Memorials LXVI - XCII
Charities (1601-48)

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

C. M. Clode (editor)

Year published

1875

Pages

295-323

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'Memorials LXVI - XCII: Charities (1601-48)', Memorials of the Guild of Merchant Taylors: Of the Fraternity of St. John the Baptist in the City of London (1875), pp. 295-323. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=64142 Date accessed: 29 August 2014.


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LXVI. DAME MARY RAMSAY'S WILL (1601).

Dame Mary Ramsay, by Will, dated 8th July 1601, gave to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors' Company 200l. to be delivered out to the brethren of their own company, upon good security, at five per cent. for four years, the profit to be distributed towards the relief of the poor of the company.

This sum of 200l. is supposed to have been lost by the failure of the borrowers and their securities, but the company have replaced the money out of their own funds, and the interest is applied annually for the relief of the poor of the company under a scheme sanctioned by the Court of Chancery.

By this scheme (settled by Order of the Court of Chancery of the 3rd June 1835) a sum of 1,300l., which included the above gift, together with the amount of interest on a sum of 500l., after deducting thereout 470l. 13s. 10d. for costs, was ordered to be from time to time lent out in several sums of not less than 50l. each, and not exceeding 300l. each, for a term not exeeeding four years, according to the discretion of the com- pany, at such a rate of interest as should yield an annual income of 32l. per annum at least, that being the amount of interest directed by the above will and those of Edward Rennick and Henry Richards. (fn. 1)

LXVII. RICHARD SHEPHAM'S WILL (1604).

Richard Shepham, by Will, dated 20th July 1604, gave to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors' Company 100l. upon trust to be lent to four poor young men, artificers of the company, for four years, and so to others from four years to four years for ever, putting in sureties according to the custom of the company, and the persons to whom the money lent paying to the clerk 2s. 6d. for every bond, and the beadle 20d.

This 100l. may probably have been many years ago lost by the failure of the parties borrowing, and their sureties, as for a great many years no notice is taken of it in the company's books.

The same testator also, by a Codicil, dated the 28th July 1604, gave to the same company 50l. more, the interest thereof to be laid out "in shirts and smocks, to the Merchant Tailors Hall for ever, yearly, according to a precedent of a gift for the like purpose made by a tailor of late."

The sum of 2l. 10s. is yearly carried to the almshouse account, and expended in the purchase of shifts for the almswomen in the company's almshouses.

LXVIII. JOHN HYDE'S WILL (1604).

John Hyde, by Will, dated 8th September 1604, gave to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company certain lands and tenements lying in the precinct called the Minories, in London, and in Fleet-street, London, to hold to them and their successors for ever, upon the trusts following, viz.:—

£s.d.
To pay an annuity to the parson and churchwardens of the parish of St. Andrew Undershaft200
To the vicar and churchwardens of the parish of St. Bride, Fleet-street1100
To the minister and churchwardens of the Trinity, in the Minories0160
All these sums to be laid out in coals for the poor.
To the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company, and their successors, for the almswomen500
To the minister of the chapel of Hayfield, in Derbyshire, keeping a grammar-school within the chapel1000
To the clerk 20s. and beadle 10s.1100

The rest of the rents to be employed for the discharge of poor prisoners within the Compters and Ludgate, of London, for small causes under 5l.

1l. 12s. is annually paid to the parish of St. Andrew Under- shaft, being the amount of the bequest to that parish, land-tax deducted.

The sum of 30s. yearly is paid to the parish of St. Bride's.

The sum of 16s. yearly is paid to the parish of the Trinity in the Minories.

The sum of 5l. per annum is retained by the Company, and carried to the almshouse account, and applied yearly in the support of the almswomen in the Company's almshouses.

The sum of 10l. is annually paid to the minister of Hayfield, upon his receipt.

The 1l. 10s. is paid to the clerk and beadle of the company, and the residue of the rents was, as in Blundell's trust, applied to the discharge of poor debtors in the White-cross-street Prison, in the Giltspur-street, Poultry Compter, and Ludgate Wards, till imprisonment for debt was abolished, and is now, with other prison funds, held in suspense till a scheme for distri- bution is approved by the Court of Chancery. (fn. 2)

LXIX. ROBERT DOWE'S DEEDS (1605–10).

Robert Dowe, by Deed, dated 28th August 1605, and made between the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company of the one part, and the said Robert Dowe of the other part; reciting, that the said Robert Dowe had at sundry times put into the hands of the said master and wardens divers sums of money, to be bestowed in the purchase of lands, tenements, and hereditaments, by the revenues whereof certain decayed brethren of the company were to be relieved with pensions, which sums amounted together to the sum of 2,158l. 10s. 8d., and reciting, that the said Robert Dowe, with the advice of the court of assistants of the said company, had with part of the said money caused to be purchased certain lands, tenements and hereditaments, in the city of London, therein particularly mentioned, and which had been duly assured unto and to the use of the said master and wardens, their suc- cessors and assigns for ever, the purchase-money for which said premises amounted to the sum of 1,212l. 13s. 4d., leaving a balance of 945l. 17s. 4d. to be employed upon some further purchase; and reciting that the said Robert Dowe had appointed the several yearly pensions thereinafter mentioned to be paid for ever out of the revenue of the said lands, tenements, and here- ditaments thereinbefore mentioned, and the revenue of such other lands, tenements, and hereditaments as should be pur- chased with the said 945l. 17s. 4d., or else by and out of other the revenues belonging to the said company, which pensions and payments amounted in the whole to the yearly sum of 133l. 8s. 1d. as thereinafter mentioned; It was by the said indenture agreed, and the said master and wardens did thereby covenant with the said Robert Dowe, his heirs, executors, and administrators, to pay and make good the several pensions and payments thereinafter appointed and specified, which were in substance as follows:—

£s.d.
To 13 poor aged and decayed brethren of the society, of good reputation, and brought up tailors, who were to be of the age of 60 years, and who had been housekeepers, the yearly pension of 6l. 13s. 4d. a-piece, making the yearly sum of (fn. 3) 86134
To retain 9l. 7s. 9d. yearly, which in three years would make 28l. 3s. 3d., to be then expended for 13 gowns for the almsmen, at 2l. 3s. 4d. a-piece976
To six persons similarly qualified to succeed to the places of any of the before-mentioned 13 persons dying, from the time of their appoint- ment as such reversioners, to the time of their actual succession (which succession was to take place according to the order of their several appointments), the yearly pension of 1l. 6s. 8d. a-piece, the said last-mentioned persons to be elected at the age of 60 years, unless blind or lame, and in such case to be eligible at the age of 50 years800
To retain 3l. yearly, which in 3 years would amount to 9l., to be then expended for six cloaks for them300
To the clerk attending the pensioners every third year to church 6d.002
To pay 2l. 16s. 4d. to the wardens substitutes, to be distributed as follows, viz.:—
To the common box, to discharge the almsmen and reversioners dinner when the feast is kept for the Bachelors Company100
To be spent at the recreation or shooting dinner of the warden substitutes &c.0134
To be spent on the burial of every almsman, calculated at 3 every year100
To the clerk 3s. by 12d. at every burial030
To the churchwardens of St. Botolph without Aldgate, yearly, to be dis- tributed among their poor1060
If the churchwardens are negligent in paying the same, &c., the company to retain the 10l. 6s., but to distribute it as they should think fit, and the renter warden for his pains to have010
And if none of the renter wardens attend, the clerk to have 12d., and also 8d. parcel of the 6s. delivered to the churchwardens with the 10l.
To satisfy yearly 6l. to Robert Dowe's almswomen in the company's alm- houses, near East Smithfield, as therein mentioned600
To fuel for the almswomen200
Also 6s. 8d. yearly for lanthorn and candle-light for the said almswomen, viz., for cotton candles 4s.; 2s. to a poor almswoman having the care of the lanthorn, and to light the candles, and for repairs068
To be expended yearly in Lent, or convenient time by the master and wardens (with other like money) for their comfort200
To pay yearly to the four officers of the company, viz., 20s. to the clerk of the company, 10s. to the beadle, 12s. to the clerk of the Bachelors Company, and 8s. to the beadle of that company2100
To the chamberlain and town-clerk, to see the charity performed, 10s. each every third year, and to the beadles 6d.0610
13381

Robert Dowe, by another Deed, dated the 4th April 1610, and made between the said master and wardens of the one part, and the said Robert Dowe of the other part, reciting that the said Robert Dowe had at various times paid the further sum of 800l. to the said master and wardens; It is witnessed, that in consideration thereof the said master and wardens, for them- selves and their successors, did covenant to pay the pensions thereinafter mentioned for ever (that is to say), to pay yearly, for ever, to increase Mr. Gregory Smith's almswomens pension—

£s.d.
From 16d. per week to 2s. 4d. per week2120
Yearly, for ever, to Mr. Dowe's almswomen, more140
Yearly, for ever, to pay to the churchwardens of St. Botolph without Aldgate 10l. 3s., and the churchwardens thereof to pay 10l. to the poor in addition to his former gift of 10l.; and more, to the clerk of their church, 12d., and to the curate, four churchwardens, and com- mon clerk of the company, 4d. each1030
To the wardens, substitutes more, to increase the 56s. 4d. given by the first deed to 3l. 13s. 4d. for like purposes0170
To the common clerk for a grace on the death of any member, yearly050
To expend, at the probation of Merchant Tailors' school, upon the masters and examiners for bread and beer800
To expend yearly for the release of prisoners in both compters, Ludgate, Poultry, Giltspur-street ward, and Newgate, by 5l. to each house2000
And for seeing the charity distributed, to the two wardens, 5s. each; to the clerk for his pains, 5s.; and to the beadle, 2s. 4d.: and to the clerk, 3s. 4d. yearly, to resort to Christ Church three Sundays in the year in Divine Service, to hear in what manner the schoolmaster and singing children of Christ's Hospital perform their singing, and that all things be performed between the city and company; and 3s. 4d. to the beadle, to see that the churchwardens of St. Sepulchre perform the passing bell140
To two persons tending the lantern in the almshouse, 8d. a piece more014
To lay up 50s. in order every three years, to produce 7l. 10s. which, with 7l. 10s., to be added by the company, was to be laid out in seven gowns every third year2100
45138

And which said sum of 45l. 13s. 8d. being added to the former yearly sum of 133l. 8s. 1d. directed to be paid by the first indenture, would amount in the whole to the sum of 179l. 1s. 9d., which sum was to be paid by the said master and wardens so long as the sun and moon should endure.

The company fulfil all these payments in the following order:—

£s.d.
By 13 aged brethren, 6l. 13s. 4d. each, per annum86134
Six reversioners, 2l. 2s. per annum (fn. 4) 12120
£s.d.
Seventy-three yards of cloth, at 7s. 6d. per yard, for gowns and cloaks2776
Eighty-seven yards of baize for linings for ditto, at 1s. 8d.750
Making 19 gowns and cloaks, at 6s. each5140
Nineteen badges, at 4s. each3160
4426
Every third year14142
Which is per annum113196
Discharge of prisoners from the New Prison in the Ludgate, Newgate, Poultry, and Giltspur-street Wards; to each ward 5l., for which the company receive petitions, and appropriate the relief according to the deserts of the objects applying (fn. 5) 2000
Almswomen on Tower-hill, sundry gifts as directed13114
£s.d.
Churchwardens of St. Botolph, Aldgate, due St. Thomas's-eve2090
The warden of the company paying the same010
The 8l. to be expended upon the master and examiners at the probations in March and October is considered as included in the expenditure of the company in the entertainments given to the master and examiners on those days, and for which they credit themselves accordingly800
The company's clerk, for reading a commendable grace050
The renter wardens, clerk, and beadle, for seeing prisoners discharged, &c.170
The company's clerk, 1l. 12s.; beadle, 10s.; under-beadle, 8s.; potation money2100
180210

LXX. REYNOLD'S BARKER'S DEED (1608).

Reynold Barker, by Deed, dated 21st September 1608, granted to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company certain lands and houses at Stockbridge, near Bow, in the county of Essex (about eleven small houses and a piece of ground behind the same, containing one acre two roods, with a chemical factory thereon) for the remainder of a term of 1,000 years from the 11th December 1580, upon the following trust, viz., to bestow all the rents and profits among the poor alms- women and almsmen in the said company's almshouses.

The rent of this estate is carried to the almshouse account, and applied to the support of the almswomen in the company's almshouses.

LXXI. FRANCES CLARKE'S CHARITY.

In the Court Book of the company, under date of 8th January 1608, the following entry is found:—" At this assembly were sealed with the common seal of this company two several writings made between the corporation on the one part, and Frances Clarke, of London, widow, late wife of Roger Clarke, citizen and alderman of London, deceased, on the other part; by one of which writings the company covenanted, in considera- tion of 200l., to satisfy and pay for ever the sum of 10l. to Mrs. Clarke during her life, and afterwards unto the church- wardens of the parish church of Odiham, in the county of South- ampton, at Midsummer and Christmas, or within ten days after, by equal portions, to be employed towards the relief of the poor of the said town as the gift of the said Mrs. Clarke."

The above annual sum of 10l. has been regularly paid, and the receipts have been regularly kept and filed.

[For the application of this charity, see 14th Report, under the head of the Odiham Charities.]

An annuity also of 10l. per annum was derived from the same benefactress, as appears by an Indenture, dated 6th January 1609, made between the master and wardens of the said company of the one part, and Frances Clarke, of London, widow, of the other part; whereby reciting that the said Frances Clarke had, before the sealing and delivery of the said indenture, paid unto the said master and wardens the sum of 200l. to charitable uses, the said master and wardens did, in con- sideration thereof, covenant with the said Frances Clarke after her death to pay unto the treasurer or governors of St. Bartho- lomew's Hospital, London, the yearly sum of 10l. at the two feasts therein mentioned, for the relief and maintenance of the poor, lame, and impotent people within the said hospital, the first payment to begin next after the death of the said Frances Clarke.

The annuity of 10l. has been regularly paid to the treasurer of St. Bartholomew's Hospital, as appears by his receipts in the possession of the company.

LXXII. RICHARD OSMOTHERLAW'S WILL (1612).

Richard Osmotherlaw, by Will, dated the 7th May 1612, gave to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors, after the death of his wife, all the residue of his rents and profits whatso- ever issuing out of his freehold lands and tenements in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldersgate, to hold to them, their succes- sors and assigns, for ever, subject nevertheless to the payment of the following annuities, amongst others, at the feast of St. Philip and Jacob, viz:-

An annuity of 10l. by his said will, limited to his wife, her heirs and assigns, for ever, to such uses as she should direct.

To five poor people inhabiting within the parish of St. Botolph, Aldersgate, 20d. a week for ever, equally amongst them, such poor people to be nominated by the vestry of the said parish, and distributed by the churchwardens of the same.

To a godly preacher, for a sermon to be made in remem- brance of the testator the first Sunday in Lent, yearly, for ever, in the said parish church, 6s. 8d.

To the churchwardens aforesaid for the time being for ever, 4s. equally between them, for their pains in distributing the money to the five poor people.

To the clerk and sexton for the time being of the said parish, 16d. a piece yearly, for ever.

To his cousin John Osmotherlaw, clothworker, and his heirs, for ever, an annuity of 5l.

To Robert Osmotherlaw, and his heirs, for ever, an annuity of 40s.

To the parson and churchwardens of the parish church of Bromefield for the time being, for ever, 10l. per annum, upon condition that they should for ever find a sufficient and learned schoolmaster to educate fifteen poor mens' children, inhabiting within the towns of Langrigge and Bromefield, in the county of Cumberland, two of the scholars to be for ever nominated and appointed by the inhabitants of Langrigge Hall, seven scholars more to be taken out of Langrigge, and six scholars out of Bromefield; and the schoolmaster to teach the said scholars within the parish church of Bromefield to be chosen by the mutual consent of the inhabitants of the said towns of Lang- rigge and Bromefield indifferently, and subject to such other stipulations as were therein mentioned.

The property derived under the above will consists of five houses, two in Aldersgate-street, and three in Little Britain.

Ann, the testator's wife, devised her annuity of 10l. in manner following, viz. : to Peter Bowle, 4l. per annum, and to Peter Mills, 6l. per annum. John Osmotherlaw, clothworker, purchasd the latter annuity of 6l.; to the former there is no claimant.

The sums given as above to the poor, the preacher, the churchwarden, clerk, and sexton of St. Botolph, would amount to 5l. per annum; and the company pay to the churchwardens of St. Botolph, Aldersgate, the sum of 4l. per annum only, to answer those bequests as far as the same will extend, according to their reduced proportions, 1l. being deducted from the said 5l. rentcharge for the land-tax.

John Osmotherlaw, the clothworker, who purchased the annuity of 6l. devised by the testator's wife to Peter Mills, also purchased the annuity of 2l. of Robert Osmotherlaw, and after- wards, by will, dated 1st June, 1642, devised the whole 13l. (including his own annuity of 5l.) as follows, viz.: to the Cloth- workers' Company, 2l. 10s. per annum; to Christ's Hospital, 2l. 10s. per annum; to the parish of St. James, Garlick Hythe, 3l. per annum; and to one Andrews, 5l. per annum: the pay- ments to the Clothworkers, Christ's Hospital, and St. James, Garlick Hythe, are still paid, amounting to 8l. yearly.

The sum of 10l. is yearly paid to the parish of Bromefield upon the receipt of the parson, churchwardens, and school- master.

By an Order of the Board of Charity Commissioners, sealed on 28th October 1873, the then subsisting annuities (amounting to 23l. per annum) were redeemed and extinguished by the transfer from the company to the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds of a sufficient sum in 3l. per cent. Consols to produce the annual sum payable, and the property devised to the company thus became wholly free and discharged therefrom.

LXXIII. RANDOLPH WOOLLEY'S WILL (1615).

Randolph Woolley, by Will, dated 23d June 1615, gave to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company, 240l. upon the following trust, to wit, to choose three poor men at the next full court of the company, of the age of fifty-six years at least, of good name and fame, and most to need; two to be free of the Company of Merchant Tailors, and the third of the Company of Clothworkers, and to pay to every of them 4l. a year, by 20s. a quarter, and so for ever.

And the said testator also gave them 100l. upon trust, to pay unto the master and usher of Wolverhampton free-school (fn. 6) the yearly sum of 5l., viz. 1l. 13s. 4d. to the master, and 3l. 6s. 8d. to the usher, yearly, for ever for their better maintenance, besides the allowance paid them by the company.

And 50l. more, upon trust, to pay Woodnette, the almswoman of Mr. John Robinson, in the company's alms- house near Tower-hill, during her life, and such persons as should succeed her, from time to time, the sum of 2l. 12s. yearly, to be paid weekly.

And the said Randolph Woolley, gave to the company the further sum of 100l. to be lent in free loan to four poor young men free of the Merchant Tailors' Company, using the handy occupation of tailors within the city of London or suburbs, to each 25l. for four years, and so from four years to four years, for ever.

The sum of 12l. yearly is paid as follows, viz. :—

To two poor freemen of the company, and to one poor free- man of the Clothworkers Company, to each 4l. per annum by quarterly payments.

The sum of 5l. is paid to the governors of Wolverhampton grammar school, under a scheme established by the Endowed School Commissioners on 9th August 1872.

The sum of 2l. 12s. is yearly carried to the almshouse account, and applied towards the maintenance of the alms- women in the Company's almshouses.

There is no evidence in the company's books of the receipt of the 100l. to be lent to young men.

The company at their discretion increase the pensions to 5l. per annum each out of their own funds.

LXXIV. SIR WILLIAM CRAVEN'S (fn. 7) CHARITIES (1615–16).

By Indenture, dated 20th December 1615, made between Sir William Craven, knight, and alderman of London, and Dame Elizabeth, his wife, of the one part, and the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors' Company of the other part; the said Sir William and his lady, for the considerations therein mentioned, did grant and confirm unto the said master and wardens and their successors all that messuage or tenement, and all shops and rooms thereunto belonging, with the apurten- ances, sometimes called the Pope's Head, and then called the Bishop's Head, situate in the parishes of St. Mary Woolnoth, in Lombard-street, and St. Michael, Cornhill, to hold unto and to the use of the said master and wardens, and their successors for ever, to the intent, out of the rent and profits thereof, to pay to himself the said Sir William Craven, for life, 140l. per annum, and after his death such sums of money as he should limit by his will, not exceeding 140l. per annum.

And the said Sir William Craven, by his Will, dated 9th August 1616, after reciting the before-abstracted deed, did direct and appoint, first, that the said master and wardens should yearly, for ever, pay to 24 poor aged men, freemen of the city of London, who should obtain their freedom by servitude or patrimony, and not by redemption, and who should be or have been householders, and lived in good report, and borne scot and lot, the sum of 96l. parcel of the 140l., viz.:—

To seven poor freemen of the company, who had been dressers of woollen cloth, past labour, 28l. yearly, to every of them 4l. a piece, and to other seven freemen of the company who had been tailors, decayed in their eyesight, 28l. yearly, viz., to every of them 4l. a piece, and to six other freemen of the said company of any other trade, in the city of London, old and decayed, 24l. yearly, viz., to every of them 4l. a piece; and to four others, freemen of the Clothworkers Company, who had been dressers of woollen cloth, and past labour, 16l. yearly, viz., to every of them, 4l. a-piece; all the above to be paid quarterly, at the hall; and in case any pensioner should die in the middle of a quarter, that quarter to be paid to his widow, executors or administrators; and if any pensioner should become disorderly, or of evil report, he was to be dismissed.

To the churchwardens of the parish of Burnsall, in the county of York, 20l. yearly, to be paid quarterly to the school- master and his successors, for ever, of the grammar-school of the town of Burnsall, founded by the said testator.

And also 10l. more to the said churchwardens; 40s. to be applied to the repairs of the church, and 8l. for the repair of the said school-house, and the bridges in the said parish (built at the testator's charge), and amending the highways between Apple- treewick and Burnsall, all then lately repaired at the like charge.

And yearly, for ever, to pay to the churchwardens of the parish of St. Antholin, in London, in the summer season, 4l. to be employed for the provision of fuel, for such poor in the same parish as should have most need.

To the churchwardens of the parish of St. Andrew Under- shaft, London, and their successors, yearly, for ever, in the summer season, 4l. for the provision of fuel for their poor most needing it

6l. to be paid to the company yearly, for ever; 10s. a-piece to the master and wardens, 30s. to the clerk of the livery, 20s. to the beadle of the livery, 10s. to the clerk of the bachelors, and 10s. to the beadle of the bachelors.

These payments are made as follows, viz.:—

To six poor freemen of this company, past labour, who have been clothworkers, 4l. to each, yearly.

To six poor freemen of this company who have been tailors, and now decayed in their eye-sight, 4l. to each, yearly.

To six freemen of the company of several trades, old and decayed, 4l. to each, yearly.

To six (fn. 8) others, freemen of the clothworkers company, who have been clothworkers and past labour, 4l. yearly to each.

The 20l. per annum is yearly paid to the churchwardens of the parish of Burnsall, in the county of York. The sum of 10l. is also paid to them, less by 2l. for land-tax.

The sum of 4l. is annually paid to St. Antholin's parish, and the sum of 4l. (less 16s. for land-tax) is paid to the parish of St. Andrew Undershaft.

The annual sum of 6l, is paid to the master and wardens, clerk, and beadle of the company, all which payments amount in the whole to the annual sum of 140l.

The books do not explain why 2l. is deducted out of the 10l. and 16s. out of the 4l. payable to St. Andrew's Undershaft, npon the account of land-tax, without making the same deduc- tion from the other charities; but the practice has in this respect prevailed for a great number of years, and it is presumable that it had its commencement in some reasonable cause. In the receipts given by the churchwardens of Burnsall for the sum of 10l. payable to them, that deduction appears to have been always admitted without objection.

The company, at their discretion, increase the pensions to their own poor freemen to 5l. each per annum out of their corporate funds.

LXXV. JOHN VERNON'S (fn. 9) WILL (1615).

John Vernon, by his Will, dated 10th October 1615, gave to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company 60l. to pay yearly, and so for ever, 3l. 6s. 8d. as follows, viz., to agree with some baker, and pay him yearly 48s., for which money he should deliver in St. Michael's Church, Cornhill, in the chancel of the same, yearly, 52 dozen of sweet and good wheaten bread, viz., 12 penny wheaten loaves every Sunday, by eight of the clock in the morning, to be distributed by the churchwardens to such poor of the parish as stood in most need thereof, after service; to a learned man to be appointed by the master and wardens, 10s. yearly, to preach a sermon upon the day of the testator's funeral in St. Michael's Church, Cornhill, at which he entreated the master, and wardens and assistants, and livery, to attend; to the clerk, 12d. yearly; to the beadle, 12d. yearly; to the sexton, to keep the monument made for Mr. Alderman Houghton, and the testator there, clean, 6s. 8d. yearly, for ever.

And the above-named testator also gave 1,500l. to the said master and wardens to purchase land to the value of 83l. by the year, or more, if the master and wardens could with that sum (which was after 18 years purchase, and at the rate of 5l. 10s. in the hundred), which said 83l. he directed to be delivered and paid yearly, for ever, as follows:—

To four poor scholars, students in divinity in St. John's College, Oxford, 16l. yearly, viz., 4l. a man, to be elected by the master, wardens and assistants, to continue no longer than they should study divinity, and remain in the said college, or stand in the liking of the said master, wardens and assistants, and so to be disposed of from one to another for ever. (fn. 10)

And 16l. by the year to be paid to poor prisoners in Ludgate, Newgate, the Compter in Wood-street, and the Compter in the Poultry, the first year to release four in Ludgate and Newgate, and the next year to release four in the Compter in Wood-street, and in the Poultry, who should be there for 4l. debt, and if but one or two be found, or none at all, then, in the discretion of the five wardens, to distribute the said 16l. yearly amongst the poor in the said four prisons, and the three wardens to have for their pains 5s. each yearly; to the clerk, to keep a register of the money paid, and of the objects, 3s. 4d. yearly; the beadle 20d. yearly. (fn. 11)

And the testator then directed that 40l. yearly should be paid to 10 aged men, poor and needy, and past labour, of the following six companies, viz., Clothworkers, Woolwinders, Carpenters, Tilers, Plasterers and Armourers, being free of and dwelling in the city, aged 60 and upwards, to be paid in Merchant Tailors Hall by 4l. yearly a man, by 20s. a quarter.

And 7l. 10s. yearly, to be laid up for three years, which would amount to 22l. 10s. to be then bestowed upon 10 gowns, with the name of the testator embroidered thereon, to be delivered to the said 10 poor men every third year, and so for ever.

And the said testator directed the remaining 50s. to be laid up yearly for three years, which would amount to 7l. 10s. of which 10s. the testator directed that 12d. a-piece should be given to the said 10 poor men on St. John's decollation-day, when it was observed and kept at the Hall, and the remaining 7l. the said testator was to take allowance of in the next legacy.

The said testator then gave and devised to the said master and wardens the fee-simple of his three houses in the parish of St. Edmund the King, in Lombard-street, London, with all the rents and fines, which the testator valued at 100l. a year, besides the fines to be taken on renewals, to hold to the master and wardens, and their successors, for ever, upon trust, to pay 93l. by the year in manner following, viz.:—

72l. yearly, for ever, to be paid to 12 poor aged and needy men past labour, to be chosen out of the Merchant Tailors' Company, and dwelling in London, by 6l. to each man, not to be under 60 years of age.

To four poor men, reversioners, aged 60 years, free of the company, and dwelling in the City of London, to each man yearly, for ever 26s. 8d.

To the master and wardens 20s. for their pains, yearly, 4s. each. To the master, wardens and assistants, 20s. yearly, for ever; to the potation-dinner, and to the wardens substitutes, and 16 men, for their shooting dinner, 13s. 4d.; to the clerk of the livery for his pains, yearly, 4s.; to the beadle of ditto, 3s.; to the clerk of the Bachelors Company yearly, 3s.; and to the beadle of ditto, 12d.

For three years to lay up the residue 12l. 10s. which would make 37l. 10s., and taking the allowances or the before-stated sum of 7l., making 44l. 10s., the testator entreated that 27l., part thereof, might be bestowed on 12 gowns every three years, to be distributed to the 12 poor men, and to bestow upon four cloaks for the reversioners, in every third year, 6l. 13s. 4d. with his name embroidered on the shoulder.

To the said 16 men 16s.; every third year to every of them 12d. on St. John's decollation-day, (fn. 12) when kept, except the wardens substitutes, and 16 men, take the allowances, and let them dine at the hall; after which last three payments every third year there would remain in every such year to the stock of the house 10l. 0s. 8d.

The said testator gave to the company the sum of 30l., to be lent out at interest, and to apply the principal and interest in the purchase of two rooms lying contiguous to the before-men- tioned premises.

And the said testator further bequeathed to the said com- pany the sum of 200l., as a stock to be employed in the purchase of coal, to be bought when lowest, and sold again to the poor of the company, or to any other poor, and the gains to be applied as therein mentioned; but in the option of the company if more troublesome than profitable, to lay out the said 200l. in the purchase of lands in better support of the good uses before mentioned.

And the testator gave to the said company the residue of his effects after the payment of his debts and legacies, to be laid out in the purchase of lands to be applied to some good use to the poor.

The residue does not appear to be laid out in land, but the 1,355l. 6s. 9d., the amount thereof and of the 200l. bequeathed to them by the foregoing will, which is 67l. 15s. 4d. per annum. The 30l. was laid out as directed in the purchase of the two rooms.

Particulars of the payments under the trusts of Mr. John Vernon's will.

£s.d.
To the parish of St. Michael, in Cornhill, for 12 penny loaves of bread, to be distributed every Sunday in the said church280
To the minister there, for a sermon on the day of testator's funeral, 1l. 1s., to the clerk and sexton 2s., and to the sexton for keeping the tomb clean, 6s. 8d.198
To four scholars of St. John's College, Oxford1600
To poor persons in White Cross-street prison, in the three wards, and Middlesex division1600
To the wardens, clerk and beadle, for seeing them discharged100
To 10 poor aged men, two clothworkers, two woolwinders, one carpenter, one tiler, two plasterers, and two armourers, to each 4l. yearly4000
To 12 poor aged men free of this company, to each 6l. yearly7200
To four reversioners, to each 2l. 2s. yearly880
£s.d.
To 110 yards of cloth for 26 gowns and cloaks, at 7s. 6d. per yard4150
To 134 yards of baize for linings, at 22d. per yard1258
To making gowns and cloaks, at 6s. each7160
To 26 badges, at 3s. 6d. each4110
Every third year65178
Is yearly21193
To the master and wardens, 1l., to the clerk, 6s. 8d., beadle, 3s. 4d., and the under beadle, 1s.1110
1801511

The interest on the residue of the testator's effects (62l. 15s. 4d.) as above, is carried to the account of the company's poor, and is distributed accordingly.

The company increase the pensions paid to the 12 aged freemen and the four reversioners to 20l. and 15l. each respectively, and the exhibitions to the four scholars to 10l. each —all out of their own funds. (fn. 13)

As to the sum given for the relief of poor prisoners, see Mem. cxiii.

LXXVI. ROBERT JENKINSON'S WILL (1616).

Robert Jenkinson, by Will, dated the 15th April 1616, gave to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company 120l., upon trust, to distribute the sum of 6l. yearly for ever, as follows, at the feast of All Saints, yearly, to provide and give, as of the testator's gift, unto 14 poor ancient widows, who then were or thereafter should be in the company's almshouses on Tower Hill, a good large smock, a good pair of stockings, and a good pair of shoes, and if any of the 6l. should be spared, to be divided between the said widows.

By a Codicil, dated the 14th October 1617, the said testator further gave to the said master and wardens 20l. more, in augmentation of the sum given for the relief yearly of the 14 poor almswomen.

The interest of these two sums is carried to the almshouse account, and applied towards the provision of shifts, stockings, and shoes for the almswomen.

LXXVII. WILLIAM PARKER'S WILL (1616).

William Parker, by Will, dated in 1616, gave and bequeathed to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company the sum of 2,000l., to provide with all convenient speed 80l. per annum, for ever, upon trust, therewith to pay as follows, viz.:—

To the parson for the time being of St. Autholin's parish, yearly, for ever, 10l.

To the clerk of the same parish, yearly, for ever, 50s.

To the sexton, yearly, for ever, 50s.

To the minister to serve the cure in the chapel of Great Bloxith, in the parish of Walsall, in Staffordshire, 20l. yearly, for ever; the minister to be single and unmarried, and to teach freely in the said chapel, or parson's house there, men children of the inhabitants of Great Bloxith, Little Bloxith, Pellsall, and Hardin, and others in Wallsall parish aforesaid, to read English, both printed and written-hand, and that he should be such a one as was obedient to the King's laws, and allowed by the Bishop of Litchfield and Coventry, and of St. John, Oxford, sent thither from Merchant Tailors School in London, and for lack of such from the said college, the inhabitants of the town of Great Bloxith should make choice of one themselves, where they could find a fit man both in learning and good life, and unmarried.

To the poor prisoners in the Compter in the Poultry, 40s. yearly, for ever.

To the poor prisoners in the Compter of Wood-street, 40s. yearly; in Newgate, 40s. yearly; in Ludgate, 30s. yearly; and in the Fleet, 30s. yearly, for ever.

To the poor prisoners, in Bedlam, 20s.

To five poor aged men free of the Merchant Tailors Com- pany who had gotten or should get their living by dressing woollen cloth in London, 4l. a-piece, yearly, for ever, to be chosen by their court of assistants and company, and in their discretion, how long any man should have it, because where most need it ought to be bestowed.

To the almsmen of the company, between them, 50s. yearly, for ever.

To the almswomen, between them, 5l. yearly, for ever.

To the clerk of the livery of the said company for the time being, for his pains, 40s. yearly, for ever.

To the beadle of the livery of the company for the time being, for his pains, 30s. yearly, for ever.

To the clerk of the yeomanry of the said company for the time being, for his pains, 20s. yearly, for ever.

To the beadle of the yeomanry, 10s. yearly, for ever.

To the master and wardens for the time being of the said company, 10s. a-piece, yearly, for ever, for their own uses, for their pains.

And the testator declared, that in case of negligence in the company, or leaving the beforegoing bequests for one whole year unperformed, the governors of Christ's Hospital in the City of London were to recover the 2,000l. or the lands bought with the same, and keep 15l. yearly, for ever, out of the same rent, for the maintenance of the poor children in the said hospital; and the Merchant Tailors Company were to have nothing to do with it; and the rest of the 80l. yearly, for ever, above the 15l., the said governors were to pay yearly, for ever, in manner before directed.

The 2,000l. does not appear to have been laid out in land, but the Court consider their corporate funds chargeable with 80l. per annum on account thereof.

The sum of 10l. (2l. being deducted for land-tax), is yearly accounted for to the rector of the parish of St. Autholin upon his receipt; as also the sum of 50s. each, deducting 10s. land- tax, to the clerk and sexton, upon their respective receipts.

The sum of 20l. per annum is paid to the perpetual curate of Great Bloxith, more commonly now called Bloxwich, who gives his receipt for the same.

[See 9th Report, p. 605.]

The annual payment of 1l. is regularly made to the poor in Bedlam, but the other prison funds were held in suspense as in other prison funds (Mem. CXIII.)

The following payments are also regularly made—viz.,

To five poor clothworkers free of the company, 20s., quarterly, to each.

The sums of 50s. and 5l. making 7l. 10s., are carried to the almshouse account.

The sum of 5l. is yearly paid to the clerk and beadle of the company, in certain proportions, and 50s. is paid yearly to the master and wardens.

LXXVIII. ALDERMAN JEFFERY ELWES'S WILL (1616).

Jeffery Elwes, by his Will, dated 8th April 1616, gave and bequeathed to the master and wardens of the said company the sum of 400l. to be disposed and distributed according as the wardens of the company for the time being, and his friends, Sir William Craven, knight, and Mr. John Vernon, or the survivors of them, in their wisdom should think fit to devise and determine, for the perpetual relief of the poor.

It appears that the 400l. was received by the company, who have regularly accounted for an annual sum of 20l. as interest for the same, at five per cent., which yearly sum of 20l. they carry to the general fund for the relief of the poor of the com- pany, and distribute among their own poor.

LXXIX. JOHN WOOLLERS CHARITY (1617).

John Wooller, by Will, dated 26th March 1617, devised to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors' Company an annuity of 24l., to be issuing out of his messuage or tenement, with the wharf, and all other the appurtenances thereto belonging, called the Cross Keys in Thames-street, in the parish of St. Magnus the Martyr, near London Bridge; to bestow the said yearly rentcharge of 24l. in manner following, viz., to pay to the two poor women therein named in one of the hospitals or almshouses erected by the company near Tower-Hill, called Mr. Robert Dowe's and Mr. Medlicott's almswomen, and to such as should succeed in their room, the sum of 5l. 4s., for ever, yearly, towards their relief and sustentation, to either of them 12d. per week, weekly for ever, or after that rate to be paid monthly, or otherwise, as the master and wardens should think fit, and as they pay other almswomen in the almshouses.

To the governors of Christ's Hospital in London, or their receiver, towards the relief of the poor children there harboured, 5l. by two payments of 50s., and 50s. on the feast of St. John the Baptist, and 20th day of December.

To the relief of the poor in Bridewell 40s. at the same time.

To the relief of the poorest and sickliest prisoners in the two compters in London, and of Ludgate and Newgate, 4l. yearly, viz. to every of these prisons 20s. yearly for ever at the aforesaid two terms.

To the relief of the poor of the parish of St. Magnus, near London Bridge, 20s. yearly at the said two terms.

To the churchwardens of the town of Brighthelmstone in Sussex, or their assigns, towards the poor there, 20s. yearly, upon the 20th or 19th December at Merchant Tailors' Hall in London.

To bestow yearly, for ever, 40s. to a poor scholar of the college of St. John in Oxford, as should have most need, and intending to study divinity.

To bestow yearly 20s. in wood or coals for the relief of seven poor almswomen belonging to the company's almshouses.

Towards a potation when the company meet together, 20s.

To the master and wardens of the company for their pains in bestowing the 24l., viz. to every one of them 5s., to the clerk of the livery yearly, 7s. 6d., and the beadle 3s. 6d. yearly, for ever.

The sum of 5l. 4s. is yearly carried to the almshouse account, and applied to the support of the almshouses.

The sum of 5l. is paid to the governors of Christ's Hospital yearly, upon the receipt of their receiver, or his deputy.

The sum of 40s. is paid to the receiver for Bridewell.

The respective sums of 20s., 20s., 20s., and 20s., are paid on the receipt of the respective stewards, attested by the keeper of the New Prison, White Cross-street, in which prison the debtors formerly confined in the compters of Ludgate and Newgate are now confined.

The sum of 4l. per annum is paid yearly to a poor scholar of the college of St. John in Oxford.

To the master and wardens, clerk and beadle, 1l. 16s. is paid yearly.

The sums of 20s. and 20s. are yearly paid to the church- wardens of St. Magnus and Brighthelmstone, upon their respective receipts.

The company make up the payment to a poor scholar to 10l. yearly out of their own funds. (fn. 14)

As to the sums given for the relief of poor prisoners, see "The Prison Funds," Mem. CXIII.

LXXX. JOHN HARRISON'S WILL (1618).

John Harrison, by Will, dated 15th May 1618, gave to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company, 500l. for the following purpose, viz. to erect a grammar school at Great Crosby, in the parish of Sephton, in the county of Lancaster, for educating children and youth in the grammar and rules of learning, for ever, to be called "The Merchant Tailors School, founded at the charges of John Harrison," and declared that the said school should have continuance for ever; and that the master and wardens should be governors of the same, and have the appointment of the master and usher for ever; and for the maintenance of the said school and other purposes thereinafter mentioned, the above-named testator gave and devised to the said master and wardens, and their successors, for ever, several messuages, houses, ground, and tenements, situate in the parish of St. Augustin and St. Swithin, in London, (fn. 15) to hold the same to them and their successors for ever, upon trust, to pay, yearly, for ever—

£s.d.
Unto the master of the said free-school at Great Crosby, for his stipend.3000
To the usher2000
To the poor in Lamb-alley, with the consent of the chiefest of the inhabi- tants of the parish of St. Augustin2000

And of the remainder, after reserving 5l. yearly, for repairs, to be bestowed among the poor brethren of the company, by 20s. a quarter a-piece.

A school was erected at Great Crosby in 1620, in the building whereof, and in the purchase of land for the same to be built upon, the sum of 500l. was expended.

The sum of 4l. being deducted from the 20l. for land-tax, the balance of 16l. is paid to the churchwardens of the parish of St. Augustin.

One-fourth of the net rents is applied to pensions, and the three-fourths to the school (as to which see "Great Crosby School, Mem. CXXVII., p. 492).

LXXXI. WILLIAM PRIESTLEY'S WILL (1620).

William Priestley, by Will, dated 2d May 1620, gave to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company 250l., upon trust, to maintain eight poor men, for ever, allowing each of them four nobles a year, to be paid them quarterly; whereof four of the said poor men were to be chosen at the discretion of the master and wardens for the time being, and to be of the poor of the company, and the other four to be of the parish of Hornsey, in the county of Middlesex, and appointed at the discretion of the parson and churchwardens for the time being of the same parish.

The company now pay the sum of 13l. 14s. 8d. per annum, viz. 8l. 8s. per annum to four poor members of the company each 2l. 2s., by quarterly payments, being an additional gratuity beyond their proportions under this charity of 15s. 4d. each; and 5l. 6s. 8d. to four poor men of Hornsey, in Middlesex, to each 1l. 6s. 8d. by quarterly payments, being the exact amount of their proportions.

The company, at their discretion, further increase the pensions to their four poor members to 5l. each out of their own funds.

LXXXII. ROBERT PARKER'S WILL (1622).

Robert Parker, by Will, dated 10th January 1622, gave unto the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company, the sum of 400l. to purchase lands for good uses in Staffordshire, upon trust to pay 20l. a year, for ever, to the poor people of the parish of Walsall, and all the villages and towns belonging to Walsall parish, as thereafter mentioned, the said 20l. to be paid in the month of December, for ever, against Christmas, viz.:—

£s.d.
To Great Bloxwich6134
To Little Bloxwich, Tofcott, Harden, Capell, Rishall End, and Davend Pelsall, Shellfitt, Woodend, and Caldmore613
To all the poor of Walsall town in Staffordshire613
2000

And the said testator did thereby desire the minister and churchwardens of the several places, and the overseers of the poor for the time being, to have a conscionable care that the said money was given according to his will.

He gave to the said master and wardens 100l. more, to lay out in land in Walsall parish-town in Staffordshire, upon trust, to pay 5l. every year in the month of December, against Christmas, as follows, viz. to the organ-player in Walsall church, 4l. per annum, and to his man that bloweth the bellows, 20s. per annum, for the performance of which gift he had written 100l. to the said master and wardens to be paid them after his death.

And he also gave to the said master and wardens another sum of 100l. to lay out in land, upon trust, to pay to themselves 5l. a-year, for ever, as follows, viz. to the master 10s., to the four wardens 10s. a-piece, to the clerk and beadle of the livery, and to the clerk and beadle of the yeomanry, 50s., amongst them.

And he also gave to the said master and wardens the further sum of 100l. to purchase land, upon trust, for the poor people in St. Antholin's parish in London, in Watling-street, both men and women; to pay 5l. every year in the month of December to the churchwardens of the parish of St. Antholin in Watling-street, London, to be equally divided among the poor people of that parish, both men and women, having most need.

The respective sums of 400l., 100l., 100l., and 100l., amounting to 700l. were not laid out in the purchase of land, as directed; but the company have always considered and still consider their funds charged with the payment of the several annual sums so bequeathed.

The sum of 20l. per annum is paid to the parish, and 5l. per annum is paid to the organist of Walsall, and the sum of 5l. per annum is duly paid to the master, wardens, and officers of the company.

And the sum of 5l. per annum is paid to the parish of St. Antholin.

LXXXIII. DAME DUCIE'S WILL (1635).

Dame Elizabeth Ducie, by Will, dated 16th December 1635, gave to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Com- pany 100l. towards the maintenance of widows of almsmen of the livery, placed in almshouses then about to be built.

The interest upon this sum, at the rate of 5l. per cent., is carried yearly to the almshouse account.

LXXXIV. SAMUEL PROCTOR'S WILL (1636).

Samuel Proctor, by Will, dated the 1st February 1636, gave to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company 100l. upon trust, to pay and distribute yearly, for ever, at Christmas, 5l. to nine poor brethren of the society, by 10s. a- piece.

To the clerk of the company, 6s. 8d. for registering the bequest.

To the beadle of the livery, 3s. 4d.

And the said testator desired that if amongst his kindred any should need and deserve the gift, then they might be preferred.

The sum of 100l. above bequeathed was received, and has been always considered as secured upon the general funds of the company. The sum of 4l. 10s. is carried to the general fund for the relief of the poor of the company, and the remaining 10s. is paid to the clerk and beadle.

LXXXV. SIR JOHN GORE'S WILL (fn. 16) (1636).

Sir John Gore, by Will, dated 23d January 1636, granted to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company an annuity of 12l. issuing out of a capital tenement in Trinity-lane, alias Knight Rider-street, London, to be paid quarterly, with full powers of entry and distress in case of the non-payment thereof, upon trust, to employ the same for the relief of three poor old men, free of the said company, to each of them 4l. a year a-piece, to be paid quarterly.

The company receive the sum of 9l. 12s. per annum (land- tax of 2l. 8s. being deducted) as a rentcharge issuing out of a house in Trinity-lane, lately in the occupation of Ritherden and Co.; and they pay to three poor members of the company 9l. 12s. per annum, to each 3l. 4s. by quarterly payments of 16s. a-piece. The names of the objects relieved are entered in a book containing a list of the company's pensioners. The com- pany at their discretion increase the pensions to 5l. per annum each out of their own funds.

LXXXVI. THOMAS COVENTRY'S WILL (1636).

By Indenture, dated the 10th July 1636, made between Thomas Coventry and Hugh Dashfield therein described, of the one part, and Michael Grigg and others, citizens and Merchant Tailors of London, of the other part; the said Thomas Coventry and Hugh Dashfield granted to the said Michael Grigg, and others, and their assigns, for ever, the three following rent-charges, viz.; a yearly fee-farm rent of 10l. 3s. 4d. issuing out of the rectory of East Mullsey, alias East Moulsey, in the county of Surrey; a fee- farm of 14l. issuing out of the rectory and church of Winslowe, in the county of Bucks; and a fee-farm rent of 7l. 13s. 4d. issuing out of the rectory and church of Kympton, in the county of Hertford; to hold the same unto and to the use of the said Michael Grigg, and others their heirs and assigns, for ever, upon trust, that the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company, and their successors, should yearly, for ever, pay 10l. part thereof, for the binding apprentices to some fitting trade or trades two or more poor children born in the parish of St. Andrew Undershaft, London, and the further sum of 10l. for the binding apprentices to some fitting trade two or more poor children born in the parish of St. Antholin, London; children without parents to be preferred, and to be chosen and presented by the churchwardens of the respective parishes to the said master and wardens in manner therein mentioned; and also that they the said master and wardens should yearly, for ever, upon the feast-day of All Saints, pay other 10l., parcel of the said rents and profits, unto the overseers of the poor of the parish of St. Pancras, in the county of Middlesex, and to the overseer or overseers of the poor of the parish of Hornsey, in the said county of Middlesex, equally to be bestowed for the benefit and relief of poor people, dwelling as well in that part of the said parish of Hornsey as in that part of the said parish of St. Pancras, in the said county of Middlesex, which is situate near to High- gate, whereof one half should be to poor people dwelling at or near the said place of Highgate, in the said parish of St. Pancras, and the other half to poor people dwelling at or near Highgate, and in the said parish of Hornsey, the same to be bestowed in fuel and clothes in such sort, as eight persons therein named, being inhabitants there, or the more part of them, should by writing under their hands limit and appoint, with power, as any of such trustees should die, for the survivors to appoint other inhabitants, so that always, for ever, there might be the full number of eight persons to limit and appoint by writing under their hands the disposition of the said 10l. yearly, which writing should be brought in yearly to the said master and wardens, to the end that the clerk might register the same.

And it was thereby declared, that the said master and wardens should yearly, for ever, retain to their own use the sum of 20s. out of the said rents and profits, and should dispose of the residue thereof, being 16s. 8d., to the clerk of the said com- pany, for his labour and pains, such payments to be made after deducting all expense and risk of collection.

The fee-farms of 10l. 3s. 4d., 14l., and 7l. 13s. 4d., less deductions for land-tax, which reduce the aggregate amount to 25l. 10s. per annum, have been severally received by the com- pany in respect of the three several rectories of East Moulsey Winslow, and Kimpton, respectively charged therewith by the above-abstracted indenture, as appears by the accounts of the company.

The company annually obtain an order from the major part of the trustees of this charity authorising the payment of the 10l. given to the poor of Highgate, under which order they have hitherto paid over the said sum to some individual of that body, taking upon himself the active management of the trust, who gives his receipt for the same.

The parishes of St. Andrew Undershaft and St. Antholin London, have been always considered by the company as entitled to an annual payment of 10l. each (minus the land-tax) for placing out apprentices from among the poor children of the same respectively. The company always wait till application is made to them from the above parishes; and as such applica- tions have not been made every year, there have been occasional accumulations, which have enabled the respective parishes, as opportunities have occurred, to increase the number of their apprentices. Out of these accumulations the company have for many years past paid the sum of 10l. in full whenever they have been applied to by the parishes.

LXXXVII. HELEN GULSTON'S WILL (1637).

Helen Gulston, by her Will, dated 15th July 1637, after making various bequests as therein mentioned, desired that 600l. might be laid apart out of her estate, to be disposed of for the good and relief of six widows in or about the City, two of citizens, two of ministers, and two of gentlemen, if by any means they might be so equally chosen, and such who had lived formerly in good fame; and she requested that the Merchant Tailors Company of London (whereof her father was a brother) would bestow the said sum in purchasing such rents as might be answerable to the said sum of money, and distribute the same among widows, by them to be chosen, by 5l. to each, yearly, viz. 50s. at Michaelmas, and 50s. at Lady-day, and if the rents should amount to more, then the overplus to be divided amongst them.

The money does not appear to have been ever laid out in the purchase of land or real estate, but the company have con- sidered their own property as charged with the perpetual pay- ment of 30l. per annum to the objects of the charity.

To two distressed widows of clergymen of the Church of England, or of dissenting congregations, they give 5l. each; to two other distressed widows, of respectable citizens, 5l. each ; and the like sum to two distressed widows of other persons who have filled respectable situations, and these pensions are paid quarterly.

LXXXVIII. CHARITIES OF STINT, RAWTHORNE, LANE, and LEE (1638).

It appears by an entry in an old gift-book of the company that certain persons, by the names of—Stint, Jeremy Raw- thorne, William Lane, and Walter Lee, in 1638 gave to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company 200l. by 50l. a- piece, upon trust, that they would yearly, for ever, pay the sum of 12l. to 24 poor aged brethren who had no pensions.

12l. is annually carried to the general fund for the relief of the company's poor and is distributed in donations to poor members of the company in fulfilment of the above charitable intentions.

LXXXIX. ROBERT GRAY'S WILL (1639).

Robert Gray, by Will, dated 1639, gave to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company, 1,500l. and a rever- sionary interest in 1,000l. expectant upon the death of the testator's niece, under 22 years of age, upon trust to apply the interest thereof in support of the almswomen of the company in their almshouses.

In the year 1651 the company sold their reversionary interest for 6321. which, together with 1,500l., amounted to 2,132l., interest for which at five per cent., viz. 106l. 12s., is carried to the almshouse account.

XC. SIR JOHN HANBURY'S WILL (1639).

Sir John Hanbury, by Will, dated 27th March 1639, gave to the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors Company 500l. to purchase lands, upon trust, to pay out of the rent thereof, yearly, for ever, to the poor of the parish of Feckenham, in the county of Worcester, the sum of 13l., and to the poor of the parish of Hanbury adjoining, in the same county, 6l. 10s., the same to be expended and distributed by the respective church- wardens in bread.

And he gave the overplus of the revenue of the said premises when bought to the said company, to be disposed of at their pleasure.

The said sums of 13l. and 6l. 10s. are yearly paid to the said parishes of Feckenham and Hanbury respectively.

The company's predecessors do not appear to have laid out the sum so bequeathed in the purchase of land, but the same became blended with their general funds, which are considered as charged with the above annual payments.

XCI. JOHN HEYMAN'S WILL (1646).

John Heyman, by Will, dated 15th October 1646, granted and assigned unto the wardens of the parish church of St. Saviour, in Southwark, all his houses, lands, and tenements, with the appurtenances, situate at Barnet, in the county of Herts, held by him for a term of 1,500 years, to hold to the said wardens and their successors, for the remainder of the said term, upon trust, (inter alia) to pay the Merchant Tailors Company, yearly, and every year, the annual sum of 40s. to be by the said company given yearly to two poor citizens, tailors, free of the company, by 20s. a-piece; and the said John Heyman did further direct, that the said wardens should pay the clerk of the Merchant Tailors Company further, 4s. per annum for his trouble.

The company receive annually from the churchwardens of St. Saviour, the sum of 2l. 4s. out of the rents of the premises vested in them by the above devise, and pay to two poor citizens, tailors, 10s. 6d. per quarter each, and 4s. to the clerk, making an annual payment of 4l. 8s. which is ascribed to this charity in their accounts, being 2l. 4s. per annum beyond the receipt. The company, at their discretion, further increase these pensions to 5l. per annum each, out of their own funds.

XCII. RALPH BOLTON'S DEED (1648).

By a Deed Poll, dated 27th February 1648, Ralph Bolton reciting that he with the approbation of the Company of Mer- chant Tailors, had paid into the hands of the master and wardens of the same company the sum of 466l. 13s. 4d. upon condition that they should pay yearly, for ever, by quarterly payments, the sum of 20l. to him the said Ralph Bolton during his life, and after his decease, to such person or persons as he by his last will, or other deed in writing under his hand and seal, should appoint to receive the same, towards the maintenance of a free-school in the parish of Audlen, in the county of Chester, or for such other charitable uses as he by his last will, or other deed or writing under his hand and seal, should appoint, did grant and assign unto William Massey, Esq, and eight other persons therein mentioned, the said yearly sum of 20l. to hold the same to them, their executors and assigns, for ever, to and for the use and maintenance of a master of a free-school to be built at Audlen aforesaid, the said master to be single, and an University-man; and he did thereby give and grant authority to the said trustees, or any five of them, or the survivor of them, his executors and assigns, or such other person or persons as the said trustees, or any five of them, or the survivor of them, should from time to time, under his or their hands and seals, substitute and appoint to receive from the master and wardens of the said company, the said annuity of 20l.; and he further declared, that as often as the said trustees should die, that then the parishioners of the said parish should choose four other persons, or so many as should be defective, to be added from time to time to the said trustees, that so their number might continue nine; and he declared that any five of the said nine should act in the premises for the whole body, and directed that the master of the said school should not admit above 30 scholars, who were not children of the parish of Audlen, without the consent of five of the trustees at least, under their hands in writing.

The company have no other instrument explaining the trusts of this institution; nor does it appear whether the trusts have been regularly transmitted by fresh appointments, or who at present act in that capacity. All that is known by the company is, that the annual sum of 20l. is paid to the schoolmaster: they do not interfere in the local management of the school.

The Company, however, upon each fresh appointment of a master to Audlem School, obtain from the then existing trustees a certificate of such appointment, and a requisition to pay him the said annuity.

Footnotes

1 See Mem. xcv.
2 See Mem. cxiii.
3 See Mem. xxxiv.
4 The Company at their discretion increases the pensions paid to the six rever- sioners to 5l. each per annum, out of their own funds.
5 For "the Prison Fund," see Mem. cxiii.
6 See Mem. I., par. 40.
7 This was the father of the Earl of Craven who held the command of the Guards when William III. ordered their removal from Whitehall to post his Dutch Guards there (see Military Forces of the Crown, vol. i., p. 485). The Earl was admitted to the Freedom in 1633, and elected to the Mastership 15 June 1692, but did not serve. He founded the "Craven" Scholarships at Oxford in 1647.
8 4 instead of 6 clothworkers are now the recipients, and the residue (20l.) is disposed of to freemen of the Company past labour.
9 The blind Marchant Stapler, who died sine prole.
10 See Mem. cxxiv., p. 481.
11 See Mem. cxiii.
12 How early a custom this was, see p. 4.
13 See Mem. cxxiv., p. 481.
14 See Wooller's Exhibition," Mem. CXXIV., p. 481.
15 Viz.:—
Premises.Where Situate.
A houseNo. 6, Swithin's-lane.
A houseNo. 38, Old Change.
A house and warehousesOld Change.
LightsOut of a house in Watling-street.
16 See "the Mayoralty" of this gentleman in 1624 [Appendix F (3), p. 600.]