Great Synagogue, Duke Street - Green Acre

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Henry A Harben

Year published

1918

Supporting documents

Citation Show another format:

'Great Synagogue, Duke Street - Green Acre', A Dictionary of London (1918). URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63152 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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Great Synagogue, Duke Street

On the south side of Duke Street next to No. 31 (P.O. Directory). In Aldgate Ward.

First mention : Rocque, 1746, "Jew's Synagogue."

Smaller than the present building.

"Pav'd Alley" seems to occupy part of the site in O. and M. 1677, and See Vine Court.

Great Tower Hill

See Tower Hill.

Great Tower Street

East from No. 40 Eastcheap to Tower Dock, Tower Hill. In Tower Ward (P.O. Directory).

Widened from Little Tower Street, 1881-4, under the Met. and Dist. Ry. Co. (City Lines and Extensions) Act, 1882, to 60 ft. wide (Lond. Street Imp. 1855-97, p. 124).

Earliest mention : Strype, ed. 1720.

Former name : "Tower Street" (q.v.).

No. 48 is called the Czar's Head, and Barrow, in his life of Peter the Great, p. 83, says he used to resort to a tavern in Gt. Tower Street to smoke and drink, and that the landlord had the Czar of Muscovy's Head painted and put up for his sign.

The new street from 46 Mark Lane to Trinity Square, formed 1889-1906, was first called Great Tower Street, but afterwards Byward Street (q.v.).

Roman patera found at the top of Beer Lane, a little below All Hallows Barking church, in a bed of fine gravel 10 ft. below the surface, c. 1790 (Arch. XII. 413).

Remains of Roman buildings have also been found throughout the street.

Great Trinity Lane

East out of Queen Victoria Street, at No. 71, to Garlick Hill (P.O. Directory). In Vintry, Cordwainer, Bread Street and Queenhithe Wards.

First mention : Strype, ed. 1720, and Lockie, 1810.

Former names : "Holy Trinity Street," 1349 (Ct. H.W. I. 554). "Trinity Lane" (Leake, 1666-Horwood, 1799). "Knightriders Street" (q.v.) (Stow, 354).

Messuages in Breadstreete and Knyhtryderstreete commonly called "Trinitie Lane," in the parish of St. Mildred Breadstreete, 1594-5 (Ct. H.W. II. 722).

It evidently at that time formed part of and was included in Knightrider street, as indicated by Stow.

It was longer formerly than at present, and extended to Old Fish Street, this western end being removed for the formation of Queen Victoria Street.

Named after Holy Trinity Church.

See Knightrider street.

Great Western Wharf

Between Greenwich Street and the Thames, adjoining Dowgate Wharf, west of Dowgate Dock (O.S.) at No. 83 Upper Thames Street.

Great White Bear Court

North out of Thames Street in Blackfriars, west of Addle Hill, in Castle Baynard Ward (P.C. 1732).

Not named in the maps.

Great Winchester Street

West out of Old Broad Street at No. 53 and north to No. 73 London Wall. In Broad Street Ward (P.O. Directory).

First mention : O.S. 1848-51.

Former name : "Winchester Street" (O. and M. 1677-Elmes, 1831).

So named from the Marquis of Winchester, who as Wm. Poulet, Lord St. John, received the grant of a large part of the house and precincts of the Augustine Friars from Henry VIII. in 1539 and pulling down the Priory buildings erected a large house on the site (L. and P. H. VIII. XIV. Pt.1 p. 588), which was called Powlet House and afterwards Winchester House. The gardens of the house were built on and made into a fair street called Winchester Street (Strype, ed. 1720, I. 111).

Great Winchester Street Buildings

On the north side of Great Winchester Street, at No. 1, in Broad Street Ward (L.C.C. List, 1912).

A large block of buildings used as offices and chambers, between Great Winchester Street and Little Winchester Street.

First mention : O.S. 1875.

The site was occupied in part by White Hart Inn and stables in the earlier maps, O. and M. 1677, and Rocque, 1746, etc.

Great Wood Street

See Wood Street.

Greek Chapel

At the north-east corner of Little Winchester Street, in Broad Street Ward (O.S. 1880).

Green Acre

There was a house in Gracechurch Street so called (Strype, ed. 1720, I. ii. 155).

Not further identified.