Billingsgate Stairs - Bird's Yard

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Henry A Harben

Year published

1918

Supporting documents

Citation Show another format:

'Billingsgate Stairs - Bird's Yard', A Dictionary of London (1918). URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63031 Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Billingsgate Stairs

Adjoining Billingsgate Dock on the west (Rocque, 1746). In Billingsgate Ward.

In Leake, 1666, called "Belinsgate Key."

The quay of "Billyngisgate" is mentioned 2 H. IV. (Cal. P.R. H. IV. 1399-1400, p. 361).

The site is now occupied by a jetty, and by piers for the market (O.S.).

Billingsgate Ward

One of the twenty-six wards of the City fronting the river, and extending west from Tower Ward to London Bridge.

Earliest mention : "Ward of Wolmar de Essex of 'Billingesgate,'" 1277, 5 Ed, I. (Cal. L. Bk. B. p. 262). See Wards.

The ward of Wolmar de Essex is mentioned in the Hundred Rolls (3 Ed. I. I. p. 415).

Named after the gate or port (q.v.).

There were a great number of foreigners in the ward in Stow's time, being 51 households, whereas 30 years before there were only about 3 foreigners (Netherlanders) in the whole ward (S. 209). The poor suffered in consequence, as the foreigners did not contribute to their maintenance, as other citizens did (ib.).

The Fire of London began in this ward at Pudding Lane, and in a few hours the ward was wholly destroyed.

There were five parish churches : St. Mary at Hill, St. Margaret Pattens, St. Andrew Hubbert, St. George, Botolph Lane, St. Botolph's Billingsgate. Now two only : St. Mary at Hill, St. Margaret Pattens.

There were also in the ward the Dock and the Market, which gave it considerable importance.

Billingsgate Ward

One of the twenty-six wards of the City fronting the river, and extending west from Tower Ward to London Bridge.

Earliest mention : "Ward of Wolmar de Essex of 'Billingesgate,'" 1277, 5 Ed, I. (Cal. L. Bk. B. p. 262). See Wards.

The ward of Wolmar de Essex is mentioned in the Hundred Rolls (3 Ed. I. I. p. 415).

Named after the gate or port (q.v.).

There were a great number of foreigners in the ward in Stow's time, being 51 households, whereas 30 years before there were only about 3 foreigners (Netherlanders) in the whole ward (S. 209). The poor suffered in consequence, as the foreigners did not contribute to their maintenance, as other citizens did (ib.).

The Fire of London began in this ward at Pudding Lane, and in a few hours the ward was wholly destroyed.

There were five parish churches : St. Mary at Hill, St. Margaret Pattens, St. Andrew Hubbert, St. George, Botolph Lane, St. Botolph's Billingsgate. Now two only : St. Mary at Hill, St. Margaret Pattens.

There were also in the ward the Dock and the Market, which gave it considerable importance.

Billingsgate Ward School

On the east side of Botolph Lane. In Billingsgate Ward (O.S.).

Erected on the site of the churchyard of St. Botolph Billingsgate (q.v.), possibly by Sir C. Wren, and occupied by him (N. and Q. 10, S.V. 304).

Amalgamated with Tower, Bridge, Candlewick and Dowgate Wards Schools (End. Ch. 1903, p. 7).

Property of Sir John Cass' Foundation (N. and Q. 10, S.V. 304).

Billiter Alley

See Lime Street Alley.

Billiter Avenue

West out of Billiter Street to Fenchurch Avenue (P.O. Directory). In Aldgate Ward.

First mention : L.C.C. List, 1901.

Billiter Avenue

West out of Billiter Street to Fenchurch Avenue (P.O. Directory). In Aldgate Ward.

First mention : L.C.C. List, 1901.

Billiter Court

North-west out of Billiter Square (O.S. 1880).

It seems to be shown in Rocque, 1746, but not named.

Site now occupied by Fenchurch Avenue (q.v.).

Billiter Court, Billiter Street

See Billet Court.

Billiter Lane

See Billiter Street.

Billiter Square

West out of Billiter Street at No. 11. In Aldgate Ward and Langbourn Ward (P.O. Directory).

Seems to be in course of formation in Strype's map, 1720, and in the text he speaks of the buildings as new (I. ii. 82). Mentioned in Hatton, 1708, "as very small, but pleasant and good buildings."

Povah says the houses on the north side and nearly all on the south side have been largely rebuilt (1894) (Annals of St. Olave Hart St. p.314).

Name derived from Billiter Lane or Street.

Billiter Square Buildings

At No. 1 Billiter Square (P.O. Directory). In Aldgate Ward.

First mention : L.C.C. List, 1912.

Billiter Street

South out of Leadenhall Street at No.38 to Fenchurch Street (P.O. Directory). In Aldgate Ward.

First mention : "Billiter Lane or Street" (Elmes, 1831).

Earlier names : "Belzeterslane," 1298 (Ct. H.W. I. 134). "Belleyetteres lane," 1306-7 (ib. 180). "Belleyetereslane," 1306-7 (ib. 184). "Belyeterslane," 1306-7 (34 Ed. I. Anc. Deeds, A. 2026). "Belieterslane," 12 Ed. II. (ib. A. 1993). "Belhetereslane," 1322 (Ct. H.W. I. 299). "Bellezeterestret," 1349 (ib. 587). "Belleyeterslane," 1470 (ib. II. 543). "Bylleter lane," 1526 (Lond. I. p.m. III. 319). "Billeter lane," 1540 (L. and P. H. VIII. XVI. p. 55). "Billitar lane " (S. 140). "Billiter lane" (Ryther's map, 1608).

Consisted of old timber houses in Strype's time which wanted pulling down and new building, occupied by small shop-keepers. These old houses still stood on the west side of the street in 1775, but on the eastern side the houses had been pulled down to widen the street, and having been rebuilt were occupied by the East India Company's warehouses and other modern buildings (Maitland, 1775, II. 778).

Derivation of name : Stow says it was so called of the first builder and owner thereof "Belzettars lane." But he gives no authority for the statement.

Skeat suggests that it was Bell-zeter's Lane, the lane where the bell-founders lived, and this seems probable enough.

"Bellezeter"=a bell-founder ("Promt. Parv." and in Halliwell, s.v.).

Wm. Burford is described as a "belyeter" in Ct. H.W. Wills, 1390 (II. 301).

Birchin Lane

South out of Cornhill at 35 to No.62 Lombard Street (P.O. Directory). In Cornhill and Langbourn Wards.

Earliest mention : 1473 (Ct. H. Wills, II. 571).

Former names and forms : "Bercheruere lane," c. 1190-1212 (Add. Ch. 1046). "Berchvereslane," 1260 (Ct. H.W. I. 7). "Bercheruerelane," 1320 (ib. 286). "Berchereslane," 1332 (Ct. H.W. I. 381). "Bercheverlane," 1349 (ib. II. 80). "Berchernerislane," 1361 (Cal. P.R. Ed. III. 1361-4, p. 138). "Bercherlane," 1372-3 (Ct. H.W. II. 153). "Birchenlane," 1386 (Ct. H.W. II. 260). "Bircheyn lane," 17 Rich. II. 1393 (Cal. P.R. Rich. II. 1391-6, p. 345). "Byrcherslane," 1401 (Ct. H.W. II. 351). "Bircherlane," 1486 (ib. 486). "Byrchyn lane," 1602-3 (ib. 728). "Burchen Lane," 1618 (ib. 743). "Burcheouer lane, so called of Birchouer, the first builder and owner thereof, now corruptly called Birchin lane" (S. 199), and See Bergereslane.

From the forms set out above, it appears that "Bercheruere" and "Berchever" were the earliest forms of the name, so that if Stow's surmise is correct the name of the builder or owner would appear to have been Bercheruere or Berchevere. It is interesting to note that the early form of Andover was Andevere.

Very little reliance can be placed upon the form "Berchernerislane," as in all probability the letter "n" was written "u" in the MS., and the "n" is an error in transcription.

Roman walls found under Nos. I, 12, 13 and 15, 20 and 22 and at the south-western corner of the lane. Pavements of tesserae and chalkstones (at a depth of 14 ft.) found under Nos. 2, 11 and 22 (Arch. VIII. 119 and 128).

Bird and Hand Alley, Court

In Cheapside (P.C. 1732-Boyle, 1799).

"Bird in Hand Alley" in Boyle.

See Bird in Hand Alley, Court.

Bird in Hand Alley, Court

South out of Cheapside at No.76 (P.O. Directory). West of Bucklersbury, in Cheap Ward.

First mention : O. and M. 1677. "Bird in Hand Alley," and in Hatton, 1708.

Can this name be a corruption of the former "Bordhawe lane" (q.v.)?

Birdes Alley

The gate of the alley was against St. Stephen's Church, 1528 (L. and P. H. VIII. IV. Pt. 2, p. 1788).

Not further identified.

Bird's Court

West out of Philip Lane. In Cripplegarte Ward Within (Elmes, 1831), to Little Wood Street (Hatton,1708).

First mention: Hatton, 1708.

Former names: "Burges Court" (O. and M. 1677-Strype, ed 1720). "Burge Court" (Maitland, 1775).

The site has been rebuilt and is now occuppied by offices and business houses.

Bird's Wharf

South out of Temple Street, west of White Fryers Stairs (Rocque, 1746-Dodsley, 1761).

Site occupied by Hawke's Wharf in Horwood, 1799.

Bird's Yard

Out of Chick Lane, West Smithfield (P.C. I 732-Strype, ed. 1755-Dodsley, 1761).

Not named in the maps.