Canterbury cathedral
Canons

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Edward Hasted

Year published

1801

Pages

55-108

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'Canterbury cathedral: Canons', The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 12 (1801), pp. 55-108. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63687 Date accessed: 17 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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A LIST OF THE CANONS OR PREBENDARIES OF THIS CHURCH.

Canons in the first Prebend

1. RICHARD THORNDEN, alias STEDE, S. T. P. was, by the foundation charter, named the first prebendary in this stall. He had been one of the monks of the late priory of Christ-church, and had been master or custos of Canterbury college, in Oxford. In 1541 he was elected by the dean and chapter to be proctor for the chapter in convocation; in 1539 he was sconsecrated suffragan bishop of Dover, and died in 1558, being the last year of queen Mary's reign, at Bishopsborne, of which church, as well as Adisham, he had been rector, and was buried in the former. (fn. 1)

King Henry VIII. in his 31st year, granted to Richard, bishop suffragan of Dover, the scite of the monastery of Childrens Langley, and several manors and lands in Kent, late belonging to it, to hold without any rent or account, during his life, or until he should be promoted to one or more ecclesiastical benefices, dignity, or annuity of the annual or greater value than 100l. (fn. 2)

2. GEORGE LILYE, son of William Lilye, the famous grammarian, was educated at Magdalen col lege, in Oxford; leaving which, though without taking a degree, he travelled to Rome, where he was known to cardinal Pole, and was taken under his protection, when he became noted there for his singular endowments and proficiency in various parts of learning. Soon after his return home he was made canon of St. Paul's cathedral, and afterwards, through the cardinal's favour, was preferred to this dignity in the church of Canterbury, upon the death of bishop Thornden, (fn. 3) being collated to it on March 13, 1557, and was the first nominated since the grant of it to the archbishop by king Edward VI. He erected a monument for his father in St. Paul's church, in London, and in the epitaph stiles himself a canon of it. He died in 1559, (fn. 4) and was buried in the church yard of that cathedral. (fn. 5)

3. THEODORE NEWTON, A. M. succeeded him in this stall, and was rector of St. Dionis Backchurch, London. He died in 1568, and was buried in the chapter-house here. (fn. 6)

4. THOMAS LAWSE, LL.D. the archbishop's commissary, was collated in his room, in 1568, and was master of Eastbridge hospital, in Canterbury. (fn. 7) He resigned this prebend some little time before Nov. 27, 1589, but continued his mastership till his death, which happened on August 9, 1594. (fn. 8)

5. WILLIAM REDMAN, S. T. P. archdeacon of this diocese, was installed on November 27, 1589, and was afterwards rector of Bishopsborne and of Upper Hardres. On January 12, 1594, he was consecrated bishop of Norwich, on which this prebend became vacant. (fn. 9)

6. RICHARD BANCROFT, S. T. P. was collated and installed on January 14, 1594. He vacated this prebend, being consecrated bishop of London in 1597, (fn. 10) and was afterwards promoted to this archiepiscopal chair.

7. RICHARD WOOD, S. T. P. was installed on April 29, 1597. He died on Sept. 15, 1609, (fn. 11) and was buried in this cathedral. (fn. 12)

8. HENRY AIRAY, S. T. P. provost of Queen's college, Oxford, succeeded him in this dignity. He died in 1616. (fn. 13)

9. JOHN WARNER, S. T. P. was next promoted to this stall. He was educated at Magdalen college, in Oxford, of which he became fellow; which he resigned about 1610, on being presented to the rectory of St. Dionis Backchurch, in London, and in 1616, was collated to this prebend. In 1633 he was promoted to the deanry of Lichfield, and on January 14, was consecrated bishop of Rochester; on which this preferment became vacant. He gave the beautiful marble font to this church. To the church of Rochester he was a generous benefactor; (fn. 14) but the college at Bromley, which he founded and endowed for clergymens' widows, will ever remain a monument of his great and liberal munificence.

10. WILLIAM BRAY, B. D. was next collated to it, and was installed on Nov. 13, 1637. He died in 1644, (fn. 15) after which it remained vacant, till

11. JOHN CASTILION, S. T. P. was, after the restoration of church and monarchy in 1660, collated the next to it. He was educated at Christ church, in Oxford, and in 1676 was made dean of Rochester.—He was rector of Mersham in this county, and vicar of Minster, in Thanet, and dying on Oct. 21, 1688, was buried in the lower south cross isle of this cathedral. (fn. 16) On his gravestone was this short memorial inscribed for him. JOHANNES CASTILION, S. T. P. ecclesiæ cathedralis Roffensis decanus & hujus ecclesiæ canonicus obiit 21 Octob. A. D. 1688 ætatis suæ 75. Margaretta uxor ejus obiit 12 Julii An. Dom. 1716, æ tatis 80.

12. JOHN BATTELY, a native of St. Edmundsbury, in Suffolk, fellow of Trinity college, in Cambridge, and chaplain to archbishop Sancroft, was collated to this prebend on November 5, 1688, being then archdeacon of this diocese, rector of Adisham, and master of Eastbridge hospital, to which he appears to have been a good benefactor. (fn. 17) He died in October, 1708, and was buried in this cathedral; his epitaph may be seen in the list of archdeacons.

13. EDWARD TENISION, LL. B. was collated next to it, and was installed on March 19, 1708–9. He was of Benet college, in Cambridge, and was first rector of Wittersham, and vicar of Lydd, in this county, and then of Sundridge and Chiddingstone, and became likewise in 1708 archdeacon of Carmarthen, in Wales, and a prebendary of the church of Lichfield.

In 1730 he was promoted to the bishopric of Offory, in Ireland; (fn. 18) upon which this stall became vacant, and was conferred on

14. WILLIAM GEEKIE, S. T. P. who succeeded him in this stall in July, 1731. He was archdeacon of Gloucester, and had first the rectories of Deal and Woodchurch, both which he resigned, and afterwards held the rectories of Chevening and Southfleet, in this county, the former of which he resigned on being inducted to Alhallows Barking, London. He died unmarried in 1767, æt. 77. His sister Jane married Sir John Head, bart. prebendary of this church, and archdeacon of this diocese.

15. JOHN BENSON, S. T. P. (fn. 19) was collated that same year to it, being then one of the six preachers of this church; he had been rector of Rucking, and vicar of Shepherdswell with Coldred, which latter he resigned and held the former with the rectory of Great Chart, as he afterwards did that rectory with that of Harbledown, and in 1780 exchanged both these rectories for the vicarage of Boxley, in this county, which, on being presented to the vicarage of Littleborne in 1789, he held therewith; but resigned the latter in 1794, and now holds only Boxley. He is the present prebendary of this stall.

Canons in the second Prebend.

1. ARTHUR ST. LEGER was installed in 1542, being appointed to it by the foundation charter. He attended upon Sir Anthony St. Leger, the lord deputy of Ireland, and had a dispensation anno 38th king Henry VIII. for non-residence, during his stay there. (fn. 20) He resigned this prebend in 1568.

2. ANTHONY RUSH, S. T. P. born in the diocese of Norwich, and fellow of Magdalen college, in Oxford, afterwards one of the queen's chaplains and an excellent preacher, was next promoted to it, being installed on April 6, 1568. He was canon of Windsor, and dean of Chichester, and died in the beginning of the year 1577.

3. JOHN LANGWORTH, S. T. P. educated in New college, Oxford, being the son of Lancelot Langworth, esq. of Kertlebury, in Worcestershire, was next installed in this prebend in 1578, and in 1579 was likewise promoted to a stall in the church of Worcester, and became archdeacon of Wells in 1588. He died in 1613, and was buried in Canterbury cathedral on January 13, that year. (fn. 21)

4. RICHARD HUNT, S. T. P. was installed in 1614. He was made dean of Durham in 1620, and in 1631 resigned this prebend.

5. THOMAS BLECHYNDEN, S. T. P. was the next prebend, (fn. 22) being installed on the 4th of Decem ber, (fn. 24) 1631, but in 1642 he was ejected by the puritans, and this preferment remained vacant till the time of the restoration, before which he died.

6. PETER GUNNING, S. T. P. was admitted on the restoration into this prebend, being installed on July 9, 1660, before which he had suffered much by sequestrations and other losses, for his loyalty. He was born at Hoo, in this county, of which parish his father was vicar, in which neighbourhood his family remains at this time. He was educated at the king's school, in these precincts, and became fellow of Clarehall, in Cambridge, afterwards chaplain of New college, in Oxford, master of Benet and St. John's colleges, in Cambridge, lady Margaret, and Regius professor in that university; besides which, he was rector of Cottesmore and Stoke Bruern, in Northamptonshire, and minister of St. Mary's the Less, in Cambridge. In 1669, he was consecrated bishop of Chichester, upon which this stall became vacant. (fn. 25)

In 1674 he was translated to Ely. He was a person of most diffusive charity, a universal benefactor to all places to which he had any relation, and what he had not spent in his life, he gave by his will to charitable uses, particularly the endowment of poor vicarages. He died much lamented in 1684, and was buried in that cathedral, æt. 91.

7. JOHN TILLOTSON, A. M. was admitted fellow of Clare-hall, in the room of Peter Gunning abovementioned. He was inducted in 1663 to the rectory of Ketton, alias Keddington, in Suffolk, and was installed into this prebend on March 14, 1669, and afterwards, upon the death of dean Turner, was promoted in 1672 to the deanry of this church; in the list of the deans of which, and of the archbishops of this see, more may be seen of him.

8. SAMUEL PARKER, S. T. P. was installed in this prebend on November 18, 1672, being then archdeacon of this diocese and rector of both Chartham and Ickham, in this county. He was a native of Northampton, and was educated at Wadham college in Oxford first, and afterwards went to Trinity, where he changed his principles from strict presbyterianism, to those of the church of England, and became chaplain to archbishop Sheldon. In 1673 he was made master of Eastbridge hospital, in Canterbury; he resigned this prebend in 1685, and was next year consecrated bishop of Oxford, on which this prebend became vacant, though he afterwards held the archdeaconry with the rectory of Ickham, and the mastership of Eastbridge hospital in commendam. (fn. 26)

9. JOHN BRADFORD, S. T. P. succeeded him in it, and was installed in October, 1685, and died about six weeks afterwards; he was buried, his body being wrapt in sere cloth, on December 12, that year, in this cathedral. (fn. 27)

10. JOHN YOUNGER, S. T. P. of Magdalen college, in Oxford, succeeded him, and was installed on the 30th of that month, in which his predecessor died. He resigned his prebend in 1691, and was afterwards canon residentiary and dean of St. Paul's, and clerk of the closet to queen Anne. (fn. 28)

11. JOHN WILLIAMS, S. T. P. succeeded him and was installed on April 27, 1691. he was born in Northamptonshire, and was sometime of Magdalenhall, in Oxford. After the restoration he became minister of St. Peter's, Paul's wharf, in London, rector of Gillingham, and vicar of Wrotham, in this county, and afterwards rector of St. Mildred's Poultry, London, and canon of St. Paul's, being then chaplain to king William, and in 1697 was consecrated bishop of Chichester, on which this stall became vacant. (fn. 29)

12. JOHN ROBINSON, S. T. P. was next advanced to this prebend, being installed on June 16, 1697; he was at that time the queen's envoy to the king of Sweden; he was afterwards made, in 1703, dean of Windsor, and on November 19, 1710, was consecrated bishop of Bristol, (fn. 30) upon which this stall became vacant.

13. EDWARD FINCH, S. T. P. son of Heneage, earl of Nottingham, lord chancellor, (fn. 31) and brother of Henry Finch, dean of York, was installed on February 8, following. He was canon residentiary likewise of the church of York, and rector of Wigan, in Lancashire. He died in 1738.

14. JOHN GRIFFITH, S. T. P. was installed in 1737–8, and next year was inducted to the rectory of St. Michael Queenhithe, London. He died in 1765, and was succeeded by

15. THOMAS DAMPIER, S. T. P. who was installed that year; he was a native of Somersetshire, and had been fellow of King's college, in Cambridge, and afterwards under-master of Eton school. In 1769 he was promoted to a canonry of Windsor, on which he resigned this stall. He afterwards, among other preferments, was made dean of Durham. (fn. 32)

16. BENNET STORER, S. T. P. (fn. 33) late of Trinity college, Cambridge, was installed in his room, on July 3, 1769, and is the present incumbent of it.

Canons in the third Prebend.

1. RICHARD CHAMPION, S. T. P. appointed in the foundation charter of this church, was installed in 1542. He was chaplain to archbishop Cranmer, and died in May, 1543. (fn. 34)

2. ROBERT GOLDSON, alias Goldsey, then one of the king's chaplains, was next promoted to this prebend, and installed on June 7, 1543; he was likewise chaplain to the princess, afterwards queen Elizabeth. He was deprived of this prebend in 1554.

3. WILLIAM DARRELL was installed in April that year; (fn. 35) he wrote a treatise De Castellis Cantiæ, the manuscript of which is in the library of the Herald's office, in London. He died in 1580.

4. ROBERT HOVENDEN, S. T. P. a native of Kent, was installed that year; he had been fell ow of All Souls college, Oxford, and then warden, when taking orders he was entertained as domestic chaplain by archbishop Parker, by whose interest he was promoted to this prebend, and was advanced likewise to prebends in the churches both of Wells and Lincoln. He wrote the Life of archbishop Chicheley, the founder of the above college, and dying on March 25, 1614, was buried in the chapel of it. (fn. 36)

5. THOMAS JACKSON, S. T. P. a native of Lancashire, was installed in 1614, being at that time rector of Ivechurch, after which he was, at times, rector of Great Chart, Chilham, St. George's in Canterbury, and of Milton, near that city, and likewise minister of Wye, in this county. He found such favour with the puritans, having been a witness against archbishop Laud, who had been his good friend and patron, (fn. 37) that the state committee allowed him 100l. pension. (fn. 38) He was buried on November 13, 1646, in this cathedral, after which this prebend remained vacant till the restoration, when

6. WILLIAM BELK, S. T. P. was installed prebendary of it in July, 1660. He was first rector of Wootton, afterwards of Chilham, and then of Wickhambreaux, in this county. He died on August 12, 1676, æt. 74, and was buried in the lower south cross of this cathedral, where his gravestone still remains, and this inscription: Hic jacet Gulielmus Belk, S. T. P. canonicus hujus ecclesiæ uxorem habuit Elizabetham Thomæ Hardress de Hardress, in comitatu Cantiano, equitis filiam obiit 12 die Augusti, Anno Domini 1676, ætatis suæ; 74.

7. THOMAS BELK, S. T. P. son of the former prebendary, succeeded him in his rectory of Wickham, as well as in this stall, in 1676. He died on Sept. 17, 1712, (fn. 39) and was buried in the south cross of this cathedral, close to the grave of his father, and this inscription on the same stone: Hic etiam jacet THOMAS BELK, S. T. P. canonicus hujus ecclesiæ, filius Gulielmi Belk, S. T. P. uxorem habuit, Annam Henrici Oxenden, de Deane, in comitatu Cantiæ, Baronetti filiam obiit 17 die Septembris, An. 1712, ætat. 72.

8. WILLIAM HIGDEN, S. T. P. was the next prebendary, being installed on May 9, 1713. He was rector of St. Paul's church, in Shadwell, and dying on August 28, 1715, was buried in the new chapel at Westminster.

9. THOMAS BOWERS, A. M. succeeded him, and was installed on Sept. 28, 1715. Next year he commenced S. T. P. in 1721 he was promoted to the archdeaconry of this diocese; in 1722 he was consecrated bishop of Chichester, but kept both these preferments, which he held in commendam till his death, which happened on August 13, 1724.

10. WILLIAM AYERST S.T.P. was installed in this prebend on Nov. 5, 1724. He was educated at Maidstone school, (fn. 40) and then at University college, Oxford, and afterwards was fellow of Queen's college, in Cambridge; in 1703 he attended lord Raby, afterwards earl of Stafford, to the court of Berlin, as chaplain and secretary to the embassy; and again to the Hague in 1711, and to the congress of Utrecht in 1712; in the succeeding reign he attended Sir Robert Cotton, as chaplain of the embassy to France. He had been, at times, rector of Gravesend and Sturmouth, and vicar of Northfleet, and was afterwards rector of St. George and St. Mary Magdalen, Canterbury, all which he resigned, and in 1724 was promoted to this prebend. He published an elegant edition of Sallust, which he dedicated to Sir Joseph Williamson; he died on May 8, 1765, æt. 83, being then rector of North Cray, in this county, and of St. Swithin's, London stone. He was buried in the middle of the nave of this cathedral. (fn. 41)

11. RICHARD SUTTON succeeded to this stall on June 1, that same year; he was rector of Ayrham near Newark, at the parsonage of which he died in 1786, and was succeeded by

12. WILLIAM WELFITT, S. T. P. who had this stall conferred on him that year. He was vicar of Walton, in Yorkshire, which he exchanged in 1795, on being collated to the rectory of Hastingleigh and vicarage of Elmsted, in this county; both which he now holds with the vicarage of Ticehurst, in Sussex. He is the present prebendary of this stall.

Canons in the fourth Prebend.

1. RICHARD PARKHURST was nominated in the foundation charter, to be the first canon of this prebend, in which he was installed in 1542. He died in 1558.

2. NICHOLAS HARPSFIELD, LL. D. archdeacon of this diocese, and rector of Saltwood, was promoted to this prebend, in which he was installed on Nov. 1, 1558; but being a Papist, he was, on queen Elizabeth's accession to the crown in 1559, deprived of all his preferments, and committed prisoner to the Fleet, for denying the queen's supremacy, where he continued several years. (fn. 42)

3. THOMAS BEACON, S. T. P. was next installed in this prebend in 1559. He laboured as much to overthrow the power of the pope, and the church of Rome, as his predecessor had done to promote it; for which purpose he wrote several very bitter treatises. He died in 1567. (fn. 43)

4. JOHN BUNGEY, vicar of Lewisham, was installed on July, 7, 1567. He died November 20, 1595, and was buried in Chartham church, (fn. 44) of which he was rector.

5. CHARLES FOTHEREY, B. D. was admitted in 1595, and was next year instituted to the archdeaconry of this diocese, both which dignities he resigned, on being promoted to be dean of this church, in the year 1615.

6. PETER DU MOULIN, S. T. P. (in Latin Molinæus), a native of France, who fled into England for religion sake, was collated by the archbishop to this prebend in 1615. He was the author of several elegant Latin poems and learned treatises. (fn. 45) He died at Sedan, on March 10, 1658, before which time this prebend had remained vacant several years, and it continued so till the restoration of church and state.

7. PETER DU MOULIN, S. T. P. succeeded his father in this stall in June 1660. He was a doctor of Leyden, and was incorporated both in Oxford and Cambridge, in the same degree. He was chaplain to king Charles II. and died in October, 1684, æt. 84, (fn. 46) and upwards, being then rector of Adisham, and was buried in this cathedral. He was the author of several treatifes, and was a zealous Calvinist. His last words, says Wood, which he uttered on his death-bed, were, Since Calvinism is cried down, actum est de Religione Christi apud Anglos. (fn. 47)

8. WILLIAM BEVERIDGE, S. T. P. succeeded him, and was installed on November 5, 1684. He was a native of Leicester, educated at St. John's college, Cambridge; he was afterwards rector of St. Peter's, Cornhill, London, and archdeacon of Colchester. He was consecrated bishop of St. Asaph in 1704, (fn. 48) on which this prebend became vacant.

9. JOHN MILLS, S. T. P. was installed in it on August 14, 1704; he was principal of Edmund hall, Oxford, and editor of the large Greek testament. He died in 1707.

10. ELIAS SYDALL, S. T. P. was next installed in this prebend, on July 23, 1707; he had been chaplain to archbishop Tenison, and was rector of Ivechurch and of Mongeham, which he held together by dispensation, and was master of St. John's and St. Nicholas's hospitals. In April 1728, he was promoted to the deanry of this church, on which this prebend became vacant. (fn. 49)

11. JOHN LYNCH, S. T. P. was installed in it in 1728, in the room of Dr. Sydall, being then rector of Alhallows, Bread-street, London, and being afterwards collated to the rectory of Sundridge, in Kent, he held them together by dispensation, and was made master of St. Cross's hospital, near Winchester; in 1731 he resigned the above livings, on being promoted to those of Ickham and Bishopsborne, and had the sinecure rectory of Eynsford conferred on him, and the mastership of the two hospitals of St. John, Northgate, and St, Nicholas, Harbledown. In January 1734, on his promotion to the deanry of this church in the room of Dr. Sydall, this prebend became vacant, (fn. 50) and

12. EDWARD DONNE, LL. D. was made prebendary in his room in 1733–4. He was rector of Alhallows, Lombard-street, and dying on January 1746, was buried in the north cross isle of this cathedral.

13. THOMAS TANNER, S. T. P. was next collated to it, and was installed in it on January 31, 1746. He was the son of Dr. Tanner, bishop of Norwich, and became rector of Hadleigh, and of Monks Idleigh, in Suffolk; he died at the parsonage house of the former, on March 11, 1786, æt. 69. Dr. Tanner married one of the daughters of archbishop Potter, whom he survived. He left by her an only daughter, married to Richard Milles, esq. of Nackington.

14. THOMAS KING, S. T. P. was made prebendary in his room, and installed on April 1, the same year, which he vacated in 1795, on being presented by the archbishop of Canterbury to the chancellorship of the church of Lincoln, an option. He is also rector of Bladon cum Woodstock, in Oxford. And in his room.

15. HOUSTONNE RADCLIFFE, S. T. P. was instalied in it the same year, having been domestic chap lain to archbishop Moore. In 1780 he was presented to the vicarage of Gillingham, in the deanry of Shoreham, by Brazen Nose college, in Oxford, of which society he was a fellow; and in 1788 was collated by the archbishop to the rectory of Ickham, near Canterbury, both which he now holds by dispensation. On October 4, 1796, he preached at St. Paul's church in London, the Concio ad Clerum, which he afterwards published, by the command of the archbishop. He is the present incumbent of this stall.

Canons in the fifth Prebend.

1. NICHOLAS RIDLEY was appointed by the foundation charter, to be the first prebendery of it, and was installed in 1542. He was born at Wyllysmondwick, in Northumberland; first educated at Cambridge, and thence removed to Oxford, where he afterwards became fellow of University college in 1521, afterwards master of Pembroke hall, in Cambridge, vicar of Herne, in this county, chaplain to king Edward VI. and prebendary of Westminster and of this church, and continued so whilst he was bishop of Rochester, in which see he was consecrated on Sept. 5, 1547, and until he was consecrated bishop of London in 1549, when it became vacant. There is a remarkable transaction of his at the visitation of Cambridge, whilst he was bishop of Rochester, recorded in the history of the reformation, which gives an instance of his integrity, and bishop Goodwyn in his account of the bishops of London, has made an honourable mention of him. (fn. 51)

2. THOMAS WILLOUGHBYE, dean of Rochester, succeeded him in this prebend, being installed on June 23, 1550. He was educated at Cambridge, where he took the degrees of doctor, both in law and divinity; he was rector of Bishopsborne and Barham, in this county. He was deprived of this, with his other preferments in 1553, (fn. 52) and was succeeded in this prebend by

3. RALPH JACKSON, who was installed in 1554. He held this prebend in 1557.

4. RICHARD WILLOUGHBYE.

5. RICHARD COLF, S. T. P. a native of Calais, (fn. 53) but educated at Christ-church, in Oxford, was the next prebendary; being installed in 1585, in which year he was vicar of Milton, near Sittingborne, and then of Herne, in this county. He died on October 7, 1613, and was buried in the north isle, at the upper end of the nave of this cathedral, (fn. 54) where there is a small mural monument placed to his memory, with this inscription: Hæc quam vides (Lector) Memoriala in Gratiam Reverendi Viri RICHARDI COLF. Sacræ Theologiæ Doctoris, bujus Ecclesiæ Præbendarii posita hic est. Natus is Calati Angliam petiit, adjuc parvulus, studiit Oxonii in Æde Christi: tædium gravis morbi longum patientissime ferens, atq; in ea quam verbo & vita professus est side ad finam perseverans Circiter LXIII & Incarn: MDCXLVIII die Octob 7 cum ad ejusdem anni in hac Metropolitica Ecclesia vice decanus esset placidissime in Domino obdormivit.

6. WILLIAM TUNSTAL succeeded him, being installed in 1613. He died in November, 1622, and was buried in this cathedral.

7. ISAAC BARGRAVE, S. T. P. was the next prebendary, being installed on Nov, 6, 1622, from hence he was promoted to the deanry of this church in the year 1625; a further account of whom may be seen in the list of deans. On his promotion this stall became vacant.

8. THOMAS PASK, S. T. P. was next promoted to it in 1625. He was master of Clare hall, in Cambridge; archdeacon of London, and rector of Much Hadham, in Hertfordshire. From all which preferments he was sequestered in the time of the civil wars; but living till the restoration of Charles II. he was then reinstated in them. He died in 1662. (fn. 55)

9. JOHN BARGRAVE, S. T. P. succeeded him, and was installed on September 26, 1662. He was educated at Peter house, in Cambridge, and afterwards became rector of St. Michael, Harbledown. He died on May 11, 1680, æt. 70, (fn. 56) , and was buried under a flat marble stone, on the entrance into the martyrdom.

10. GEORGE THORP, S. T. P. succeeded next, and was installed on May 26, 1680. He was chaplain to archbishop Sancrost, and was rector of both Bishopsborne and Ickham. He died in November 1719, and was buried in this cathedral, in the south cross. (fn. 57)

11. JOHN HANCOCK, S. T. P. had the prebend conferred on him, and was installed on Dec. 14, 1719. He died æt. 80, in 1728.

12. JOHN HARRIS, S. T. P. succeeded to this stall in 1728, being dean of St. Buriens, in Cornwall, and was installed on August 2, that year. In 1729 he was consecrated bishop of Landaff, but held this prebend in commendam till his death, in 1738, on which this preferment became vacant.

13. THOMAS TENISON was installed in it, anno 1738. He died in May 1742, and was buried in the nave of this cathedral. (fn. 58)

14. SPENCER COWPER, S. T. P. second son of William, earl Cowper, was preferred to this stall in 1742, being then rector of Fordwich, in this county. In 1746 he was promoted to the deanry of Durham, upon which this stall became vacant.

15. ARTHUR YOUNG, LL. D. chaplain to the house of commons, succeeded to it in 1746, being installed on June 28; and in 1748 was inducted to the vicarage of Ixning, in Suffolk. He died in 1759.

16. JOHN HEAD, S. T. P. archdeacon of this diocese, was next promoted to this prebend, being installed on July 17, 1759, and on the death of his elder brother in 1768, succeeded him in the title of baronet. He was rector of Pluckley and of St. George's, Canterbury; both which he resigned for the rectory of Ickham, in this county, in the chancel of which church he was buried. He died on Dec. 4, 1769. (fn. 59)

17. JOHN PALMER, S. T. P. (fn. 60) late of Jesus college, Cambridge, chaplain to the house of commons, succeeded him, in the same month and year. He was in 1776 presented to the rectory of St. Swithin's, London Stone. He exchanged this prebend with his successor, in 1781, for the rectory of Adisham, which was conferred on his son; upon which.

18. JOHN LYNCH, LL. D. second son of Dr. John Lynch, dean of Canterbury, was promoted to it that year, being installed on April 28, 1781. He is rector of St. Dionis Back church, London, and archdeacon of this diocese, to which he was collated on Nov. 7, 1788, and is the present incumbent of this stall. (fn. 61)

Canons in the sixth Prebend.

1. JOHN MENYS, a monk of the late suppressed priory, was nominated in king Henry VIII.'s charter of foundation, the first prebendary in it, in which he was installed in 1542. He died in 1549, and was buried in the north isle of this cathedral. (fn. 62)

2. EDMUND CRANMER, brother to the archbishop, being then archdeacon of Canterbury and provost of Wingham, was on March 4, 1549, promoted to this prebend likewise; and had besides the rich benefices of Cliff and Ickham conferred on him. In the year 1554, he was deprived of all his preferments, and forced to fly into Germany, to save his life, for being married; and is said to have died abroad in 1571. (fn. 63)

3. ROBERT COLENS, or Collins, LL. B. was admitted canon, and installed on April 12, 1554, in his room. (fn. 64) He was commissary to the archbishop and official to the archdeacon. He was deprived of this prebend in 1559.

4. ALEXANDER NOWEL, S. T. P. was the next prebendary, being installed on Feb. 14, 1560. Upon queen Mary's accession to the throne, he was one of those who sled into Germany, and returned again in the beginning of the next reign of queen Elizabeth, when he had several ecclesiasical dignities conferred upon him; for on February 14, 1560, as above-mentioned, he was constituted canon of this church, and of the church of Westminster; but in the year 1564, being promoted to the deanry of St. Paul's, in London, he seems to have resigned both his prebendal stalls. He was buried in the church of St. Paul.

5. JOHN PORY, S. T. P. succeeded dean Nowel in this prebend, in which he was installed on May 1, 1564. He resigned it in 1567.

6. JOHN HILL, alias, Bury, of Christ-church, in Oxford, who had succeeded dean Nowel in the prebend of Westminster, resigning it in 1567, was installed prebendary of this church June 29th that year, and his predecessor John Pory was admitted to the canonry of Westminster in his room; so there seems to have been a mutual exchange of these dignities. He was afterwards vicar of Minister, in the Isle of Thanet, and dying in 1597, was buried in this cathedral. (fn. 65)

7. WILLIAM WHITAKER, S. T. P. Regius prefessor and master of St. John's college, in Cambridge, succeeded on May 10, 1597, and died in the same year.

8. ADRIAN SARAVIA, S. T. P. prebendary of Gloucester, was, on the death of Dr. Whitaker, admitted canon of this church, on December 6, 1597. He was a native of Flanders, being born in the town of Hedin, in Artois; he received his doctor's degree at Leyden, in Holland, and about the year 1582 became preacher to the French church there, and about five or six years afterwards, came into England, when he was incorporated in the university of Oxford, and taught school in several places, particularly the freeschool at Southampton; but growing in esteem for his learning, he was preferred to a prebend in the church of Gloucester, then to one in this church; archbishop Whitgift, the lord chancellor Hatton, and the lord treasurer Cecil, were his singular good friends and benefactors. He had also contracted an intimate familiarity with the venerable Mr. Hooker, then rector of Bishopsborne, not far from this place, with whom he held several conferences concerning the ecclesiastical hierarchy. Isaac Casaubon, a contemporary canon of this church, a man of solid learning and judgment, speaks with high commendation of Saravia, for the book which he wrote on episcopacy, (fn. 66) in a manuscript diary of his own life. He was vicar of Lewisham, and rector of Great Chart, and in 1601 was further promoted to a prebendary of Westminster; he was a grave and venerable divine. Dying on January 25, 1612, æt. 82, (fn. 67) he was buried in the north isle of the nave of this cathedral, where there is a small monument, against the wall, erected to his memory. He was twice married; first to Catherine D' Alliz, who died in 1605, and lies buried by him; secondly to Margaret de Wytts, who survived him, and erected this monument to his memory, on which is this inscription: Dilecto conjugi HADRIANO de SARAVIA, Margareta Wiits, adjuc superstes qua cum ille nuptias secundo iniit, annosq; sex pie & feliciter vixit. Memoriale hoc fincerum licet exiguum amoris sui quasi pignus ponendum curavit: Fuit is dum vixit Theologiæ doctor egregius, Cathedralis bujus ecclesiæ prebendarius, meritissimus vir in omni literarum genere, eximius pietate, probitate, gravitate, suavitate morum insignis; scriptis clarus, fide plenus, & bonis operibus diver valde, natione Belga, natus Hedinæ Artesiæ rexit quondam Lugduni Batavorum, Angliæ Petiit primo sub initium Regni beatæ memoriæ Elizabethæ Doctor (Lugduni ante Creatus) Oxoniæ post incorporatus est.

In Memoria Æterna erit justus 1612.

Near the monument, on his gravestone, was once this inscription, long since obliterated. Hic Inbumata Jacent Corpora ADRIANI SARAVIA, ejus prius nuptæ Catherin Æ D' Allez. Obiit illa placide in Domino Anno Ætatis suæ 82 Salutis nostræ 1612, Jan. 25. Hæc 2 Febr. 1605, Anno a Nuptiis 15.

9. JOHN ABBOT, S. T. P. succeeded him and was installed in 1612. He died in August 1615, and was buried in this cathedral.

10. JOHN SANDFORD, S. T. P. rector of Ivechurch and Snave, was collated to this prebend by archbishop Abbot, whose chaplain he was, in the year 1615. He was the son of Richard Sandford, of Chard, in Somersetshire, of which county he was a native, (fn. 68) and was educated at Baliol, and afterwards at Magdalen college, in Oxford, of which last he was chaplain. He was a good scholar, a sound divine, master of several languages, and had a taste for poetry; he wrote an introduction to the Spanish, Italian and French tongues. He died on Sept. 24, 1629, æt. 60, (fn. 69) and was buried in the north isle of the nave of this church, where his gravestone and inscription on it, remained tili very lately as follows: Depositum Venerabilis JOHANNIS SANDFORD, viri inter literatos paucis, nulli inter liberales Secundi, Deo hic quasi ab Eleemosynarii, viduis Mariti, orphanis Patroni, Quem tu, Lector, rudes instruendo, esurientes pascendo, nudos vestiendo imitare et mercede nunquam peritura fruere obiit 24 Septembris

AnnoSalutis1629
Ætatus60
Canonicatus12

11. JOHN JEFFRYS, S. T. P. was installed in his room in 1629, being then rector of Old Romney; he was living in 1645.

12. JOHN AUCHER, S. T. P. was, on the resioration of king Charles II. admitted to this prebend, being installed on July 9, 1660. Among other charities, he left by his will, a legacy towards the support of clergymens' widows for ever, and was besides, a benefactor to Alhallows church, in Lombard-street, London. (fn. 70) Having filled this stall for the space of forty years, he died on March 12, 1700, æt. 82, and was buried in the north isle of the nave of this church, (fn. 71) where his gravestone, with this inscription, remained till very lately. JOHANNES AUCHER, S. T. P. Qui ob fidem Deo & Ecclesiæ & Regi Egregie prestanti cum reduce Carolo II. ad Canonicatum bujus Ecclesiæ admissus est quem ultro 40 annos excoluit & redditus 80 librarum viduis clericorum alendis in perpetuam reliquit obiit 12 Martii anno Domini 1700 æ tatis 82.

13. THOMAS GREEN, S. T. P. was next promoted to it, being installed on March 19, 1700. He was born in the city of Norwich, and educated at Benet college, in Cambridge, of which he became first fellow, and afterwards master. In 1695 he became vicar of Minister, in Thanet, and in 1708 rector of Adisham, and was the same year promoted to the archdeaconry of this diocese. In 1716 he was inducted to the vicarage of St. Martin's in the Fields, Westminster; after which he was consecrated, on October 8, 1721, bishop of Norwich, and thence in 1723 translated to Ely, on the former of which promotions this stall became vacant. (fn. 72)

14. EDWARD WAKE, S. T. P. was next collated to this prebend, being installed on Nov. 9, 1721; he was likewise a prebendary of the church of Lincoln. (fn. 73) and rector of Whethamsted, in Hertfordshire. He died at Canterbury on Novermber 7, 1732, æt. 68, and was buried in this cathedral, in the south cross isle.

15. EDWARD WAKE, A. M. succeeded next on his father's decease to this stall, on Nov. 24, 1732, being fellow of All Souls college, in Oxford. He died in 1738, and was buried in the south isle of this cathedral.

16. SAMUEL STEDMAN, S. T. P. was collated to this stall on Jan. 18, 1738-9. In 1756 he was promoted to the archdeaconry of Norfolk, and died on May 11, 1768. (fn. 74)

17. GEORGE BERKELEY, LL. D. succeeded him and was installed June 11, 1768, being the second son of the well-known bishop of Cloyne, in Ireland, by a daughter of Mr. Forster, speaker of the Irish house of commons. He was student of Christ-church, in Oxford, and in 1764 was collated by the archbishop to the valuable rectory of Acton, in Middlesex, which, with his patron's leave, he exchanged for this stall. He was first vicar of East-Garston, then of Bray, and in 1768 was inducted to the vicarage of Cookham, which preferments all lay in Berkshire; the latter he held with the vicarage of East Peckham, in this county, but resigned it on being promoted to St. Clement's Danes, in London, which, having resigned Cookham, he held with the vicarage of Tycehurst, in Sussex. He likewise was chancellor of the collegiate church of Brecon, in Wales. He died on January 6, 1795, æt. 61, and was buried in Christchurch, in Oxford, in the same vault with the bishop his father. (fn. 75)

18. GEORGE MOORE, A. M. was his successor, being installed on Feb. 12, following. He is the eldest son of the most Rev. the archbishop of Canterbury, now rector of Wrotham, having resigned the rectory of Brasted, in this county, and is the present incumbent of this stall. (fn. 76)

Canons in the seventh Prebend.

1. HUGO GLAZIER, a friar minor of Oxford, and B. D. was nominated in king Henry VIII.'s foundation charter, the first prebendary in this stall, and was installed in 1542. He was rector of Deal, and succeeded Dr. Harvey, as commissary-general of Calais, to archbishop Cranmer. He was a great favourer of the reformation, and preached the first Lent sermon at St. Paul's cross, after king Edward VI.'s accession to the crown; (fn. 77) he died in 1557, upon which

2. JOHN BUTLER was installed in it that same year and died in 1569. He was buried in the chapter-house here. (fn. 78)

3. RALPH CAVELAR succeeded to it, and was installed on January 27, 1569. He died on January 4, 1606, but is supposed to have resigned this prebend some time before, for

4. JOHN WINTER was the next prebendary of this stall, and was likewise rector of Southfleet, and dying in January, 1606, was buried in this church. (fn. 79)

5. WILLIAM BARLOW, S. T. P. sometime fellow of Trinity-hall, in Cambridge, was next installed in this prebend, and was likewise prebendary of St. Paul's and of Westminster, and dean of Chester, whence he was promoted to the see of Rochester; (fn. 80) he held this prebend in commendam, till the year 1608, when he was translated to Lincoln, when, on it becoming vacant

6. BENJAMIN CARRIER, S. T. P. was installed in it in 1609. He died in 1614, (fn. 81) and was succeeded by

7. JOHN SYMPSON, S. T. P. of Corpus Christi college, in Oxford, the son of Nicholas Sympson, a prebendary likewise of this church, who was installed in 1614. (fn. 82) He died in May 1630, æt. 51, and lies buried with his father Nicholas, above-mentioned, in the middle of the nave of it. (fn. 83)

8. THOMAS WESTLY, S. T. P. was his successor here, being installed on May 8, (fn. 84) that same year. He was rector of Great Chart, in this county, and minister of the Savoy church, in London, when dying about 1639, (fn. 85) he was buried in the latter church.

9. SAMUEL BAKER, S. T. P. was next installed in this prebend, in May 1639. (fn. 86) He was of Christ college, in Cambridge, afterwards chaplain to bishop Juxon, rector of St. Mary Hill and St. Christopher's in London, prebendary of St. Paul's and canon of Windsor, but being deprived in the time of the rebellion, by the Puritans, as being an Arminian, this stall continued vacant till the restoration of church and monarchy, before which he was deceased, (fn. 87) and

10. THOMAS PEIRCE, S. T. P. was, on the restoration, in 1660, installed in it on July 9. He was born at the Devizes, in Wiltshire; fellow of Magdalen college, in Oxford, from which he was ejected by the parliament visitors in 1648, after which he became rector of Brington, in Northamptonshire. After the restoration, he was made king's chaplain, and canon of this church, as above mentioned, and created S. T. P. and prebendary of the church of Lincoln. In the year 1661 he was made president of Magdalen college, which he resigned on being promoted to the deanry of Sarum, but he seems to have held this prebend in commendam, till his death on March 28, 1691, being buried in the church-yard of North Tidworth, in Wiltshire; (fn. 88) upon which

11. ZACHEUS ISHAM, S. T. P. was next admitted prebendary in it, and installed on May 19, 1691. He was born at Barby, in Northamptonshire, was student of Christ church, in Oxford, afterwards chaplain to bishop Compton, rector of Bishopsgate, in London, and prebendary of St. Paul's, and lastly of this church. (fn. 89)

12. HENRY JAMES, S. T. P. was next installed in it on August 4, 1705. (fn. 90) He was president of Queen's college, in Cambridge, and regius professor of divicity there. He died on March 15, 1716, and was buried in the chapel of that college.

13. WILLIAM BRADSHAW, A. M. succeeded him in it, being instated on March 24, 1716. He was a native of Abergavenny, and then rector of Fawley, in Hampshire, afterwards S. T. P. He resigned this stall in July 1723, being made first canon, and next year dean of Christ-church, Oxford, and afterwards bishop of Bristol. (fn. 91)

14. JOHN CLARK, S. T. P. succeeded him, and was installed on August 15, 1723. He was afterwards made dean of Salisbury, upon which this stall became vacant.

15. SAMUEL LISLE, S. T. P. was installed on August 9, 1728. He was then archdeacon of this diocese, in the list of whom, hereafter, more may be seen of him. In 1744 he was promoted to the bishopric of St. Asaph, on which this stall became vacant, and was afterwards translated to the bishopric of Norwich.

16. FRANCIS WALWYN, S. T. P. succeeded to it on April 14, 1744; he was educated at Maidstone school. He was at times rector of Great Mongeham, St. Mary Bredman, Canterbury, and East Peckham, which he resigned, on being collated to that of Adisham, in this county. He died unmarried on May 19, 1770, at his prebendal house, and was buried in the church at Maidstone. (fn. 92)

17. WILLIAM BARFORD, S. T. P. chaplain to the house of commons, succeeded to this prebend in 1770, being installed on June 23. He was educated at Eton, whence he became fellow of King's college, and was afterwards elected public orator of the university of Cambridge in 1763, and next year instituted to the rectory of Pilton, in Northamptonshire, which he vacated, and became afterwards rector of Fordingbridge, in Hampshire, which he resigned for that of Kimpton, in Hertfordshire, of which he was rector at his death, as well as of Alhallows, Lombardstreet, London, and fellow of Eton college. He died s.p. leaving his widow surviving, at his parsonagehouse of Kimpton, in November, 1792, universally respected by all learned and good men; upon which

18. JOHN LUXMOORE, A. M. was promoted to this stall that year, being nominated on February 14, 1793, and was installed on the 23d in the same month. In June 1795 he had the degree of S. T.P. conferred on him by the archbishop; in 1796 he was presented to the vicarage of Tenterden, which he held with the rectory of St. George the Martyr, Queen'ssquare, on his promotion to the deanry of Gloucester.

19. THOMAS COOMBE, D. D. succeeded to this stall in January, 1800. He is chaplain in ordinary to his Majesty, and minister of Curzon chapel, MayFair, London.

Canons in the eighth Prebend.

1. WILLIAM HUNT, alias HADLEY, formerly a monk, and at the dissolution of this monastery, subprior of it, was named in the charter of this foundation, the first prebendary in this stall, in which he was installed in 1542. He died in 1545.

2. JOHN PONET, S. T. P. a native of this county, was presented to this stall on January 29, 1545. He was chaplain to the king, who granted him at his request, a licence to travel with two servants, three horses, twenty pounds in money and other necessaries; on June 28, 1550, he was consecrated bishop of Rochester; in the list of the bishops, of which see more of him in the History of Kent; he had licence to hold this stall with his other preferments (fn. 93) in commendam; he vacated this preferment, and

3. PETER ALEXANDER, a native of Arras, was installed in his room, on April 15, 1551. He was deprived of this prebend in the reign of queen Mary, when

4. JOHN WARUM was presented in his room by the queen, on May 1, 1554. He died in 1558, and was buried in this church.

5. J. KNIGHT, for so he appears to have written his name; but what his Christian name was further, I cannot find, seems to have succeeded him in this stall, but when, or the year in which he died, I have not found; however, on the accession of queen Elizabeth Peter Alexander, the former incumbent, was reinstated, and had the queen's licence for non-residence, dated July 29, 1560, anno 2 Elizabeth. (fn. 94) When he died, I know not.

6. STEPHEN NEVINSON, LL. D. the archbishop's commissary, was the next prebendary in this stall. He obtained a licence of plurality, dated Nov 1, 1570, to hold three benefices at the same time. He died in October 1581. (fn. 95)

7. NICHOLAS SYMPSON, S. T. P. of Corpus Christi college, in Oxford, father of John, prebendary in the seventh stall above-mentioned, was next admitted canon in this stall. He died in 1609, æt. 60, and was buried in the middle of the nave of this cathedral, as mentioned before. (fn. 96) The inscription on his gravestone, lately removed into the lower south cross, is as follows:

Nicholas & John Sympson.
ExuviæNICOLAISYMPSON.
JOHANNIS
NICOLAI

Avi, Patris, Filii, in Spem lætæ Resurrectionis depositæ, Avus & Pater uterq; S. T. P. & bujus Ecclesiæ Canonici obiere bic An. Dom. 1630 æat. 51. ille An. Dom. 1609. ætat. 60. Filius primis annis Mercaturæ addictus, Flagrante Bello civili, Rus recepit, vitamq; degit splendide. Vir acri ingenio, singulari industria, Pius, Probus, Pacificus, Privatim illibatus, Publice probatissimus, Regi & Ecclesiæ fidelis: Amicus integer, charus omnibus & ab omnibus desideratus: Quem nemo non bonoroficicentissime appellat: obiit vero Aug. 22. An Dom. 1680 ætat. 58.

8. ISAAC CASAUBON came into England on an invitation from king James I. and was by him promoted to this canonry, in which he was installed on January 16, 1610. King James granted to him, January 3, in his 8th year, anno 1611, letters of denizen, and by his special mandate, dated a few days afterwards to the dean and chapter, reciting that he had by his letters patent, dated Dec. 17, in his 8th year, anno 1611, granted to him, being a man very deserving in every kind of literature, a prebend or canonry in the church of Canterbury, which Nicholas Sympson, deceased, had lately enjoyed; he therefore granted to him of his especial grace, &c. that although the said Isaac Casaubon was a layman and married, yet he should enjoy the same and every profit belonging to it, &c. and although he should not keep any kind of residence there whatsoever, he commanded them to allow him a stall in the quire, and a place and voice in the chapter, as was accustomed; after which, on the 19th of that month, the king granted him a pension of 300l. per annum, during pleasure, mentioning, that he had invited him hither out of France, to be useful as he should see cause, for the service of the church, and had granted him the above for his better support and maintenance. (fn. 97) He died in 1614.

9. WILLIAM KINGSLEY, S. T. P. fellow of All Souls college, in Oxford, succeeded him in this stall in 1614, and was likewise archdeacon of this diocese. He died on January 29, 1647, and was buried in the lower south cross, or wing of this cathedral, where there is a mural monument erected to his memory, the inscription on which, as well as a further account of him, may be seen hereafter, among the archdeacons of this diocese.

10. JOHN READING, B. D. succeeded him in this stall. He was born in Buckinghamshire, educated in Magdalen college, in Oxford, and afterwards of Alban hall; he afterwards became minister of St. Mary's church, in Dover, where he was plundered and imprisoned, and afterwards banished. In the year 1642 archbishop Laud, then in the tower, through the king's letter, collated him to the rectory of Chartham, and in 1644 he was nominated to this prebend, after which he was presented to the rectory of Cheriton, but was imprisoned again in Dover castle, and then in that of Leeds, from which last he obtained his release, but he was sequestered from the whole of his preferments, and continued so till the restoration, when he congratulated king Charles II. in an eloquent oration, on his landing at Dover, and was at the same time restored to his ecclesiastical benefices, and to this dignity. He died at Chartham on Oct. 26, 1667, and was buried in the church there. (fn. 98)

11. EDMUND CASTEL, S. T. P. was next admitted to this stall in November 1667. He was celebrated for his knowledge in the Oriental languages, and was Arabic professor in the university of Cambridge, where he published the Lexicon Heptaglotton. He died in 1685.

12. CHARLES ELSTOB, S. T. P. was next installed in this canonry, in his room, in December 1685. He died, and was buried in this cathedral in November, 1721, in the north cross isle, near the monument of archbishop Peckham.

13. SAMUEL HOLCOMBE, S. T. P. was nominated to it on January 26, 1721-2, and in 1742 was promoted to a prebend likewise in the church of Worcester. He died in 1761, æt. 95, and was buried in this cathedral, where, in the south cross, there is a monument erected to his memory, with this inscription: —H. S. E.—SAMUEL HOLCOMBE, S. T. P. —Hujusee Ecclesiæ Canonicus; Vir sane integritate morum Simplex, Et in Sacris imprimis eruditus; Veram Strenue Coluit Religionem, Doctrina & Exemplo Christianus. ob. Apr. die I mo æt. anno 96. Salutis 1761 —SAMUEL Holcombe, A. M. Eccl. Vigorn Canonet FRANCISCA Filii ejus Hoc monumentum posuere. (fn. 99)

14. GEORGE SECKER, S. T. P. nephew to the archbishop, late of Christ church, in Oxford, was next installed in it, in April 1761. He had a dispensation in 1751, to hold the vicarage of Yardley. in Hertfordshire, with that of Sandown, in the same county; and in 1754 he was installed in the prebend of Willesdon, in St. Paul's cathedral; and next year had a dispensation to hold the vicarage of Yardley, above-mentioned, with the rectory of St. Mildred, Bread-street, London. He resigned his prebend of Canterbury in 1766, on being made a canon residentiary of St. Paul's, being at that time rector of Biasted, in this county, and of Alhallows, Thames-street, London. (fn. 100)

15. HENEAGE DERING, S. T. P. descended from a collateral branch of the Derings, of Surrenden, seated at Charing, in this county, succeeded next to this stall in 1766. He was the youngest son of Dr. Heneage Dering, dean of Rippon, and archdeacon of the East Riding of York, by Anne, daughter of John Sharpe, archbishop of York. (fn. 101) He was first vicar of Tedeaster; and in 1754, was presented to the rectory of Burley on the Hill, near Stamford. He was in 1754, for some time perpetual corate of Wye, in this county, while he resigned the same year; he was afterwards promoted to the rectore Milton Keynes, in Buckinghamshire, which he holds at this time, and is the present incumbent of this stall.

Canons in the ninth Prebend.

1. WILLIAM GARDINER, alias Sandwich, one of the monks of the late priory, and warden of Canterbury college, in Oxford, at the time of the dissolution of it, (fn. 102) was named in the foundation charter of this church, to be the first prebendary in this stall, to which he was admitted in 1542. (fn. 103) He died on the feast of St. Michael in 1545, and was buried in the nave of this cathedral, where his grave-stone remained till very lately, but the inscription has been long since obliterated. Weever has given his epitaph, as follows: (fn. 104)

Heus tu sistito gradum, qui Obambulas,
Et quod Scriptum est legito Gulielmi
Gardneri Candidati Theologie
Hujus et Ecclesiæ olim Prebendarii
Ossa hoc clauduntur Sub marmore
Obiit qui Sancti Michalelis …luce
Anno post Milesim & Quingentesimum
Quadragesimo quarto cui det
Christus Vitam & tibi Lector perennem.

2. WILLIAM DEVENISH, (fn. 105) LL. B. one of the king's chaplains, was installed on Nov. 26, 1545.—He was sometime fellow of Merton college, then pro vost of Queen's college, in Oxford, and canon of Windsor, and was chaplain to king Edward VI. but he was deprived of all his preferments in 1553, for being married. (fn. 106)

3. HUGH, alias Hentry Turnbull, S. T. P. was next installed in his room, on March 1, in the first year of queen Mary, anno 1553. (fn. 107)

4. GEORGE BOLEYN, S. T. P. dean of Lichfield, and a prebendary of Chichester, was installed next in it, on Dec. 21, 1566. He died in January, at the beginning of the year 1603, and was buried in Lichfield cathedral, of which he then continued dean. (fn. 108)

5. WILLIAM MASTER, S. T. P. was installed on Jan. 25, 1603. He died in May 1628. (fn. 109)

6. MERIC CASAUBON, S. T. P. the son of the learned Isaac Casaubon, prebendary in the eighth prebend as before-mentioned, was next promoted to it, being installed on June 19, 1628. He was born at Geneva in 1599, and being brought into England at eleven years of age, received his education at Christchurch, in Oxford, of which he became student, and received the king's letters of denizen, dated Jan. 13, 1625. (fn. 110) He was grandson of the famous and learned Henry, and great-grandson of Robert Stephens. He was first beneficed at Bledon, in Somersetshire, and afterwards was vicar of Minster and of Monkton, in the isle of Thanet, (fn. 111) the latter of which he resigned for the rectory of Ickham, in this county. He died in July 1671, æt. 75; (fn. 112) having enjoyed this prebend near forty six years; and was buried in the lower south cross of this cathedral, where there is a marble monument erected to his memory, with the following inscription:

Sta & Venerare viator
His Mortales Immortalis spiritus exuvias deposuit
MERICUS CASAUBONUS.

Magni Nominispar Hæres:
Eruditiq; Generis
Quippe QuiPatremhabuit.
Avum Henrieum Stephanum
Provaum Robertum Stephanum

Heu quos viros! Quæ Literum lumina! Quæ ævi sui decora! Ipse Eruditionem per tot erudita capita traductam excepit, Excoluit, & ad Pietatis (quæ in ejus pectore Regina Sedebat) ornamentum &incrementnm fæliciter consecravit: Rempublicamq; literariam multiplici rerum &linguarum supellectile locupletavit. Vir, incertum, Doctior out melior, in Pauperes Liberalitate, in amicos utilitate, in omnes bumanitat, in acutissimis Longissimi Morbi tormentis Christiana Patientia infignissimus. Gaudeat primaria bæc Ecclesia Primariis Canonicis CASAUBONIS ambobus, qui eundem in Eruditione quo ipsa in Ecclesiarum Serie, or dinem obtinuerent. Obiit noster pridie Idus Julii anno 1671, ætatis suæ 75, Canonicatus Sui 46.

7. LEWIS HERAULTt, S. T. P. was the next prebendary in it, being installed on August 25, 1671.—He died in 1682, and was buried in November, that year, in this cathedral. (fn. 113)

8. JAMES JEFFERIES, S. T. P. brother to then Sir George Jefferies, was installed in this prebend, on November 18, 1682, and dying on Sept. 4, 1689, æt. 40, (fn. 114) was buried in the martyrdom, or lower north cross of this cathedral, where his gravestone, with this inscription, yet remains: Sub hoc marmore depositæ sunt reliquiæ JACOBI JEFFERIES, S. T. P. hujus Ecclesiæ Canonici Qui obiit 4. Septembris Anno Doumini 1689, ætatis suæ 40.

9. THOMAS NIXON, S. T. P. was next installed in it on Nov. 4, 1689. He died in November, 1712, and was buried at Queenhithe, in London, of which church he was rector. (fn. 115)

10. JOHN GRANDORGE, S. T. P. succeeded next to it, being installed on May 4, 1613. He was fellow of Magdalen college, in Oxford, where he died in January 1732. By his will he bequeathed to Magdalen college 500l. to this cathedral 500l. for repairs and ornaments; to the corporation of the sons of the clergy the like sum, to be distributed among the daughters of poor clergymen, besides many other charitable legacies.

11. THOMAS GOOCH, S. T. P. was next installed on Feb. 27, 1729-30. He was archdeacon of Essex, master of Caius college, in Cambridge, and rector of St. Clement's, Eastcheap, in London. He died in 1738.

12. JULIUS DEEDES, A. M. was next promoted to this stall on Feb. 27, 1739. He was the son of William Deedes, M D. of Canterbury; he was rector of Great Mongeham and of Dimchurch, in this county, and died on April 19, 1752, æt. 59, and was buried in the family vault in Hythe church. (fn. 116)

13. WILLIAM TATTON, S. T. P. succeeded him in it on May 15, 1754. He was afterwards vicar of East Peckham, in this county, and rector of Rotherfield, in Sussex; the former of which he resigned on being presented to that of St. Dionis Backchurch, London, and was likewise a prebendary of the church of York. He died on Feb. 11, 1782, and was buried in the family vault of the Lynch's, at Staple, near Sandwich. (fn. 117)

14. RICHARD FARMER, S. T. P. was made the next prebendary in this stall, on March 7, that year. He was a native of the town of Leicester, a man of great simplicity of manners and modesty, though of eminent learning, both as a critic and an historian. In the knowledge of antient English literature more especially, he was exceeded by none. His library exhibited a most valuable and extensive collection of books in various languages, but more particularly of curious and uncommon articles relating to the history, the customs, the drama, and the poetry, of this country.

He became master of Emanuel college, Cambridge, and Margaret preacher in that university, which latter he soon afterwards resigned. On March 22, 1788, he was promoted to be a canon residentiary of St. Paul's church, in London, on which he resigned this prebend, and

15. SAMUEL RYDER WESTON, B. D. rector of Marwood, in the diocese of Exeter, was installed on April 19, 1788, in his room. He vacated it in December, 1798, on being promoted to a canonship residentiary of St. Paul's, and is now S. T. P.

16. CHARLES NORRIS, A. M. succeeded next to this prebend. He was the son of Charles Norris, LL. B. deceased, vicar of Braborne, in this county; he was installed on Jan. 19, 1799, and is the present incumbent of this stall; and is rector of Fakenham, in Norfolk.

Canons in the tenth Prebend.

1. JOHN MYLLYS, alias WARHAM, was one of the monks of the late dissolved priory, and was named in the charter of foundation by king Henry VIII. the first canon in this stall, to which he was admitted in 1542, and was afterwards rector of Chartham and Ringwold, in this county. He died in 1565, and was buried in the nave of this cathedral. (fn. 118)

2. WILLIAM KING, B. D. succeeded him, being installed on January 19, 1565. He was first fellow of King's college, in Cambridge, chaplain to queen Elizabeth, then archdeacon of Northumberland, canon of Windsor, and vicar of Apledore, in this county. He died on Sept. 23, 1590, and was buried in St. George's chapel, at Windsor. (fn. 119)

3. WILLIAM BIRD, S. T. P. was installed in September, 1590, on the death of the former prebendary, before-mentioned. He died in June, 1609, and was buried in this cathedral.

4. GEORGE HOVENDEN, S. T. P. succeeded him, and was installed the same year. He died in 1625, and was buried in St. Mary's church-yard, in Oxford.

5. ACCEPTED FREWEN, S. T. P. had a grant given him by king James I. in his 8th year, of a prebend in this church, which he made use of on the death of George Hovenden, last-mentioned, the mandate for his installation being dated on September 1, 1625. He was a native of Kent, educated first at the King's school, at Canterbury, and then at Magdalen college, in Oxford, of which he was afterwards president, and made one of the King's chaplains. He was afterwards successively promoted to the deanries of Gloucester and Wells, besides which he was rector of Stanlake, in Oxfordshire, and Wanford, in Hampshire. In 1643 he was consecrated bishop of Litchfield and Coventry, on which this prebend became vacant, after which he was lastly promoted to the see of York. (fn. 120) On this stall's becoming vacant as abovementioned, Stephen Goff was nominated to it, but he seems never to have been installed in it, and is said afterwards to have turned Papist, so that it remained vacant till the restoration, when,

6. PETER HARDRES, S. T. P. was installed in it in July, 1660, being then rector of Upper Hardres, in this county. He died in July 1678, and was buried in this cathedral. (fn. 121)

7. JOHN MAXIMILIAN DE L'ANGLE, S. T. P. was next installed in it on July 27, the same year; he was rector of Chartham, where dying on November 11, 1724, he was buried in the chancel of that church. (fn. 122)

8. WILLIAM EGERTON, LL. D. was made prebendary in his room, being installed on Nov. 25, 1724. He was grandson of John, earl of Bridgewater, and was educated at New college, in Oxford. After his becoming prebendary of this church, he was presented in 1732 to the rectory of Alhallows, Lombard-street, London, which he held with that of Penshurst, and was likewise rector of Cowden, both in this county. He died on Feb. 26, 1737, æt. 55, and was buried in the chancel of Penshurst church, where, within the altar rails, on the north side there is a memorial for him. (fn. 123)

9. SAMUEL SHUCKFORD, S. T. P. succeeded to it on March 23, 1737-8. He was formerly of Caius college, in Cambridge, and was made a chaplain in ordinary to king George II. He was promoted to the rectory of Alhallows church, Lombard-street, London, and died on July 14, 1754, and was buried in the middle of the nave of this church.

10. JOHN DAVIS, S. T. P. was next promoted to this stall on May 29, 1755. He was rector of Hansey, in Sussex, and of East Peckham, in this county, and died on Feb. 8, 1766, and was buried in the middle of the nave of this cathedral.

11. LYNFORD CARYL, S. T. P. was next promoted to this stall on March 1, 1766. He was first register of the university of Cambridge, afterwards fellow and then master of Jesus college, and promoted to prebends, both in the collegiate churches of Southwell and Lincoln. He died in his prebendal house here, on June 18, 1781, and was buried in Jesus college chapel, in Cambridge. (fn. 124)

12. THOMAS VYNER, LL. D. was his successor in this prebend the same year, being installed on March 21, 1782. He is vicar of East Peckham, in this county, and the present incumbent of it.

Canons in the eleventh Prebend.

1. JOHN DANIEL, alias CHILLENDEN, a monk of the late priory, was named in the foundation charter by king Henry VIII. the first canon in this stall, to which he was admitted in 1542. He died in February 1546. (fn. 125)

2. ROBERT STEWART was admitted at Lambeth, by proxy, canon of this church succeding the former one, before-mentioned, in this stall. He was bishop of Cathness, in Scotland, and brother to Mathew, earl of Lenox, as Spotwood, in his catalogue of Scottish bishops, informs us; in his procuratorial letters, he stiles himself clerk only, omitting his episcopal title.

3. BERNARD OCHINUS, or Ochine, was presented May 9, anno 1549, being the 2d year of Edward VI. In the instrument of his presentation, there is a clause of dispensation for non residence, and for his cohabitation with his wife. He was an Italian born, and came over with Peter Martyr into England, and was kindly received by archbishop Cranmer. He wrote a Latin dialogue against the pope's supremacy, which was translated into English by Ponet, bishop of Winchester. (fn. 126)

4. THOMAS WARD, S. T. P. was presented by the queen and installed on April 2, 1558, (fn. 127) and was afterwards consecrated bishop of St. Asaph, upon which this stall became vacant.

5. JOHN BALE the centurist, succeeded him in this stall, in the 2d year of queen Elizabeth. (fn. 128) He lies buried in the body of this church.

6. ANDREW PEERSON was admitted canon in this stall on Nov. 30, 1563, and had a licence for nonresidence, dated Jan. 4, 1570; he had been rector of Brasted, of Chidingstone, and of Wrotham, in this county. He died in November, 1594. (fn. 129)

7. RALPH TALBOYS, S. T. P. upon the death of Peerson, was presented to this prebend on Nov. 13, 1594. He died in 1596.

8. MARTIN FOTHERBY, S. T. P. was admitted canon of this church, July 3, 1596. He was educated at Cambridge, and fellow of Trinity college there; afterwards he became vicar of Chistlet, and then rector of Mongeham and of Chartham, all three in this county; he was consecrated bishop of Sarum on April 18, 1618, on which this stall became vacant. He died in 1619, and was buried in the church of Alhallows, Lombard-street, London, where his monument was burnt, together with the church, in 1666. (fn. 130)

9. ALEXANDER CHAPMAN, S. T. P. succeeded him in this prebend the same year. He was a native of the county of Norfolk, and was chaplain to the princess Elizabeth, consort of the prince Frederic, elector palatine, and became archdeacon of Stow, in Lincolnshire, and a prebendary of that church. He died on Sept. 6, 1629, æt. 52, (fn. 131) and was buried in this cathedral, in the martyrdom, where there is a monument, with his bust on it, in white marble, erected to his memory, and this inscription: ALEXANDRO CHAPMAN Norfolciensi Sacræ Theologiæ Doctori in Academia Cantebrigiensi: Serinissimæ Elizabethæ, Frederici Electoris Palatini Consorti, a Sacellis, Dominæ suæ Clementissimæ: Archidiacano de Stow in Comitatu Lincolniensi & Metropoliticæ bujus Ecclesiæ Prebendario: viro Multiplici Linguarum ut et Literarum Scientia instructissimo, Concionatori mire Flexanimo, dumq; per vires licuit & Valetudinem, non sedulo minus quam solido: Pietate erga Deum, charitate erga proximum, & morum suavitate erga omnes eximio: Charissimo Fratri suo optimeq; de se Merito (qualem, qualem) gratam erg a defunctum animi Memoriolam posuit H. C. Sabbatho Mortalitatis in Æternitatis mutato, spiritum Deo reddidit 6 Septembris. Anno salutis, 1629, ætatis 52.

10. JOHN GERARD VOSSIUS, was next installed in it in 1629. On the sequestration of the revenues of the dean and chapter in 1644, he found such favour with the Puritans, that he, and Dr. Jackson, had both pensions of 100l. a year each allowed to them. He died in 1650, after which this prebend continued vacant till the restoration, (fn. 132) when

11. EDWARD ALDEY was admitted canon in it, and was installed on July 9, 1660. He died on July 12, 1673, and was buried in St. Andrew's church, in Canterbury, of which he was rector. (fn. 133)

12. THOMAS BLOMER, S. T. P. was next installed in it on August 6, 1673. He resigned this preferment in 1706.

13. RALPH BLOMER, S. T. P. son of the former prebendary, succeeded him in it, being installed on May 22, the same year. (fn. 134) He was rector of Alhallows church, in Lombard street, London, and of Horndon on the Hill, in Essex, and one of the king's chaplains. (fn. 135) He died on April 6, 1732, and was buried in the nave of this cathedral.

14. The Hon. HENRY DAWNEY, S. T. P. third son of Henry, viscount Downe, succeeded to this stall in June, 1732. He was rector of Piddle Town, and of Corscombe, in Dorsetshire; and died in July, 1754. (fn. 136)

15. THOMAS CURTEIS, S. T. P. was installed in his room, in 1755. He was son of the Rev. Thomas Curteis, A. M. rector and vicar of Wrotham, in this county. In 1747 he succeeded his father in the vicarage of Sevenoke, and possessed likewise the sinecure rectory of that church, of both which he was patron. In 1756 he was inducted to the rectory of St. Dionis Backchurch, London. He died at his house at Sevenoke, on May 28, 1775, and was there buried.

16. RICHARD LUCAS, S. T. P. rector of Edith Weston, was, on his death promoted to this prebend, and installed on June 17, 1775. He died in 1789.

17. PHILIP WILLIAMS, A. M. succeeded him, and in 1797 exchanged this stall for a prebend of Winchester and other preferment, with

18. The Hon. EDWARD LEGGE, the fourth surviving son of William, earl of Dartmouth, who was born on Dec. 18, 1767. He is vicar of Lewisham, in this county, fellow of All Souls college, in Oxford, and chaplain in ordinary to his Majesty, and is the present incumbent of this stall.

Canons in the twelfth Prebend.

1. JOHN BAPTISTA DECASIA, LL.D. was named by the king, in his foundation charter, to be the first prebendary in this stall, and was admitted to it in 1542. He had a licence of non-residence for his whole life. He died in 1544.

2. ROBERT NEVIL succeeded him, and was installed that same year. He died in 1550.

3. JOHN JOSEPH, alias SOLLEPH, P. D. was installed on July 18, 1550; (fn. 137) he was deprived by queen Mary, for being married, in 1553.

4. RICHARD FAUCET, (fn. 138) S. T. P. was admitted next to it in April 1554, (fn. 139) and installed on the 23d of the same month; but was deprived in 1559.

5. HENRY GOODRICK, S. T. P. was next promoted to it in his room, being installed on July 10, 1559. He died in 1566.

6. PAUL FRENCH, B. D. of All Souls college, was admitted canon, and installed on Sept. 4, 1566; and died on Nov. 1, 1600, and was buried at Windfor, of which church he was a canon. (fn. 140)

7. GREGORY MILNER was next presented, and was installed on November 6, 1600. He died in 1614.

8. THOMAS ANYAN, S. T. P. president of Corpus Christi college, Oxford, was next installed in it the same year. He was born at Sandwich, became one of the king's chaplains, and afterwards prebendary of Gloucester. He died in January 1632, and was buried at the upper end of the north isle of the nave of this cathedral. (fn. 141)

9. HUMPHREY PEAKE, S. T. P. was installed in it in his room, in 1632. He was a younger son of the family of Peake, of Hills-court, in Ash, by Sandwich. He had been vicar of Tenterden, and rector of Kingsnoth, and afterwards was rector both of Acrise and of Liminge, in this county; in 1626 he had been installed in the prebend of Marston, St. Laurence, in the church of Lincoln. He died after the year 1645, and this stall continued vacant till the restoration, (fn. 142) and

10. WILLIAM BARKER, S. T. P. was then installed in it, in July, 1660. He had been of New college, Oxford, and was rector of Hardwyck, in Buckinghamshire, where he died in March 1669, and was buried in the church there.

11. EDWARD SPILLINGFLEET, S. T. P. dean of St. Paul's church, in London, was next admitted canon in this stall, on April 21, 1669. This learned prelate was born at Cranborne, in Dorsetshire. He had been fellow of St. John's college, Cambridge; then rector of Sutton, in Bedfordshire, and of St. Andrew's Holborn, and one of the king's chaplains; afterwards prebendary of this church, and canon of St. Paul's cathedral, and then dean of the same. On Oct. 31, 1689, he was consecrated bishop of Worcester, on which he vacated this stall. (fn. 143)

12. The Hon. LEOPOLD WILLIAM FINCH, B. D. the fifth son of Heneage, earl of Winchelsea, was next admitted canon in it, being installed on November 4, 1689. He was born at Constantinople, educated at Christ-church, first fellow and then warden of All Soul's college, in Oxford. He died in December, 1702. (fn. 144)

13. JOHN ADAMS, S. T. P. was installed on January 9, 1702; being promoted to a canonry of Windsor in 1708, he resigned this preferment. He was afterwards provost of King's college, Cambridge, and at different times had various parochial preferments conferred on him. (fn. 145)

14. WILLIAM WHITFIELD, A. M. was installed in it on Feb. 4, 1708 9. (fn. 146) He was vicar of St. Giles's, Cripplegate church, in London, where he died in 1716, and was there buried.

15. LILLY BUTLER, S. T. P. was installed in it by proxy, on March 23, 1717. He died on May 7, following.

16. JOHN TURNER, S. T. P. vicar of Greenwich, was next installed in it, in June 1717; he was a prebendary likewise of the church of Lincoln. (fn. 147) He died in December, 1720, and was buried in this cathedral, in the north isle of the nave, where there is a monument erected to his memory, with this inscription:—Prope Hoc marmor quod Mortale babuit reliquit Vir Pietate, Doctrina & Morum Suavitate insignis JOHANNIS TURNER S. T. P. Qui in defendendis Ecclesiæ Anglicanæ furibus Strenuum se gessit Athletam, in asserenda Doctrina Redemptionis Salvatoris nostri mystam, pium, in debito Regi obsequio prestando subditum fidelem. Utoxetor in Com. Stafford, eum nascenlem Cunis excepit Anno Dom 1660 Die 16 Novembris. Schola Patria in primis Doctrinæ Elementis Erudivit; Collegium S. S. Trinit. Cantab: ad penitiora Scientiarum aaita investigenda admissum Brabeis & Honoribus auxit quem Schola in Erica nigra Ludimagistrum Doctissimum, Grenovicum Pastorem fidelissimum, babuit, Cui Canonicatum in Ecclesia Cathedrali Lincoln. Gratia Episcopi, in Metropolitica Cantuariensi Regia assignavit. Uxorem duxit Saram Tucker Clerici in agro Suffolciensi filiam, Ex qua filium & filias duas genuit: Tandem cum nihil in rebus bumanis firmum & stabile. Febri Correptus, in Domo sua Cantuariensi, Sexagenario Major, extremum obiit Diem, Anno Reparatæ salutis 1720, 7 Decemb. Vidua boc pietatis Monumentum posuit. At top are the arms of Turner, impaling Tucker and quarterings.

17. DAVID WILKINS, S. T. P was next installed in it on January 26, 1721. He was chaplain to archbishop Wake, who conferred on him the rectories of Hadley and Monks Idleigh, and the archdeaconry likewise of Suffolk. (fn. 148) He died on Sept. 7, 1745, æt. 62, at his parsonage house at Hadleigh.

18. JOHN POTTER, S. T. P. was the next prebendary, being installed on Sept. 27, 1745. He was the eldest son of archbishop Potter, and was at that time archdeacon of Oxford, vicar of Lyd, and rector of Childingstone, which latter he resigned for the valuable benefice of Wrotham, in this county. On Dec. 23, 1766, he was installed dean of this church, on which this stall became vacant. (fn. 149)

19. DAVID DUREL, S. T. P. a native of the island of Jersey, was, on this vacancy, promoted to it in 1767, being then principal of Hartford college, in Oxford. He was afterwards promoted to the vicarage of Ticehurst, in Suffex, and died in 1775, at Oxford, and was there buried.

20. EVERARD BUCKWORTH, S. T. P. was installed in his room, on Nov. 11, 1775, being rector of Washingborough, in Lincolnshire. He died at his house in London, in 1792. (fn. 150)

21. EDWARD WALSEY, S. T. P. was promoted to this prebend on his death in February, 1793. He is rector of the church of Alhallows, Lombard-street, London; and of Lamborne, in Essex, and the present incumbent of it.

Footnotes

1 I find his name written both Thornton and Thorndon.—Batt. Somn. pt. ii. p. 123; and more of him before, in the Hist. of Kent, under Dover.
2 Deeds of Inrolment, in Augmentation-office.
3 See Biog. Brit. vol. v. p. 2970.
4 Battely's Somner, pt. ii. p. 123. See Biog. Brit. vol. v. p. 2970, note [I].
5 See more of him, Newcourt's Repert. p. 171. Wood's Ath. vol. i. p. 16, where see an account of him and his writings.
6 His will is in Prerog. off. Cant. proved Feb. 7, 1568.
7 Battely's Somner, pt. ii. p. 123.
8 He was son of Thomas Lawse, of Aylesham, in Norfolk, and bore for his arms, Or, on a chief, sable, three stars of six points of the field.
9 See more of him among the list of archdeacons.
10 Battely's Somner, pt. ii. p. 124.
11 Ibid.
12 His will, proved September 22, 1609, is in Prerogativeoffice, Canterbury.
13 Battely's Somner, pt. ii. p. 124.
14 See an account of him and his benefactions, in Wood's Ath. vol. ii.p. 373.
15 Rym. Fœd. vol. xx. p. 219. Walker's Sufferings of the Clergy, pt. ii. p. 6.
16 See Lewis's Thanet, p. 102. Newcourt's Repert. p. 332. Wood's Ath. vol. ii. fasti, p. 138.
17 See Battely, p. 172.
18 See an account of both Tenison's prebendaries, in Biog. Brit. vol. vi. p. 3929. The bishop of Ossory died in 1735, at Dublin, æt. 62.
19 Created S. T. P. by the archbishop, 1770. He was nephew to Dr Benson, bishop of Gloucester, who gave him the registership of the diocese of Gloucester, which he some time since resigned in favor of his son. He married Susanna, daughter of Dr. Oliver, of Bath, by whom he has a son Martin, and two daughters, Catherine Elizabeth, married to the Rev. John Wood, vicar of Herne, and Harriet unmarried.
20 See Battely, p. 172.
21 His will, proved January 22, 1613, is in the Prerog. off. Canterbury. Willis's Cath. vol. i. p. 668.
22 He died in 1638, and was buried at Durham. See Willis, ibid. p. 252.
23 Rym. Fœd. vol. xix. p. 543.
24 Rymer's Fœd. vol. xix. p. 349. Walker's Suff. of the Clergy, pt. ii. p. 7.
25 See an account of him in Wool's Ath. vol. ii. p. 766.
26 See an account of him and his writings in Wood's Ath. vol. ii. p. 814. Willis's Cath. vol. ii. p. 436. He was intruded by king James II. on Magdalen college for their president, whose humour he seemed entirely disposed to comply with; and, as Anthony Wood intimates, would have changed his religion for that of Rome, but for his wife, who was unwilling to be parted from him, and being thus riveted in the king's measures, he procured him to be elected September 18, and consecrated October 17, 1686, bishop of Oxford, of which he had little enjoyment; for dying March 20, 1687, æt. 47, at Magdalen college, he was buried in the chapel there without any memorial. See more of him among the archdeacons, hereafter.
27 Battely, ibid.
28 See Wood's Ath. vol. ii. fasti, p. 214.
29 See an account of him and his writings in Wood's Ath. vol. ii. p. 1119.
30 He was afterwards lord privy seal, and in 1713, tranflated to London.
31 See the grant of this prebend, in Harleian MSS. No. 2264, 236.
32 In 1771 he was installed prebendary of Durham, which two years afterwards he exchanged for the mastership of Sherburn hospital, a preserment which he afterwards, being then dean of Durham, resigned in favour of his son the present dean of Rochester. He died at Bath in 1777.
33 So created by the archbishop, 1770.
34 By his will, proved in the Prerog. office in Canterbury, on June 20, 1543, it appears, that he had a benefice in London, and was vicar likewife of Eastry. He mentions his friends Drs. Nicholas and Lancelot Ridley; he appears to have been a learned man, by the several books he lest among his friends, and mentioned in his will.
35 He had queen Mary's letters of presentation on April 2, 1554. Rym. Fœd. vol, xv. p. 382.
36 See an account of him and his writings in Wood's Ath, vol. i. p. 393.
37 Wood says the archbishop had given him an hospital.
38 Walker's Suff. of Clergy, pt. ii. p. 7. See an account of him and his writings in Wood's Ath. vol. i. p. 636.
39 His will, proved October 18, 1712, is in Prerogativeoffice, Canterbury.
40 History of Maidstone, p. 164.
41 He bore for his arms, Argent, on a chevron engrailed, gules, in the upper part a sun; in the lower, a falcon volant, or, in the sinister chief, a cross pomal, gules.
42 See more of him among the archdeacons.
43 His will is in Prerog. office, Canterbury, proved July 3, 1567. See Granger's Biog. Hist. vol. i. p. 156.
44 He was son of John Bungey, of Filbye, in Norsolk; and married Margaret, daughter of Thomas Parker, of Norwich, brother of Matthew, archbishop of Canterbury, by whom he had eight sons and four daughters. He built the seat of Mystole, in Chartham; and bore for his arms, Argent, a lion passant, or, three bezants, two in chief, and one in base. There is a pedigree of them in the heraldic visitation of Kent, anno 1619.
45 See Wood's Ath. vol. i. fasti, p. 265–112.
46 His will, proved October 13, 1684, is in Prerog. off. Canterbury. By it he gave his book in solio, which had cost him much labour and expence, being the defence of king James's book against cardinal Perron, englished by him; and also all those books composed by him, for the defence of the church and the king, in the most perilous times; and other books wrote by him for God's holy truth, to the dean and chapter of Canterbury, to be kept in the common library there for ever. He gave to his kinsman John Maximilian Delangle, D. D. canon of Christ-church, Canterbury, the pictures of his father and Dr. Rivitt, and all his manuscripts and writings that do not concern his estate.
47 See an account of him and his writings, in Wood's Ath. vol. i. sasti, p. 112.
48 Ibid. p. 176.
49 See more of him among the deans.
50 See ibid.
51 He was translated to London in 1549, and burnt at Oxford in 1555. See an account of him and his writings in Wood's Ath. vol. i. p. 94; and his life in Biog. Brit. vol. vii. appendix, p. 150. Fox, vol. iii. p. 434.
52 He was afterwards bishop of Salisbury.
53 See an account of him in Wood's Ath. vol. i. fasti, p. 180. He was son of Amande Colf, of Calais, and afterwards of Canterbury. They bore for their arms, Or, a fess, sable, between three colts of the second. There is a pedigree of them in the heraldic visitation of the county of Kent, anno 1619.
54 His will, proved October 27, 1613, is in Prerog. office, Canterbury.
55 See the Mercurius Rusticus. Walker's Suff. of the Clergy, p. 6. pt. 2, p. 141.
56 Walker's Suff. of Clergy, pt. 2, p. 152. Wood's Ath. vol. ii. fasti, p. 152. His will was proved in Prerog. office, Canterbury, on May 28, 1680. By it, he ordered his body to be buried in the earth, and the chain which he took from one of the English slave's legs, which he redeemed from Angiers, to be hung aloft over his grave, with some small motto for a memorandum over him. He gave his cabinet of medals with the antiquities that flood upon it, in his study, and all his other greater medalions that hung upon the shelves, unto the library of the cathedral church of Canterbury; to which he gave likewise, the great octangular round marble table, that stood in his dining-room; and he gave several books to the library of St. Peter's college, in Cambridge, viz. two vols. of Mathiolus upon Discorides, in Italian, the cuts all illuminated; a rare piece, presented formerly by the States of Venice to the king of England's eminent ambassador, Sir Henry Wootton; and several other valuable books named therein—He gave to the library of Canterbury all his large and lesser maps of Italy, Old Rome and New, in sheets at large, very fair, together with all the cuts in his trunks, of all the antient ruins, the palaces, statues, fountains, the cardinals, soldiers, philosophers, &c. of Italy, France and High Germany.
57 In the register of burials, within these precincts, he is entered, by the description of the good and hospitable Dr. Thorpe.
58 See an account of both the Tenisons, prebendaries of this church, in Biop. Brit. vol. vi. p. 3929.
59 See more of him among the archdeacons.
60 He was so created by the archbishop in 1770.
61 See more of him among the archdeacons.
62 His will is in Prerog. office, Cant. proved March 8, anno 4 Edward VI. He desired to be buried in the north isle of the cathedral, where the first masse was went to be said.
63 See more of him among the archdeacons.
64 He was presented that year. See Rymer's Fædera, vol. xv. p. 382.
65 His wife Mary survived him, and dying at the latter and of the same year, was buried near him.
66 His works were collected together and printed at London in 1611.
67 See Walton's Lives, p. 215, 256. Newcourt's Rep. p. 927. Willis's Cath. vol. i. p. 744. Strype's Annals, vol. i. p. 524, vol. iii. p. 288. Wood's Ath. vol. i. p. 140. His will, proved January 21, 1612, is in Prerog. off. Cant.
68 He bore for his arms, Argent, a chevron, between three mullets, sable, an annulet, or, on the chevron, for difference. There is a pedigree of them in the heraldic visitation of the county of Kent, anno 1619.
69 His will is in Prerog. office, Canterbury. He gave in it a legacy of books to the library of Christ-church, heretolore demolished, and then intended by the governors of it to be repaired and rebuilt. See an account of him and his writing in Wood's Ath. vol. i. p. 540.
70 See Strype's Survey, B, 2, p. 156
71 His will, proved March 27, 1701, is in Prerogative office, Canterbury.
72 See more of him among the archdeacons of this diocese.
73 Willis's Cath. vol. ii. p. 206, 233.
74 Dr. Stedman left one son and one daughter, the former took orders and became vicar of Preston, near Wingham, and rector of Elmsted, in this county. He died in 1792.
75 Dr. Berkeley married Elizabeth, the eldest daughter of the Rev. Mr. Frinsham, by his wife, the daughter of Mr. Cherry, of Shottisbrooke, in Berkshire; by her he had two sons, GeorgeMonk Berkeley, esq. and Robert, who both died unmarried, the latter in his infancy. He bore for his arms the same coat as those of Gloucestershire. Mrs. Berkeley is still surviving. This year, 1800, an 8 vo. volume of sermons, by Dr. Benkeley, with his portrait, &c. has been advertized for publication.
76 See a further account of him in the List of Deans, in that of his father as dean of Canterbury.
77 Wood's Ath. vol. i. fasti, p. 61.
78 His will, proved Feb. 23, 1569, is in the Prerog. office, Canterbury, in which he desires to be buried in the chapterhouse beside Mr. Newton; he was then vicar of Minster, and parson of Kingston. It appears by his will, that he was owner of several houses and lands in and about Calais, in one of which he had dwelt, all of which he bequeathed to different persons, should that place ever become English again.
79 His will, proved January 13, 1605, is in Prerog. off.
80 From which see he was translated in 1608, to that of Lincoln. He died in 1613, and was buried in the chancel of Bugden church. Willis's Cath. vol. ii. p. 68.
81 See Strype's Annals, vol. i. p. 567.
82 John Sympson, S.T. P. was inducted in 1619, to the rectory of Aldington, in this county; and in 1626 held it by dispensation with Sandhurst. Rym. Fæd. vol. xviii. p. 874; but whether the above-mentioned person, I know not.
83 His father Nicholas died in 1609, æt. 60; and Nicholas, son of John, above mentioned, died in 1680, æt. 58; being at first bred a merchant (as the inscription on the grave-stone informed us, which was put down after his death, and removed on the new pavement of the nave) and afterwards retired into the country, where he remained quietly, during the confusion of the rebellion. They all three lie buried near each other here.—Wood, in his Athenæ, vol. i. fasti, p. 180, says, by mistake, that this Nicholas was likewise a canon of this church, but he never was in orders. It was his grandfather Nicholas who was the canon, of whom mention will be made hereafter, among those of the eighth prebend, and the inscription on the gravestone inserted. His will, proved June 1, is in Prerog, court, Cant. by which he appears to have been possessed of different estates, in several parishes in this county, and mentions the lease of his house wherein he then dwelt.
84 He had the king's letters patent, for the next prebend that should become vacant, dated August 13, 1628. Rym. Fæd. vol. xix. p. 43.
85 Ibid. vol. xx. p. 387–5. Wood's Ath. vol. i. fasti, p. 252.
86 He had the king's letter of presentation on May 18, 1639. Rym. Fæd. vol. xx. p. 387.
87 He was living in 1645.
88 See an account of him in Wood's Ath. vol. i. fasti, p. 226. Newc. Rep. p. 215. Walk. Suff. Clergy, pt. ii. p. 7.
89 See an account of him and his writings in Wood's Ath. vol. ii. p. 401, 858.
90 See Harleian MSS No. 2262–77.
91 He died on December 16, 1732, æt. 60, and was buried in Bristol cathedral.
92 See History of Maidstone, p. 164.
93 Viz. the vicarage of Ashford, in this county, and the rectories of St. Michael, Crooked-lane, London; and of Towen, in Merionethshire.
94 See Rym. Fœd. vol. xv. p. 599.
95 His will, proved October 12, that year, is in Prerog. office, Canterbury.
96 Wood's Ath. vol. i. fasti, p. 180. His will, proved Feb. 27, 1609, is in Prerog. office, Canterbury. He bore for his arms, Per bend, a lion rampant, counterchanged, or, and sable.— His pedigree is in the heraldic visitation of the county of Kent, anno 1619.
97 Rym. Fæd. vol. xvi. p. 707, 709, 710. Among the Harleian MSS. is a catalogue of his manuscripts, No. 6469, and a collection of his letters, No. 7002–2. And, among the manuscripts in the library of Canterbury cathedrai, is a diary of his life, in Latin, written with his own hand; marked D. 1. folio. See Mr. Todd's Catalogue, Deans of Canterbury, p. 286.
98 See an account of him and his writings in Wood's Ath. vol. ii. p. 406. Nich. Hist. Libr. p. 169. Walker's Sufferings of Clergy, pt. ii. p. 8.
99 Near the above is a monument to the memory of his wife, and this inscription: —Juxta hoc marmor situm of—Quicquid mori potuit Franciscæ HOLCOMBE—Reverendi Viri S. HOLCOMBE. S. T. P. —Et hujus Ecclesiæ Canonici, Uxoris—Fæminæ prudentis, piæ pudicæ—non solum Conjugi suo dilectissmæ —sed et ab omnibus plurime æstimandæ—Parentes habuit— —GALFRIDUM HETHERINGTON, —LONDINENSEM Generosum —Et SUSANNAM ex antiqua WILMENORUMStripe, —In agro EBORACENSIoriundam E qua- tuor quos enixa est liberis,—SUSANNA præmaturâ morte est abrepta,—FRANSCISCA, SAMUEL, ANNA, —Super, unit—post graves ct longos Corporis Dolores—Quos tamen incricata parientia—Peddrlit le—leviore-— Tandem, xxx die Mensis Martis—Anno Dom 1725, ætatios 62—Piece Ketgiose, prout vixerat. obiit—Plorantibus undiq; amicis.
100 He died at his residentiary house in Amen Coraes, naving married the daughter of Mr. Bind, of Coventry, whom be left survivings.p. She afterwards married Richard Cope Hopton, esq. barrister at law, a younger son of the family of that same in Herefordshire, whom she likewise survived.
101 This branch of the Derings bear for their arms the sana 25 those of Surrenden, in this county, baronets, but wites a chilazure, for difference.
102 A specimen of his learning may be seen in Strype's Memorials of archbishop Cranmer p. 103.
103 His will is in the Prerog. office, Canterbury.
104 Funeral Monuments, p. 237.
105 In a manuscript of this church he is called Thomas.
106 Wood's Ath. vol. i. fasti, p.65.
107 Rym. Fæd. vol. xv. p. 382.
108 See Willis's Cath. vol. i. p. 400. Strype's Annals, vol. iii. p. 174.
109 His will is in the Prerog. office, in Canterbury. In it he mentions his lease of his new house, in the common garden; and gives five marcs towards the amending of the highways, on Boughton-hill, to be paid whenever the ways thereabouts should effectually go in hand to be amended; and gives towards the choir of Christ-church 10l. which he had lent them, towards the buying of the patent of Thornden.
110 Rym. Fæd. vol. xviii.
111 Walker's Sufferings of Clergy, pt. ii. p. 8.
112 Wood's Ath. vol. ii. p. 485; for an account of him and his writings, and his life, in Biog. Brit. vol. ii. p. 1192. His will, proved on August 8, 1671, is in the Prerogative-office, Canterbury. There is a particular and curious account in it, but of too great length to be inserted here, of his father's and his own manuscripts, many of which he gave to the public library of the university of Oxford, and others to that of Christ-church, in Canterbury; to which latter he gave his old coins of gold, silver, brass and copper. He gave 20l. to the same library. To the buildings of Christ-church, in Oxford, 100l. and legacies to his two parishes of Ickham, and Minster in Tnanet.
113 His will is in the Prerogative office, Canterbury.
114 His will is in the same office, proved September 19, that year. In it he mentions his nephews, Sir Griffith Jeffreys, and John, lord Jeffreys, baron of Wem, and his brother Sir Thomas Jeffreys. He gave to the library of Christ-church, in Can. terbury, 20l. worth of books, to be taken out of his study; and to Jesus college, in Oxford, 20l. to be laid out in books for their library. He was possessed of several estates in Derbyshire.
115 Newcourt's Repert. p. 488.
116 He married Dorothy, widow of Richard Ibetson, D. D. eldest daughter of Nathaniel Denew, esq. by whom he had Wm. Deedes, esq. of St. Stephen's, the father of William Deedes, esq. now of Saltwood. Hist. of Kent, vol. viii. p. 238.
117 He married Sarah, daughter of Dr. John Lynch, late dean of Canterbury, by whom he left a daughter and heir Catherine, who married James Brockman, esq. of Beechborough.
118 His will, proved August 4, that year, is in Prerog. office, Canterbury; in which he writes himself John Mylles, cl. in it he gives to the school-master and usher, and to the scholars of the common hall, towards their bread to be then eaten, two seams, of wheat; and legacies to the several petty canons, vesturers, vergers, &c. and twenty shillings to the prisoners of the castle and Westgate. To the childrens table, several utensils; and to master Engeham's wife, his round ball of brass, to warm her hands, only as a remembrance.
119 See Wood's Ath. vol, i, fasti, p. 38, 128. Ashmole's History of Berkshire, vol. ii. p. 263. Harwood's Alumn. Etoneses, p. 164.
120 He was the eldest son of John Frewen, rector of Northiam, in Suffes, and was buried in York Cathedral in 1664. Willis's Cath. vol. i. p. 57, 393, 730. Ath. Glouc. p. 94. Wood's Ath. vol. ii. p. 1146.
121 He was third son of Sir Thomas Hardres, of Hardres, by Eleanor, daughter and heir of Thoresby. Walker's Suff. of the Clergy, pt. ii. p. 8.
122 See some account of his father in Wood's Ath. vol. ii. fasti, p. 220, whom he mistakes for this prebendary.
123 He married Anne, daughter of Sir Francis Head, bart. and left one son, who died unmarried, and two daughters who became his coheirs; Charlotte, married to William Hammond, esq. of St. Albans, in this county, and Jane, who married Edward Brydges, esq. of Wotton.
124 He married in 1751 the daughter of Mr. Fox, of Cambridge, who survivied him, but by whom he had no issue.
125 His will, proved March 3, is in Prerog. office, Canterbury. By it, massess and other ceremonies for the dead appear not to have been left off then. He stiles himself John Daniel, clerk of the collegiate church in Canterbury; and bequeaths his soul to Almighty God, the Virgin Mary, and all the blessed company of Heaven; and that there be done for his soul and all Christian souls, and every of his burial, and month's day, two solemn massess, viz. one of the glorious Trinity, and the other of requiem; and gives to every prebendary present at dirge or masse, or being fick within the precinct of the college, 2s. and in like manner smaller sums to every member of the church being present, or at that time sick in the college.
126 See Wood's Ath. vol. i. p. 100, 139. Rapin, vol. ii. p. 11.
127 See Rym. Fœd, vol. xv. p. 381. Battely erroneously calls him Wood.
128 In his letters of presentation, this prebend is said to have become void by the deprivation of Thomas Ward, S. T. P. the last incumbent of it. Rym. Fœd. vol. xv. p. 563.
129 His will is in Prerog. office, Canterbury.
130 See Wood's Ath. vol. i. p. 726. Newcourt's Rep. p. 439. Willis's Cath. vol. ii. p. 130, 213.
131 His will is in the Prerog. office, Canterbury.
132 Biog. Brit. vol. vii. Append. p. 181 [A]. Walker's Suff. of Clergy, pt. ii. p. 8.
133 His will is in the Prerog. office, Canterbury.
134 See the grant in the Harl. MSS. No. 2262–157.
135 He married Hester, the youngest daughter of Sir Anthony Aucher, bart. of Bishopsborne, by whom he left two sons and five daughters.
136 He died s. p. having married Elizabeth, one of the daughters of Sir Thomas D'Aeth, bart. of Knolton, who survived him.
137 The king's letters of presentation are dated July 18, 1550. Rym. Fæd. vol. xv. p. 237.
138 Called Nicholas, in a manuscript of this church.
139 See Rym. Fœd. vol. xiv. p. 382.
140 Wood's Ath. vol. i. fasti, p. 75.
141 Ibid. p. 198 Willis's Cath. vol. i. p. 741.
142 See Willis's Cath. vol. ii. p. 218. Walker's Suffereings of Clergy, pt. ii. p. 8.
143 He died at Westminster, æt. 63, in 1699, and was buried in his own cathedral of Worcester. Wood's Ath. vol. ii. fasti, p. 11, for an account of him and his writings. Willis's Cath. vol. i. p. 654.
144 Wood's Ath. vol. ii. p. 1063, fasti, p. 226.
145 Harwood's Alumn. Etonenses, p. 48.
146 See the grant of it in Harleian MSS. No. 2264, 236.
147 Willis's Cath. vol. ii. p. 216.
148 Tan. Mon. p. 458. He had been rector of Great Chart.
149 See more of him among the deans of this church.
150 He married the youngest sister, and at length coheir of Charles Amcolts, esq. of Lincolnshire, whom he left surviving without issue.