putts mee into confusion; you know very well what an intollerable life I have led here, to the impaireing my health, and in perpetual anxiety and disquiet of mind. I cannot tell what vertue a bare title will have as to the bettering my condition. I should not dare to refuse the serving his present highness and my country in the meanest capacitie; but to be alwayes in the fier, who can bear it?

I remember, that in the first account you gave mee of this great change, there was an odd hint of some ill spiritts in the army, disputing whether the military power devolved to his highness; and being able to picke up something of the same tendency (if not worse, if that can bee) it leaves me not without some feare concerning the true state of affaires in England, though I am withall glad, that the outside of things shew faire. I am sorry to heare of your indisposition at this juncture; wherefore I shall forbeare enlargeing at this time.

The address of this army to his highness is now returned out of all quarters, unanimously subscribed by all officers, and shall shortly be sent by a convenient hand. It is, it may bee, short of others in expressions, but I dare say equall with the best in true duty and affection. I remain,
Your very affectionate and humble servant,
H. Cromwell.

Oct. 6. 58.

Dr. Tho. Harrison to secretary Thurloe.

Vol. lxi. p. 267.

May it please your Honour,
I Cannot sufficiently expresse my thankfulnesse for the hopes of your pardoning my former presumption given me by the favour of your last letter. It was out of zeale for the publike good and prosperity of that family, wherein God hath made the publike so much concerned, that I adventured therein, only opening my poore thoughts to yourselfe; but not in the least syllable (tending that way) to my lord deputy, or any other.

The gentleman, that brings this to your hand, was steward to the late queene for the mannor of Wimbleton, and by that meanes well acquainted with the courtiers, and with the present possessour of that mannour. He saith, he came over hither with a purpose to have practised as a councellour at law, but it is much prest in spirit to returne into England, hoping to do some considerable service to his highnesse and the publike, by discovering the designes of some persons, whome he suspects now to be brewing mischeife. He hath appeared in print for his late highnesses person and government; how farre he will prove either faithfull or usefull, will be much sooner discerned by your honour, then by
Your Honour's
poore servant, Tho. Harrison.

Dublin Castle, Oct. 6. 58.

Mr. Downing, resident in Holland, to secretary Thurloe.

Vol. lxi. p. 264.

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Right Honourable,
All yours came to my hands this weeke safe, so that I am now furnished with the copy of the Portugal treaty, and have heerein inclosed to you the proposition made by the Portugal ambassador heere; the substance whereof I gave you in my last. This day sennight a man of warr of this state of 32 guns, but which could carry above 40, which had never bin at sea, endeavouring to goe out at Heleford-sluce in the night, hastening to get to the Vlye to the fleete, run on ground, and was overset and lost; but the fleete are, we believe, now at last gone to sea out of the Ulye, another list whereof, and later than that I formerly sent you, is herein inclosed; and we shall this next weeke begin to be in expectation of newes from them: and there is no manner of doubt at all made heere of their releiving Copenhagen. And I cannot perceive, that K. of Sweden hath any thoughts of a peace with the K. of Denmark, but to hazard all upon the making himself master of the Sound, 408 468 459 152 105 36, which is like to draw very deepe in the consequences of it; and how farr the lord protector may be concerned therein 286 107 279 468 131 339 I am not soe well able to judge; and on the other hand its certain, that if this reliefe 43 362 41 50 39 shall gett into Copenhagen, that the states generall 311 109 467 535 will dayly send more men into it; 284 133 41 380 339 477 71 151; and rather then fayle, transport 105 140 431 136 150 the Imperiall forces under the elect. of Brandenburg to Zeeland, and will certainly become very insolent; 170 339 459 358 107 151; and undoubtedly endeavour to gaine Croningberg castle 110 58 231 137 53 250 358 for themselves, and for which there will not want very much of pretence upon the accompt of this succour; 155 28 254 152 137; and thereby endeavour againe to give law to England. 477 547. I am sure takeing all things together, it is a very unhappy busines. Mr. Applebome 241 412 saith, that the K. of Sweden will fight this Holland fleete. 358 289. Heere is very much talk and enquiry about the fleet now equipped in England, 126 153 70 120 125 279 339 547, and a great jealousy least it should have bin designed for the Sound, 108 279 304 468 459 156 110 38, which if it had bin, would undoubtedly with what the K. of Sweden hath, given the law; but certainly the Dutch ambass. hath abused the lord protector in that memorial of his mentioned in your last, wherein he desires the stop of Sir George 408 140 68 134 311 416 311 Ascu 239: upon that article of the treatie that no men shall bee sent, 319 822 31 140 41 41 108 150 477 to the enemies of the other, 468 112 468 135; for there is nothing at all yet declared 355 135 by the stat. gen. or the K. of Sw. against each other; but on the contrary, papers passing between each other as formerly, as you will perceive by the inclosed: but if this succour get into Copenhagen 136 311 151 339 477 254 426 109 319 311 110, then they will be high; 58 66; but if otherwise, yet by this fleete they will make their peace with the king of Sweden; 536; and upon this accompt they doe daily laugh at the lord protector 534, saying, that the ld: prot. may well loos by siding with the king of Sweden; 108 58 500 536; but that they see nothing that hee is in a way of getting thereby, but on the contrary, that the stat. gen. if the present enterprize succeede, that they 251 279 467 468 173 will have what they will of the king of Sweden, but if otherwise 49 114 468 135 502 that yet 467 171 289 they make no manner of doubt of in all things getting as good conditions as England. 217 317 254 107 267 475 412 143 217 547. Mr. Weyman, deputy extraordinary for the elector of Brandenburg, came last week to this towne, so that now all these persons, of whose being to come hither I long agoe gave you an accompt, are now all here. He hath not yet notifyed to me his arrivall according to the custome, and his business is to push on the succour 64 412 468 144 156 28 254 156 137 for Denmark, and that the elector of Brand. his forces may be transported 437 108 by the states general's fleete into Zeland. 51 358 289 339 477 558. There is great quantity of provisions, which goes dayly from Amsterdam for the reliefe of the imperiall army under the elector of Brandenburg, which is a great army; and unless relieved from hence, would hardly be able to subsist in Holstein, and must necessarily be extreamly incommodated by the abundance of wet weather, which hath bin and yet continues; as it hath also, as is said, much hindered the king of Sweden in his beseidging Copenhagen. And I perceive, that he is very thristy of his men, and he is fortifying Corsoar, and some other places in Zeland. It's said, that his fleete is not man'd, but that he intends, if occasion be, to fill his ships with souldiers, though with all his force, is not so considerable in Zeland, as to be able to spare many men. If he should fight the Holland fleete; and beate them, he would carry all and give the law; if his fleete should be beaten, he is in a prison. All the possible force of the states general 305 251 408 535 408 of the king of Sweden's which are reade are with their fleete; 500 468 73 134 51 358 289; but in my last I gave you an accompt, that patents are out for the fowr thousand men more, 418 305 468 304 161 135 474 380 384 133, but very little progress made for the hastening of them, or for 305 shipps, 142, nor will there be till they see the issue of this fleet; 44 408 469 51 358 289; and then accordingly matters will goe. As for Charles Stuart his having been in Holland, 339 557, surely you had my memoriall complaining thereof, which was even at the very time while he was in Holland; 657, and at the very time I had an accompt from one Killigrew of his bed-chamber, 132 41 159 408 327 231 34 28 319 89 20 286, of every place where he was, and the 496 324 488 207 468 time, with his stay and company 207 254 102 122 14 393 of which also I gave you an accompt in mine by the last post. He vowed 113 159 287, that it was a journey of 155 132 108 171 408 123 pleasure, 142 153 132, and that none of the states general, nor anie person of note of Amsterdam, came to him; 566 246 477 326; besides I have perfectly gain ed To m Ho wa r d (fn. 1) of Ho wa r d of S u f fo l k, whose papers I sent, 135 142 70 140 41 105 127, (which yet hee hath noe knowledge of at all, or that I have any such things) and hee assured mee, 143 156 134 287 379, that it was a journie of pleasure; 393 408 122 358 16 143 156 135 41; but withall hee tells me, Hen. Germin is 467 324 106 441 311 135 101 339 346 certainly gon into France 549 upon some notable business; some think it is with propositions for a peace with Spaine, 550, which the lord Germain 36 311 134 100 339 is to put forward; and some do conjecture, that this is the product of the visitt which the cardinall 493 468 245 133 36 339 199 is said to have given to the little queene, 150 358 126 157 43 45 390, upon the newes of the death of the lord protector 62; of which I gave you an accompt in a late letter, which I assure you is heere very much talked of, and absolutely beleeved by all heere. Others whisper, as if there were some propositions of a marriage 441 16 311 between the king of France and Charles Steward's sister at Paris; 213 346; but this hee assures me the last night, 148 393 57 64 148, the princesse royall shewed him a letter from the duke of York to her, 573 477 61 286, wherein he writes, that hee was come from the Spanish armie, 124 205 346 64 214, and to returne 148 156 thither no more; 325 468 137 395 284 136 44; but the reason he knows not. 324 353 287 395 151. But this was done upon Germin's going to 339 France, 314 339 56 477 549, nor doe I for my part knowe, what to make of it. Its written also from Bruxells, that hee is again to be employed 231 43 101 122 365 171 279 in France, or to have a great pension. 44 219 426 109 142 345. There is certainly something in this busines. Prince William 251 503 333 90 is now in this towne; he was with the princess dowager one of the times when Charles Stewart was there: 468 476 143 492 572 488 468: hee sayth that Charles Stuart came uninvited, and only upon a 339 155 71 149 279 207 412 362 523 16 visit to her house, 73 466 65 286 329, within two or three leagues of Hockstrate, 75 141 437 466 160, where Ch. St. was; but I little creditt 362 150 358 31 l36 Z79 73 146 what he sayth, 149 66 for that hee is now might and maine endeavouring, by all imaginable industrie and artifice, to be made feild-marshall; 87 38 371 136 41 144 319 85; and upon the accompt highly courting Holland, 150 339 56 557, and particularly Amsterdam; and upon that accompt hath of late spoken liberally of the protector; but especially the king of Sweden: and this I know, that Ch. St. was as far as Enchuisen, 30 331 346 45 109, and his horses 136 143 286 were shipped in into West-Friezland; and that Ch. St. did intend to go himself into West-Freizland 50 339 to visite prince William 144 72 466 123 441 108 251 503 71 202, but my memorial 384 441 199 stoped that journey; 156 137 393; and every body knowes, that the old princesse 124 441 108 251 128 is wholly Spanish; 122 205 346 65; and this I know, that C. St. the K. of Hung. and Spanish ambassadour 346 65 2O2 227 143 449 416 did write 441 466 477 64 286 to her, to persuade the elector of Brandenburg to give his 32 voyce for the king of Hungary 468 539 and the elect. of Brand. being now against the K. of Sw. carryes all the Orange 205 311 interest with it, so that Zeeland, which could never before be brought to consent 108 142 44 109 147 to any thing against the K. of Sw. hath yet now agreed 135 44 279 to the sending this 339 58 469 fleet to Denmark. 150 477 552. I think I can hardly pitch upon for one a fitter instrument then 286 339 142 149 447 386 151 468 110 477 Tom Howard, hee beeing master of 231 339 58 371 142 149 286 the horse to the princesse royall; 468 570; and I shall endeavour to improve him 443 155 44 326 Prince William 251 503 73 202 asked me, 35 379. why I did not visite the old 143 71 466 468 116 83 37 122 441 107 princesse? I put it off, not thinking fitt to be engaged to such a thing without your positive mind therein first had.

As for Whitford 145 305 32, I did give De Witt 149 two or three times notice of his lodging, 58 339 57, and he must have bin taken 110, but that it was always 24 hours ere an order could be had; and he removed his lodging every night. And if I had endeavoured to have done it by the stat. gen. it would have bin much more tedious, and would also have bin knowne; and he is since; as I a good while ago gave you an accompt, gon for Muscovy, 524 254 157 170, in a ship bound with ammunition thither. I am,
Right Honourable,
Your most faithfull humble servant,
G. Downing.

Hague, 8ber 18. 58. [N. S.]

Footnotes

1 This gentleman recommended Mr. Downing to the king's favour. See Carte's Collection of Original Letters and Papers, Vol. II. p. 319.