Moses' Court - Mr. Hood's Iron Wharf

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Henry A Harben

Year published

1918

Supporting documents

Citation Show another format:

'Moses' Court - Mr. Hood's Iron Wharf', A Dictionary of London (1918). URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63239 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


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Moses' Court

See Mosley's Court.

Mosley's Court

East out of Philpot Lane. In Langbourn Ward (Rocque, I 746-Boyle, 1799).

Former names: "Moseley's Court" (O. and M. 1677-P.C. 1732). "Moses Court" (Strype).

Site has been rebuilt and is now occupied by business houses.

Sir Nicholas Mosley was Alderman of Langbourn Ward 1594-1602, and Mayor of London 1599-1600 (Beavan). Perhaps the Court was named after him or his family.

Mouldmaker's Row

West out of Foster Lane and north from Round Court and west and north into Dean's Court. In St. Martin's le Grand in Aldersgate Ward (Lockie, 1816).

First mention : "Moldmaker Row" (O. and M. 1677).

In a deed of 1684 some of the messuages are described as newly built (L.C.C. Deeds, Harben Bequest, 1600-1700, No.102).

Other name: "Mouldmakers Rents" (Strype, Ed. 1720).

The western end seems to have been called " Back Alley" (q.v.) in the 18th century.

Site afterwards occupied by the buildings of the old General Post Office, erected 1825-9

Moun (Soke of)

The soke of Moun with homages, rents, suits, etc., and advowsons of churches pertaining to the said soke as well in the City of London as without in the county of Middlesex. Parties, Richard, Abbot of Westminster, and Robert de Bello Campo. The Mayor and Citizens of London put in their claim 36 H. III. (Cal. L. and M. Ft. of Fines, 1.34).

No later mention.

There seem to have been several of these sokes, or privileged areas, in the City in early days.

Moundevyle Aley

An alley so called in the parish of St. Michael in Bassyngeshawe, in which Girdlers' Hall was situated, late Middelton Alley, 1520-1 (Ct. H.W. II. 628).

Girdlers' Hall (q.v.) may have been on or near the site, and has probably absorbed the alley, for Robert Belgrave, girdler, by his Will dated 1520-1, gave a parcel of land in this alley to the Girdlers of London, whose Hall was in this ward as early as 1438-9, and this gift may well have been for the extension and enlargement of the Hall.

The alley is described as in Bassyngeshawe Street, '5 H. VIII. 1523 (Lond. I. p.m. I. 42).

The name suggests an owner or builder.

Mount (le)

In parish of St. Giles, Cripplegate, 1535 (L. and P. H. VIII. VIII. p.443)

Not further identified.

Mount Court

South out of Harrow Alley, Middlesex Street. In Portsoken Ward (Rocque, 1746-O.S. Ed. 1880).

Site covered by Metropolitan Railway and Artizan Street (q.v.).

Mount Godard Street

" On the backside of the shambles be divers slaughterhouses and such like, pertaining to the Shambles and this is called Mount Godard Street. This streete goeth up to the North end of Iuie lane" (S. 315 and 345).

Seems to have been on the south side of Newgate Street.

The word "Goddard" is defined in Halliwell as "a fool," a kind of cup or goblet, and Stow says the street was so called of "Goddards mounting from the tappe to the "Table, from the table to the mouth and sometimes over the head" (S. 345).

Mountenhaut Lane.

-In the parish of St. Mary Somerset, south out of Knightriders street to Thames Street. On the east side of St. Mary Mounthaunt lane in Finimore or Five foot lane (S. 354).

=Old Fish Street Hill (q.v.).

"Mountenhautlane," 1432 (Ct. H.W. II. 459).

Named after the family, who owned the property.

See Mary (St.) Mounthaw.

Mountfiquit (Tower of)

Near the Wall of London, next to Castle Baynard, in the Ward of Castle Baynard, afterwards included in the precinct of the Blackfriars.

Earliest mention: Land in parish of St. Martin de Ludgate in the corner opposite the land of the Dean of St. Paul's, between the land of David Longus, Chaplain, towards the north and the street south, which extends towards the wall of the City by the ditch "Cast' de munfichet," C 12 H. III. Witness, Joce fit Petri, Alderm. (MS. D. and C. St. Paul's, Press A. Box 15, 402).

Stow says the castle was built by the Baron of Mountfiquit, who came over with William the Conqueror, not far distant from Baynard's Castle (p.68).

Later forms of name: "Castle Munfichat" (before 1223) (H. MSS. Com. 9th Rep. 15) Castle of Munfichet," 1246 (ib. 25). " Turns Montis Fisheti," 1275 (Cal. P.R. 1272-81, p.98).

In the charter of foundation of St. Mary Spital, 1235, among the grants made was one of land lying between the ditch of the castle of Munfichet of the fee of Richard Munfichet and land of Martin Permentani de Flete (Dugdale VI. (2), 624).

In an Inquisition 4 Ed. I. the jurors found that the " situ turns qul dicitur ' Montfichet' in civitate Londofi" did not belong to Richard de Montfichet, but to Robert "films Walteri," as also did the whole site of Castelbaynard (Ch. I. p.m. 4 Ed. I. 101).

In 1275, 3 Ed. I. , licence was granted to Robert " filius Walteri" to sell the castle called Castle Baynard with its appurtenances in dykes, etc., or even in the "Turris Montis Fisheti" (Cal. P.R. 1272-81, p.98), and the whole site was granted to the Blackfriars for the building of their church, etc., in 1278 (Cal. Char. Rolls, II. 211).

Mountford's Court

In Fenchurch Street (Dodsley, 1761).

Not named in the maps.

Mountjoy (Brethren of)

See Montejovis Inn.

Mountjoy Place

See Doctors' Commons.

Mount's Gateway

In Butcher Row, Upper East Smithfield, leading to Great Garden Street (Lockie, 1810 and 1816).

Not named in the maps.

Mourning Bush (The)

See Fountain Tavern, Aldersgate.

Mouse Alley, East Smithfield

See Dean Street.

Mousetrap House

See Fleur de lis Court, Fetter Lane.

Mr. Calvert's Brewery

See City of London Brewery.

Mr. Calvert's Brewery

See City of London Brewery.

Mr. Hood's Iron Wharf

See Iron Wharf.

Mr. Hood's Iron Wharf

See Iron Wharf.