The hundred of Folkestone
Introduction

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Edward Hasted

Year published

1799

Page

120

Citation Show another format:

'The hundred of Folkestone: Introduction', The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 8 (1799), pp. 120. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63466 Date accessed: 01 August 2014.


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THE HUNDRED OF FOLKESTONE

LIES the next south-eastward to that of Loningborough, written in Domesday, Fulchestan, and in antient deeds and records, universally, Folkestone; though of late years it has been erroneously written Folkstone.

IT CONTAINS WITHIN ITS BOUNDS THE FOLLOWING PARISHES:
1. SWINGFIELD.
2. LIDDON in part.
3. ALKHAM.
4. CAPELL.
5. HAWKING.
6. CHERITON; and
7. NEWINGTON.

And the churches of those parishes; and likewise part of the parishes of ACRISE, HOUGHAM, and FOLKESTONE; the town and liberty of Folkestone, comprehending the church and a part of that parish, having been long since made a separate jurisdiction from it, and having peace officers of its own. Two constables have jurisdiction over this hundred.

This hundred, which was appurtenant to the lordship or manor of Folkestone, was, in the reign of the Conqueror, part of the possessions of the bishop of Baieux, who being disgraced in the 19th year of it, all his estates were consiscated to the crown; the hundred of Folkestone afterwards passed, in the same succession of ownership as the manors of Folkestone and Tirlingham did, as may be further seen hereafter, under the description of them, to the present lord and owner of it, the right hon, Jacob Pleydel Bouverie, earl of Radnor.