Memorials
1317

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

H. T. Riley (editor)

Year published

1868

Supporting documents

Pages

123-126

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Memorials: 1317', Memorials of London and London Life: In the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries (1868), pp. 123-126. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=57662 Date accessed: 26 November 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Inventory of goods received from the Executors of Richard de Blountesham.

10 Edward II. A.D. 1317. Letter-Book E. fol. lix. (Latin.)

On the Saturday next before the Feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary [25 March], in the 10th year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward, came Matildis, who was the wife of Hugh de Oxenford, and acknowledged a certain writing as her deed, the tenor of which is as follows.—

"Know all men by these presents, that I, Matildis de Oxenford, who was the wife of Hugh de Oxenford, late citizen of London, in pure widowhood and of my lawful power, have had and received, in the stead and name of Idonia, daughter of Margery, who was the wife of Richard de Blountesham, late citizen of London, from Walter Waldeschef, Matthew de Essex, and James Beauflur, executors of the will of the said Richard de Blountesham, the goods underwritten, which the said Richard by his will left to the said Idonia, that is to say;—one feather-bed with a bolster, value 10s. sterling; two complete beds, with two blankets, two cloths called 'coverlitz,' four linen sheets, two canvas sheets, two mattresses, and two ear-pillows, value 40s. 8d. Also, one piece of table-cloth containing 10 ells, value 3 pence per ell, and one piece of towelling containing 14 ells, value 2 pence halfpenny per ell, the total value of the said cloth and towelling being 5s. 5d. Also, one brass pot, weighing 67 pounds; also, one brass pitcher weighing ten pounds; also, two pewter wine flagons, (fn. 1) value 2 shillings, each flagon containing one potel; (fn. 2) also one kettle, value 6s. 8d.; also, one great chest, which formerly belonged to the said Margery, mother of the same Idonia, value 10 shillings. Also, three silver cups, ten shillings in weight. (fn. 3) Also, I confess and acknowledge that I have had and received of the executors aforesaid, in the stead and name of Johanna, sister of Idonia before-named, the goods underwritten, which the aforesaid Richard de Bluntesham by his will left to her the same Johanna, namely"—[An assortment of articles is given, exactly similar to the preceding]. "Moreover, I have had and received from the executors aforesaid, in the stead and name of the said Idonia and Johanna, one cupboard, (fn. 4) in which the pewter vessels of the said Richard deceased were kept, that is to say, dishes, plates, and saltcellars; which cupboard is appraised at 5 shillings sterling. Also, I have had and received in the stead and name of the same Idonia and Johanna, 12 plates, 12 dishes, and 18 saltcellars, of peutere, which used to be kept in the said cupboard, value 5 shillings; and which the aforesaid Richard by his will left to the said Idonia and Johanna. Also, I confess and acknowledge that I have received and had from the executors aforesaid, in the stead and name of the said Idonia and Johanna, and in my own proper name, the jewels underwritten, in a certain desk of leather (fn. 5) contained, and which the said Richard left to me and the aforesaid Idonia and Johanna, among us proportionably to be divided; that is to say, one three-cornered fermail, called a 'nuche,' (fn. 6) value 20 shillings; also, 2 gold rings, value 2 shillings; also, two diamonds, (fn. 7) value 6s. 8d.; also, one pair of paternostres of pearls, (fn. 8) value 20 shillings; also, 128 pierced pearls, value 10s. 8d.; also, other small pearls on a string, value 3s. 4d.; also, two girdles of silk, edged with silver, value 4 shillings; also, one girdle of silk, edged with silver, value 12 pence; also, another girdle of silk, edged with silver, value 8 pence: also, seven cauls of silk, value 14 pence sterling. Which goods aforesaid by the said Richard de Bluntesham left to me and the said Idonia and Johanna, and by me received, as aforesaid, I do promise and bind myself to keep to the behoof and use of the same Idonia and Johanna, and either of them, until they shall have become of fitting age for marriage etc."

Agreement made for plastering the Hall of John de Bretagne, Earl of Richmond.

10 Edward II. A.D. 1317. Letter-Book E. fol. lxi. (Latin.)

On Thursday the Feast of St. Dunstan [10 May], in the 10th year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward, came Adam le Plastrer, and acknowledged a certain writing to be his deed; the tenor of which is as follows.—

"Know all men that I, Adam le Plastrer, citizen of London, am held bound and obligated to Sir John de Bretagne, (fn. 9) Earl of Richmond, to find plaster of Paris, at my own proper charges, good and sufficient, without default, proper for the hall of the said Earl; (fn. 10) and also, that I will competently, at my own proper charges, plaster and complete the said hall, (fn. 11) and will repair the walls of the same with the said plaster well and befittingly within and without; as also the tewels, (fn. 12) to the summit, in such manner as befits the repair of the hall aforesaid; and this I will do for 24 pounds sterling, which our Lord the said Earl has paid to me beforehand. Faithfully to perform the which work within eight weeks from the Day of the Holy Trinity next ensuing, I do bind myself and all my goods, moveable and immoveable, namely, my lands, houses, and tenements, within the City of London being, to distress on part of any bailiff of our Lord the King, etc., into whose hands soever the same may have come, for enforcing observance of all and singular the premises. In testimony whereof, etc. Given at London, on the Thursday next before the Feast of Pentecost, in the 10th year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward."

Delivery made of houses in the suburbs, as lodgings for the King's household.

11 Edward II. A.D. 1317. Letter-Book E. fol. lxv. (Latin.)

Be it remembered, that on the Thursday next after the Feast of St. Thomas the Apostle [21 December], in the 11th year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward, Clement, the Clerk of the King's Marshalsey, came here, (fn. 13) and asked of the Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs, that the Serjeants of the City might be deputed, on the City's behalf, to go with him into the suburbs, to make delivery (fn. 14) there of lodgings for the use of the household of his lordship the King, on his next coming to Westminster.

And to do this there were deputed Roger atte Watre, and Roger le Barbier, serjeant.

Arrest for assault, and resistance to the authorities.

11 Edward II. A.D. 1317. Letter-Book E. fol. lxvii. (Latin.)

Be it remembered, that John de Saxtone, furbisher, (fn. 15) was committed to the prison of Neugate, on Saturday, the Eve of our Lord's Circumcision [1 January], in the 11th year of the reign of King Edward, because that on the same day, in the King's highway in the Poultry, as one      , (fn. 16) a vadlet of Master Richard de Stanho, Dean of the Arches in London, was coming along and crossing the road, carrying a sword under his arm, he assaulted him, drawing out the sword which the said vadlet was carrying; and wounded him with it, and maltreated him, in breach of the peace of our Lord the King, and to the damage of the said vadlet etc. And further, because that the same John would not deliver himself up to the Mayor's serjeant, nor would he surrender to justice until Sir John de Wengrave, the then Mayor, had come to the spot.

Afterwards, on the Wednesday next after our Lord's Epiphany [6 January], the said John de Saxtone was brought from prison before the said Mayor and Aldermen at the Guildhall, and being arraigned thereof, he acknowledged the trespass aforesaid, and put himself upon the good graces of the Mayor. And the said John was liberated on the surety of William atte Ram, John de Bradlee, John Attehulle, and Henry de Farenbergh: on the understanding that in future he would well and peacefully behave himself, and would make satisfaction to the said vadlet for the trespass so committed upon him.

Footnotes

1 pitalphos.
2 Two quarts.
3 Or 6 ounces.
4 compotorium.
5 scrinio.
6 Meaning "an ouche," a brooch, or clasp.
7 diamandas.
8 See page 20 ante, Note 2.
9 Son of Beatrix, daughter of Henry III., and cousin of Edward II.
10 Probably that of his residence, mentioned as being near to St. Paul's, in page 98 ante.
11 faciendam.
12 The louvres, or flues for the smoke.
13 To the Guildhall.
14 This was done by sending a billet, arbitrarily seizing the best houses, turning out the inhabitants, and marking the houses so selected with chalk. Strictly speaking, the City itself was exempt from this annoyance.
15 A polisher of arms.
16 Name omitted.


<--Previous:
Memorials:
1316
Next:-->
Memorials:
1318