Blackfriars Almshouses - Bladder Street

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Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Henry A Harben

Year published

1918

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Citation Show another format:

'Blackfriars Almshouses - Bladder Street', A Dictionary of London (1918). URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63037 Date accessed: 24 November 2014.


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Blackfriars Almshouses

In Church Entry on the east side, a few doors from Shoemaker Row, Blackfriars (Lockie, 1810, to Elmes, 1831).

Blackfriars Bridge

A bridge across the Thames above London Bridge extending from the southern end of New Bridge Street to Albion Place, on the south side of the river.

Commenced 1760-completed 1770. Repaired 1840. New bridge erected 1865-9.

Blackfriars Gateway

In Ludgate Street, in parish of St. Martin Ludgate, nearly opposite the church, leading through Pilgrim Street to the Broadway (P.C. 1732-Elmes, 1831).

The late Blackfriars Gate called the New Gate, near to Carter Lane (H. MSS. Com. 7th Rep. 665a).

Not named in the maps.

Blackfriars Lane

See Water Lane, Blackfriars.

Blackfriars School

Founded in 1716 by Peter Joy, for 40 boys and 30 girls (Dodsley, 1761).

Blackfriars Stairs

At the southern end of Water Lane, Blackfriars, in Farringdon Ward Within (Boyle, 1799).

In 1294 a quay was in course of construction at the house of the Friars Preachers (Cal. Close R. Ed. I. 1288-96, p. 373) and in the description of the house and precinct as it stood at the death of Thomas Cawardine, 2 Eliz., mention is made of the lane which led to the "comon Staires of the Thames" as one of the boundaries (Lond. I. p.m. I. 193).

Blackfriars Station

At the northern end of Blackfriars Bridge, at the eastern end of the Victoria Embankment (P.O. Directory).

On the boundary of the wards of Farringdon Within and Without.

Before the erection of the station the site was occupied by Chatham Place (q.v.), as shown in Horwood, 1799.

The Fleet entered the Thames at this site in former times.

Blackfriars Theatre

The site on which this theatre was erected had been for thirty-five years the office of the Revels during Sir Thomas Cawarden's tenure of the former monastery of the Blackfriars, granted to him by Edward VI.

The site of the Old Revels Storehouse adjoining the Pipe Office with free ingress and egress was conveyed to James Burbage 1595 for £600, and the premises converted by him into the Blackfriars Theatre (H. MSS. Com. 7th Rep. 537).

Ordered to be closed 1619, but remained open for many years after, and not finally suppressed until 1642. Pulled down 1655.

Playhouse Yard occupies part of the site.

Blackfryers

See Water Lane, Blackfriars.

Blackhorse Alley, Court, Fleet Street

North out of Fleet Street with a passage east to Fleet Market and Ditch (O.S. 1848-51).

First mention : In a petition by the inhabitants against the erection of timber houses there 1618. The Lord Mayor, having made enquiry into the matter, found that the projected houses were on former sites, but were larger and more airy, and would greatly improve the alley, which was very close and crowded. A portion only encroaching 12 ft. on ground formerly void he adjudged to be pulled down (L. and P. Ed. VI. etc. IX. p. 553).

Strype, writing in 1720, described it as nastily kept (I. iii. 277).

Called "Blackhorse Court" first by Elmes, 1831.

There was a tenement called "le Blakehors on the hope" in Fleet Street, 19 Rich. II. (H. MSS. Com. 9th Rep. p. 7), and in a deed relating to the tenement was a covenant to make an "ale" called "entre" between two houses.

Possibly this was the first mention of the "alley," which may have derived its name from this tenement.

Removed for the formation of Ludgate Circus and St. Bride Street.

Blackhorse Alley, Court, Fleet Street

North out of Fleet Street with a passage east to Fleet Market and Ditch (O.S. 1848-51).

First mention : In a petition by the inhabitants against the erection of timber houses there 1618. The Lord Mayor, having made enquiry into the matter, found that the projected houses were on former sites, but were larger and more airy, and would greatly improve the alley, which was very close and crowded. A portion only encroaching 12 ft. on ground formerly void he adjudged to be pulled down (L. and P. Ed. VI. etc. IX. p. 553).

Strype, writing in 1720, described it as nastily kept (I. iii. 277).

Called "Blackhorse Court" first by Elmes, 1831.

There was a tenement called "le Blakehors on the hope" in Fleet Street, 19 Rich. II. (H. MSS. Com. 9th Rep. p. 7), and in a deed relating to the tenement was a covenant to make an "ale" called "entre" between two houses.

Possibly this was the first mention of the "alley," which may have derived its name from this tenement.

Removed for the formation of Ludgate Circus and St. Bride Street.

Blackhorse Alley, Yard

Leading out of Bartholomew Close, on the east side of West Smithfield (Lockie, 1810-Elmes, 1831).

The houses in this alley formed part of the boundary of Great St. Bartholomew's Close, 36 H. VIII. 1544 (L. and P. H. VIII. XIX. (1), p. 376), and have been rebuilt in recent years for business purposes.

Blackleste

A tenement so called in parish of St. Benet Fink given to the Abbot of St. Mary de Gracus by Joan Hull, 1425 (Strype, I. ii. 13).

See Blakelofte.

Black's Alley

In East Smithfield (Strype, ed. 1755-Boyle, 1799).

Not named in the maps.

Black's Rents

In St. Katherine's precinct (Survey Sloane, MS. 3254, A. 4).

Called "Bleeks Rents" or "Eagle and Child Alley."

Site now occupied by St. Katherine's Docks and the adjacent warehouses.

Blacksmiths' Hall

On the west side of Lambeth Hill, in Queenhithe Ward (Leake, 1666-Strype, 1755).

Let as a warehouse in 1831 (Elmes).

The business of the Company is now conducted at Guildhall.

The Blacksmiths are the fortieth in order of the City Companies.

In existence in 1325. United with the Spurriers and incorporated 1571 and reincorporated 1639.

The ordinances of the Blacksmiths, 1434, are set out in Trans. L. and M. Arch. Soc. IV. pp. 7-32.

Blackwell Hall

On the west side of Basinghall Street at No. 6 with a passage west to the Guildhall and south to Cateaton Street (Gresham Street). In Bassishaw Ward.

On the east side of Guildhall Yard (Lockie, 1816).

Earliest mention : "Bakkewellehalle," 1356 (Cal. L. Bk. G. p. 67).

Other forms : "Bakwellehalle," 1396 (Cal. P.R. Rich. II. 1396-9, p. 23) and 1395 (Harl. Ch. 57 E. 37, 9 Rich. II.). "Bakwelhalle," 1 H. IV. (Cal. L. Bk. I. p. 6). "Selde of "Blakwelhalle," 15th cent. (Cal. L. Bk. D. p. 200). "Blakewell hall," 4 Ed. VI. (Pat. R. Pt. 9). "Blackwell Hall," 1566 (Lond. I. p.m. II. p. 79). "Bay Hall" (Strype, ed. 1720, I. iii. 59).

It appears from the Hustings Roll 22 (55) of the year 1293 that the Communa of the City granted to John de Banquell property near the Guildhall, which formerly belonged to Sir Roger de Clifford (Cal. L. Bk. C. pp.12 and 13).

Dispute in 1304 as to ownership of a wall between the tenements of Sir John de Banquell and Roger le Viroler decided in favour of Sir John de Banquelle (ib. 121).

Referred to as chamber formerly belonging to John de Bankewelle 1336-9 (Cal. L. Bk. E. 304).

The tenement seems to have remained in possession of this family throughout the 14th century and in a Harl. Charter 57 E. 37, 9 Rich. II. the "man'ii" of Bakwellehalle appears as formerly the property of Robert Bakwelle, rector of the church of All Hallows, Bread Street, who had acquired it from his brother Wm. de Bakwelle (Hust. Roll. 124 (57)).

In 1396 a messuage called Bakwellehalle and a garden in the parishes of St. Michael de Bassyngeshawe and St. Laurence in the Jewry were conveyed with the royal licence by John Fressh, Wm. Parker and Stephen Speleman, mercers, to the Mayor and Commonalty (ib. 125 (65)).

It seems thenceforth to have been used as a market place for woollen-cloths and foreigners were directed to bring their woollen cloth for sale to Bakwellehalle (Cal. L. Bk. H. p. 449).

The oath of the keeper of the selde of Blakwelhalle in the 15th century relates to the selling of cloth, etc. (Cal. L. Bk. D. p. 200).

Stow describes it as a market place for cloths and says it was rebuilt at the end of the 16th century (S. 115-16).

Burnt in the Fire 1666 and rebuilt 1672. Removed 1820 to make way for the new Courts of Law at the Guildhall.

There seems to be little doubt from the original forms of the name set out above that the hall derived its name, as Sharpe suggests, from the family of "Banquelle," "Batquelle," "Bauquelle," the former owners of the property, and that Stow is probably in error in identifying it with the "haugh" or "hawe" of the Basings.

Blackwell Hall Court, Passage

North out of Cateaton Street to Blackwell Hall. In Cheap Ward (Strype, ed. 1720-Boyle, 1799).

Shown in O. and M. 1677, but not named.

The site is now occupied by the entrance to Guildhall Buildings.

Blackwell Hall Yard

In Basinghall Street (Strype, ed. 1755-Boyle, 1799).

Not named in the maps.

Bladder Street

See Blow Bladder Street.