Register Book
1605, July-September

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

Pauline Croft (editor)

Year published

1973

Supporting documents

Pages

26-58

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'Register Book: 1605, July-September', The Spanish Company: London Record Society 9 (1973), pp. 26-58. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63969 Date accessed: 30 August 2014.


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1605, July-September

174. [p. 51] An assembly held at Pewterers' Hall on Monday 1 July 1605 in the presence of the president, Mr. Newman, Mr. Harby, Mr. Lyng, Mr. Dorrington, Mr. Savage, Mr. Bowyer, Mr. Newton, Mr. Owen, Mr. Cobb; the secretary.

175. The president urged those present to consider that, by the words of the charter, the company was enjoined to receive 'meere marchaunts to be so quallified as by the charter appeareth'. He therefore asked them to decide 'what person (in their opynions) should be accompted a meere merchant'. After due consideration and debate,

they delivered their opynions that they accoumpt him a meere marchaunt that hath only delt and traded as a marchant, without any retayling or shopp keeping, the full space and terme of Eight yeres, (in which tyme an apprentize by his service may attayne to the freedome) shalbe accoumpted a meere marchant, and (if he be otherwise qualified) may be receaved into the freedome by Redemption.

176. The draft of a letter to be sent to John Barker of Bristol, recently elected deputy for that port and the other places within the division, was read out to the assembly. It was approved 'and appointed to be sent away with all speed'.

177. An assembly held at Pewterers' Hall on Saturday 6 July 1605 in the presence of the following:

178. The president, the treasurer, Mr. Staper, Mr. Chamberlen, Mr. Newman, Mr. Ling, Mr. Dorrington, Mr. Bowyer, Mr. Furner, Mr. Newton, Mr. Towreson, Mr. Cobb, Mr. Hanger, the secretary.

179. [p. 52] First, the form of the letters to be sent out to the recently-elected deputies was agreed and orders were given that they should be despatched with all speed.

180. It was agreed that the president should not

deliver any warrants under his hand to the Customers for transportation of merchaundizes into Spayne or Portugall but only for such as shalbe certified by the Secretary under his hand to Mr. President that they were either sworne upon the first or last charter wherein the Secretary shall sett downe certenly upon what day every such person was sworne.

181. It was also ordered that former precedents for impositions should be sought out, 'to th'entent that ymposicions may be rated and levied in such manner as by a generall court or court of assistaunts shalbe thought fitt and aunswerable to the tyme'.

182. It was also agreed that 'the like allowance shalbe made for the use of the Pewterers hall as in former tymes hath ben accustomed, the same to be paied by Mr. Treasurer and to be allowed him in his accoumpt'.

183. It was further agreed 'that Mr. President shall make provision of a Carpett and a dozen of Cushions for the use of the company, and Mr. Treasurer to disburse the money for the same'.

184. Lastly, two letters sent to the company from Spain were read out, one from the resident ambassador Sir Charles Cornewalleys and the other from Nicholas Oseley a brother of the company. 'But it was thought fitt to referre the consideration thereof unto a generall court'.

185. [p. 53] 'A generall court warned and entended to have been kept upon Wednesday the 10 of July Anno Domini 1605 at Pewterors hall. But for want of apparance of a competent nomber of assistants which cannott be held without 13 Assistaunts at least, therefore it amounted only to an assembly of these viz.'

186. the president, Sir Robert Lee, Mr. Chamberlen, Mr. Jackson, Mr. Bowyer, Mr. Newton, Mr. Towreson, Mr. Owen, Mr. Wyche, Mr. Cobb, Mr. Greene; the secretary, and divers of the generality.

187. Albeit it hath not ben thought fitt to admitt any into the freedome but at a generall court yett forasmuch as a generall court was appointed to have kept this day and summaunce gyven accordingly, and because 11 of the Assistaunts are here present and only 2 assistants wanting to make a full court and forasmuch as diverse grave and woorshipfull persons of the generallity are nowe present and certen persons make clayme to the freedome against whom there can be no opposition or obiection, therefore it is held fitt that they be admitted and sworne at this assembly whereupon Robert Lewes also Anwell a meere merchaunt bound apprentize to a merchaunt and free of no other Company of marchaunts was for the fine of ten pownds, admitted into the freedome of this society by redemption, and tooke the oath of a freeman by redemption accordingly.

188. [p. 54] Four other persons made claim to their freedom by ancient trade. Their claims were examined and allowed, whereupon each of them paid 6s. 8d. to the use of the society and was admitted, taking the oath of a freeman by ancient trade. The claimants were Richard Wych the younger son of Richard Wych, skinner, by patrimony; Nathaniel Cobb son of Robert Cobb, girdler, also by patrimony; John Couchman by service with Paul Banning, and John Caplyn by service with George Collymere, all the latter being ancient traders.

189. At the last general court Henry Ball was elected deputy for Lynn, but

forasmuch as the company are enformed that one Mr. Thomas Sendall is a more auntient sufficient and fitter man for the said place, it is therefore ordered that the name of the said Thomas Sendall shalbe entred in the place of the said Henry Ball, and that the said Thomas Sendall shalbe Deputy for Lynne and the membres thereof for this yere ensuing.

190. A general court held at Pewterers' Hall on Friday 12 July 1605 in the presence of Thomas Wilford, president, and the following assistants:

191. Sir John Swynnerton, alderman, Sir William Romeney, alderman, Mr. Staper, Mr. Chamberlen, Mr. Cokayne, Mr. Newman, Mr. Andrew Banning, Mr. Ling, Mr. Dorrington, Mr. Bate, Mr. Savage, Mr. James, Mr. Bowyer, Mr. Towreson, Mr. Owen, Mr. Wych, Mr. Cobb, Mr. Hanger; the secretary and also divers of the generality.

192. [p. 55] The acts and agreements of the last assembly were 'liked allowed and confirmed'.

193. Andrew Banning and Richard Wych, two of the assistants, then took their oaths for the due execution of their office.

194. The two letters previously read out, from Sir Charles Cornewalleys the ambassador in Spain and from Mr. Oseley, were read again, together with a letter from Alderman Sir Stephen Soame of London 'but the court held it fitt to take further tyme to consider of all the said letters'.

195. William Anys son of Dunstan Anys who had been made free by ancient trade on 26 July 1577, claimed his own freedom by patrimony. The claim was examined and allowed, 'but by reason he departed before th'end of the court he was referred to take his oath at some other tyme'.

196. Hewyt Stapers also claimed his freedom by patrimony in the right of his father Richard Staper one of the assistants. His claim was allowed, whereupon he paid 6s. 8d. to the use of the society and took the oath of a freeman by ancient trade.

197. At a court of assistants on 8 June 1605, 'divers committees were appointed to consider the Auntient oathes and ordinaunces for the government of this society'. They were asked to revise them as they should think[fit and [p. 56] bring them up to date, before finally presenting them to a general court for its confirmation.

Whereupon diverse of the said committees having mett at three severall tymes in performance of the trust in them reposed, finding moast of the ordinances fitt to be contynued without alteration, and having altered some and leaving some others with blancks, referring all their proceedings to be altered and reformed by a generall court, doe nowe at this court offer and present the same to the whole assembly here present; who caused as many of them to be redd and debated upon as tyme would permitt, and in some points did alter reforme make perfect, and fully conclude and agree of so many of the oathes and ordinances as are entered in the booke of ordinances beginning page 1 and ending page 29. And being prevented by tyme were dryven to breake of and to referre the consideration of the residue of the said ordinances untill the next generall court.

198. The court granted Richard Langley the secretary an annuity of £20 over and above the ancient yearly standing fee of £20 and the other fees and profits due to him for the execution of his office. The annuity was granted to him only for the duration of his service [p. 57] as secretary, and the total sum of £40 was to be paid quarterly by the treasurer and allowed him in his account.

199. The court also granted Richard Colman the beadle an annuity of £6 13s. 4d. in addition to his ancient yearly standing fee of 20 marks and the usual profits of his office. He was to receive these fees only during the pleasure of the company, the total sum of £20 being paid quarterly by the treasurer and allowed him in his account.

200. A general court held at Pewterers' Hall on Wednesday afternoon 24 July 1605, in the presence of Thomas Wilford, president, and the following assistants:

201. Nicholas Ling, John Dorrington, John Bate, Robert Savage, Edward James, Robert Bowyer, John Newton, Thomas Owen, Richard Wych, George Collymere, George Hanger, Laurence Greene; the secretary and divers of the generality.

202. [p. 58] The business of the last general court was read out and confirmed, then the company proceeded as follows.

203. First, three persons claimed their freedom by ancient trade. Their claims were allowed, whereupon they were sworn in as freemen by ancient trade, paying the fine of 6s. 8d. to the use of the society. The claimants were John Howard by service with Mrs. Margaret Bond the widow of Alderman William Bond, Gregory Bland by service with Peter Collett, merchant tailor, and Edward Lynch by service with John Ramridge, mercer, all these merchants being freemen by ancient trade.

204. William Castle and Richard Syms, both mere merchants and free of no other company, sued to be admitted as freemen by redemption. They were accepted 'with free and generall consent', and paid their fines of £10 each to the treasurer before taking their oathes as freemen by redemption.

205. Whereas the names of a great nomber of parsons are inserted into his majesty's Chartre lately graunted to this society whereof divers are of the auncient freedom or discended from the same, and some others paid and disbursed money to Mr. President to have their names put in the charter, and yet neverthelesse did voluntarely consent to accept of their freedom by way of Redemption; and some others procured their names inserted by the Recommendation of honorable parsons or men in aucthority, and some by one meanes, and some by another. And whereas greate debate and dispute hath byn had in what manner the severall parsons named in the said Chartre are to be admytted, whether as freemen by auncient [p. 59] trade or else by way of Redemption, for the deciding of which doubt and for the more orderly proceeding therein; yt is at this Court agreed that Mr. Cokayne, Mr. Wych, Mr. Howe, Mr. Dorrington, Mr. Hanger, Mr. Newton and Mr. James, or any fyve of them, shall peruse over the names of all such as are inserted into the said Chartre, and inquire and learne out, by what right or how and in what manner and by whose procurement they obtayned their names to be soe inserted and to consider and lay downe aswell howe many and which are to be admytted by auncient trade as also how many and which are to be admitted by redemption, and thereof to make relation at a generall Court for further therein to be done as shalbe then thought fytt and convenient.

206. Complaints had been made to the members of the privy council that persons capable of the freedom of the company 'know not when or whether to resort to challeng the same'. It was therefore ordered

that there shalbe a generall Court held heere every Wensday morning begyning at seaven of the Clock in the sommer, and at eight of the Clock in the winter, and to end at eleaven of the Clock upon every of the same daies, and so to contynue untill order shalbe taken to the contrary.

207. [p. 60] It was also ordered that 'for the more certen observing of the said Court daies, the ease of Mr. President and the better goverment of the Company, a fytt and discreete person should be elected and chosen deputy'. Three candidates, John Newton, Roger Howe, and Arthur Jackson stood for election, 'but by lyfting up of hands th'election did fall uppon the said Mr. John Newton, who was thereupon admitted and sworne for the due execution of the said office'.

208. It was also ordered that Alderman Sir Stephen Soame,
by reason that he is free of the Company of the marchaunts of the Staple and also of the East marchaunts cannot by the true meaning of the charter be admitted into the freedom of this society, unlesse he procure the like freedom for one of this Company or pay according to the words and trew meaning of the charter.

209. By the last charter granted to the society they are required to receive into the freedom any of his majesty's subjects

which then were or shalbe meere marchaunts, and which by the lawes and statutes of this Realme may lawfully use the trade of Marchaundize from or into the Realme of England (excepting Retaylers and such other persons as in and [p. 61] by the said charter are mentioned).

The question has arisen

whether a man that hath byn a shopp keeper, and for the space of divers yeres hath given over his trade who was not brought up in the trade of marchandize seaven yeres at the least as an apprentize may be refused to be admitted into the freedome of this society by the words of the said charter.

The company, 'being desirous to carry an even and indifferent hand', observed that by the laws of the realm no man might use any trade or occupation, 'being farre inferior to the profession of a merchant', without serving at least seven years as an apprentice. After due consideration it was therefore agreed

that every parson and parsons, which during the full space and terme of seaven yeres together, hath only used, or hereafter shall use, the trade of marchandize, without keeping any shopp, or using any other trade withall, but only lyved as a meere marchaunt, (Except all such as now be or hereafter shalbe free of any spetiall incorporation or Company of merchants trading by force of any Act of parliament, charter or letters patents, into any the partes beyond the seas) shall and may from and after such tyme, as hee or they have or hath or hereafter shall have only used the trade of a mere marchaunt, during such full terme of seaven yeres in form abovesaid, be admytted and receaved into the freedome of this society by Redemption, for such fyne and fynes, (according to the tyme they shall require the said freedome) as in and by the said charter is lymitted.

210. [p. 62] It was also agreed that an act passed at the last general court, entitled 'In what tyme the freedome of this company shalbe claymed', should be reviewed and considered more carefully at 'a more full and ample generall Court'.

211. A general court held at Pewterers' Hall on Wednesday 31 July 1605 in the presence of Thomas Wilford, president, John Newton, deputy, and the following assistants:

212. Laurence Greene, treasurer, Robert Chamberlen, Nicholas Ling, Arthur Jaxon, John Dorrington, John Bate, Edward James, Robert Bowyer, Symion Furner, William Towreson, Nicholas Style, Thomas Owen, Richard Wych, George Hanger, Richard Langley, secretary, and divers of the generality.

213. The business of the last general court was read and confirmed.

214. First, an election was held to fill the vacancy left among the assistants by the election of John Newton to the post of deputy. Two candidates were nominated, Roger Howe and William Harrison, 'and the triall being made by lyfting up of hands the Election did fall upon the said Mr. Roger Howe'.

215. [p. 63] Roger Howe and two other assistants, John Bate and Nicholas Stile, then took the oath appointed for the execution of their office.

216. John Jolles, named in the charter and subsequently elected an alderman of London, 'being generally knowne to have ben an auncient trader into Spayne and Portugall' was admitted as a freeman by ancient trade. He took the appointed oath and paid the treasurer 6s. 8d. to the use of the society.

217. It was agreed that Thomas Boothby should be given a certificate by the president for the officers of the customs, 'testifying only that he is free of this society, And upon his humble suit he is only tollerated to keape open his shopp untill Michaelmas next and no longer, upon the paynes conteyned in the companies orders, or as they shall thinck fitt to ympose upon him'.

218. Humphrey Wyms, named in the charter, was refused admittance to the company unless he paid the sum of £10 and took the oath of a redemptioner, 'which he denyed to performe, and therefore departed the court for this tyme'.

219. James Boyle, mercer, claimed his freedom by service with Michael Boile, a freeman by ancient trade. His claim was allowed and he was admitted, paying his fine of 6s. 8d.

220. [p. 64] Rowland Backhouse son of the late alderman Nicholas Backhouse of London, claimed his freedom by patrimony. His claim was allowed and he was admitted, paying a fine of £10, 'being the lyke some that his father paied at his admission'. Since he was also free of the Merchant Adventurers, Backhouse 'tooke that oath which is appointed for freemen by redemption being also alreadyfree of some other company of marchaunts'.

221. Furthermore six other persons claimed their freedom by redemption, 'being all brought up as meere marchaunts or ells for the space of Seaven yeres last past and above only used the trade of a marchaunt without any manner of retailing whatsoever and being free of no other society of marchaunts'. They were John Buffeild, armourer, William Greene, cutler, Ralph Belfeild, skinner, John Davies, haberdasher, John Greenewood, draper, and Edward Skeggs, haberdasher. They each paid the treasurer £10 to the use of the society and took the oath appointed for freemen received by redemption who were not free of any other company of merchants.

222. Laurence Horton requested his freedom by redemption, but 'forasmuch as he may challenge by patrymony the freedome of the society of the marchaunt Adventurors and did refuse to renownce the same or to take the oath auntiently administred to freemen by redemption', he was thought unfit to be admitted under the terms of the charter.

223. [p. 65] The court designated a group of new committee members: the president or the deputy, Mr. Jolles, alderman, Mr. Staper, Mr. Allabaster, Mr. Dorrington, Mr. Jaxon, Mr. Ling, Mr. Bate, Mr. Towreson, Mr. Harrison and Mr. Boothby. They or any four of them were asked to join with the seven members designated at the last general court, or any five of them,

to consider of aunsweres to be presently written to Sir Charles Cornewalleys now Lord Ambassador resident in Spayne, and to Mr. Nicholas Oseley, and to advise and Consider whether it were that any of the company and which of them should resort unto the right honorable John Baptista de Taxus the Spanish Ambassador nowe resident here and shortly to returne into Spayne (as is reported) to desire his favour for the confirmation and enlardging of our Auntient liberties in Spayne.

They were also asked to think of suitable persons to be consuls in Spain and Portugal, 'and of any other matter that shall concerne the good estate of the company, and to make relation of their proceedings at the next generall court'.

224. [p. 66] A general court held at Pewterers' Hall on Wednesday 7 August 1605 in the presence of John Newton, deputy, and the following assistants:

225. Sir William Romney, Lawrence Greene, treasurer, Richard Staper, Robert Chamberlen, William Cockayne, John Newman, Nicholas Lyng, John Dorrington, John Bate, Robert Savage, Edward James, Robert Bowyer, Symion Furner, William Towerson, Richard Wych, George Hanger, Roger How, assistants of London; William Harebrowne of Yarmouth, William Nevey of Southampton, Richard Langley, secretary, and divers of the generality.

226. Robert Towerson, skinner, son of Mr. William Towerson claimed his freedom by patrimony 'in the right of his father who was an ancient freeman'. His claim was allowed, whereupon he took the oath of a freeman by ancient trade and paid 6s. 8d. to the use of the society.

227. [p. 67] The following seven persons claimed their freedom by ancient trade: Robert Bromley by service with Sir Thomas Pullison, Leonard Holmes of Yarmouth by service with the above-named William Harebrowne of Yarmouth, William Nevey of Southampton, named in the charter, by service with Paul Stavely of Southampton, John Feild by service with William Towerson, Richard Dalby of Southampton by service with William Nevey, William Payne by service with Alderman Thomas Starky, and John Colmer by service with Henry Colthurst. Their cases were examined, and as all their masters were ancient traders they were all admitted, each paying 6s. 8d. to the use of the society and taking the oath of a freeman by ancient trade.

228. Eight other persons claimed their freedom. They had all been brought up as mere merchants, or else had traded exclusively as a merchant for the last seven years without any retailing, and were free of no other society. The claimants were Henry Kynnersley, merchant tailor, Emanuell Francklyn, clothworker, Thomas Wakeman of Yarmouth, Bartholomew Wormell of Lynn, Francis Rumbald, fishmonger, William Thurston, salter, Thomas Ball, haberdasher, and Nicholas Lockwood, leatherseller. The claimants were admitted into the freedom by redemption, paying £10 each to the treasurer and taking the oath appointed for freemen by redemption who are not free of any other company of merchants.

229. [p. 68] In addition Simon Smyth claimed his freedom by patrimony. He was the son of Simon Smyth who was admitted into the freedom by redemption on 27 February 1577 for the sum of £5. His claim was allowed, whereupon he paid the fine of £5 to the use of the fellowship as his father had done before him, and took the oath appointed for a freeman by redemption who is also free of another company.

230. Thomas Waltham, named in the charter, was refused the freedom of the society 'unlesse he shall satisfie the some of £10, and also receive and take the oath appointed for a Redemptioner which he Denyed to performe, and therefore departed the court for this tyme'.

231. At this courte Mr. William Hareborne lately elected Deputy for yarmouth, did deliver some speciall reasons declaring that he cannot conveniently execute the said office, and therefore according to the purport of the companies letter, he hath caused to come up the aforenamed Leonard Holmes being sometymes his servaunt and the only man in those parts that can clayme his freedome by auncient trade, as a man fitt to supply the said office of Deputy, upon whose recommendation so made by the said Mr. Hareborne, and his loving promise to be ayding counselling, and assisting of him, the said Leonard Holmes was elected and chosen Deputy for the said towne of yarmouth and the lymitts thereof.

232. [p. 69] After the above election William Hareborne and William Nevey of Southampton, both assistants named in the charter, then took their oaths of office.

233. Mr. Nevey, earlier elected deputy for Southampton, and Leonard Holmes who had been elected deputy for Yarmouth at this court, both took their oaths as deputies for their respective divisions.

234. The following persons were delegated to form a committee: Mr. Cockayne, Mr. How, Mr. Wych, Mr. Hanger, Mr. Dorrington, Mr. Bate, Mr. Towerson and Mr. Harrison. They, or any four of them, were asked

to consider and lay downe what power and aucthority is fitt to be given to the Deputies for government in their several divisions and that the Secretary shall deliver them such copies of oathes ordinances and other things as they or any 4 of them shall thinck fitt.

235. A petition was read out from Richard Candler 'humbly desiring the freedome of this company for his owne person gratis', but consideration of it was deferred to the next court.

236. Also Hugh Hamersley named in the charter, clayming the freedome by patrymony, for as much as his father died before the graunting of the charter of Decimo Nono of Queene Elizabeth, the company have taken further tyme to consider of his clayme.

237. [p. 70] A general court held at Pewterers' Hall on Tuesday 13 August 1605 in the presence of Thomas Wilford, president, John Newton, deputy, and the following assistants:

238. Richard Staper, John Harby, Andrew Bannyng, Nicholas Lyng, Arthur Jackson, John Dorrington, Robert Savage, Nicholas Style, George Hanger, Roger How, Martyn Bond, Thomas Bostock, assistants of London; John Clynch of Ipswich; Richard Langley secretary and divers of the generality.

239. After due examination the court allowed William Fisher son of John Fisher of Ipswich to receive the freedom of the society by patrimony in the right of his father, who had received his freedom by ancient trade on 21 August 1577. As the claimant was absent from the court,

Mr. President or his deputy and fowre of the assistaunts (according to aucthority graunted by the charter) may administer unto the said William ffisher the oath of a freeman by auncient trade, he first paying to Mr. Treasurer to the use of this society the some of 6s. 8d.

240. [p. 71] Two other persons claimed their freedom by patrimony in the right of their fathers who were ancient freemen. They were Samuel Garrett, mercer, son of Anthony Garrett, and Richard Barne son of Alderman Sir George Barne, haberdasher. Their claims were allowed, whereupon they took the oaths of freemen by ancient trade and each paid 6s. 8d. to the use of the society.

241. At former courts the question had been debated

in what manner Edward Davenant, merchauntailor, should be admitted into the freedome of this society, whether by auncient trade, or as a Redemptioner by reason that the said Edward Davenant not knowing of his right by patrymony delivered Mr. Roger Howe the last Treasurer the some of Tenn poundes, making then suit to be admitted by Redemption, which the cort at that tyme refused to graunt, by reason it was supposed he was not then capable of the freedome. And sithence his name being inserted into the charter he challenged thereby the freedome as amply as any Auncient trader, which the company did not allowe. After all which upon serch made in the old books it appeareth that John Davenant, merchauntailor, deceased late father of the said Edward Davenant was an auncient free brother of this society, admitted by auncient trade and sworne the 26 of June Anno Domino 1578 whereby the said Edward Davenant claymed by his patrymony, to be admitted by auncient trade. Whose case being examyned he was found enhabled, and thereupon paid for his admittance 6s. 8d. and tooke the oath of a freeman by auncient trade, and was admitted into the freedome accordingly.

242. Four other persons claimed their freedom by ancient trade: Joseph Jackson by service with Alderman Sir John Spencer, clothworker, Thomas Witherall by service with Thomas Boothby, [p. 72] merchant tailor, Humphrey Wotton by service with William Shawcrost, girdler, and John Clynch of Ipswich by service with John Barker the elder of Ipswich. Each claimant's case was on examination found valid, for all the masters were ancient traders. Each paid 6s. 8d. to the use of the society and took the oath of a freeman by ancient trade.

243. Moreover Edward Grent, mercer, and John Dade, merchant tailor, 'being both brought up as mere merchaunts, or ells by the space of seaven yeres last past and above only used the trade of a merchaunt without any manner of retayling whatsoever, and being free of no other society of merchaunts' were admitted into the freedom by redemption. Each paid £10 to the treasurer and took the oath appointed for freemen by redemption who were unfree of any other company.

244. Peter Muffett, skinner, claimed his freedom by service with Lawrence Carlill, who became free by redemption on 20 November 1582 for the sum of £10. His case was examined and found valid, whereupon he paid £10 being the same fine paid by his master and took the oath of a freeman by redemption who was also free of another company.

245. [p. 73] According to a note made by Richard May the former secretary of the company, Richard Reynolds the apprentice of Simon Lawrence an ancient freeman claimed his own freedom on 1 February 1589 'when the keeping of Corts was discontynued'. Since he may rightfully claim the freedom,

forasmuch as he is not in estate to come abroad, therefore upon humble request made in his behalf, it is ordered that he shalbe admitted by vertue of his said service, and that Mr. President or his Deputy and fowre of the assistants (according to the aucthority graunted by charter) may administer unto him the oath of a freeman by auncient trade, he first paying to the use of the society 6s. 8d.

246. John Clynch, named in the charter as one of the assistants for Ipswich and recently elected deputy for that port and its division, 'did in open corte receave and take the two severall othes for the due execution of the said two severall offices'.

247. Whereas it is found by experience, that (when corts of Assistaunts are called) much tyme is spent, and no business can be performed, for want of a competent nomber of Assistaunts to make up a full courte, and forasmuch as Mr. Thomas Cordell and Mr. John Castlyn, two of the Assistaunts named in the charter, by reason of other occasions cannot attend the service, nor appeare at courts, (as Assistaunts ought to doe) and therefore desier to be dischardged thereof, and some others elected in their places; therefore at this corte the company dischardged the said Mr. Thomas Cordell, and Mr. John Castlyn, and proceeded to election of two other Assistaunts in their roomes ffor which purpose these woorshipfull persons following were put in election (viz) Mr. Martyn Bond, Mr. William Harrison, Mr. Thomas [p. 74] Bostock, Mr. Thomas Boothby, Mr. John Ramridge and Mr. Gyles Snoade whoe being all entreated to walk forth, the company (according to their usuall manner) proceeded to election, by lyfftyng up of handes, and by the greatest nomber of hands the election did fall upon the said Mr. Martyn Bond, and Mr. Thomas Bostock, whoe were thereunto admitted, and in open courte did receave the oath for the due execution of the said office.

248. A letter was read out from Thomas Sandyll, recently elected deputy for Lynn,
whereby he desireth to be dischardged of the said office of Deputy. But forasmuch as he is knowne to be a fitt and worthy man, the company resolve not to alter their election, and therefore doe agree that a letter shalbe written unto him for the same purpose.

249. Two other letters were read out, one from John Bagg, recently elected deputy for Plymouth, the other from John Lister, deputy for Hull.

After the reading of which letters and consideration thereunto had, and forasmuch also as diverse other Deputies have not retorned any answeres to the companies letters, yt is ordered and thought fitt, that for the swearing of the severall Deputies, and to setle government, and give direction in every of the said places, that Mr. Deputy Newton and Mr. Arthur Jackson shall with all convenient speede ryde to all the severall places, where the said deputies are elected, and that a Commission shalbe drawne and sealed with the seale of this society, to give them sufficient aucthority for the performance of the said service, and that Mr. Treasurer shall deliver them money to defray their chardges in the said Jorney. And upon the earnest motion and entreaty of the company Mr. Deputy hath gyven his absolute consent, and Mr. Jaxon hath promised (his owne private affaires being setled which will hold him almost a moneth) to prepare himself ready to undertake the service.

250. [p. 75] The court also appointed a committee of auditors for the accounts of George Hanger and Roger How, the last two treasurers of the company. The auditors were Mr. Lyng, Mr. Dorrington and Mr. Harby from among the assistants, and Mr. Harrison, Mr. Boothby, Mr. Stone, Mr. Snoade and Mr. Stokeley, five of the generality, together with either the president or the deputy.

251. The drafts of two letters were then read out, one to Sir Charles Cornewallis the ambassador in Spain 'in answere of a letter written by his Lordshipp to this company in favour of Mr. Nicholas Osely', and the other to Nicholas Osely himself. The latter was in answer to his letter
touching the procuring of a newe graunt and confirmation of the Companies charter and liberties, wherein the company doe signifie they have agreed to give his wief here in England ffyfty pounds, and to make over unto him ffowre hundred Ducketts and when the charter and priviledges are confirmed (in respect of the chardg he shalbe at) to gratifie him with Eight hundred Duckatts more.

Both drafts were approved; orders were given to provide the money and send off the letters with all convenient speed.

252. fforasmuch as many of the Assistaunts made default of apparance at this courte, therefore the names of all the Assistaunts were openly redd, and the Beadle examyned (by vertue of his oath taken to this societie) what particuler summons, and warning, he gave to every of them, and as many as were in the Country, at the tyme of the summons, or otherwise specially ymployed, were excused, but these sixe following viz. Mr. Robert Chamberlen, Mr. John Newman, Mr. John Bate, Mr. Edward James, Mr. Symion Furner and Mr. Robert Cobb, being duly sommoned, and making default of apparance, are to pay such fynes, as in such case, by the orders of this society, are lymitted and appointed.

253. [p. 76] Certain committee members were authorised at the last general court, to fix the powers and authority to be given to the outport deputies in their divisions. The secretary was also to deliver to the deputies such copies of oaths and ordinances as the committee, or any four of its members, should think fit.

According to which aucthority Mr. William Cokayne, Mr. Richard Wych, Mr. Georg Hanger and Mr. John Dorrington, four of the said committees, (being accompanied with Mr. Newton the Deputy) did assemble and meete togeather the 7 day of August 1605, and did cause their opynions and conceipts to be laid downe in wryting to be presented to the next generall corte to be confirmed or disallowed as the court should thinck fitt. The tenor whereof followeth in these words viz.

254. Imprimis every Deputy to have an abstract of the charter, or a copy at lardg, if they will pay for it.

255. Also coppies of the oath of a freeman by auncient trade.

The Oath of the Deputy

The Oath of the Assistaunts

The Oath of the Treasorer

The Oath of the Clark in the Country

256. The copy of the Act for Apprentizes that the words Marchaunt of Spayne and Portugall should be inserted in their Indentures.

257. Also the Copy of the order of Dispensation, notwithstanding the omission of the words, Spayne and Portugall, sithence 1585 which order was taken at a generall court holden ultimo Augusti 1604.

258. The copy of the Act against Marchaunts using retayling.

259. And it is agreed that the Deputies severally and respectively in their severall Divisions may admitt and sweare into the freedome, the sonnes and servaunts of such as may clayme the freedome by auncient trade, and being discended from such fathers or masters as have byn sworne to this company, and none other whatsoever, unlesse they have byn sworne, notwithstanding they be named in the Charters or either of them, and that this power and aucthority shall only have contynuance untill the feast of All Saincts next ensuing, and no longer, and then all to come up hether.

260. [p. 77] It was also agreed that the deputy should summon to him four or five freemen, 'if so many may be had, or ells as many as the place will aford' to give their consent to the acceptance of those admitted as freemen by patrimony or service.

261. Furthermore, they should with all convenient speed certify the names of all those admitted, 'and under whome, and by what right they made their clayme'.

262. Notwithstanding this authority for admitting sons and servants claiming their freedom by patrimony or ancient trade, it was also agreed that if any of the claimants by patrimony or ancient trade could not make clear proof of their rights, or if any doubts should arise in any way, 'that then every such person shalbe remitted and sent up to London, to receave their freedome here'.

263. It was also absolutely agreed that any claimants by redemption should be sent up to London, with a certificate from the deputy and six assistants

or speciall Marchaunts of the Company (yf so many may be had) or ells so many as the place will afford, testefying that they are meere Marchaunts fitt to be admitted, and have only traded in marchaundizing, seaven yeres at the least, and not free of any other company of marchaunts, and that they are neither retailours, Artificers, Inholders, farmors, comon Marryners or handycrafts men, but esteemed and knowne to be sole Marchaunts, trading beyond the Seas.

It was also agreed that all sons and servants of redemptioners should be sent up to London with similar certificates from the deputy and such merchants or assistants 'testefying whose sonnes they are, and their Masters report for their service, and no Redemptioner, nor the sonne or servaunt of any Redemptioner to be admitted without such certificate as aforesaid'.

264. [p. 78] The deputy was also to keep a full account of all the fees he received 'for admissions or for fynes, brokes or any other thing for the company, and to Accoumpt to the Treasorer when he shalbe required, and if he be not required, yet once a yere at the least'.

265. The deputy was to inform the company if any merchant also retailed goods, so that a penalty could be fixed.

266. He must also advise the company 'from tyme to tyme upon all occurrences, what is fitt for governement in those severall places to th'end it may be considered of heere, and order taken accordingly'.

267. Lastly he must give 'certificates to the Customers for freemen that have taken their Oathes, that they may Shipp, and none other, and to have a care to restraine all others'.

268. 'And concerning ympositions the company will presently consider, and advertize the severall Deputies.'

269. This report from the committee was read out in court, receiving general approval. It was agreed that it should be entered as an act of the court and that all the deputies should have a copy of it and of everything mentioned in it, 'and this order to be a sufficient warrant to the Secretary in that behalf.'

270. [p. 79] A general court held at Pewterers' Hall on Wednesday 21 August 1605 in the presence of Thomas Wilford, president, John Newton, deputy, and the following assistants:

271. Richard Staper, Robert Chamberlen, John Newman, Nicholas Ling, Arthur Jaxon, John Bate, Robert Savage, Edward James, Robert Bowyer, Symion Furner, Thomas Owen, Robert Cobb, George Collymore, George Hanger, Roger Howe, Martyn Bond, Thomas Bostock, being assistants of London; John Clynch of Ipswich, Richard Langley, secretary, and divers of the generality.

272. First, the business of the last general court was read out and confirmed.

273. Then three persons claimed their freedom by patrimony in the right of their fathers who were all freemen by ancient trade: Roger Collymore, draper, son of George Collymore, Richard Hollworthy of London, mercer, son of John Hollworthy of Bridgwater and also formerly apprenticed to James Boyle a freeman by ancient trade, and Salaman Shorter, merchant tailor, son of William Shorter. They were all admitted, paying 6s. 8d. each to the use of the society and taking the oath of freemen by ancient trade.

274. [p. 80] The following four claimants were made free by virtue of their service with freemen by ancient trade: James Bagg of Plymouth by service with Nicholas Ball of Plymouth, Thomas Style, skinner, by service with William Cokayne, William Boornford by service with William Coles, grocer, and John Hale by service with Richard Hale, grocer. They paid 6s. 8d. to the use of the society and took the oath of freemen by ancient trade.

275. Richard Candler, mercer, the clerk for policies of assurance, petitioned the company

shewing that he was bound apprentize to a merchaunt whose master was Sir Thomas Gresham being a freeman of this company. Also that he having a dwelling house in the Royall exchange will have a roome necessary for the Assistaunts to meete together at any convenyent tymes upon any sudden buisness for the company which shalbe at their commaund, and that he is not free of any forren Company. And therefore he humbly prayed the Company to graunt him the freedome gratis. (fn. 1)

The company after considering his petition granted him his freedom without charge, for his person only, 'but not to make either sonne or servaunt free'. He was admitted and took the oath of a freeman by ancient trade.

276. The seven persons following, all mere merchants and free of no other company, were admitted into the freedom by redemption: William Yonge, Benjamyn Cooper and Augustine Yonge of Yarmouth, 'upon the Certificate of Mr. William Harburne and of the Deputy of Yarmouth, and Isack Cooper of Yarmouth upon the report of Mr. Staper and others, [p. 81] and Thomas Carrowe of Lynn upon sufficient report and certificat'. In addition there were Humphrey Phipps of London, joiner, and Richard Newman, fishmonger, mere merchants for fourteen and twenty years respectively. All seven claimants paid £10 each to the use of the society and took the oath ordained for freemen by redemption who are not free of any other company.

277. Thomas Girling of Lynn son of William Girling was admitted into the freedom by patrimony, paying £10 to the use of the society as his father had paid on his admission by redemption on 18 August 1584. Thomas Girling took the oath of those freemen by redemption who were also free of some other company.

278. John Langham, leatherseller, who had traded as a mere merchant for sixteen years, 'saving only he maried a Dutchwoman who keapeth a shopp in ffanchurchstreete selling Lawnes and cambricke' requested his freedom by redemption for £10. He was denied it 'during so long tyme as his wief doth contynue the keaping of her shopp or retailing as aforesaid. And it is agreed that when shee shall gyve over the same he shalbe accepted and allowed according to his desire'.

279. Richard Hobby also claimed his freedom by service with William Sherrington 'whom he alledgeth to have ben free'. Richard Washer, John Amherst and Silvanus Payne also requested their freedom by redemption for £10 each.

fforasmuch as question is made whether by the trewe entent and meaning of the charter and the orders of the Company they be capable and fitt to be admytted, it is therefore ordered that certen Committees shalbe appointed to consider of the claymes and requests of them, and of such others as shalbe doubtfull and questionable.

280. [p. 82] There was 'eftsoones commended to the consideration of the Company the request of Sir Stephen Soame knight and Alderman of London to be admitted into the freedome of this society'. Sir Stephen Soame was already free of the Merchant Staplers and the Eastland Company;

he therefore doth desire that some one of this company (not being free of the marchaunt adventurors) may be nomynated by this court and made knowne unto him, whom he will procure to be admitted either into the freedome of the Staple or ells into the freedome of the Eastland company.

When the company was considering the matter, Thomas Boothby one of the freemen of the society but not free of the Merchant Adventurers

did offer to gyve unto this Company the some of Twenty Pownds to procure him the freedome of the Marchaunts of the Staple. Whereupon it is ordered and agreed that yf the said Sir Stephen Soame will procure the said Thomas Boothby to be made free of the company of merchaunts of the Staple, that then the said Sir Stephen Soame shalbe admitted and receaved into the freedome of this society of marchaunts of England trading into Spayne and Portugall without any other fine to be paied for the same.

281. Among those present at this court were Richard Dochester, recently elected deputy for Exeter and an ancient freeman, 'and as appeareth by a faire Register booke of Excetor sworne at Excetor 16 Januarii 1578', together with James Bagg, deputy for Plymouth, who was made free at this same court, and Nicholas Downe of Barnstaple, 'an auntient freeman admitted and sworne 21 Junii 1583 as by the records here remayning may appeare'. [p. 83] All three,
making their apparaunce hether according to letters unto them in that behaulf directed, did in open court receave and take the oath for the due execution of the office of Deputy for the severall places whereof they are elected and the Auntient lymitts within their severall Jurisdictions.

282. The above deputies

did present and deliver in open Court certen Demaunds in writing. But forasmuch as the tyme being spent they could not resolve or Determyne of them at this cort, and because the said Deputies desire expedition having speciall occasion to hasten homeward, it is therefore ordered that Mr. President and Mr. Deputy and the Committees named at a court of Assistents holden here the 7 of this instant August, viz Mr. Cokayne, Mr. How, Mr. Wych, Mr. Hanger, Mr. Dorrington, Mr. Bate, Mr. Towreson and Mr. Harrison, or any fowre of them shall meete and conferre together with the said Deputies upon and touching their said Demaunds, or any other thing for the good of the company. And what they shall determyne or conclude upon this Court doth and will approve and allowe. And it is ordered that the Secretary shall deliver unto the severall Deputies such copies as the said persons and Committees before named or any fowre of them shall appoint, and this order shalbe his sufficient warrant and dischardge in that behalf.

283. 'Lett the demaundes and resolutions entred page 87 come in here.' (fn. 2)

284. Memorandum: that on 27 August 1605 in the presence of John Newton, deputy, John Bate, Robert Bowyer and Thomas Owen, three of the assistants, and Richard Langley, secretary, according to an order taken at a general court on 13 August 1605, Richard Reynoldes took the oath of a freeman by ancient trade, paying 6s. 8d. to the use of the society.

285. [p. 84] A general court held at Pewterers' Hall on Wednesday 28 August 1605 in the presence of Thomas Wilford, president, John Newton, deputy, and the following assistants:

286. William Cokayne, John Newman, Andrew Bannyng, Nicholas Lyng, Arthur Jackson, Robert Savage, Edward James, George Hanger, Roger How, Martyn Bond, Thomas Bostock, being assistants of London; John Whitson of Bristol, James Bagg of Plymouth and divers of the generality.

287. The business of the last court was read out and confirmed.

288. Two persons claimed their freedom by patrimony in the right of their fathers, 'auncient freemen, well knowne to the company': John Pytt of Weymouth son of Mr. Richard Pytt of Weymouth and Robert Peacock, grocer, son of Mr. Robert Peacock. They were admitted, taking the oath of freemen by ancient trade and paying 6s. 8d. to the use of the society.

289. [p. 85] Five other persons claimed their freedom by apprenticeship to ancient traders: William Waltham of Weymouth by service with John Peter of Exeter, John Stradling of Bridgwater by service with Robert Bucking of Bridgwater, Henry Jennyngs, draper, by service with Robert Cox, William Morse, skinner, by service with William Cokayne the elder, and Charles Colfox, haberdasher, by service with Edmund Eyton. Their claims were examined and found valid, whereupon the claimants paid 6s. 8d. each to the use of the company and were admitted, taking the oath of freemen by ancient trade.

290. John Erick of London, a mere merchant and free of no other company, 'making suite to be admitted by Redemption, was with free and generall consent accepted'. He paid his fine of £10 and took the oath of a freeman by redemption.

291. Thomas Stoner of Southampton came to this court to claim his freedom by patrimony through his father Peter Stoner of Southampton an ancient merchant named in the charter of 1577. 'But his clayme was referred to be further considered of, and determyned, by Mr. Deputy Newton, att his commyng downe into those parts.'

292. At a general court on 28 June 1605, the company elected Alexander Jones as deputy of Bridgwater, 'and by letter written unto him did require him to make his repaire hether, to take his oath for the due execution of the said place'. At this court a letter was read out from Alexander Jones [p. 86]

wherein he alleadgeth that by reason of dishabillity of body, he is not hable to undertake the travell and chardg of the said place, and therefore having procured a counsell or meeting of the said society within the said towne, they made choice of Mr. John Stradling a freeman by auncient trade, to supply the said place of Deputy, whom they sent up of purpose to receave the said oath. But forasmuch as sithence the wryting of the said letter, the company doe fynde that the towne of Bridgwater hath byn heretofore a member, and under the Jurisdiction of the citty of Bristoll, therefore they have forborne the swearing of any Deputy there, unlesse the Deputy and merchaunts of Bristoll give their consents thereunto. And therefore it is agreed that the said Mr. John Stradling shalbe allowed to beare his charges in commyng up hether the some of Three poundes, the same to be paid by Mr. Treasuror, and to be allowed him in his accompt.

293. A letter to the company from Sir Charles Cornwallys the lord ambassador in Spain was openly read out.

294. It was endorsed as sent to the right worshipful the Spanish company of merchants in London, and its contents were as follows.

295. After my harty commendations, et cetera, understanding that the office of Consulshipp for Portugall was by the king's majesty of Spaine long before my hether commyng, given to one Rowland Maylard, Englishman and Inhabitant of the said citty, conceiving him thereby to be of good sufficiency every way for the executing and dischardg of that place, I thought good at his very ernest suite, so far as in me lay to confirm and Ratifie unto him the said graunt of the King yet with condition on his parte, under his hand wryting to be performed, that if hereafter it [p. 87] shall appeare to me, that any iust complaint of his bad and evill dealing in the said place, be by the company made against him, he will at my direction forthwith resigne the same to whome the election of an other shall be found to appertayne. And so hoping that you will rest well contented with what herein I have done, I bid you hartely farewell from Vallodolid of July the 26.
Your loving friend
Charles Cornwalys

296. After reading the letter the company decided that

by vertue of the charter graunted by our soveraigne lord the king's majesty, the election of Consulls doth belong to this company. Therefore they held it not fitt to give any allowance or assent to the election made either by the king of Spaine, or by the said Lord Ambassadour, but to appoint and elect a fitt man of their owne knowledg and nomynation.

A letter to that effect was to be sent to the ambassador.

297. Lett these Demandes of the Westerne Deputies, and the resolutions thereupon be entred in th' end of page 83. (fn. 3)

298. Demaunds by the Deputies of the westerne Devisions 21 Augusti 1605.

299. Item that our courts may contynue of so many assistaunts as in tyme past, that is 16 of Exceter, 12 of Plymouth, and that Barnestable which before had ben 6 Assistaunts may (for better government) be allowed 8.

300. Item that wee may have the Charter Exemplefied under the seale, to be in Exeter, as in tyme past.

301. [p. 88] Item that our courts may have power, to make and establish lawes, and ordynances for the beter government of the company, and ordering of their goods and marchaundizes.

302. Item that our Deputies, and other officers, may take their oath for the executing of their offices at our generall corts holden for that purpose, and not to be compelled to come to London, being so greate a Jorney, and needlesse chardg.

303. Item, that sonnes, Apprentices, and Redemptioners, may be made free there, and not compelled to come to London for the causes aforesaid.

304. Item that the moyety of our fynes, Impositions, Amerciaments and all other penalties, and brokes, may remayne and be amongest us, towardes the Defraying of any needfull chardg, and relief of decayed bretheren.

305. Item that whereas the President, and Assistaunts, have power to make lawes, that wee may no further be bound by oath to the observations of them then as they may stand with the good of our Countrey, and the consent of our severall courts there.

306. A committee held at Pewterers' Hall on Wednesday afternoon, 21 August 1605, in the presence of

307. Mr. Wilford, president, Mr. Newton, deputy, Mr. Ling, Mr. Howe, Mr. Hanger, Mr. Harrison; deputies Mr. Dochester of Exeter, Mr. Bagg of Plymouth, Mr. Downe of Barnstaple, Mr. Clynch of Ipswich.

308. The committee assembled according to the order taken at the general court held on the morning of 21 August 1605, 'to advise and consider of the Demaundes before mentyoned, being delivered in open corte by the severall Deputies, before named'. Their answers to the demands were as follows:

309. [p. 89] The first Demaund is assented unto, and allowed by the said Committees.

310. To the second wee thinck that a copy of the Charter wilbe sufficient, which our Secretary (for reasonable consideration) shall deliver. And it shalbe allowed them againe out of their ympositions, whereupon the said Deputies were well satisfied and content with the same.

311. To the third wee thinck that by our letters patents all Acts and ordynaunces for the good goverment of the whole society, are to be made, and agreed upon here, at a generall corte. Otherwise greate confusion might growe in making of Acts and therefore it is requisite the Deputies, and Assistaunts, should conforme themselves, and be bound to governe by such Acts and ordynaunces, as shalbe made and agreed here by the generall courte. Nevertheless for there owne better goverment wee thinck it lawfull and fitt, that the Deputies, Assistaunts and generality in their severall Divisions from tyme to tyme may devise, and lay downe acts and ordinaunces amongest themselves, which acts and ordynaunces before the putting of the contents thereof in execution, they shall send unto us in wryting, and being allowed, and ratified by our generall courte, they shall stand in force, or ells not.

312. Item, to the 4th that the like order and course be observed, as in auncient tyme was accustomed, aswell for electing as for swearing of Deputies, Assistaunts and officers.

313. Item to the ffyft, that the Indenture of every apprentice bound in the Countrey, shalbe sent up hether to be enrowled with our Secretary here, within the ffirst yere after his bynding, and that the Secretary shalbe allowed for every such enrowlment 12d., and that every such Apprentice whose Indenture shalbe so enrowled within the first yere and shalbe bound to a freeman by auncient trade, shall at the expiration of his terme (yf he shall faithfully serve his Master according to such Indenture) be sworne before the Deputy, Assistaunts and generality [p. 90] in the Countrey. But every such Apprentice, whoe shall not be enrowled within the first yere, shalbe sent up hether to receave his freedome here. And all Redemptioners whatsoever, and the sonnes and servaunts of all Redemptioners shalbe sent up hether to receave their freedome with such certificate from the Deputy and Assistaunts there, as by an order taken at a former Committee entred at Corte holden the 13 of August 1605 is mentioned.

314. Item to the 6th the severall Deputies and their Treasurers to rendour accoumpt of all receipts, as in former tymes hath byn accustomed.

315. Item to the 7th they are to be bound (as wee and all brothers in the company are) according as in the oathes and ordynaunces is mentioned, and according to the true entent and meaning of the same.

316. And for the present the said Committees doe thinck fitt, that the severall Deputies shall have such copies delivered them and be only aucthorised to proceede so farr, as was formerly thought fitt by the Committees, to whome the same was referred, according as it is agreed and entred at a generall courte holden the said 13 day of August 1605, and hereafter to have such further addition or detraction, as circumstaunces and tyme may Minister iust occasion. Vide page 83. (fn. 4)

317. [p. 91] A general court held at Pewterers' Hall on Friday 30 August 1605 in the presence of Thomas Wilford, president, John Newton, deputy, and the following:

318. Lawrence Greene, treasurer, William Cokayne, John Newman, Andrew Bannyng, Arthur Jackson, Edward James, Robert Bowyer, Thomas Owen, Robert Cobb, George Hanger, Roger Howe, Martyn Bond, assistants of London; John Whitson of Bristol, James Bagg of Plymouth, Richard Langley, secretary, and divers of the generality.

319. The business of the last general court was read out and confirmed.

320. And this corte being specially appointed only to conclude of the Acts and ordynaunces for the goverment of this society, and of a commission or aucthority to be graunted to Mr. John Newton (the Deputy generall) and Arthur Jackson (one of the Assistaunts) whoe at a former courte were entreated and appointed to ryde to Bristoll, and the other severall porte townes, to keepe Courte and performe services, and ymployments for the good of the company. They caused a draught of a comission prepared for the same purpose to be openly redd, the tenour whereof followeth in these words, viz.

321. [p. 92] To all true Christian people to whom this present wryting shall come, the President, Assistaunts and fellowshipp of Marchaunts of England trading into Spaine and Portugall send greeting. Whereas our moast gratious soveraigne Lord the King's moast excellent Majesty that now is, by his highnes letters patents under the greate seale of England, bearing date at Westminster the 31 day of May last, did incorporate us into a society or fellowshipp, with aucthority to keepe courts, Elect officers, and to admitt freemen into our society, and to make and ordayne lawes and statutes for the goverment of our Society, and with diverse other privileges and ymmunities as in and by the said letters patents at large appeareth. Now knowe yee that aswell for the present ease of all the Deputies, and other freemen (whoe ought to come up to London to receave their oathes) and for the setling of goverment in every severall place where Deputie [sic] are or heretofore have byn appointed, and for keeping of courts, electing and swearing of officers, and Ministers in the said severall places (which have not byn lately sworne here at London) admitting and swearing of freemen, aswell as by Patrymony and service, as also by Redemption and doing and performing all other things which wee the President Assistaunts and fellowship can or may doe, by vertue of the said charter, wee have nomynated constituted and appointed, And by these presents Doe nomynate, constitute and appoint our trusty and welbeloved, John Newton (the Deputy generall of our said society) and Arthur Jackson (one of the Assistaunts of the same) whome wee have aucthorised and entred to performe, execute and undertake this greate trust and ymployment before mentyoned, of whose approved wisdomes and [p. 93] fidelity wee have sufficient experience. And forasmuch as they have byn present with us at moast of our courts and thereby are fully acquainted with our orders and manner of government here, wee are confidently perswaded they will keepe their courts, and so dispose of busines by vertue of this commission, with that integrity and indifferency as they have observed, and knowne us to governe here, wherein we desier one and the self same order to be observed without respecting of persons, or any favour or parcially to be shewed to any whatsoever. Especially requiring them that if (upon examynation) they shall fynd the name of any person to be inserted into the said charter, whoe cannot lawfully clayme the freedome thereof, as sonne or servaunt to some freeman heretofore admitted and allowed by auncient trade, that then (according to the Ordynaunce and our proceedings here) they shall not admitt or swere him or them into the freedome of this society, unlesse he or they first satisfie to the use of the society the some of Tenn pounds apeece, and take the oath appointed for a Redemptioner, and that if any of them shall refuse soe to doe, that then they admonish and warne him and them to desist and forbeare trading under the paines contayned in the companies ordynaunces. And for the better directions of the said John Newton and Arthur Jackson in their proceedings wee have delivered unto them a perfect and true copy of our Charter and of certen Ordynaunces and statutes already made, devised, and allowed, for the goverment of the Company. And whatsoever they shall doe in the premisses wee doe by these presents, promisse to [p. 94] ratifie and allowe. In witness whereof wee have hereunto caused our comon seale to be putt, the fowrth day of September Anno domino 1605.

322. After the commission had been modified in some points and finally embodied in the form given above, it was ordered

that the same shalbe ingrossed against the next generall courte to be then sealed with the auncient Common seale of this society, being in open courte produced and shewed furth by Mr. President, in whose custody the same hath remayned sithence the dissolving of our auncient Courts.

It was also ordered that the treasurer should deliver £20 to Mr. Newton and Mr. Jackson towards the costs of their journey, and the sum be allowed him in his account. 'And what chardges they shall disburse in their said Jorney upon an Accompt by them made and delivered up, shalbe allowed and paid by this company.'

323. The company then went on to the reading of various acts and ordinances for the government of the society,

whereof parte of them were taken out of the auncient ordynaunces of this Company, with some alterations and aditions, as to certen Committees, appointed to consider of them, were thought fitt and convenient. And so many as were thought unnecessary, and which tyme had worne out of use, were frustrated, made void, and omitted, and the residue which were held fitt, and proffitable for the goverment of the company, were ratified and allowed, and all such as are appointed now to stand in force, are entred in a faire register booke, (called the booke of ordynaunces) made and appointed for that purpose.

324. [p. 95] A general court held at Pewterers' Hall on Wednesday 4 September 1605 in the presence of Thomas Wilford, president, John Newton, deputy, and the following assistants:

325. Lawrence Greene, treasurer, John Newman, John Harby, Andrew Banning, Nicholas Lyng, John Dorrington, Robert Savage, Edward James, Robert Bowyer, Symion Furner, Thomas Owen, Richard Wyche, George Hanger, Roger How, Martyn Bond, Thomas Bostock, assistants of London; Richard Langley, secretary, and divers of the generality.

326. The business of the last general court was allowed and confirmed.

327. The commission to John Newton the deputy general and Arthur Jackson one of the assistants, agreed on at the previous general court, 'and now ingrosed in parchment, was sealed with the common seale of this society'.

328. Three persons claimed their freedom by patrimony in the right of their fathers who were all freemen by ancient trade: Henry Newton mercer, son of John Newman the deputy, Nathaniel Isam, mercer, son of Henry Isam, and Leonard Shawe, clothworker, son of Francis Shawe. They were all [p. 96] admitted, paying 6s. 8d. each to the use of the society and taking the oath of a freeman by ancient trade.

329. Also the following five persons were made free by service with merchants who were free by ancient trade: Richard Cox, grocer, by service with Robert Peacock, John Skybow, grocer, by service with Richard Reynolds, John Morris, haberdasher, by service with Robert Dawborne, Robert Criste 'now of London' with William Godbeare of Taunton, and Robert Greene, grocer, by service with Robert Brooke the younger. Each paid 6s. 8d. to the use of the society and took the oath of a freeman by ancient trade.

330. The following four persons 'being all mere merchaunts, and free of no other society of merchaunts, and having used merchaundising above the space of seaven yeres' were admitted into the freedom by redemption: William Whitwey of Dorchester, (fn. 5) John Roye of Weymouth, Richard Archdale of London, draper, and Richard Washer of London, fishmonger. Each paid £10 to the use of the society and took the oath appointed for redemptioners free of no other company.

331. John Hawes, salter, claimed the freedom by service with John Cage. He was admitted, paying a fine of £5 'being the like some that his Master paid', and took the oath of a freeman by redemption.

332. [p. 97] At the motion and request of the right worshipfull Mr. John Doderidge Esquiour, the king's Majesty's Solicitour generall, it is concluded and agreed that William Gamyng of [blank] in the County of Devon, shalbe admytted and receaved into the freedome of this society for his owne person gratis. And it is agreed that Mr. Deputy Newton and Mr. Jaxon when they come into the Country may mynister unto him the oath of a freeman, according to his admyttaunce.

333. Also Richard Hobby, haberdasher, apprenticed formerly to William Sherrington, requested his freedom by ancient trade 'by vertue of his office'. However, no record could be found that William Sherrington had ever been made free,

so as the said Richard Hobby cannot directly prove himself capeable thereof. Neverthelesse it hath pleased the Company, to bestowe upon him the freedome of this society for his Owne parson gratis and thereupon in open courte he was admytted and sworne accordingly.

334. Upon the humble petition of Josias Brand, a poore brother of this Company, it is agreed, that Mr. Treasurer shall deliver him the some of fyve pownds, upon his Bond to the Company in £10, to repay the same at our Lady Day next.

335. It was also agreed that the sum of £10, which Edward Davenatt deposited with Mr. Howe the former treasurer, should be repaid to him 'because it appeareth that he had right to the freedome by Patrymony, whereupon he was lately admytted'.

336. [p. 98] It was agreed that the president

shalbe allowed, (for and in respecte of the Execution of his said office, and his care and dilligence in the affaires of the Company) a yerely some of one hundreth pownds, whereof £50 to be accoumpted for his standing fee, and £50 by way of gratuity. And the same allowaunce to comence and begyn at our Lady Day was Twelve moneth, which was Anno Domino 1604.

He would thus receive £150 next Michaelmas to cover one and a half years' service. Thereafter the fee was to be paid quarterly by successive treasurers and allowed them in their accounts.

337. It was also agreed that Mr. Newton the deputy 'for and in respect of his greate care and dilligence in the service of the Company' should receive an annuity of £50, of which £30 was his standing fee and £20 a gratuity. It was to be paid quarterly by the treasurer, beginning at Michaelmas next.

338. [p. 99] A general court held at Pewterers' Hall on Friday 6 September 1605 in the presence of Thomas Wilford, president, and the following assistants:

339. Sir Robert Lee, alderman, Sir William Romeney, alderman, Lawrence Greene, treasurer, Richard Staper, Robert Chamberlen, Andrew Bannyng, John Newman, John Harby, Nicholas Lyng, John Dorrington, Robert Savage, Edward James, Robert Bowyer, Richard Wych, George Hanger, Roger How, Martyn Bond, Thomas Bostock, Richard Langley, secretary.

340. 'There was also then and there present not being of the Assistaunts the right worshipfull Sir John Spencer and Sir Thomas Pullison knights and divers of the generallity.'

341. Nicholas Leate, ironmonger, claimed his freedom by service with Sir Thomas Cambell an ancient freeman. He was admitted after paying a fine of 6s. 8d. and taking the oath of a freeman by ancient trade.

342. [p. 100] Robert Sandy, grocer, a mere merchant for twenty years 'and free of no other society of marchaunts (saving onely of East India)', requested his freedom by redemption. He paid a fine of £10, took the oath of a redemptioner, and was admitted accordingly.

343. And notwithstanding the company have heretofore held the freedome of East India not to be any barr or ympedyment to restraine any from being admytted into the freedome of this society, yet upon the motion of some of the Company it was held fytt, that some order might be laid downe and Recorded concerning the resolution of the Company in that case, whereupon being put to question to the howse, it was resolved and fully agreed, that the said Company of East India is dissolved, and not to be any longer accoumpted for a Company, and that any such freedom of itself, is not thought sufficient to barr or hinder any marchaunt (being otherwise lawfully quallified, according to the charter and the Companies ordynaunces) to be admytted and receaved into this society. (fn. 6)

344. The company then proceeded to the election of consuls

to rule and governe in Spayne and Portugall, according to the true intents and meaning [p. 101] of the charter (ffor which purpose this Courte was specially called). And first they entred into consideration how many, and for what places Consulls were to be elected. And in the end they agreed to make election of severall Consulls, for these severall places following (viz)

345. '(1) Biskey (2) Baion in Galitia (fn. 7) (3) Lisboine (4) St. Lucar and Sivill (5) Malaga (6) Valentia (7) Canaries (8) Matheres (fn. 8) (9) St. Michael's, and the 7 other Islands'. (fn. 9)

346. They then proceeded to elect consuls for the above places, with nominations as follows:

347. 'Bisky: James Wych, Thomas Chace and William Palmer. An then by lifting up of hands the Election did fall upon the said James Wych'.

348. The following elections then took place. Bayona in Galicia: Francis Lambert, Hugh Lea and John Audley, of whom Francis Lambert was elected.

349. [p. 102] Lisbon: Hugh Lea, John Audley and Phillip Gregory, of whom Hugh Lea was elected.

350. San Lucar and Seville: Hugh Bourman, John Audley and John Ramridge, of whom Hugh Bourman was elected.

351. Malaga: Simon Bourman, Humphrey Wootton and Jeffrey Davies, of whom Humphrey Wootton was elected.

352. 'But for Valentia and other the places before named, they take longer and further tyme to make inquiry, and to informe themselves of fytt and worthy men to be Consulls in the said severall places.'

353. After the above elections were concluded, a committee was set up with the following members: the president, Sir William Romeney, Mr. Staper, Mr. Andrew Banning, Mr. Harby, Mr. Wych, Mr. How, Mr. Hangar, Mr. Dorrington, Mr. Lyng, Mr. Bond, Mr. Bostock, Mr. James, all of them assistants; Mr. Parslow, Mr. Harrison, Mr. Davies, of the generality.

354. [p. 103] They or any seven of them were asked to meet on Monday next, 9 September 1605,

and to send for so many of the said Elected Consulls as are nowe remayning about London, and to conferr with them touching their allowaunce and entertaynement for th'execution of the said places, and to consider and lay downe what allowaunce is fytt to be given to the other elected Consulls that are absent.

355. The committee was also asked to consider the levying of impositions and, if any were to be levied, at what rates.

356. Furthermore they were
to consider of an act drawne by Mr. President prohibiting that no stranger shall lade with or amongst the freemen of this society, and to make relation of all their proceedings at the next generall Courte, for further therein to be donne, as shalbe then thought fytt and Convenient.

357. An assembly held at Pewterers' Hall on Wednesday 11 September 1605 in the presence of the following assistants:

358. Mr. Wilford, president, Andrew Banning, Nicholas Ling, John Dorrington, Robert Savage, Roger Howe, Martyn Bond, Thomas Bostock, Richard Langley, secretary, and certain of the generality.

359. [p. 104] A general court was to be held this day, but

for want of a Competent nomber of assistaunts they could not proceede, nor determyne the businesse, for which the Court was specially summoned. And therefore it was earnestly desired that such as were absent should pay the penalties, due by the ordynaunces to be inflicted upon such as make default of apparaunce at such Courts.

360. The draft of a letter to the deputy of Southampton was read out and passed. It concerned

an information that was given, that one Mr. Janveryne not being free, was in hand to lade a French Barck for Spayne, requiring the Deputy (if it were trew) to make stay thereof. And Mr. Davies one of this society being in Courte hath undertaken for 10s. to send a foote post with the letter and to retorne an aunswer, which some is agreed shalbe delivered and payd.

361. A general court held at Pewterers' Hall on Friday 13 September 1605 in the presence of Thomas Wilford, president, and the following assistants:

362. Sir Robert Lee, Lawrence Greene, treasurer, Richard Staper, Robert Chamberlen, Andrew Banning, William Cokayne, John Newman, Nicholas Ling, John Dorrington, Robert Savage, Nicholas Stile, Roger Howe, Martyn Bond, Thomas Bostock, Richard Langley, secretary.

363. [p. 105] Also present was Alderman John Jowles, 'not being of the Assistaunts' and divers of the generality.

364. The business of the previous general court was read out and confirmed.

365. First, John Garrett, merchant tailor, claimed his freedom by service with Peter Collett an ancient freeman. He was admitted after paying a fine of 6s. 8d. and taking the oath of a freeman by ancient trade.

366. Richard Aldworth, grocer, and John Cooper, fishmonger, both mere merchants for many years and members of no other society, were admitted into the freedom by redemption. They paid £10 each 'and tooke the auntient Oath for Redemptioners in that case ordayned and provided'.

367. Then the report of the committee authorised at the last general court was read out. The committee was to consider the question of allowances for the consuls in their different posts, the levying of impositions, and the president's draft of an act forbidding strangers to load with or amongst those free of the society. Their report was as follows:

368. According to the aucthority graunted at the last generall Court, we Andrewe Banning, Roger Howe, Richard Wych, George Hanger, John Dorrington, Nicholas Lynge, Martyn Bond, Thomas Bostock, and Edward James, being [p. 106] of the Assistaunts and Gyles Parslowe, William Harrison and John Davies of the generallity (being accompanied with Mr. Wilford President) did assemble and meete together at Pewterers hall upon Munday and Tuesday being the 9th and 10th daies of this instant moneth of September 1605 and did cause our opinions and conceipts to be laid downe in writing to be presented to the next generall Courte to be confirmed or disallowed as the Court shall thincke fytt, the tenour whereof followeth in these words viz.:

369. We the said Commyttees upon long conference amongest ourselves, and regarding the severall expences and charge that will growe upon the severall Consulls, within their severall divisions and cercuits, in executing the office of Consulshipp, are of opinion, that yf they faithfully parforme the office and charge incident to such a place, that they may deserve those stipends and allowaunces heereafter following:

370. Inprimis the Consull for St. Lucar and Civill the yerely allowaunce of two hundreth pounds of lawfull English money.

371. And to the Consull resident in Lisborne the yeerely allowaunce of one hundreth and fifty pownds of like money.

372. And the severall Consulls resident in Baion in Galitia, Biskey, and Maliga, the severall yerely allowaunces of forty pownds apeece, of like lawefull English money.

373. And we are further of opynion that it were fytt that every Shipp whatsoever fraighted into, or from Spayne or Portugall, of the burden of one hundreth Tonnes or under shall pay one ducket, and every shipp above one hundreth tonnes shall pay two ducketts, the same to be paid by the master or owner of every such shipp or shipps at such places where any such shipp or shipps shall first discharge or unloade any goods or Marchaundizes, and the same to be [p. 107] Levied and receaved by the severall Consulls (in the parts of Spayne and Portugall) within their severall devisions, to the use of this society, for which they shall make iust and true accoumpts and be aunswerable to the Company for all they shall receave. (fn. 10)

374. And concerning the levying of Impositions upon all and every the goods or Marchaundizes transported or retorned into or from the parts of Spayne and Portugall, the said Commyttees the first day did thinck fytt that the some of 2s. 6d. outward, and 2s. 6d. homeward, shalbe levied uppon the value of every hundreth pounde so to be transported or returned as aforesaid. But at the second daies meeting, uppon further consideration they thought fytt to increase the same 2s. 6d., unto the some of 3s. 4d. owtward, and asmuch homeward. And that the same Impositions should generally be receaved and entred in a faire booke heere in England by such parson as heereafter upon further consideration (by the Company at a generall Courte) shalbe aucthorized and allowed, to receave the same. (fn. 11)

375. And towching the order drawne by Mr. President they referr the same to a generall Courte.

376. After the report of the committee had been read out,

greate dispute and reasoning grewe concerning the same, some holding the allowaunce greater then th'estate of the Company as yett fytt or hable to defray. Others wishing their allowaunce as greate in substaunce, but utterly disliking that the same should be made by such certen yerely fee from the body of the Company.

In the end, 'after along tyme spent in debating and discoursing thereof' it was noted that there was a sum given to the cape-merchant or his factor,
to be distributed for [p. 108] Romaging, wynding, hasar, Primage, Pilatage, petit lodagie money, (fn. 12) and in rewarding of the master and others of the Company as they shewe themselves dilligent about the Marchaunt's goods. And in some parts of Spayne and Portugall they pay after one rate, and in some after an other, but in noe place above two royalls and a half plate money of Spayne (fn. 13) upon a tonn.

It was therefore suggested that in addition to this allowance, half a royal per ton might be paid to the consuls together with the fine of a ducat on each ship, which would be 'as greate and a more fytt and proper allowaunce to be made unto them, then the said certen yerely fees before mentioned'. Although the suggestion was 'well allowed and apprehended by some, yet by others for speciall causes was not approved, and therefore referred to be considered better of, at the next generall Courte'.

377. [p. 109] A general court held at Pewterers' Hall on Wednesday 18 September 1605 in the presence of Thomas Wilford, president, and the following:

378. Lawrence Greene, treasurer, Andrew Banning, John Newman, John Harby, Symion Furner, Thomas Owen, Richard Wyche, Robert Cobb, George Collymore, George Hanger, Roger How, Martyn Bond, Thomas Bostock, Richard Langley, secretary, and divers of the generality.

379. Three persons claimed their freedom by ancient trade: Hugh Hamersley, haberdasher, 'being named in the last charter and the sonne of Hugh Hamersley decessed who was well knowne to have ben an auntient trader before Anno 1568'; William Anys, grocer, son of Dunstan Anys who was made free in 1577; and Robert Barker of London, mercer, [p. 110] son of William Barker of Ipswich, 'who is named in the charter of 19 Elizabeth, knowne to diverse of the company present to have ben an auntient trader and to have ben present at many courts, albeit it cannott be fownd when he was sworne'. They were all made free by ancient trade, paying 6s. 8d. each and taking the oath provided for that case.

380. Ninus Lane, merchant tailor,

being made free of that company by patrimony, but bound by Indenture (orderly made with the words Spayne and Portugale in the same) unto John Challenger, haberdasher, and having faithfully served his whole terme as Mr. Challenger being present in Court doth make report, is by vertue of his service admitted into the freedome of this society.

He paid £5, 'being the like somme that Mr. Challener paid at his admission', and took the oath appointed for such a redemptioner.

381. The three persons following, all mere merchants free of no other company, were granted the freedom by redemption. They were Robert Cox, grocer, George Dunscombe, merchant tailor, and Abraham Beavoir of Guernsey ('Garnsey'). Each paid £10 and took the oath appointed for them, being admitted accordingly.

382. [p. 111] The report of the committee on consuls, entered up under the last general court, was read out and considered. It was resolved that every ship of the burden of 100 tons or less, freighted to or from Spain and Portugal, should pay one ducat, and every ship above 100 tons should pay two ducats. The sum was to be paid by the master or owner at the first port at which any goods were unloaded. The money would be collected by each consul in his division, 'to the use of the society ffor which they shall make Just and trewe accoumpts, and be aunswerable to the Company for all they shall or may receave'.

383. As regards the impositions to be levied on any goods transported to or from Spain and Portugal, 'it was demaunded what sommes were fitt to be levied upon the value of every hundreth pownd, both outward and inward'. The sums of 2s. 6d., 3s. 4d. and 5s. were each suggested in turn, 'and first by triall by lyfting up of hands to every of the said sommes the greatest nomber of hands were for the two first somes viz. 2s. 6d. and 3s. 4d., and the fewest nomber for 5s.'.

The two smaller sums were voted on once more, 'and then by moast hands and voices it was agreed that 3s. 4d. outward and 3s. 4d. inward shalbe levied for ymposition upon all merchaundize of the value of £100, and so after the same rate for merchandizes of greater or lesser value'.

384. [p. 112] The goods would be valued according to the custom-house rate, but for wines, which are not rated there, it was agreed 'that for all sorts of wynes whatsoever a butt or pipe shalbe rated and valued at £5. But it is not as yett concluded when the said ympositions shalbe collected'. (fn. 14)

385. With regard to the additional half royal per ton mentioned previously, 'the same is disalowed and by the greatest nomber disliked and not thought fitt to be graunted'.

386. And forasmuch as greate varyety of opinyons was shewed when the allowaunces to Consulls should begin and much tyme spent and little concluded upon concerning the same, it was in th'end thought that a Court of Assistaunts might better resolve and determyne of such and the like business.

The general court therefore thought fit to refer the whole matter to a court of assistants, asking them not only to settle it but also to consider 'what directions and aucthority is fitt to be gyven to the Consulls, and what letters are to be procured either from his Majestie or the lords of the Counsaill (for their better Creditt) to be carried over with them'. The general court will confirm whatever sums the assistants think fit to grant the consuls 'for their better furnishing before they goe over', and also ratify the orders and directions they decide on for them.

387. As for the consuls' yearly standing fees, the general court approved the sums as set out in the report of the committee.

388. [p. 113] A letter was read out in court from the earls of Dorset and of Salisbury, 'in favour of William Masham to be admitted into the freedome of this society'.

389. A letter was also read out from Bristol, sent by the deputy Mr. Newton and Arthur Jaxon, 'shewing that the merchaunts of Bristoll pretende to stand and governe of themselves, and refuse to submitt themselves to the orders and government of this society'.

390. Lastly a letter was read from Hugh Lee the newly-elected consul for Lisbon. However, it was decided to take further time to consider all these letters before drafting any replies.

391. A general court held at Pewterers' Hall on Wednesday 25 September 1605 in the presence of Thomas Wilford, president, and the following assistants:

392. Mr. Greene, treasurer, Mr. Banning, Mr. Newman, Mr. Ling, Mr. Dorrington, Mr. James, Mr. Bowyer, Mr. Furner, Mr. Cobb, Mr. Collymere, Mr. Hanger, Mr. Bond, Mr. Boston; the secretary and also divers of the generality.

393. [p. 114] The business of the last general court was read and confirmed.

394. Thomas Higgins 'the late elect deputy for Rye, was admytted into the freedome of this Company for his owne parson gratis'. He took two oaths, that of a freeman and that of a deputy, and the president and treasurer were authorised 'to satisfy him such allowaunce for his charge in coming up as in their wisdomes shalbe thought fytt'.

395. The letter from the earls of Dorset and Salisbury to the company on behalf of William Masham was read out as follows.

396. To our loving frends the President Assistaunts and fellowship of Marchaunts of England trading Spayne and Portugall, be these et cetera.

397. After our harty commendations. Whereas before the sealing of your Patent, William Masham of London made suite unto us to be the meanes for his admytaunce into your society, who uppon his earnest suite and greate reasons alleadged of his discontynuance of his other trade to Stoade, and long frequenting and using his whole trade, into the Countries of the King of Spain the greatest parte of his estate being there [p. 115] ymployed, and his servaunts there resident, obtayned our favourable promise therein, which was by us omytted and forgotten to be spoken at the sealing of your graunt. Wherefore although (having of late byn sued by many) we have ben, and are very loathe to presse you with any inconvenience, yet have wee thought good in regard of our former promise to pray and entreate you, onely to entertayne into your Company the said William Masham assuring you that by yelding to this our request, you shall drawe us from henceforth not to importune you in the behalf of any other. And so we bidd you hartely farewell, from Dorsett Howse the ffyfth of September 1605.
Your very loving friends
Thomas Dorset Salisbury

398. After considering the letter

the Company were very desiorous to graunt asmuch as by their charter they lawfully might, yet finding that the said William Masham is free of an other Company of Marchaunts, they have admitted and sworne him into the freedom of this Companie for his owne person gratis, whereunto he rested well satisfied.

399. Two persons claimed their freedom by apprenticeship: Thomas Symonds, skinner, by service with Percivall Hassall and Nicholas Heath, mercer, by service with Richard [p. 116] Culverwell, both masters being ancient traders. They were both admitted and Nicholas Heath who was present in court paid his fine of 6s. 8d., taking the oath of a freeman by ancient trade. Thomas Symonds who was absent was to pay his fine and take his oath at some other time.

400. Also, two persons requested their freedom by redemption, both of them mere merchants for above seven years and free of no other company: John Greene of Wells in Norfolk and Thomas Fayrefaix of Walsingham in the same county. They were admitted 'with free and generall consent', paying £10 each and taking the oath of a freeman by redemption. 'And it is agreed that they shalbe assistaunts to the deputy of Lynn, who by letters is to be advertized thereof accordingly'.

401. Robert Myldmay, grocer, requested the freedom by redemption for £10 but was denied admittance since various members of the company 'did [p. 117] affyrme, that he is noe meere marchaunt, but keepeth an open warehowse, and servaunts contynually attending the same'.

402. A court of assistants held at Pewterers' Hall on Friday 27 September 1605 in the presence of Thomas Wilford, president, and the following:

403. Andrew Banning, Mr. Dorrington, Mr. James, Mr. Bowyer, Mr. Stile, Mr. Owen, Mr. Wych, Mr. Cobb, Mr. Cullimore, Mr. Hanger, Mr. Bond, Mr. Bostock; the secretary.

404. The business of the last court of assistants was read out and confirmed.

405. 'First, that the Duplicate of the Chartre, under the greate Seale of England, and florished with Armes, shalbe sent over into Spaine to the Ambassadour or Mr. Ousley, to procure the Confirmation.' (fn. 15)

406. [p. 118] It was resolved that

letters of two natures shalbe sent to Nicholas Oseley, the one verbatim, as the former, to be delivered unto him yf it shall appeare to Mr. Bowreman that he hath effected the busines to any purpose, and yf he have not, then other letters signifying the Companies dislike. And then letters to be delivered to the lord Ambassadour to entreate his honorable favour to procure the same effected. And the gratuity promised to Nicholas Oseley to be conferred where his Lordship shall appoint. (fn. 16)

407. It was agreed that the president, the treasurer, the secretary and Mr. Boureman should 'take a iourney to the Court one sunday next to procure letters from his Majestie to the king of Spayne and the Ambassadour to be carried over by Mr. Bowreman'.

408. For the expenses of his journey with the letters Mr. Bowreman was to receive 200 ducats 'which Mr. Treasurer will deliver at Bilbo or St. Sebastians, at 5s. 8d. the Duckett'.

409. The sum of £50 to be delivered to Mr. Bowrman at his going over to Spain was 'to be accepted as parcell of his fee of £200 a yere, which fee is to take comencement from the tyme that he shall returne from the king of Spain's Court to St. Lucar'.

410. It was also agreed that he should have a letter of credit for a further 200 ducats, in case he had need of the money in Spain.

Footnotes

1 See above, p. xli.
2 This paragraph has been inserted into the text. See below, 297–305.
3 See above, 283.
4 See above, 282.
5 Presumably Dorchester, Dorset, rather than Dorchester near Oxford.
6 See above, p. xl.
7 Bayona in Galicia.
8 Possibly Madeira.
9 São Miguel and the Azores.
10 Margin note, 'This Point is allowed at the next general court'.
11 Margin note, 'Concerning Impositions 3s. 4d. upon the hundreth allowed at the next generall court'.
12 Rummaging, the arranging of casks in the hold; winding, the hauling or hoisting of a sail, or the vessel itself, by means of a winch; hawser, to pull on a hawser or cable, usually in mooring; primage, the customary allowance made to the master and crew for the loading and care of the cargo; pilotage, the cost of hiring a pilot wherever necessary or compulsory; petit lodagie money, probably relating either to the loading of the vessel or to the hiring of a 'lodesman' or pilot.
13 'Royalls' or 'ryalls', the English corruption of the Spanish real.
14 Crossed out underneath are the words, 'And the same ympositions to be collected from michaelmas next ensuing'.
15 This paragraph has a single line through it. Margin note, 'Upon the hearing hereof at the next court thought fitter to send a Copy'.
16 Margin note, 'This Course is altered at the next court'.