Love Lane - Lucas Lane

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Henry A Harben

Year published

1918

Supporting documents

Citation Show another format:

'Love Lane - Lucas Lane', A Dictionary of London (1918). URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63213 Date accessed: 24 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Love Lane

A parcel of land and garden called "la Lovelane," in parish of St. Christopher, in the ward of Bradestret given to the rector of that church, 1357 (Ct. H.W. I. 699).

Shop in Love Lane mentioned 17 Ed. III (1343) (Cal. L. Bk. F. p. 85).

Not further identified.

Love Lane

South out of Eastcheap, at No. 18, to 25 Monument Street (P.O. Directory). In Billingsgate Ward.

Prior to the formation of Monument Street, Love Lane was longer and extended south to Lower Thames Street.

Earliest mention : 1394. "Love lane" formerly called "Roppelane" near Billingsgate (Ct. H.W. II. 311). Lane formerly called "Roperelane" and now called "Love lane," in parish of St. Mary atte Hille, 1458 (ib. 536).

Stow says the lane was of old called "Roape Lane," and since "Lucas lane" of one Lucas, owner of some part thereof and now corruptly called "Love Lane" (S. 211).

He does not give any authority for the statement that it was called Lucas Lane, and as the name does not appear in any early records, whereas "Love Lane" does, Stow may be in error as to this.

It is interesting to note in connection with the name "Love Lane," that about the year 1377 in an ordinance for safeguarding the City, the Alderman of Billynges-gate Ward was to guard the wharf of Reynold Love up to Billinges-gate. It does not seem to be at all impossible that the change of name from "Roper" to "Love" Lane may have been made about this time, and that the lane may have been renamed after this family, if, as seems likely, they were possessed of considerable property in the neighbourhood.

It has been suggested that this lane was named corruptly after John Lovekyn, M. 1348, 1358, contracted into Lukin and Lukins, and later converted into Lucas (N. and Q. 10th S. v. p. 302-3-4).

Fragments of Roman bricks found in 1774 on the east side of the lane during excavations for the erection of a sugar-warehouse and at a higher level, namely 14 or 15 ft. below the level of the street, old Saxon coins were discovered (Arch. IV. 356).

Love Lane

On the east side of Coleman Street near King's Alley (S. 286). In the ward of Colemanstrete, 1339 (Ct. H.W. I. 434).

In another Will it is described as in the street called "la Elde Jurie," 1336 (ib. 412).

In the parish of St. Olave in Old Jewry, 36 H. VIII. 1544 (L. and P. H. VIII. XIX. Pt. 1, p. 505).

Not named in the maps.

Love Lane, Aldermanbury

West from Aldermanbury, at No. 66, to 36 Wood Street (P.O. Directory). In Cripplegate Ward Within.

First mention : S. ed. 1598, p. 231.

The part north and east of St. Albans Church, now called "Little Love Lane," was all called "Love Lane" in Strype's time (ed. 1720, I. iii. 90) and in 1755 ed.

Part of it is called "Great Love Lane" in P.C. 1732.

So called of wantons, Stow says (ed. 1603, p. 298). But why not after an owner named "Love"?

Lovell's Court

North out of Paternoster Row, at No. 20, in Farringdon Ward Within (P.O. Directory).

First mention : "Lovel's Court" (O. and M. 1677-Strype, 1720).

Other forms : "Lovets Court" (Rocque, 1746). "Lovers Court" (Horwood, 1799).

Name derived from Lovell's Inn (q.v.) which formerly stood on a portion of the site.

Lovell's Inn

In Ivy Lane and Paternoster Row, in Farringdon Ward Within, in parish of St. Faith.

A great house at one time belonging to the Earles of Britaine and afterwards to the Lovels and called Lovels Inn. Held by Mathilde, wife of John Lovell, first of Henry VI. (S. 344) and Proc. in Chanc. temp. Q. Eliz. I. 394).

Site now partly covered by Lovell's Court (q.v.).

Lovel's Yard

In Whitecross Street, Cripplegate (Strype, ed. 1755-Boyle, 1799).

Not named in the maps.

Lover's, Lovet's Court

In Paternoster Row (Strype, ed. 1755-Boyle, 1799).

See Lovell's Court.

Love's Grove

Out of George Alley, between Farringdon Street and Shoe Lane, in Farringdon Ward Without. Houses there in ruins in 1786.

Taken down for the formation of Farringdon Market 1827 (End. Ch. Rep. St. Bride's, 1901, p. 5).

Not named in the maps.

Lower Court

In the Little Minories (W. Stow, 1722-Boyle, 1799).

Not named in the maps.

Lower East Smithfleld

West from Little Thames Street to the Hermitage Swing Bridge and Basin (P.O. Directory).

In the eighteenth century the street of this name ran south from Butcher Row (Hatton, 1708) and during the second half of the century at any rate extended to Burr Street only. This portion of the street was removed for the formation of St. Katherine's Docks. During this period the eastern continuation of the street from Burr Street to Hermitage Dock Side was called "Little Thames Street" (Rocque, 1746-Horwood, 1799).

Called also "Lower Street," East Smithfield (London Guide, 1758).

Street was widened 1872-9 under Metropolitan Street Improvement Act, 1872, by setting back portions of the northern and southern sides (London Street Improvements, 1855-97, p. 43).

Lower East Smithfleld

West from Little Thames Street to the Hermitage Swing Bridge and Basin (P.O. Directory).

In the eighteenth century the street of this name ran south from Butcher Row (Hatton, 1708) and during the second half of the century at any rate extended to Burr Street only. This portion of the street was removed for the formation of St. Katherine's Docks. During this period the eastern continuation of the street from Burr Street to Hermitage Dock Side was called "Little Thames Street" (Rocque, 1746-Horwood, 1799).

Called also "Lower Street," East Smithfield (London Guide, 1758).

Street was widened 1872-9 under Metropolitan Street Improvement Act, 1872, by setting back portions of the northern and southern sides (London Street Improvements, 1855-97, p. 43).

Lower Mews

Out of the Crescent, Minories, in Portsoken Ward (Lockie, 1816).

Not named in the maps.

Lower Mews

Out of the Crescent, Minories, in Portsoken Ward (Lockie, 1816).

Not named in the maps.

Lower Thames Street

East from London Bridge to Tower Hill (P.O. Directory). In Tower, Billingsgate and Bridge Wards.

First mention : Horwood, 1799. Former name : "Thames Street."

Called "Lower" as being below the bridge.

Remains of a Roman Bath and building found opposite the north-west angle of the Custom House (Arch. XXXVI. 206), and a Roman hypocaust discovered under the New Coal Exchange at a depth of 12 ft. (ib.).

Lower Thames Street

East from London Bridge to Tower Hill (P.O. Directory). In Tower, Billingsgate and Bridge Wards.

First mention : Horwood, 1799. Former name : "Thames Street."

Called "Lower" as being below the bridge.

Remains of a Roman Bath and building found opposite the north-west angle of the Custom House (Arch. XXXVI. 206), and a Roman hypocaust discovered under the New Coal Exchange at a depth of 12 ft. (ib.).

Loxon's Alley

In Leadenhall Street, near the Bull Inn, No. 152, in parish of St. Peter, Cornhill.

Left by Thomas Hinde, 1635, to the parson and churchwardens of the parish (End. Ch. St. Peter, 1903, p. 2).

No later mention.

Named after an owner or builder.

Loyd's Brewhouse

On the east side of Golden Lane, in Cripplegate Ward Without (Rocque, 1746).

Part of the site seems to be occupied by the City Mortuary.

Loyd's Yard

See Three Colt Court, Angel Alley, Bishopsgate.

Lucas Lane

See Love Lane.