Memorials
1308

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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H. T. Riley (editor)

Year published

1868

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Pages

63-67

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'Memorials: 1308', Memorials of London and London Life: In the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries (1868), pp. 63-67. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=57653 Date accessed: 24 November 2014.


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Acknowledgment of trespass committed against a Sheriff.

1 Edward II. A.D. 1308. Letter-Book C. fol. xciii. (Latin.)

Adam de Blakesale, hakeneyman, (fn. 1) came on the Friday next after the Feast of the Purification of Saint Mary [2 February], in the first year of King Edward, son of King Edward, before Sir John le Blound, the then Mayor of London, John de Wengrave, Richer de Refham, and other Aldermen, and acknowledged that he was pledged to Nicholas Pycot, Sheriff, in three tuns of wine, for trespass and rescue of three hackneys from the same Nicholas by him, Adam, made; the same to be taken at his good pleasure. Whereupon, the said Nicholas remitted to him one tun of wine; and another tun he placed in safe-keeping, to see how he, Adam, would behave himself. And the third tun was to be paid over to the same Nicholas at his good pleasure. And Adam before-named bound himself so to do, etc.

And Robert, son of Robert le Treyere, Walter le Taillour of Fencherche, Ralph de Wymbihs potter, (fn. 2) and Walter Atte Calle, came before the said Mayor and Aldermen on the day beforementioned, and bound themselves, and each of them, jointly and severally, for payment of the said wine to the aforesaid Nicholas, as before stated. And the said Adam de Blakesale bound himself, his heirs, and executors, to keep the said Robert, Walter, Ralph, and Walter, indemnified therein.

Proclamation made before the Coronation of King Edward the Second.

1 Edward II. A.D. Letter-Book 1308 C. fol. xciii. (Norman French.)

This proclamation was made on the Sunday next after the Feast of St. Valentine the Martyr [14 February], in the first year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward.—

"In the first place,— That no one shall be so daring, on the day of the Coronation, as to carry sword, or knife with point, or misericorde, (fn. 3) mace, or club, or any other arm, on pain of imprisonment for a year and a day.

"And further.— The King doth command that all persons shall receive and pay honour to the French and the other folks from abroad, who have come, and shall come, to the said Coronation; and that no one shall do them wrong in word or deed, on pain of imprisonment for a year and a day, and of forfeiture to the King, in the loss of all that they have.

And further.—The King doth command that no person shall strike another, or shall lay hand on another, in evil manner, on pain of losing the hand. And if any person shall be found to brandish sword, misericorde, knife, mace, club, or other arm, to do evil therewith, with such arm as he shall have so brandished, let him be pierced (fn. 4) through the hand."

Delivery of hostels to the Citizens, which had been taken for the Coronation.

1 Edward II. A.D. 1308. Letter-Book C. fol. xciii. (Latin.)

The hostels in the City of London, which were taken by the Marshals of our Lord King Edward, son of King Edward, for lodging the great folks, native and foreign, who had come to the Coronation of our said Lord the King, on Sunday the Feast of St. Matthias the Apostle [24 February], in the year of our Lord 1308, and the first year of his reign, were, by award of him, our Lord the King, and his Council, given up on the Thursday following; it being understood that if the parties occupying them should wish to make any further stay, they were to make recompense to the owner of the house for the same, etc.

Delivery of a Cope, to be presented by the City to the Bishop of Worcester.

2 Edward II. A.D. 1308. Letter-Book C. fol. cii. (Latin.)

John Bonde and John de Stebenhethe, clerk, on the Tuesday next ensuing after the Octave of St. Michael [29 September], in the second year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward, came before Sir John le Blound, Mayor of London, John de Wengrave, and other Aldermen, and delivered to the same Mayor and Aldermen the embroidered cope before-mentioned, of the value of thirty pounds. Therefore they and their sureties were to be acquitted thereof. And the said Mayor and Aldermen are bound, for themselves and their fellows, and all the commonalty of the City of London, and their successors, and do make promise bona fide, to pay to the aforesaid John Bonde and John de Stebenhethe 15 pounds at Our Lord's Nativity next ensuing, and 15 pounds at the Feast of the Purification of St. Mary [2 February] next ensuing; namely, one fourth thereof to John de Stebenhethe, as the share thereof belonging to Margery his wife, and one fourth, to Ketherine, daughter of Simon Godard, who is of full age, as the share belonging to her thereof; and the remainder, namely, the other half, to the said John Bonde, to the use of Thomas and Simon, children of Simon Godard, etc.

The same cope was given by the Mayor (fn. 5) and commonalty aforesaid to Sir Walter Reynaud, Treasurer to our Lord the King, and Bishop of Worcester, at his consecration at Canterbury on the Feast of St. Edward the King [5 January].

Specifications for building a house.

2 Edward II. A.D. 1308. Letter-Book C. fol. xcvi. (Latin.)

Simon de Canterbury, carpenter, (fn. 6) came before the Mayor and Aldermen on the Saturday next after the Feast of St. Martin the Bishop [11 November], in the second year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward, and acknowledged that he would make at his own proper charges, down to the locks, for William de Hanigtone, pelterer, (fn. 7) before the Feast of Easter then next ensuing, a hall and a room with a chimney, (fn. 8) and one larder between the said hall and room; and one sollar (fn. 9) over the room and larder; also, one oriole (fn. 10) at the end of the hall, beyond the high bench, (fn. 11) and one step with an oriole, (fn. 12) from the ground to the door of the hall aforesaid, outside of that hall; and two enclosures as cellars, opposite to each other, beneath the hall; and one enclosure for a sewer, with two pipes leading to the said sewer; and one stable, in length, (fn. 13) between the said hall and the old kitchen, and twelve feet in width, with a sollar above such stable, and a garret above the sollar aforesaid; and at one end of such sollar, there is to be a kitchen with a chimney; and there is to be an oriole (fn. 14) between the said hall and the old chamber, eight feet in width. And if he shall not do so, then he admits etc.

And the said William de Hanigtone acknowledged that he was bound to pay to Simon before-mentioned, for the work aforesaid, the sum of 9l. 5s. 4d. sterling, half a hundred of Eastern martenskins, (fn. 15) fur for a woman's hood, value five shillings, and fur for a robe of him, the said Simon, etc.

Acknowledgment of a debt due to one of the King's Justiciars.

2 Edward II. A.D. 1308. Letter-Book B. fol. 90. (Latin.)

John de Merlawe, quilter, (fn. 16) came before the Mayor, Aldermen, and Chamberlain, on the Tuesday next after the Feast of St. Nicholas the Bishop [5 December] in the second year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward, and acknowledged that he was indebted to Sir Gilbert de Robire, (fn. 17) Justiciar of our Lord (fn. 18) the King, in the sum of sixteen pounds sterling; to be paid at the Feast of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary [2 February] next ensuing. And if he shall not do so, he agrees etc.

A Supervisor of the Barbers of London appointed.

2 Edward II. A.D. 1308. Letter-Book C. fol. xcvi. (Latin.)

Richard le Barbour, dwelling opposite to the Church (fn. 19) of All Hallows the Less, was chosen and presented by the Barbers of London, on the Tuesday next after the Feast of St. Lucy the Virgin [13 December] in the second year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward, before Sir Nicholas de Farndone, the then Mayor of London, John de Wengrave, and other Aldermen, to have supervision over the trade of the barbers, etc. And he was admitted, and made oath that every year he would make scrutiny throughout the whole of his trade; and if he should find any among them keeping brothels, or acting unseemly in any other way, and to the scandal of the trade, he was to distrain upon them, and cause the distress so made to be taken to the Guildhall, etc.

Footnotes

1 A letter of horses on hire.
2 See page 47, Note 2.
3 A short dagger, so called from its being often used to put the wounded in battle out of their pain.
4 Probably the iron spike on the mace or club would effect this.
5 With the view, no doubt, of conciliating the favour of a prelate so high in the King's favour. See page 63 ante.
6 Carpenters were ordinarily the constructors of houses in these days; the material being generally of wood.
7 Or skinner.
8 camino. It has been doubted whether chimneys were in general use at this date.
9 Or sun-parlour; an upper room.
10 Probably a recess, with a bay window.
11 summum scamnum.
12 A porch, probably, in this instance; the exact meaning of the word, however, is doubtful. See Parker's Glossary of Gothic Architecture, Vol. I.
13 The length is omitted.
14 "Oriole" probably means here; room with a bay window.
15 The word is indistinct, but it i "cablon" to all appearance: an inferior kind of sable is probably meant.
16 cozoun.
17 Or "Roubiry;" a Justiciar of the Court of King's Bench.
18 "Note that this was a Justiciar of our Lord the King."—Marginal Note.
19 Opposite Suffolk Lane, in Thames Street. It was destroyed by the Great Fire of 1666.


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