Offices and officers

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

W. H. and H. C. Overall (editors)

Year published

1878

Supporting documents

Pages

270-307

Citation Show another format:

'Offices and officers', Analytical index to the series of records known as the Remembrancia: 1579-1664 (1878), pp. 270-307. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=59959 Date accessed: 17 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Offices and Officers.

I. 10. Letter from the Lord Mayor to Sir Christopher Hatton, Knight, Vice Chamberlain, as to his application for the reversion of the office of Packership for his servant, Mr. Cockes; stating the reason why his former letter had not been attended to; explaining the mode of appointment, the duties to be performed, the disposition of the emoluments, and their reasons for not complying with his request.
12th April, 1580.

I. 16. Letter from the Lords of the Council, by command of the Queen, to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, soliciting the grant of the office of Salt Meter or Seacoal Meter for John Hubard.
25th May, 1580.

I. 17. Letter from the Lord Mayor to the Lords of the Council in reply, stating the manner of appointing to those offices, and the qualifications necessary. Hubard was not a qualified person. They had, however, agreed to grant him the Freedom of the City, which he had never yet come to receive.
13th June, 1580.

I. 32. Letter from Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, requiring the election of a Water-bailiff to be stayed until the Queen's pleasure should be signified to them.
30th May, 1580.

I. 42. Letter from Sir William Cordell to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, requesting a grant in reversion of one of the offices of Secondaryship for his servant, Jaspar Warren.
Dated from the Rolls, 13th June, 1580.

I. 43. Letter from Mr. Justice Ayloffe to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, requesting them to allow his brother, who had a grant in reversion of a clerkship, to take the place of Mr. Bulman, who was unable to attend, in the City Courts, so that he might qualify himself to be admitted to the office when it became vacant.
Serjeants' Inn, 22nd June, 1580.

I. 135. Letter from Peter Osborne to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, thanking them for admitting his servant, Robert Nicholls, to the Freedom of the City, and requesting that the office of Alnager and Searcher of Cloth, held by William Parker, and which he desired to surrender, might be bestowed upon him.
27th September, 1580.

I. 148. Letter from Sir Thomas Bromley, Lord Chancellor, to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, stating that a reversion of the office of one of the clerkships of the Lord Mayor's Court had been granted to James Smith, some time clerk to Mr. Coys, upon whose death he had become one of the four officers of that Court. Some alterations had since been made in the Court, which had greatly abridged his fees and emoluments. The Lord Chancellor requested that he might be restored to the full execution of his office and the enjoyment of the profits thereof as his predecessors.
28th October, 1580.

I. 184. Letter from William, Lord Burghley, Robert, Earl of Leicester, and Sir Francis Walsingham, Lords of the Council, to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, requesting that the vacant place of Attorney in the Guildhall might be given to Valentine Penson.
9th January, 1580.

I. 209. Letter from William, Lord Burghley, to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, requesting that William Parker might be admitted to a place in Blackwell Hall, if there should be found any use for his services.
13th June, 1581.

I. 243. Letter from Sir Christopher Hatton, Knight, Vice-Chamberlain, to the Lord Mayor, reminding him of the letter he had written to him by command of the Queen, recommending William Parker for the office of Alnager, to which no answer had been received. Her Majesty desired her letter might be read at the next Court of Aldermen, and an answer sent forthwith.
20th August, 1581.

Postscript.—Her Majesty had twice demanded whether the answer of the City had been received.

I. 245. Letter from Sir Christopher Hatton, Knight, to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, stating that Her Majesty, understanding the Aldermen had considered her desire in favour of Mr. William Parker, had commanded him to inquire whether he had been admitted, and to again commend him.
4th September, 1581.

Postscript.—Her Majesty had desired that the poor man might not be called upon to pay anything for the preferment.

I. 263. Letter from the Lord Mayor and Aldermen to the Lord Treasurer, acknowledging the receipt of sundry letters from his Lordship, the Council and the Vice-Chamberlain, on behalf of William Parker, also the commendation of Her Majesty in his behalf. Parker, at his request, had long since been admitted to the office of Alnager. Being in difficulties, he had requested permission to part with his office to a person to be named by him, whereupon the City accepted an honest young man, some time servant to Mr. Peter Osborne, who paid to Parker 160l. for the place. Upon receipt of other letters from the Lord Treasurer, requesting that he might be helped with a creditor to whom he owed 200 marks, a lease of one of the City's houses had been granted to him, valued at 100 marks. Subsequently he desired to replace his nominee; this was agreed to upon his paying back the purchase-money, which the latter had refused to accept. Being still desirous further to help him, an agreement had been made to grant him 30l. yearly out of the common charge, so long as he should demean himself, and cease his importunities, and not alienate the same, but keep it to his own use.
15th September, 1581.

I. 264. Letter from the Lord Mayor to Sir Christopher Hatton, Knight, upon the same subject and to the same effect.
13th September, 1581.

I. 275. Letter from Sir Christopher Hatton, Knight, to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, requesting the reversion of the office of Common Hunt for his servant, John Dewell, Citizen and Salter.
5th October, 1581.

I. 279. Letter from William, Lord Burghley to the Lord Mayor, stating that he had understood that by the death of Blase Saunders, who held by lease the office of Garblership of London, the same had become vacant, and that the appointment rested with him and the Aldermen, and requesting them to stay proceeding in the matter until he communicated with them further, as he meant to be a suitor to them for the office for a friend of his.
10th October, 1581.

I. 280. Letter from Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Mayor, stating that he understood some steps had been taken to wrest from his cousin, the widow of Mr. Blaze Saunders, the lease of the office of Garbler, which he held for certain years unexpired, and desiring to be informed of any such practice or attempt, in order that he might assist her therein.
11th October, 1581.

I. 281. Letter from the Queen, under signet, to the Lord Mayor, informing him that she had understood the late deceased Blase Saunders held a lease of the office of Garbler for twenty-one years, of which certain years were unexpired, and requiring a lease of the office for twenty-one years to be granted to George Southacke, (fn. 1) Citizen and Merchant Taylor, after the determination of the former lease had expired, for the like rent, and with such covenants as the said Saunders had.
Richmond, 14th October, 23rd Elizabeth (1581).

I. 282. Letter from Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, upon the same subject, informing them that he had understood they intended shortly to make a decree touching the disposal of the Garblership of Spices and Drugs, granted to his late cousin and his assigns for a certain term of years, contrary to the effect thereof, and requesting that the executors might quietly continue the execution of the office according to the grant, or that they might be heard in maintenance of their title.
11th October, 1581.

I. 283. Letter from Sir Christopher Hatton to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, to the same effect.
15th October, 1581.

I. 284. Letter from Sir Christopher Hatton to the Lord Mayor and Lord Mayor elect, recommending them to carry into effect the wish of Her Majesty, and grant to Mr. Southake a lease of the office of Garbler, after the determination of the lease granted to the late Mr. Saunders.
15th October, 1581.

I. 289. Letter from the Lords of the Council to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, requesting that the reversion of the office of Bailiwick of Finsbury (fn. 2) might be granted to Mr. Rowland Smart and Mr. Edward Barker.
8th October, 1581.

I. 298. Letter from Sir Thomas Bromley, Lord Chancellor, to the Lord Mayor, stating that he had been informed by George Heton, (fn. 3) late Chamberlain of the City, that notwithstanding a lease granted to him by the Mayor and Court of Aldermen, under seal, of the profits and office of Gaugership of London, for thirty years, if he should live so long, he paying yearly into the Chamber 40l., and twenty nobles to the Lord Mayor for the time being (which he had done for the last thirteen years), the Lord Mayor had now required of him a further sum, which he was unable to pay. The Lord Chancellor requested that his poverty might be taken into consideration, and that he might not be charged with a greater sum than by his lease was required.
Dated from his house, next Charing Cross, 24th February, 1581.

I. 299. Letter from the Lord Mayor, in reply, denying the statement of Mr. Heton. The office of Gaugership belonged to the Mayor for the time being, and could only be disposed of by him. On account of the poverty of Heton, he was willing to let him perform the office, upon giving surety for the due execution thereof.
26th February, 1581.

I. 329. Letter from Sir Christopher Hatton to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, renewing his request for the reversion of the office of Common Hunt, for his servant John Dewell.
2nd May, 1582.

I. 333. Letter from the Lords of the Council to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, complaining that Her Majesty's recommendation, that a lease of the office of Garbler of the City should be granted to George Sowthacke, had not been carried out, the City alleging that it would be prejudicial to their charter. This being a suggestion without good grounds, the Council had thought it good to revive Her Majesty's motion, and to require the City at once to take order that a good and sufficient lease should be granted to him.
28th November, 1581.

I. 334. Letter from Sir Francis Walsingham to certain Aldermen, to the same effect.
31st January, 1581.

I. 335. Letter from William, Lord Burghley to certain Aldermen, urging the suit of Southacke.
9th Feburary, 1581.

I. 354. Letter from Robert, Earl of Leicester, to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, requesting them to admit his servant, John Dower, to the office of one of the City Waits, (fn. 4) vacant by the decease of Mr. Baker.
19th June, 1582.

I. 358. Letter from the Lords of the Council to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, reminding them that they had not complied with the request of Her Majesty on behalf of John Hubbard, servant to the Groom of her Privy Chamber, for an appointment to the office of a Salt Meter and Seacoal Meter, and directing them to do so upon the next vacancy.
21st June, 1582.

I. 361. Letter from Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, stating that George Southaicke, whom they had admitted at his request into the office of a Coal Meter, found the income so small, as well on account of the number of officers as the small quantity of coals brought yearly to the City, as to be scarcely sufficient to maintain those who exercised it, and requesting that the Common Council would pass a decree not to admit any further number, until, by death or otherwise, they had been reduced to four.
4th July, 1582.

I. 366. Letter from the Lord Mayor to the Lords of the Council, acknowledging the receipt of their letter recommending John Hubbert for the place of a Seacoal Meter or Salt Meter. There were no vacancies, and Hubbert would be ineligible by the laws of the City unless they were dispensed with by the Common Council.
10th July, 1582.

I. 368. Letter from Sir John Langley, (fn. 5) Lord Mayor, to..............................acknowledging the receipt of his letter, intimating Her Majesty's pleasure that the City should grant to Mr. John Hibberd the office of Coal Meter or Salt Meter, or the next reversion thereof, and requesting him, if he should think it worth while, to inform Her Majesty that none of those offices were then vacant; and that by the laws of the City the ycould only be granted to Freemen by birth or servitude, all grants otherwise made would be void. The appointments to the offices of measurers were vested in the Mayor for the time being, and there was no help but by the Common Council. He hardly supposed he would think it meet they should be assembled, and Her Majesty's request and name publicly used, for so small a matter.
21st March, 1576.

I. 369. Letter, signed by the Lord Mayor and fifteen of the Aldermen, to the Lords of the Council, acknowledging the receipt of their letter, signifying Her Majesty's pleasure for granting the Freedom of the City to John Hubberd, and also for a Salt Meter's or Seacoal Meter's place, or the next of them that should be void. They had, with one assent, agreed to grant him the Freedom without payment, which they trusted Her Majesty and the Council would accept in good part. There was no vacancy in the office of Salt Meter or Seacoal Meter, and the next avoidance was not in their power to grant, it being at the disposition of the Lord Mayor at the time of such vacancy.
Guildhall, 17th March, 1578.

I. 370. Letter from to the Lord Mayor, stating that his answer made yesterday to Her Majesty, by Mr. Midlemore, of her privy chamber, touching the suit of John Hubberd, was taken in very good part, for which he had been directed to thank him. He requested that the grant might be set down and recorded, that the poor man might not be disappointed thereof when it should fall vacant.
9th April, 1579.

I. 371. Letter from Robert, Earl of Leicester, to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, stating that the Lord Mayor and Aldermen had, at his request, granted to his servant and solicitor, Richard Sutton, of Lincoln's Inn, a Citizen, the reversion and next avoidance of the office of Common Serjeant, or of one of the Judges or Under Sheriffs in the Sheriffs' Court, which of them should first become vacant, and requesting the Common Council to grant their confirmation and assent thereto.
12th July, 1582.

I. 386. Letter from Lady Anne Hopton (fn. 6) to Sir James Harvey, Lord Mayor, requesting on behalf of her coachman, the appointment of the "carre rome" in the Tower.
The Tower, 4th July, 1582.

I. 389. Letter from Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, reminding them of a previous letter sent to them by command of the Queen, requesting a Coal Meter's room for Hubbard. They had promised him the next vacancy, notwithstanding which they had placed two before him, one of them specially recommended by the Queen, the other by private favour. He was surprised at their want of reverence to Her Majesty, and recommended the assembling of the Common Council, and their taking order for displacing of the new Coal Meter, and bestowing it upon Hubbard, fearing otherwise that the Queen would take it offensively, and that they would, perhaps, repent the little care they had had to satisfy her request in a matter of so small importance.
Barnelmes, 26th July, 1582.

I. 439. Letter from the Lords of the Council to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, recommending Francis Langly, who had long since received from them the grant of the reversion and next avoidance of the office of one of the Alnagers and Searchers of Cloth, to the vacancy caused by the death of Sutton.
3rd December, 1582.

I. 443. Letter from Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, recommending Francis Langly to the office of Alnager.
9th December, 1582.

I. 448. Letter from William Lord Burghley to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, stating he had been informed that, upon the decease of Mr. Mabbe, (fn. 7) late Chamberlain of the City, they had elected Mr.

Palmer, who had been appointed by Her Majesty Comptroller of her Mint, to which office his whole time should be devoted, and requesting them to appoint some other person.
1st January, 1582.

I. 466. Letter from the Queen, under signet, to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty, stating that Barnard Randolph, (fn. 8) Common Serjeant, through age and infirmities was unable to fulfil his duties. Having regard to the reputation of the City, she recommended as deputy for that office, Julius Caesar, Doctor of Civil Law, a wise, learned, and discreet man. She desired them to award some reasonable portion of the profits to Randolph, during his life, and the rest to Mr. Caesar, for occupying the place, and to grant him a reversion of the office.
Dated from the Manor of Richmond, 28th January, 1582.

I. 477. Letter from the Lords of the Council to the Lord Mayor, requesting him to command the City Gauger to forbear the gauging of any sacks, until such time as the President of the Spanish Merchants should certify to him that Her Majesty's purveyors had made choice thereof, and complaining of the evil dealings of the Gauger and his deputies, which they desired might be inquired into by the Court of Aldermen. Some steps should also be taken to prevent the same for the future.
14th February, 1582.

I. 484. Letter from the Lord Mayor to Sir Francis Walsingham, acknowledging Her Majesty's letters to the Common Council, in favour of the appointment of Dr. Caesar, as Deputy to Bernard Randolph, Common Serjeant, and that a reversion of the office might be granted to him. The matter had been brought before the Courts of Aldermen and Common Council, where Mr. Randolph had been moved to consent to pass over the execution of his office, by deputation to Mr. Caesar. He had in both Courts delivered openly his answer in tears, declaring his desire to remain and to die an officer of the City, and his most humble petition that intercession might be made for him to Her Majesty, not to command him to be removed. The Common Council were not desirous to make alteration in his Case, but to be humble petitoners for him to Her Majesty. With regard to Dr. Caesar, however otherwise he might be qualified for the efficient performance of the office, it would be necessary that the officer should understand the Common Laws of the Realm, by which City cases were governed, and not by the Civil Laws.
February, 1582.

I. 501. Letter from Sir Francis Walsingham, to the Lord Mayor, reminding him of Her Majesty's request on behalf of Mr. Caesar, to be appointed Deputy Common Serjeant. At their request he had been the means of staying Mr. Caesar from further proceeding in his suit, for which reason he now recommended them to admit him to the freedom of the City, and appoint him one of the City's Counsel for all causes touching his profession of the Civil Law, allowing him such a yearly fee and pension as would be seemly for a man of his degree.
17th May, 1583.

I. 521. Letter from Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, recommending that the number of Coal Meters be limited to four, and that a decree to that effect be passed in the Common Council.
9th July, 1583.

I. 528. Letter from Sir Francis Walsingham to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, stating that he had been informed that, by the death of one Williams (Serjeant) Carver, the rest of the under officers of the household were to be promoted, whereby there would be void the room of a Yeoman Waiter of the Waterside, and requesting that the place might be bestowed upon his servant, Harry Ramscroft, a Freeman of the Salters' Company, or that the next avoidance of some other place might be granted to him.
22nd July, 1583.

I. 531. Letter from Henry, Earl of Huntington, (fn. 9) to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, recommending William Aldersey, Serjeant at Mace, to one of the vacant offices of (Serjeant) Carver.
27th July, 1583.

I. 535. Letter from Henry, Earl of Pembroke, to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, requesting them to grant to Reginald Hughes, clerk to Mr. Randolph, Common Sergeant, the reversion of the next avoidance of the clerkship of the City's works.
Dated from Cardiff, 26th April, 1583.

I. 537. Letter from the Lord Mayor to Mr. Recorder Fleetwood, requesting his speedy return to the City, the Court of Aldermen desiring his advice upon some urgent affairs.
10th September, 1583.

I. 544. Letter from the Queen, under signet, to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, recommending Robert Pamplyn, a servitor in her Wardrobe of Robes, to the next vacancy in the office of one of the Measurers of Coal.

From the Manor of Oatlands, 13th of September, in the 13th year of her reign (1571).

I. 547. Letter from Sir Thomas Henage (fn. 10) to the Lord Mayor, recommending a friend for the vacant office of a Clerkship of the Bridge-house.
22nd October, 1583.

I. 548. Letter from Robert, Earl of Leicester, and Sir Christopher Hatton, to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, recommending Thomas Bartrich to the above office.
20th October, 1583.

I. 551. Letter from Sir Gilbert Gerrard to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, stating that, Robert Lawton, who had been appointed by them to the office of Bailiff of the Hundred of Osulton, (fn. 11) within the county of Middlesex, held the office for life, and the reversion thereof was in their gift, which he requested them to grant to his servant, Henry Norris, a Freeman.
12th November, 1583.

I. 552. Letter from William Lord Burghley to the Lord Mayor, recommending Jonas Freind to the office of one of the Attorneys of the Sheriffs' Court.
18th November, 1583.

I. 560. Letter from the Lords of the Council to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, Recorder, and Sheriffs, commending their judgement in not appointing Andrew Mallory to the office of Secondary, and requesting them to grant the next reversion to George Fytton, servant of the Master of the Rolls, as a fit person, sound in religion, and learned in the law.
16th January, 1583.

I. 561. Letter from Sir Thomas Bromley, Lord Chancellor, to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, Recorder, and Sheriffs, thanking them for granting a reversion of the office of Secondary to George Fitton, and begging them to admit him when the place should be void.
From his house near Charing Cross, 20th January, 1583.

I. 564. Letter from the Lords of the Council to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Recorder, stating that they had seen the copy of an order under the hand of the Town Clerk, and entered of record in the City books, adjudging Andrew Mallory, who had a reversion of the office of Secondary, to be wholly unfit to serve that office, and that they approved of what had been done. The Council had recommended George Fytton for that place. Nevertheless they had been given to understand that, since the receipt of their former letter, some doubts had arisen as to the validity of the Order made and recorded, and they desired to know what had induced the City to take that step, and whether Mallory had since deserved so well of them as to be judged fit to serve Her Majesty and the City.
5th February, 1583.

I. 565. Letter from Sir Gilbert Gerrard to the Lord Mayor, recommending him to admit George Fytton, without any longer delay, to the office of Secondary, especially as Mallory's practice touching Sir James Harvey had already been proved.
Dated from the Rolls, 10th February, 1583.

I. 566. Letter from Ran......... Hurleston to the Lord Mayor, informing him and the Aldermen, at the request of George Fitton, what the behaviour of Andrew Mallory had been in the Society. For his notable disorder committed, he had been thrice put out, as a man most unworthy, yet, upon the most importunate suit of his friends, he had been received back again, to the great grief of the godly and honest among the Society.
Dated from the Inner Temple, 6th February, 1583.

I. 570. Letter from the Lords of the Council to Mr. Serjeant Fleetwood, Recorder. They had understood that, by order of the Court of Aldermen, Andrew Mallory, for abuse, had been adjudged unfit and unworthy to execute the office of one of the Secondaries, and had since gone about attempting to frustrate the said order. The Council were surprised that the Court having, after due and good consideration, entered upon record their decision, should afterwards, upon a simple allegation, call it in question; and desired to draw his attention to the conduct of Mallory, in advising certain steps to be taken dangerous to the custom of orphanage. They recommended Fytton for admission to the office without further delay.
3rd February, 1583.

I. 572. Letter from four of the Lords of the Council, viz. ["Edward Lyncoln, Francis Bedford, Charles Howard, and Christopher Hatton,"] to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, stating that they had heard lately there had been some question made upon matters untruly suggested against Andrew Mallory, and some proceeding taken to deprive him of the reversion of the office of Secondary. They requested them, as a matter of justice, to hear his defence and to act indifferently according to justice and equity.
Westminster, 13th February, 1583.

I. 573. Letter from the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty of the City to the Queen, stating that, upon the receipt of her letter recommending Dr. Fletcher to the office of Remembrancer, vacant by the decease of Thomas Norton, a Common Council had been called, and, in obedience to her wish, they had elected him to that office.
19th January, 1586.

I. 586. Letter from the Court of Aldermen to the Lord Chancellor, acknowledging his letter recommending Leonard Courson for the grant of keeping the Poor's Wharf of coal and wood, made to him in reversion after the death of Anthony Pearcy, and stating that Pearcy had in his hands a great portion of the poor's stock in coal and wood, amounting to 800l.; and that he also owed to the poor the sum of 80l., which could not be raised out of his estate, whereby the poor would be greatly injured in case the widow should be dispossessed of the wharf. After due consideration, they had agreed to suffer her to enjoy the place for some convenient season, and after that to grant the same to Courson.
3rd March, 1590.

I. 611. Letter from the Lord Mayor to the Countess of Warwick, (fn. 12) stating, in reference to her request on behalf of Mr. Recorder, (fn. 13) that, on account of his increasing years and infirmities, the Court of Aldermen were almost unanimous in the opinion that he should resign. If he complied, he would use his endeavours to obtain from that body an annuity commensurate with his long and faithful service.
2nd December, 1591.

I. 621. Letter from the Lord Mayor and Aldermen to........., Cook, (fn. 14) informing him that they had elected him to the office of Recorder, and requesting him to repair to the City with all speed to be admitted.
2nd January, 1591.

I. 631. Letter from the Lord Mayor to the Lords of the Council, stating that the complaint made to them by Dewell, the Common Hunt, touching the grant made to him in reversion of the office of Water-bailiff at the request of the late Lord Chancellor, was untrue. They had promised him the office at his own entreaty, and upon condition that he diligently fulfilled his present office, which he had failed to do, and they thought him unfitted for the appointment of Water-bailiff.
8th March, 1591.

I. 644. Letter from the Lord Mayor to the Lords of the Council, acknowledging their letter of recommendation on behalf of William Webbe, to be appointed one of the Meters of Seacoal and other things measurable. The number had been limited to twelve; at present there were no vacancies, and the right of appointment rested with the Lord Mayor for the time being. He was, therefore, unable to grant a reversion of the office.
3rd March, 1591.

I. 648. Copy of No. 631.
8th March, 1591.

I. 650. Letter from the Lord Mayor to the Lord Chamberlain, acknowledging his letter recommending "Isaack Norton, Comfertmaker," to be admitted into the office of one of the Waiters of the Waterside for the measuring of sea coals. The Court of Aldermen were desirous of gratifying him touching the bestowal of the office, but the appointment rested solely with the Lord Mayor for the time being, and there being no vacancy, he could not, according to custom, bind his successor to confirm the appointment.
18th March, 1591.

I. 654. Letter from the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen to the Lords of the Council, as to the application made to them by John Dewell, Common Hunt, denying that he had ever been promised the office of Water-bailiff upon the intercession of the late Lord Chancellor, and pointing out that, on account of his unfitness for that appointment, the reversion only of which had been granted to him, they had elected another person on the last vacancy occurring. The offer made to him by the Lord Mayor of 40l. was made out of kindness and on account of his disappointment.
6th April, 1592.

II. 18. Letter from the Lords of the Council to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs, soliciting them to appoint Richard Hatchman, one of Her Majesty's serjeants-at-arms, Keeper of Newgate, loco Dios, deceased.
15th April, 1594.

II. 21. Letter from Charles Lord Howard, Lord High Admiral, to the Lord Mayor, soliciting him to bestow upon his servant the office of Measurer.
28th June, 1594.

II. 22. Letter from the Lords of the Council to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs, regretting that they had not appointed Richard Hatchman to the office of Keeper of Newgate, his sureties being good and sufficient, and directing them to place him in that office.
24th June, 1594.

II. 38. Letter from the Lords of the Council to the Lord Mayor, touching the removal of Richard Hutton, Bailiff of Southwark, from his office.
5th April, 1595.

II. 43. Letter from Sir T. Henage to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, for a grant of the reversion of the office of Collector of Scavage for his servant Proby.
29th December, 1594.

II. 43A. Letter from the Lords of the Council to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, requesting them to admit John de Cardenas to the office of Collector of Scavage, the reversion of which office had some time since been granted to him.
29th December, 1594.

II. 45. Letter from Lord Burghley to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, soliciting for John de Cardenas the appointment to the office of Collector of Scavage Dues, the reversion having been granted to him by Sir Thomas Pullison, (fn. 15) Knight, and the Court of Aldermen, some time since.
New Year's Day, 1594.

II. 46. Letter from Sir T. Henage to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, soliciting them to relieve one of Her Majesty's Watermen, who had been injured in the City's service.
12th January, 1594.

II. 47. Letter from Sir John Puckering to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, soliciting the reversion of a Common Pleader's place for Christopher Molleneux, of Gray's Inn.
24th January, 1594.

II. 48. Letter from Sir John Puckering and Sir John Fortescue to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen with respect to their recommendation of Christopher Molleneux, whose name and religion had been called in question, and requesting them to call him before the Court of Aldermen to answer the charges alleged against him.
7th February, 1594.

II. 53. Letter from Sir John Puckering to the Lord Mayor, commending to his notice the Petition (fn. 16) of Ralph Thorpe and Ralph Conyers.
29th April, 1595.

II. 71. Letter from Aldermen Bennet and Ley (fn. 17) to the Right Hon. Mr. Herbert, Master of the Court of Requests, concerning the removal of Frances Westby from the office of Coal Gatherer in Holborn and Fleet Street.
28th October, 1594.

II. 86. Letter from the Lord Mayor to the Lord Chamberlain, regretting his inability to grant the office of Bailiff of Southwark to Richard Gauntlet, on account of his not being a Freeman of the City, and stating that the office had been bestowed upon an ancient servitor and officer of the City.
19th February, 1594.

Note.—This has been crased.

II. 94. Letter from the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen to the Lords of the Council, upon the complaint of Richard Hutton, who had been removed by the Court from the office of Bailiff of Southwark on account of his unfitness.
9th April, 1595.

II. 124. Letter from the Lord Mayor to the Lords of the Council reporting the causes of the removal of Richard Hatchman from the office of Gaolership of Newgate.
27th November, 1595.

II. 125. Letter from the Lord Mayor to the Lords of the Council, acknowledging the receipt of the Petition of Widow Yardley, praying Probably Sir Robert Lee, who filled the office of Sheriff with Mr. Alderman Bennelt. that the office of one of the Coal Meters, held by her late husband, might be bestowed upon her brother-in-law, and informing them that the place had been conferred by the late Lord Mayor, Sir John Spencer, upon Michael Palmer for his life, for which Sir John had received a sum of 260l., or thereabout. They had endeavoured to induce him to pay her a sum of 100 marks for her relief, which he had refused. He recommended them to censure him, and to intreat Sir John Fortescue and Sir John Wolley, to whose determination he had referred himself, to award a sum to be paid by him to the widow.
16th November, 1595.

II. 158. Letter from the Lord Mayor to Mr. Herbert, of Her Majesty's Court of Requests, acknowledging the receipt of a letter from Her Majesty on behalf of John Spencer to be admitted one of the Coal Meters within the City, above the number already appointed, and referring to former orders of Her Majesty restricting the number to be appointed.
26th May, 1596.

II. 163. Letter from the Lord Mayor to Doctor Julius Caesar, one of the Masters of the Court of Requests, similar to the above.
26th July, 1596.

II. 168. Letter from the Lord Mayor to the Lords of the Council, acknowledging the receipt of their Letter enclosing the Petition of John Cottesford, complaining of his removal from the office of Gauger, and of the committal to ward of two of his servants, who were deputed by him to execute the office, and pointing out the unfitness of the officer to perform his duties, whereby the citizens were sufferers.
1st December, 1596.

II. 183. Letter from the Earl of Nottingham and Sir Robert Cecil to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, recommending, on behalf of Her Majesty, Mr. Wyncall for the office of Common Serjeant, loco Mr. Mylbrum, deceased.
From the Court at Farnham Castle, 22nd September, 1601.

II. 210. Letter from the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, in reply, expressing regret that a reversion of the office, granted in the 22nd year of Her Majesty's reign, to Richard Wheler (fn. 18) (Wheeler), a counsel of Lincoln's Inn, who had since been sworn and admitted into that office, prevented the Court of Aldermen from acceding to the request.
22nd September, 1601.

II. 218. Letter from the Lord Mayor to the Lord Keeper, with reference to a suit depending before him in the Court of Chancery, between John Nicholas, Keeper of one of the Compters, and John Skevington, executor of Richard Skevington, defendant, concerning an annuity agreed to be paid to the said John Skevington by the present Keeper, out of the profits of the office, which had caused scandalous exactions to be made upon the prisoners, and beseeching that the said burden might be removed.
June, 1602.

II. 246. Letter from the Lord Mayor to........................ to attend the next meeting of the Court of Aldermen, on the 14th of August next, to answer the complaint made by Mr. Doggett touching the Clerkship of the Papers of Wood Street Compter.
21st July, 1604.

II. 271. Letter from the Lord Mayor to Lord ....................... concerning a suit pending in Chancery between William Miller and Martin Heullin against John Nicholas, about the office of Keeper of the Wood Street Compter, referred to the Lord Mayor, Sir John Watts, (fn. 19) and to Sir Henry Montagu, Recorder, with the Lord Mayor's report thereon.
(Circa 1606–7.)

II. 279. Letter from the Lord Mayor to the Lord High Admiral, acknowledging the receipt of a letter from him concerning the Carttaker's place, lately void. According to an agreement between the Governors of Christ's Hospital and the Board of Green Cloth, this officer should be chosen in turn by them, and the present vacancy fell to the City.
(Circa 1606–7.)

II. 285. Letter from the Lord Mayor and Aldermen to the Lord Chancellor (Ellesmere), soliciting him to put Francis Morgan in the Commission of the Peace for the County of Surrey, in the place of Mr. Dale, removed.
30th April, 1607.

II. 306. Letter from the Lord Mayor to the Lord Treasurer (the Earl of Dorset), enclosing a Petition from the Ward of Aldersgate, complaining that William Court, an inhabitant of that Ward for eight or ten years past, refused to undergo the office of Scavenger in the parish, claiming exemption from such service, he being privileged as Clerk to Sir William Spencer, Knight, one of the Auditors of the Court of Exchequer, and praying that Mr. Court, although privileged, should be directed to find a substitute or deputy, and pay him.
5th February, 1607.

II. 318. Letter from the Lord Mayor to the Lord Chancellor, requesting him to put Mr. John Warner, of the Middle Temple, upon the Commission of the Peace for Surrey.
5th May, 1608.

III. 1. Letter from the King, stating that he had been pleased, on behalf of Richard Wright (who had for many years held the office of Common Packer within the City and Port of London), to direct his letters for the granting of the reversion of the office to Robert Wright, one of his sons. Robert having died, the grant had not taken effect. His Majesty's object being the establishing of one of his sons to succeed him, he recommended that the reversion should be granted to his other son, Lionel Wright.
Westminster, 28th December, 8 James I. (1610).

III. 8. Letter from the King to the Court of Aldermen, stating that the Recorder (Sir Henry Montagu) had requested his permission to resign, for what reasons they best knew. When he made him one of his Serjeants-at-law he did not intend to take him from his Recordership. The appointment he had received was but a further mark of his favour, and an honour to the City, and so he thought they would have taken it. When he should be so employed that he could not attend them, he would hearken to his suit and leave them their liberty of electing freely a successor.
Westminster, 20th March, 9 James I. (1611).

III. 27. Letter from Sir Julius Caesar to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, on behalf of Rowland Hinton, a poor kinsman of his, who had been for a long time one of the Lord Mayor's household, for the next reversion of the Offices of Yeoman of the Waterside and Yeoman of the Meat Market at Newgate or Leadenhall, whichever might first happen.
Dated from his house in the Strand, 12th October, 1611.

III. 47. Letter from Sir Julius Caesar to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, soliciting the appointment of Outroper (fn. 20) of the City for Christopher Macham, Citizen, and Barber-Surgeon, the son of an old servant of his.
30th April, 1612.

III. 52. Letter from the Lord Chancellor (Ellesmere) to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs, enclosing a Petition presented to him by John Crompton, and requesting them to consider the same, and if any question or point of law arose concerning the disposition of the Clerkship, to consult Sir Henry Montague, the Recorder, that he might hear the parties and their Counsel on both sides; or at least to use his advice and assistance in their further proceedings.
York House, 24th June, 1612.

Marginal reference says—"My Lord Chancellor to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen for John Crompton to be Deputy Secondary."

III. 53. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, on behalf of Francis Bilcliff, and requesting that he might be admitted to the office of Chief Clerk to the Secondary of the Compter in Wood Street, if there should be no just exception against him.
8th July, 10 James I. (1612).

III. 63. Letter from Sir James Altham, (fn. 21) one of the Barons of the Exchequer, to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, on behalf of his godson, James Monger, to be appointed to the place of one Blockley, an officer of the Lord Mayor's house, who was willing to yield up his place on reasonable conditions.
(Circa 1613.)

III. 107. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, requesting them to grant the next reversion of the office of Bailiff of Oswaldstone or Osulstone, in the County of Middlesex, to John Owen, Gentleman.
Windsor, 18th July, 11 James I. (1613).

III. 128. Letter from the Lords of the Council to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, referring to the King's letter of the 18th July last, on behalf of Mr. John Owen, and stating that, although they had accepted such recommendation, Mr. Owen now complained that they would neither pass the reversion to him nor make answer to His Majesty's letters to show cause for their refusal. The Council advised them to accomplish His Majesty's desire on the Petitioner's behalf, or else they would require them to deliver the King's letters to Mr. Owen, that they might not prejudice His Majesty's title whenever he pleased to refer the matter to trial by law.
31st January, 1613.

III. 139. Letter from Sir Francis Bacon and Sir Henry Yelverton, Attorney- and Solicitor-General, to the Lord Mayor, informing him that a Petition had been presented to the King concerning his title to the Bailiwick of Ossulstone, the grant whereof the Court of Aldermen had of late made claim to, which Petition had been referred to them for consideration, and requiring the Court of Aldermen to send persons sufficiently instructed on their behalf to the Attorney-General's Chambers, in Gray's Inn, to show by what title they claimed the same.
22nd March, 1613.

IV. 7. Letter from the Governor and Assistants of the East India Company (fn. 22) to the Lord Mayor, stating that the Court of Aldermen had been pleased, in the 27 Elizabeth, to bestow upon Captain John Martyn the next office or place that might fall void; since which the office of Judge of the Sheriffs' Court, becoming void by the surrender of Mr. Morgan, had been given, during Captain Martyn's absence in Virginia, to Sir Edward Mosely, Knight, (fn. 23) who held the next reversion. They prayed the Court to restore him to his ancient right according to his grant. (The names of the Governor and eight Assistants are appended.)
11th December, 1615.

IV. 23. Draft of Letter from the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen to the Lord Chancellor, in reply to his letter recommending the suit of Mr. Robert Glover for the next reversion of the office of Auditor of the Chamber and Bridge House accounts. There was no such place as Auditor exercised by any peculiar persons in the City; the Auditors of the accounts were a certain number of Aldermen and Commoners, chosen annually on Midsummer Day, by the voice of the whole Commons of the City. When the accounts were audited, they had sometimes, in cases of difficulty, used the help and assistance of a Mr. Phillipps, as a man expert and skilful in accounts, but he was the first ever so employed, and his employment being but casual, and not of necessity, was not allowed for any settled office, and therefore no reversion could be granted.
28th March, 1615.

IV. 31. Letter from Sir Ralph Winwood to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, signifying His Majesty's request that the next reversion of the office of Remembrancer might be granted to Mr. Thomas Lecch, Master of Arts.
Greenwich, 19th June, 1616.

IV. 41. Letter from the King, under signet, to the Lord Mayor, stating that a grant had some time previously been made by Sir Thomas Pullison, then Lord Mayor, and the Court of Aldermen, to one John Martyn, Gentleman, of the next reversion of several places in such grant specified, by virtue whereof, and by a surrender long before made, His Majesty was informed that Mr. Martyn should of right have been possessed of one of the said places had he not at the time been in Virginia as a Captain, with the approbation of the whole colony. His Majesty, being unwilling that any discouragement should be given to men of such employment, had caused the letter to be written, to the end that satisfaction might be given to Captain Martyn.
23rd November, 14 James I. (1616.)

IV. 42. Reply of the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Some thirty years before, at the request of his father, then an Alderman, (fn. 24) a grant had been made to the said John Martin, of the reversion of some of the principal offices in the City, requiring great skill and ability, to which an express condition was attached that he should take no benefit therefrom unless he should be thought by the Court of Aldermen for the time being fit and able for such place as should first fall vacant, and unless he should in the mean time apply himself to the study of the Common Law. About six years since, Mr. Francis Morgan, (fn. 25) Reader of the Middle Temple, one of the Judges of the Sheriffs' Court, surrendered his office, and Martin, as next in reversion, should have succeeded him. Having, however, taken no degree in Law, but betaken himself to martial affairs, the Court of Aldermen could not so neglect their duty as to leave a place of Judicature unsupplied for one who was known to be altogether insufficient, but, according to former precedents, forjudged him of the place as incapable of it, whereby his reversion became void by his own defect, and Sir Edward Mosely (since appointed Attorney of the Duchy of Lancaster), the next in reversion, was admitted to the office, and still held it.
Circa1616.

IV. 49. Letter from the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen to the King, stating that they had heard he was offended with their proceedings in the election of Recorder, and giving their reasons for the course taken.
31st January, 1616.

IV. 56. Letter from the Lords of the Council to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Recorder, recommending Thomas Peter, Esq., of the Inner Temple, for the place of Recorder's Assistant and subordinate Judge of the Mayor's Court.
17th February, 1616.

IV. 109. Letter from the Marquis of Buckingham to............ on behalf of Thomas Leech, for the next reversion of the office of Remembrancer.
Whitehall, 3rd April, 1618.

IV. 110. Letter from Sir Thomas Lake to the Lord Mayor, on behalf of Mr. Thomas Constantine, who, about ten years previously, had made over to his son Alexander, who was in great danger of his life, his office of one of the four Porters of Leadenhall. In the event of his death, the office would be in the disposal of the Lord Mayor, whom he requested to bestow it upon the father.
Whitehall, 8th April, 1618.

IV. 111. Letter from G. (Lord) Carewe to............on behalf of ............(marginal note says "for Mr. Leech to be Remembrancer of the City.")
Savoy, 10th April, 1618.

IV. 112. Letter from Sir Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor, to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, on behalf of Mr. Thomas Foster, who had entered into a private agreement with William Iremonger, the Bailiff of Southwark, and Thomas Dudson, his Deputy, for the surrender to him of that office.
York House, 11th April, 1618.

IV. 113. Letter from Lord Carewe to the Lord Mayor, in support of Mr. Leech's application for the office of Remembrancer, and referring to the letter of Sir Ralph Winwood on his behalf two years previously.
Savoy, 11th April, 1618.

IV. 117. Letter from Sir Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor, to the Lord Mayor, in support of the application of John Whitehand, an Attorney of the Sheriffs' Court, to be allowed to surrender his place to Matthew Hancock.
York House, 27th April, 1618.

V. 25. Letter from Sir Henry Montague, Lord Chief Justice, to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, stating that Mr. Dyos, the Remembrancer, was desirous, on account of his age, to surrender his place to Mr. Dynne, of the Inner Temple, Master of Arts, and expressing his opinion that they could not make a better choice.
25th May, 1619.

V. 26. Letter from Lord Verulam, Lord Chancellor, to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, to the same effect.
York House, 29th May, 1619.

V. 42. Letter from Lord Verulam, Lord Chancellor, to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, referring to his former letter with respect to the resignation by Mr. Dyos, and renewing his request that Mr. Dynne might be accepted as his successor.
York House, 29th November, 1619.

V. 44. Letter from the Lord Chief Justice, Sir Henry Montague, to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen to the same effect.
(Circa 1619.)

V. 46. Letter from the Lord High Admiral, the Marquis of Buckingham, to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, stating that the King had lately written to them to permit Mr. Dyos to make benefit of his place by surrender, and renewing his request on behalf of Mr. Leech for the office.
Newmarket, 12th December, 1619.

V. 47. Letter from Sir Henry Hobart to the Recorder (Robert Health, Esq.), requesting him to assist the suit of the bearer, Henry Goldwell, to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, for the place of an Attorney in the Sheriffs' Court.
St. Bartholomew's, London, 3rd January, 1619.

V. 74. Letter from William Dyos to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen with reference to his conduct, and requesting their clemency and grace towards him. (fn. 26)
11th July, 1620.

V. 76. Letter from the Earl of March to the Lord Mayor, soliciting the next reversion of an Attorney's place in the Guildhall for George Parkins, an ancient Clerk there.
Drury Lane, 17th July, 1620.

V. 95. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, stating that he had formally commended to them for election as Recorder, Robert Shute, (fn. 27) of Gray's Inn, when exceptions were made to him, but His Majesty had since satisfied himself that, although there was then some colour for the same, there was now none, besides which, he had since been Reader of that Society, whereby he had given public satisfaction of his worth and ability in his profession. As His Majesty had made Robert Heath, late Recorder, his SolicitorGeneral, he now again recommended Mr. Shute to their choice.
Theobalds, 19th January, 1620.

V. 96. Letter from Lord Mandeville, (fn. 28) Lord Treasurer, soliciting the reversion of one of the four Common Pleaders' places for Thomas Pickhaver, an upper Barrister of the Middle Temple.
(Circa 1620.)

V. 97. Letter from the Lord Mayor to the Lord Treasurer, acknowledging, on behalf of the Court of Aldermen, the receipt of his Letter, recommending Mr. Shute for Recorder, and stating that they were willing, having regard to his Lordship's liberal recommendation of him, to put him the first man in the election when a new choice was requisite; but they begged that in respect of their ancient liberty of a free election they might be spared from engaging themselves beforehand to any man.
17th January, 1620.

V. 99. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen. He had heard of the death of the late Recorder, and recommended for their election "Hennadge Finch." (fn. 29)
Theobalds, 7th February, 1620.

VI. 46. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor, recommending John Cocker, one of his Huntsmen, for the reversion of the office of Common Hunt of the City.
Windsor Castle, 7th September, 1624.

VI. 56. Petition from the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen to the King, stating that they had received his letter, recommending the petition of Mr. William Murray for a Coal Meter's place, either in addition to the number already appointed, or for the reversion to the first vacancy that might happen; and reminding him that his royal father, upon a similar occasion, was satisfied with their answer that there was no necessity for an additional Coal Meter, and that the same was the case now. Besides which, by a former grant from his royal predecessors, the Mayor of London had the bestowal of such places when vacant, which did not happen in every Mayor's time, and when they did were a return of but a poor part of the vast expense incurred by him for the maintenance of the honour of the City of London.
(Circa 1625–6.)

VI. 74. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor, referring to his former recommendations of William Murray for a Coal Meter's place, to which no answer had been received, although he had further signified his pleasure to the same effect by Secretary Sir John Cooke and Sir Edward Salter. He had been moved to renew his former recommendations, and he desired further to let the Lord Mayor know that he should expect the same respect from him as had been given to his predecessors.
Westminster, 13th October, 2 Charles I. (1626).

VI. 77. Petition of the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of London to the King, with respect to his recommendation of Mr. Murray for a Coal Meter's place. (Similar in effect to No. 56).
(Circa 1626.)

Note in margin.—"The Petition to the King concerning the Coal Meter's place sought by Mr. Murray, and ended at Mr. Recorder's Chamber; therefore not delivered."
In Mich. Term, 1626.

VI. 92. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, recommending William Murray, a Freeman, for admission as a Coal Meter, in addition to the number appointed, or for the promise of the first of the existing places that should fall void.
Westminster, 7th January, 1st Charles I. (1625).

Note in margin.—The said Mr. Murray was compounded with for that place, and received 100l. in the Mayoralty of Sir George Whitmore. (fn. 30)

VI. 94. Petition of the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of London to the King, with respect to his recommendation of Mr. Murray for a Coal Meter's place. (Similar Petition to No. 77.)

Note in margin.—"Not delivered; the business was otherwise compounded."

VI. 100. Letter from the Lord Mayor to Mr. Secretary Conway, stating that he had received a letter from the King, requesting a grant of the reversion of the Common Hunt's place for John Cocker, his servant. By several Acts of Court the City had lately bound their hands from settling any reversion of the place, having considered rather how to spare both place and fee as being utterly unuseful to the City. He therefore entreated him to inform the King of their determination.
In margin, April, 1627.

VI. 116. Petition of the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of London to the King, with respect to his recommendation of Mr. Murray for a Coal Meter's place.

Similar Petition to Nos. 56, 77, and 94, with similar note in margin to that at No. 94.

VI. 119. Copy of No. 92.

VI. 120. Letter from Secretary Sir Edward Conway to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, stating that the King had addressed them a letter on behalf of his servant, John Cocker, for the place of Common Hunt of the City; since which he had understood that the Duke of Buckingham had previously recommended Hugh Smallwood, his servant, for the same office, but that for some reason the delivery of the letter of the Duke had been deferred. His Majesty had therefore directed him to signify, that if their affection for Cocker was greater than any other, then he continued his recommendation of him; but if they had a better opinion of any other, or were formerly engaged, he would not insist on the precedency of his recommendation, but left them to their free choice, and would like it well if they chose the Duke's servant.
Havering, 13th September, 1624.

VI. 122. Letter from the Duke of Buckingham to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, recommending Hugh Smallwood, who had long been employed by him in services of special trust, for the next reversion of the office of Common Hunt.
Hanwell, 22nd August, 1624.

VI. 126. Copy of No. 100.

VII. 13. Letter from the King, under signet, to the Lord Mayor, stating that, upon the Petition of Robert Carpenter, he had referred the question of the admission of one Lionel Wright to the office of Clerk of the Papers to the Lord Keeper and some of the Judges; but being since informed that Wright had the first reversion, he had no desire to question the proceedings.
Westminster, 29th December, 1st Charles I. (1625).

VII. 96. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, recommending Francis Walworth, executing the Clerkship of the Papers in the Poultry Compter, for the office of Common Packer, when it should become void by the death of John Massingberd. (Walworth is stated to be descended from a family very well deserving of the City.)
Westminster Palace, 21st October, 1633.

VII. 98. Copy of information given to Mr. Secretary Windebank, on the application of Francis Walworth, for the reversion of the office of Common Packer. In it, it is stated that the City, in the 18th Henry IV., purchased of the Crown, for 7,000l., the office of Package, with some other things of no great value. The profits of the office had, by Act of Common Council, been employed for the public and common charges of the City. Walworth was no servant or clerk of the City, but a writer or under-clerk in the office of the Clerk of the Papers of the Poultry Compter.
Dated in margin, 31st October, 1633.

VII. 129. Letter from the Earl of Arundel and Surrey to the Lord Mayor, soliciting the appointment to the office of City Gauger for William Oughtred.
Arundel House, 1st November, 1634.

VII. 144. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, recommending them to increase the number of Coal Meters from ten to twelve, and to admit to the office two persons to be nominated by the Lady Thomasine Carew.
Greenwich, 18th May, 1635.

VII. 152. Letter from Mr. Secretary Windebank to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, expressing the King's displeasure that his letter (No. 144) had not even been noticed. Unless they showed more conformity, the King would use his right to dispose of those places, being informed that they belonged to him as appurtenances of his Admiralty.
Westminster, 14th August, 1635.

VII. 168. Petition of the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of London to the King, referring to his letters of the 18th May last for the addition of two Coal Meters' places, and stating that by Act of Common Council the number was limited to ten, and that it was not in their power to add to the number without a Common Council; that His Majesty's royal father had, upon a similar occasion, been pleased to accept a similar answer. They prayed that His Majesty would accept this as their answer.
(Circa 1635.)

VII. 195. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and............ ....................., requesting that Captain William Smith might have the nominating of a Coal Meter to the next place that might fall void.
Westminster, 17th May, 13th Charles I. (1637).

VIII. 5. Letter from Sir John Crooke (fn. 31) to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting the reversion of a Common Pleader's place for John Keelinge.
2nd November, 1618.

VIII. 6. Letter from Sir Francis Bacon to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting the reversion of a Common Pleader's place next after Mr. Salter for Thomas Brickenden.
Sans date.

VIII. 7. Letter from Sir Henry Montague (Recorder), relative to the placing of his arms in the new Council Chamber, and complaining of the position assigned to them.
27th October, 1614.

VIII. 16. Letter from Sir Henry Hobarte to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting the appointment to a Clerkship for Richard Stone, and his admission to the freedom to qualify him for the same.
(Circa 1616.)

VIII. 17. Letter from George Snygge (fn. 32) to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen on behalf of his nephew, Galterne, who was a suitor for the ordinary fee heretofore allowed unto his place of daily attendance for the despatch of causes and other extraordinary business of the City.
2nd December, 1616.

VIII. 18. Letter from Sir Francis Bacon and other Benchers of Gray's Inn to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting the appointment of a Judge of one of the Sheriffs' Courts for Richard Gippes, who had the reversion thereof, loco Coventrie, appointed Recorder.
20th November, 1626.

VIII. 20. Letter from Sir Laurence Tanfield (fn. 33) and others (dated from Serjeants' Inn), to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting the appointment of Chaplain to the Guildhall Chapel, if void, or the next reversion thereof, for Thomas Langley. (fn. 34)
28th November 1616.

VIII. 21. Letter from Sir Henry Montague to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, resigning the office of Recorder, the King having called him to serve him in another place, and recommending them not to be sudden in their choice of a successor, because, in a place so near the King, His Majesty might expect to be made acquainted with their intention.
16th November, 1616.

VIII. 22. Letter from Sir Henry Montague to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, for the reversion of a Common Pleader's place for Mr. Calthorpe. (fn. 35)
13th May, 1618.

VIII. 23. Letter from Sir Henry Hobarte to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, for the like for Mr. John Finch.
22nd June, 1618.

VIII. 30. Letter from the Archbishop of Canterbury (Abbott) to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting them to admit Tilney Couchman an Attorney of the Sheriffs' Court, loco Robert Cracherve, a prisoner for debt.
9th November, 1620.

VIII. 35. Letter from Sir Thomas Coventry to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting the reversion of the place of an Attorney of the Sheriffs' Court for George Perkins.
23rd October, 1620.

VIII. 36. Letter from Lord Pembroke (fn. 36) to the lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen on behalf of the above.
31st December, 1619.

VIII. 39. Letter from the Lord Chancellor (Lord Verulam) to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting the reversion of a Common Pleader's place for Edward Ayscough.
21st November, 1620.

VIII. 57. Letter from the Earl of Southampton (fn. 37) to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting the reversion of one of the Clerk Sitters' places in the Sheriffs' Court for Henry Whalley. (fn. 38)
21st July, 1624.

VIII. 58. Letter from Robert Bacon, (fn. 39) Remembrancer, to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, for a continuance of the annual allowance made to him.
3rd June, 1624.

VIII. 59. Letter from the Lord Keeper, the Bishop of Lincoln (Williams), to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting the reversion of the office of Sword-bearer for Mr. Humfrey Leigh, (fn. 40) His Majesty's Serjeant-at-Arms attending the Great Seal.
22nd February, 1623.

VIII. 62. Letter from the Lord Chancellor (the Bishop of Lincoln) to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting for Mr. David Carpenter (in whose behalf he had lately written to the Common Council for the Coroner's place) the reversion of one of the offices of Attorney of the Sheriffs' Court, Clerk of the Papers, or Clerk Sitters of the same Court.
24th January, 1623.

VIII. 63. Letter from Sir Julius Cæsar, Master of the Rolls, to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting the reversion of an Attorney or Clerk Sitter's place in the Sheriffs' Court for John Glyn, Esq. (fn. 41)
11th October, 1615.

VIII. 64. Letter from hellip; to Sir Heneage Finch, Knight, Recorder, with respect to his application for the reversion of Common Hunt's place for Hugh Smallwood.
November, 1624.

VIII. 79. Letter from Lord Keeper Coventry to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting the appointment of Remembrancer, which is likely to be void by the illness of Mr. Bacon, for Mr. Thomas Allured. (fn. 42)
30th March, 1626.

VIII. 87. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, recommending the appointment of Edward Littleton, Esq., (fn. 43) as Recorder.
6th December, 1631.

VIII. 42. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, with respect to his recommendation of Heneage Finch, Esq., to be Recorder, and explaining that it was his purpose not to deprive them of their liberty of choice, but only to signify his good opinion of him.
9th February, 1620.

VIII. 43. Letter from the Earl of Buckingham to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, signifying His Majesty's desire that Mr. Shute, of Gray's Inn, should be elected Recorder.
17th January, 1620.

VIII. 46. Letter from the Lords of the Council to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, by command of His Majesty, recommending Mr. Harbert Finche (fn. 44) for the next reversion of the office of Common Crier and Serjeant-at-Arms.
3rd November, 1622.

VIII. 47. Letter from Sir James Ley to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting the reversion of a Common Pleader's place for Mr. Francis Walsted.
21st February, 1622.

VIII. 48. Letter from H. Mandeville (fn. 45) to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting for John Willson the place of one of the servants of the City for Music and Voice, vacant by the death of Richard Balls.
21st October, 1622.

VIII. 49. Letter from the Duke of Buckingham to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen on the like behalf.
4th November, 1622.

VIII. 54. Letter from Sir William Jones (fn. 46) to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting the appointment of one of the City's Counsel for Mr. Edward Bushopp.
24th October, 1624.

VIII. 55. Letter from Richard Hatton (fn. 47) to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting the reversion of one of the Attorneys' and Clerk Sitters' places in the Sheriffs' Courts for Matthew Hancock, jun.
8th October, 1624.

VIII. 93. Letter from Lord Keeper Coventry to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, renewing his request for the appointment of Mr. Thomas Allured as Remembrancer.
12th October, 1631.

VIII. 129. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen on behalf of Joseph Cocke, son of Joseph Cocke, Citizen and Salter, who, having a grant in reversion of the offices of Town Clerk, Common Serjeant, Judges, and Secondaries, dated 10th January, 19 James I., was desirous of resigning his said grant unto such a sufficient person as the said Joseph Cocke, the elder, should present for that purpose.
9th December, 1633.

VIII. 137. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, recommending the appointment of Robert Mason (fn. 48) as Recorder, in which he doubted not of their conformity, especially as he had made the place void by preferring Edward Littleton, Esq., to the office of Solicitor-General.
19th October, 1633.

VIII. 174. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, recommending the appointment of Henry Calthorpe (of the Middle Temple), Esq., as Recorder, loco Robert Mason, deceased.
24th December, 1635.

VIII. 177. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, recommending the appointment of Thomas Gardiner (fn. 49) (of the Inner Temple), Esq., as Recorder, loco Calthorpe, upon whom he had bestowed the place of Attorney of the Court of Wards and Liveries.
23rd January, 1635.

VIII. 197. Letter from the Earl of Pembroke and Mount gomery (fn. 50) to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, soliciting the appointment of City Chronicler, Vacant by the decease of Benjamin Johnson (fn. 51) (Jonson), for Mr. May.
27th September, 1637.

VIII. 198. Letter from the Earl of Dorset (fn. 52) to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen on behalf of the same.
27th September, 1637.

VIII. 199. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen on the same behalf. (In this letter the name is given "Thomas May.") (fn. 53)
16th October, 1637.

IX. 3. Letter from Secretary Edward Nicholas, by command of the King (Charles II.), to (the Lord Mayor), forwarding a paper presented to him by Sir John Weld, Knight, complaining of his dismissal from his office of Town Clerk in 1642 for Sympathizing with the late King, and recommending his case to the consideration of the Court of Common Council, that such relief might be afforded to him as justice and custom demanded.
Whitehall, 16th July, 1660.

IX. 12. Letter from Secretary Nicholas to Sir Richard Browne, Knight and Bart. (Lord Mayor), stating that Mr. Wiseman, (fn. 54) the late Rememberancer, had been dispossessed of some houses held by him of the City, and which, as he affirmed, had been let to another person, and requesting him to use his influence to restore him to his office, and to award him some compensation for the houses in question.
3rd November, 1660.

IX. 13. Letter from the King, under signet, to the Lord Mayor, expressing his satisfaction at the appointment of Francis Vernon to the place of a Coal Meter, and requesting the Lord Mayor to grant a reversion of the office to John Duncombe, and William, his son, for their lives.
Oxford, 28th January, 20th Charles I. (1644–5).

IX. 14. Letter from Secretary William Morrice, by command of the King, to the Lord Mayor, referring to the above recommendation by his Royal Father, and requesting that the same might now be carried into effect. Whitehall, 7th November, 12th Charles II. (1660).

IX. 36. Letter from the King to the Lord Mayor and Common Council, recommending William Cutler to the office of Garbler of the City.
19th November, 1661.

Footnotes

1 The following particulars as to Southacke have been gathered from the City's Records. On the 18th June, 1582, a lease in reversion of the office of Garbler was granted to him by the Court of Aldermen at the Queen's request, for twenty years from the termination of the lease to Blase Saunders, deceased, and on the same conditions. In the mean time, for his relief, he was appointed an extra Seacoal Meter, making the fifth officer. If he predeceased his wife, she was to have the power of nominating a fitting successor, or Southacke might have one of his sons joined with him instead. If he obtained the Garblership, the Coal Meter's appointment was to cease absolutely. On the 15th July following, he was admitted a Seacoal Meter accordingly. On the 26th February, 1583, Thomas Saunders, Grocer, was sworn as Garbler (probably for the remainder of the lease to Blase Saunders, deceased, which lease was for twenty-one years from Lady Day, 1570); and on the 22nd October, 1584, the widow of Thomas Saunders obtained the sanction of the Court of Aldermen to set over the remainder of the lease unexpired to George Southacke, who was sworn as Garbler on the 26th October, 1584. On the 26th October, 1587, Southacke surrendered the office of Coal Meter; and Thomas Scot, Grocer, was admitted in his room. On the 8th February, 1603–4, he, with the assent of the Court of Aldermen, assigned his interest in the Garblership to his son Thomas, who was thereupon admitted and sworn.
2 The Corporation of London held this manor from 1315 to 1867, upon lease from the Prebendary of Halliwell and Finsbury, in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul. The Corporation appointed the stewards and other officers of the Manorial Court.
3 George Heton, Merchant Taylor, Master of his Company, 1556–7; elected Chamberlain, August 1st, 1563; removed from his office, December 13th, 1577. In June, 1572, he thanked the Company for the grant of a pension of 13l. 6s. 8d. per annum, and declared that, being otherwise well provided for, he was willing the pension should cease. In April, 1576, he again applied for it, and his request was granted; but in the following year the Company directed its discontinuance. Vide Clode's 'Memorials of the Merchant Taylors Company.'
4 Originally watchmen, "Wayte, excubius." They piped the hour, hence their conversion into musicians. Notes to Machyn's 'Diary,' p. 464.
5 Goldsmith, son of Robert Langley, of Althorp, Lincolnshire; elected Alderman of Billingsgate, October 8th, 1566; chosen Sheriff for part of the year 1567, upon the decease of Richard Lambert; removed to Queenhithe, December 12th, 1570; to Langbourn, February 19th, 1572; Lord Mayor, 1576. He was buried in the Guildhall Chapel. His pedigree is set out in the 'Herald's Visitation of London,' 1568, published by the Harleian Society. James Harvey, elected Alderman of Langbourn, loco Langley, deceased, February 4th, 1578.
6 Wife of Sir Owen Hopton, Lieutenant of the Tower.
7 John Mabbe, Goldsmith, elected Chamberlain, December 13th, 1577.
8 Admitted to the office of Common Serjeant, March 4th 1563. Thomas Kirton admitted, loco Randolph, deceased, August 15th, 1583.
9 Henry Hastings, third Earl; succeeded his father, Francis, second Earl, in 1560. With the Earl of Shrewsbury, had charge of Mary Queen of Scots, 1569; Lord President of York, 1572–87; died, December 14th, 1595.
10 M.P. for Stamford, 1553; appointed one of the Gentlemen of the Queen's Privy Chamber, circa 1557–8. The Manor of Copthall, in Essex, granted to him by the Queen, 3rd August, 1564; Treasurer of the Queen's Chamber, January, 1570; Knighted, December 1st, 1577; represented the County of Essex in Parliament from 1585 till his death; made Vice-Chamberlain of the Queen's Household, September, 1587; Paymaster of the land forces raised to repel the Spanish invasion, in July, 1588; appointed Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster in 1590; died in the Savoy, October 17th, 1595, and was buried in St. Paul's.
11 Ossulstone, from which the hundred of that name in Middlesex is derived, is a geometric stone, placed by the Romans near the north-east angle of Hyde Park. It is figured in Rocque's Map of 1741–1761, and is called the stone where soldiers are shot. See Mr. Black's paper, 'London and Midd. Archaeological Societies' Proceedings, 'vol. iv. p. 62.
12 Lady Ann, eldest daughter of Francis, Earl of Bedford, married to Ambrose Dudley, Earl of Warwick, November 11th, 1565. She was his third wife.
13 Fleetwood.
14 Sir Edward Coke.
15 Draper; chosen Sheriff, August 1st, 1573; elected Alderman of Farringdon Without, October 6th, 1573; translated to Vintry, July 11th, 1577; elected Mayor, September 29th, 1584; resigned, August 16th, 1588. He resided in Budge Row, and subsequently near the Conduit at Dowgate. The Court of Aldermen directed the Chamberlain to pay Mr. Alderman Barkham 40 marks, to be disposed of as a gift of the Court, to the use of Sir Thomas Pullison, Knight, some time Lord Mayor and Alderman of the City, who was at that time very sick and speechless, April 9th, 1616.
16 The purport of the petition is not mentioned.
17 Probably Sir Robert Lee, who filled the office of Sheriff with Mr. Alderman Bennett.
18 The reversion of the office of Common Serjeant and Common Clerk granted to him, April 12th, 1580; admitted to the office of Common Pleader, October 17th, 1587, which office he surrendered, December 8th, 1590; admitted Common Serjeant, September 24th, 1601; Deputy Recorder, February 9th, 1608. Daniel Hills, of Lincoln's Inn, admitted Common Serjeant on decease of Wheeler, 10th March, 1613.
19 Clothworker; elected Alderman of Aldersgate, October 26th, 1594; chosen Sheriff, June 24th, 1596; removed to Tower Ward, April 21st, 1601; Knighted at Whitehall, July 26th, 1603; removed to Aldersgate, May 29th, 1605; and to Langbourn, January 28th, 1605–6; Lord Mayor, 1606. He married Margaret, daughter of Sir James Hawes, Knight, Lord Mayor in 1574. He died in September, 1616, and was buried at Ware, Hertfordshire, September 7th, 1616. For a Pedigree of the family, see Clutterbuck's 'History of Hertforshire,' vol. iii. p. 305. He entertained at his house, adjoining Clothworkers' Hall, on June 12th, 1607, King James the First, the Duke of Lenox, &c., on which occasion the King was made a Free Brother of the Clothworkers' Company, to whose Hall they adjourned for the purpose. See 'King James's Progresses,' vol. ii. p. 132. He left a sum of 4l. per annum for the relief of the poor of Buntingford, Herts., his native place, 10l. to Christ's Hospital, and 20l. to St. Thomas's Hospital.
20 The office of Outroper, or Common Cryer, is referred to in the Inspeximus Charter of the 18th October, 14 Charles I. (1638). The language of the Charter appears to suggest that it was then newly established, although the above letter and other evidence prove it already existed. The duties of the office are stated in the Charter to embrace the selling of household stuff, apparel, leases of houses, jewels, goods, chattels, and other things of all persons willing that the officer should sell them by public and open cry, commonly called outery, in open places in the City and Liberties, and the Town and Borough of Southwark. Norton, in his 'Commentaries on the History, Constitution, &c., of the City of London,' p. 401, says: " The term outroper, or outrouper, like that of bankrupt, seems to be derived from the breaking up (ruptum) of stock; though as applied to the public selling of effects by crying them out, the etymology of the word is somewhat more intricate and involved. The word, and probably the office too, is more ancient than this Charter, which professes to create it, for the officer called the common cryer is perhaps as ancient as the City. The classical reader need hardly be reminded of the importance of the cryer in the earlier ages of democratic states, as testified in the character of Homer's Stentor, and of Tolmides, in Nenophon's 'Anabasis.' It may be presumed that a similar duty was performed by the cryer of London. It was his task to summon the councils, and call for order in their deliberations. It continues so to the present day, and whoever attends the civic assemblies will still find his voice the most audible, if not the most attended to. His duty, as outroper, was that of an auctioneer broker, the performance of which in open places detracted in no small degree from his ancient and also his modern dignity. This has, however, long ago ceased to be noticed in the list of his duties, as the change of the times has produced improvements in public sales, and indeed the legality of this exclusive grant by charter of such an office may be reasonably doubted."
21 Called to the Bar and appointed Reader of Gray's Inn, 1600; created Serjeant in 1603; made Baron of the Exchequer and Knighted, 1607; died February 21st, 1617. His grandfather, Edward, was Sheriff of London in 1531, and his father in 1556. His mother was sister of Alderman Sir Thomas Blanke.
22 A meeting of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Merchants, was held at Founders' Hall, September, 1599, to consider whether it was desirable to open a direct trade with India round the Cape of Good Hope. A hundred and one of those present formed themselves into an association to carry out the above object, and subscribed 30, 133l. as their capital. They were incorporated by Elizabeth, December 31st, 1600. The Charter was granted to the Earl of Cumberland and 215 Knights, Aldermen, and Merchants; Alderman Sir Thomas Smith was appointed the first Governor.
23 Second son of Sir Nicholas Mosley, Lord Mayor in 1599, for whom see note 2, p. 80. Sir Edward was knighted at Whitehall, December 31st, 1614. He purchased the Manor of Rolleston, Staffordshire, where he died, without issue, in 1638.
24 Sir Richard Martin. See note 1, p. 4.
25 Admitted Judge of the Sheriffs' Court, February 7th, 1604; surrendered his office, November 22nd, 1610. His surrender appears to have been caused by the disgrace of his son, Francis Morgan, jun., who was admitted deputy to his father, March 2nd, 1608, and dismissed from office November 15th, 1610, for enticing and taking away from the house of Sir Thomas Cambell, Knight, then Lord Mayor, one of the daughters and orphans of Myles Hubberd, and grandchild of Sir Thomas, and marrying her without the licence and consent of the Court of Aldermen. The entry recording his son's dismissal goes on to state that, by his example, and shortly afterwards, one Thomas Harrys, of mean friends and estate, being an apprentice of Sir Thomas Cambell, did steal, carry away, and marry another of the daughters and orphans of the said Myles Hubberd.
26 See note 2, p. 188.
27 Elected and sworn Recorder, January 20, 1620. Heneage Finch elected and sworn on the decease of Mr. Shute, February 15th, 1620.
28 Sir Henry Montague, Viscount Mandeville, afterwards Earl of Manchester. See note 1, p. 23.
29 Second son of Sir Moyle Finch, of Eastwell, Kent, ancestor of the Earl of Winchelsea and Nottingham. Sir Heneage Finch was elected Recorder, February 15th, 1620, in the room of Robert Shute, Esq., deceased. He was knighted at Wanstead, June 22nd, 1623; created Serjeant, 1623; M. P. for London, 1624–5. He was Speaker of the first Parliament of King Charles the First. He held the office of Recorder (in addition to that of Speaker ) till his death, December 5th, 1631. He was buried at Raunston, Bucks. For his son Heneage Finch, first Earl of Nottingham, see note 2, p. 77.
30 Haberdasher; elected Alderman of Farringdon Within, June 2nd, 1621; Sheriff, 1621; removed to Langbourn, November 7th, 1626; Lord Mayor, 1631; knighted by King James the First at Greenwhich, May 27th, 1632. His Pageant, entitled London's Jus Honorarium, was written by James Heywood, and performed at the expense of his Company. He was succeeded in his Aldermanry by John Kendrick, Grocer, May 25th, 1643. Sir George was the second son of William Whitmore, of Buldwas, Shropshire, and London, who married Anne, daughter of Alderman Sir William Bond. He was a staunch Royalist, and was imprisoned with Sir Kenelm Digby, Sir John Jacob, and Roger Pettiward, Esq., in Crosby House, for refusing to contribute money for the service of the Parliament. He resided at the Balmes, Hoxton, not far from the Kingsland Road. Here, on November 25th, 1641, Sir William Acton, Lord Mayor, with the Aldermen, Recorder, &c., awaited the arrival of Charles the First on his return from Scotland, when he was received right royally, a roadway, being cut through Sir George's estate to Moorgate. When the intention of the King to leave London was made known in the City, Sir George waited upon His Majesty at Whitehall, accompanied by many of the principal citizens, and offered a guard of 10,000 men, which the King graciously declined. He was a great benefactor to the repairs of the Cathedral of St. Paul's. He also assisted the King with money to the extent of 15,000l. He was sent prisoner to Yarmouth, in Norfolk. Upon the Alderman's decease, at his residence, the Balmes, December 12th, 1654, the Rev. Anthony Farrindon, B.D., preached his funeral sermon, a copy of which will be found at the end of the works of that divine. His sister, Elizabeth, married Alderman Sir William Craven, Merchant Taylor, Lord Mayor in 1610, from whom the present Earl of Craven is descended. His mother, by her will, dated January 21st, 1622, left certain houses to the Haberdashers' Company for the payment of certain gifts to old windows. The portrait of Sir George is still preserved at Haberdashers' Hall. Mr. Whitmore, M.P. for Bridgenorth, Salop, is a descendant of this family. For a full account of the Whitmores, see Le Neve's 'Knights,' Harleian Society's Publications, vol. viii. p. 20, and Burke's 'Landed Gentry.' There are several fine views of the Balmes in the collection of prints preserved in the Corporation Library.
31 Elected Recorder, November 11th, 1595; M. P. for London, 1597–1601; resigned, May 26th, 1603; Speaker of the House of Commons, 1601–3; King's Serjeant, May 29th, 1603; Judge of the King's Bench, June 25th, 1607. Died at his House in Holborn, January 23rd, 1620.
32 Of the Middle Temple; called to the Bar, June 17th, 1575; Treasurer, 1602; Recorder of Bristol; created Serjeant, 1604; Baron of the Exchequer, October 14th, 1604; died, November 11th, 1617.
33 Of the Inner Temple, 1569; Reader, 1595; created Serjeant, January 28th, 1603; Justice of the King's Bench, January 13th, 1606; Chief Baron of the Exchequer, June 25th, 1607; died, April 30th, 1625.
34 Admitted Reader in the Guildhall Chapel, loco John Hall, deceased, at a yearly salary of 5l., last of March, 1618.
35 Of the Middle Temple Queen's Solicitor; elected and sworn Recorder, December 28th, 1635; resigned on being appointed Attorney-General of the Court of Wards, January 15th, 1635–36.
36 William, third Earl.
37 Henry Wriothesley, K.G., third Earl, the friend of Shakespeare.
38 Admitted, January 24th, 1631, Clerk Sitter of Wood Street Compter, loco Thomas Leech, deceased, in pursuance of a reversion granted to him in the Mayoralty of Sir Martin Lumley.
39 Admitted, loco Dyos, December 22nd, 1619. Succeeded by Thomas Wiseman, September 12th, 1633.
40 Appointed Sword-bearer, June 7th, 1631. He performed his duties by deputy, which gave rise to many complaints, and on the 16th May, 1643, he was removed from office for not attending personally to his duties.
41 Probably Serjeant Glyn, elected Recorder, May 30th, 1643.
42 The reversion of the office of Remembrancer granted to him, January 9th, 1631.
43 Elected Recorder, December 7th, 1631; appointed Solicitor-General, October 17th, 1634; Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, January 27th, 1640; Lord Keeper, January 18th, 1641; created Lord Lyttelton, February 18th, 1641; died, 27th August, 1645; buried in the Cathedral of Christ Church, Oxford.
44 The reversion of the office of Common Crier and Serjeant-at-Arms granted to him upon the letter of Sir Sidney Montague, Knight, one of the Masters of the Court of Requests, written by command of King James and Prince Charles, November 7th, 1622. He was admitted, January 11th, 1629. Edward Deeves admitted as his Deputy, December 17th, 1634. The Court of Aldermen, in consequence of his continual absence, and of his inability and negligence, discharged him from his office, March 13th, 1645. Henry Hodges, elected Common Crier in his room, 30th March, 1645.
45 Henry Montague, Viscount Mandeville. See note I, page 23.
46 Called to the Bar, January 28th, 1595; created Serjeant, and knighted, March 14th, 1617; appointed Chief Justice of King's Bench in Ireland, March 14th, 1617; Judge of the Common Pleas in England, 1621; transferred to King's Bench, October 17th, 1624; died at his house in Holborn, December 9th, 1640.
47 The reversion of an attorneyship in the Sheriffs' Court, or the clerkship of either of the two Compters granted to him upon the letter of (Sir) Christopher Hatton, 4th January, 1576. Letter Book. V. fol. 45. Letter from (Sir) Christopher Hatton, thanking the Lord Mayor. (Sir Ambrose Nicholas), for the grant of the reversion of some of the City offices to Richard Hatton, 31st January, 1576. Letter Book Y. fol. 46.
48 Elected, October 20th, 1634; died, December, 1635.
49 Elected and sworn, January 25th, 1635; Reader of the Inner Temple, 1638; 100l. and two hogsheads of claret and one pipe of canary, presented to him by the City thereon, July 3rd, 1638; presented with the Freedom of the City, October 6th, 1640. He was impeached in 1642 for advising the Lord Mayor, Sir Maurice Abbott, Knight, the Aldermen, and Common Council to levy ship-money. See Howell's 'State Trials,' vol. iv. p. 167. Discharged from his office, May 2nd, 1643; appointed Solicitor-General, October 30th, 1643; Attorney-General, November 3rd, 1645, which office he held till the trial of King Charles the First in 1649, when William Steele was appointed in his room; died, October, 1652.
50 Phillip Herbert, K.G., fourth Earl of Pembroke, created Earl of Montgomery, 1605.
51 The celebrated Ben Jonson; made M.A. of Oxford, July 19th, 1620; admitted City Chronologer, loco Thomas Middleton, September 2nd, 1628. He died, August 6th, 1637, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.
It may not be considered uninteresting to give a list of the names of the different holders of this peculiar office, some of whom, as Thomas Middleton, Ben Jonson, and Francis Quarles are otherwise known to fame, with some few particulars from the Civic Records concerning them:—
1620, 6th September, 18th James I.—Thomas Middleton, admitted City Chronologer. Item, this day was read in Court (of Aldermen), a petition of Thomas Middleton, Gent., and upon consideration thereof taken, and upon the sufficient testimony this Court hath received of his services performed to this City, this Court is well pleased to entertain and admit the said Thomas Middleton to collect and set down all memorable acts of this City and occurrences thereof, and for such other employment as this Court shall have occasion to use him in; but the said Thomas Middleton is not to put any of the same acts so by him to be collected into print without the allowance and approbation of this Court, and for the readiness of his service to the City in the same employments this Court does order that he shall receive from henceforth, out of the Chamber of London, a yearly fee of 6l.13s.4d." Rep. 34, fol. 540b.
1620, 20th November, 18th James I.— His salary increased to 10l. per annum. Rep. 35, fol. 76.
1621, 17th April, 19th James I— A Freedom granted to Thomas Middleton, Chronologer and inventor of honourable entertainments for this City, towards his expenses. Rep. 35, fol. 148b,
1622, 7th May, 20th James I.— Another Freedom granted to him for his Letter encourage, ment in his labours. Rep. 36, fol. 129.
1622, 17th September, 20th James I.—15l. granted to him, for the like. Rep. 36, fol. 249.
1622(3), 6th February, 20th James I.—20l. granted to him. Rep. 37, fol. 95.
1623, 24th April, 21st James I.—One Freedom granted to him. Rep. 37, fol. 151b.
1623, 2nd September, 21st James I.—Twenty marks given him for his services at the shooting on Bunhill and at the Conduit Head before the Lord Mayor and Aldermen. Rep. 37, fol. 240.
1627, 7th February, 3rd Charles I.—Twenty nobles given to his widow Magdalen. Rep. 42, fol. 89.
1628. 2nd September, 4th Charles I.—"Item, this day Benjamin Johnson, Gent., is by this Court admitted to be the City's Chronologer in place of Mr. Thomas Middleton, deceased, to have, hold, exercise, and enjoy the same place, and to have and receive for that his service, out of the Chamber of London, the sum of one hundred nobles per annum, to con"tinue during the pleasure of this Court." Rep. 42, fol. 271.
1631, 2nd November, 7th Charles I.—"Item, it is ordered by this Court that Mr. Cham berlain shall forbear to pay any more fee or wages unto Benjamin Johnson, the City's Chronologer, until he shall have presented unto this Court some fruits of his labours in that his place." Rep. 46, fol. 8.
1634, 18th September, 10th Charles I.—"Item, this day Mr. Recorder and Sir (Hugh) Hamersley, Knight, Aldermen, declared unto this Court His Majesty's Pleasure, signified unto them by the Right Hon. the Earl of Dorest, for and in the behalf of Benjamin Johnson, the City Chronologer, whereupon it is ordered by this Court that his yearly pension of 100 nobles out of the Chamber of London shall be continued, and that Mr. Chamberlain shall satisfy and pay unto him all arrearages thereof." Rep. 48. fol. 433.
1633, 27th August, 9th Charles I.—Twenty pounds given to Mr. Edward Hewes, formerly the City Chronologer, in consideration of his age and good services. Rep. 47, fol. 336.
1639, Ist February, 15th Charles I.—At the request of the Right Hon. the Earl of Dorset, signified by his letter, Francis Quarles, Gent., was admitted Chronologer, with a fee of 100 nobles per annum, during the pleasure of the Court. Rep. 54, fol. 86.
1645, Ist October, 20th Charles I—Walter Frost, Esq., Sword-bearer, admitted Chronologer, so long as he shall well demean himself therein and present yearly something of his labours. Rep. 57, fol. 219.
1660, 28th February, 13th Charles II.—Captain John Burroughs admitted City Chronologer, the place having been void for several years, his salary to be 100 nobles per annum. Rep. 67, fol. 208.
1668, November 23rd, 20th Charles II.—Upon the recommendation of a Committee, the yearly payment of 100 nobles to one Bradshaw, called the City Chronologer, was discontinued with the place, there appearing no occasion for such an officer. For. 46, fol. 251.
1669, February 24th, 22nd Charles II.—On the petition of Cornewall Bradshaw, Gent., late City Chronologer, for some recompense for his salary of 33l. 6s.8d., taken from him by vote of the Court (Common Council), it was ordered that, upon his resigning his said place, the Chamberlain should pay him 100l. in full of all claims. For. 47, fol. 26b.
1669, 17th March, 22nd Charles II.—Bradshaw (admitted in the Mayoralty of Sir T. Bludworth, 1665–6, as City Chronologer) surrendered his office, with all its rights, &c., and a freedom was given to him. Rep. 75, fols. 136 and 139.
52 Edward Sackville, fourth Earl. Succeeded to the title, 1624; died, 1652.
53 The son of Sir Thomas May, Knight, of Mayfield, Sussex. Born, 1595; educated at Cambridge, where he took the degree of B.A. He was much noticed by Charles the First, Was the author of several dramatic and other works. On the breaking out of the Civil War he was elected Secretary of the Long Parliament, 1640, his history of which is well Known; he died November 13th, 1650, and was buried in Westminister Abbey, but at the Restoration his body, with several others, was dug up and thrown into a pit in St. Margaret's Churchyard, under a Royal Warrant, dated September 9th, 1661.
54 Thomas Wiseman, admitted Remembrancer in the room of Robert Bacon, deceased, September 12th, 1633. 100l. granted to him as a gift from the Court of Aldermen for his constant attendance upon the weighty affairs of the City, October 8th, 1635. Discharged from his office, it being considered no longer necessary, and the books, &c., in his custody to be delivered and sealed up, February 18th, 1642. Thomas Skinner elected to the vacant office, August 1st, 1646.


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