The hundred of Milton or Middleton
Introduction

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Edward Hasted

Year published

1798

Pages

2-4

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'The hundred of Milton or Middleton: Introduction', The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 6 (1798), pp. 2-4. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=62941 Date accessed: 21 November 2014.


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THE HUNDRED OF MILTON, ALIAS MIDDLETON.

THE hundred of Milton, as it is usually called, but more properly Middleton, lies the next hundred northward from that of Eyhorne last described.

It is an appendage to the manor of Milton, and was formerly stiled the court of antient demesne, held for the hundred of Milton; the jurisdiction of which includes the several parishes of the Isle of Shepey within its bounds, excepting Harty, which is in Faversham hundred.

It has the manor and hundred of Marden annexed as an appendage to it, which has been so from time immemorial.

In the pleas of the crown, taken before the justices itinerant, anno 21 Edward I. it is noted, that the hundred of Middleton was the king's hundred, with that of Marden; and further, that John de Shorne and Daniel de Burgham, whilst bailiffs of Middleton, held pleas weekly for five days, wherever they thought fit throughout that hundred; in which roll, mention is likewise made of one Lucas de Gare, Camerarius de Middleton.

In the 25th year of the above reign this hundred had a distinct coroner of its own, and was then farmed of the king by John de Northwood, and anno 7 Edward III. when queen Philippa had a grant of it, the return of writs was granted to her within it.

In the tower records, among the clause-rolls of the 1st year of Richard II. No. 33, the men of this hundred were exempted from all watch and ward on the sea-coasts, excepting in the island of Shepey.

Though the manor and hundred of Milton was granted, for lives and for terms of years, at different times, a more ample account of which, and of its several privileges, will be given in the description of the manor itself hereafter, yet the fee of it remained uninterrupted in the crown till king Charles I. in his 10th year granted it in fee to Sir Edward Browne and Christopher Favell, since which it has passed in like manner as the manor of Milton, of which a more ample account will be given hereafter, to the present owners of it, the right hon. Sophia, countess dowager Wenman, and her sister Mrs. Anne Herbert, who are now jointly possessed of this hundred and manor, with that of Marden appendant to it.

THIS HUNDRED CONTAINS WITHIN ITS BOUNDS THE PARISHES AND CHURCHES OF

1. RAINHAM.
2. HARTLIP.
3. UPCHURCH.
4. HALSTOW THE LOWER.
5. NEWINGTON.
6. BORDEN.
7. TUNSTALL.
8. BREDGAR.
9. MIDSTED.
10. KINGSDOWNE near Sittingborne.
11. RODMERSHAM.
12. BAPCHILD.
13. TONG.
14. MURSTON.
15. SITTINGBORNE.
16. MILTON, alias MIDDLETON.
17. BOBBING, and
18. IWADE.

And in the Island of Shepay, which is usually stiled Shepey Liberty, the parishes and churches of

1. MINSTER.
2. QUEENBOROUGH.
3. EASTCHURCH.
4. WARDEN.
5. LAYSDOWN, and
6. ELMLEY.

And likewise part of the parishes of BICKNOR and STOCKBURY, the churches of which are in another hundred.

This hundred is under the jurisdiction of three constables, one of which is appointed for the liberty of the Island of Shepey.



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