Inquisitions
Henry VII

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

G.S. Fry (editor)

Year published

1896

Pages

5-27

Citation Show another format:

'Inquisitions: Henry VII', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 1 (1896), pp. 5-27. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65866 Date accessed: 21 November 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Henry VII

ABSTRACTS of the Inquisitiones Post Mortem

relatin to the

CITY OF LONDON,

RETURNED INTO THE HIGH COURT OF CHANCERY.

INQUISITIONS OF THE REIGN OF KING HENRY THE SEVENTH.

Katherine Stafford.

The calendar records an inquisition of Katherine, late wife of Humphrey Stafford, in the second year of Henry VII, but it does not appear to be extant.

John, Earl of Lincoln.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, on Wednesday, 16 January, 3 Henry VII [1488], by virtue of the King's Letters Patent to enquire about certain articles therein contained, by the oath of William Cok, Thomas George, Thomas Cusac, William Matrasse, Henry Hopkyns, Simon Merssh, Peter Foster, Simon Pryour, Henry Lorymer, Nicholas Skynner, Thomas Cole and John Atkynson, as well as by other ways and means, whereby it is found that

John, late Earl of Lincoln, was seised of 11 tenements situate in the parish of St. Augustine next St. Paul's, in the ward of Bredestrete, which he held of the King in free burgage, and which are worth per ann., clear, £20.

Inq. p. m., 3 Henry VII, No. 4.

Sir William Petche, Knight.

Inquisition taken at London, 1 October, 5 Henry VII [1489], before Robert Tate, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of Richard Hunter, William Chamberleyn, John Wylley, William Walsshe, Richard Saby, William Michell, William Jele, John Richard, Robert Smyth, Richard Water, Rowland Belk, William Brown and Thomas Somer who say that

John Wode, esq., was seised of 7 messuages in the parish of the Blessed Mary of Wolnoth, in Lumbardstrete; 4 messuages in the parish of St. Michael, Cornhill; 6 messuages in the parish of St. Martin in the Vintry; 2 messuages in the parish of St. Pancras; 1 messuage in the parish of St. Benedict, Shorehog; 2 messuages in the parish of St. Anthony; 4 messuages in the parish of St. Brigide, Fletestrete; 1 messuage in the parish of St. Dionisius Bakchirche, and of a void place, formerly built upon, in the parish of the Blessed Mary Fanchurch.

So seised he by charter enfeoffed thereof William Fecche, knight, John Palmer, gent., and William Cressyll, gent.: to hold to them and their heirs for ever. They being so seised by charter enfeoffed Thomas Bourghchier, junior, knight, John Scotte, knight, William Pyknam, clerk, Thomas Wilkinson, clerk, Edmund Lychefeld, clerk, Nicholas Gaynesford, William Essex, Thomas Alfray, Henry Heydon, John Alfegh, Robert Rede, John Codyngton, and Arthur Holbroke, of the premises in the said parishes of St. Brigide, St. Pancras, St. Benedict, St. Mary Wolnoth, St. Michael on Cornhill, and St. Martin in the Vintrey: to hold to them and their heirs for ever.

Afterwards the said John Palmer and William Pecche died, and the said William Cressyll survived them.

All the said premises are held of the King in free burgage and by the service of paying therefor yearly 1 penny, and are worth per ann., clear, £70 10s. 0d.

William Pecche died 9 April, 3 Henry VII [1488]; John Pecche is his son and next heir, and is aged 17 years and more.

Inq. p. m., 3 Henry VII, No. 27.

Sir John Scrope, Knight, Lord le Scrope.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 13 October, 14 Henry VII [1498], before William Purchase, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Scrope, knight, by the oath of Robert Best, John Scathe, John Paynter, William Colby, Gilbert Wylcokks, Henry Calverd, William Nutkyn, Thomas Reyner, Richard Spicer, Deukyn A Parys, John Jakson, Henry Company, and Henry Pole, who say that

John Scrope, knight, did not hold any lands of the King or of others in London, but Guy Fayreffex, knight, late one of the Justices of the Pleas to be held before the King, was seised of 1 messuage called Serjeants Inn, situate opposite the Church of St. Andrew, in Holborn, with 2 gardens and 2 cottages thereto belonging. So seised he by charter dated 8 February, 9 Henry VII [1494], demised to the said John Scrope by the name of John Scrope, knight, Lord le Scrope of Bolton, Robert Wyngfeld, esq., Robert Constable, Robert Drury, William Berdewell, Francis Calabut, Humphrey Segiswyk, and Peter Bumsted, the said premises: to hold to them and their heirs for ever to the use of the said John Scrope and his heirs for ever.

The premises are held of the King in burgage and are worth per ann., clear, 10s.

John Scrope died 27 August last past; Henry Scrope, knight, is his son and next heir, and is aged 30 years and more.

Inq. p. m., 4 Hen. VII, No. 108.

Joan, wife of John Stanford.

Inquisition taken at London, 16 September, 5 Henry VII [1489], before Robert Tate, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of Thomas Serle, Richard Pomfret, William Beamond, William Tailbois, William Jele, William Michell, Richard Saby, Robert Tutt, Richard Watyr, William Walshe, Andrew Creshop, Robert Smyth, and Thomas Glover, who say that

Joan, (fn. 1) who was the wife of John Stanford, was seised of the moiety of 5 tenements in the parish of St. Botolph next Billyngisgate, 3 whereof are situated in Thamystrete, and 2 in Botolphslane; also of the 6th part of the 16th part of another tenement called the Oldwolkey situate in the parish of the Blessed Mary of Barkyng.

So seised, the said Joan married John Stanford, esq., and they had issue John Stanford who died thereof seised. The said John Stanford the father still survives: after the death of his said son he was seised of the said moiety and 6th part for his life.

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage: the moiety of the said 3 messuages in Thamystrete is worth per ann., clear, 66s. 8d., the moiety of the said 2 messuages in Botolphslane, 13s. 4d., and the said 6th part, 26s. 8d.

Joan Stanford died 22 July, 4 Henry VII [1489]; Thomas Leventhorp, son of John Leventhorp, junior, is her son and next heir, and is aged 24 years and more.

Inq. p. m., 5 Henry VII, No. 135.

John Tyryngham.

Proof of age of John Tyryngham, (fn. 2) son and heir of John Tyryngham, esq., taken at the Guildhall, 10 . . . 6 Henry VII, before John Mathewe, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of James Hunter, Hugh Raynescroft, John Rogers, John Knyght, John Broun, Philip Richard, John Martyn, John Rayner, John Barbour, John Broughton, Laurence Bardney, John Brewer, and Edmund Hill, who say that

John Tyryngham is aged 21 years, and was so on the 6 day of October last past.

James Hunter, who is now aged 53 years, well recollects being in the church of St. Stephen in Colman Street on the 6 October, 9 Edward IV [1469], and seeing the said John baptized.

Hugh Raynescroft remembers John Tyryngham, the father, asking John Iwardeby to be godfather to his said son.

John Rayner, aged 48 years, well recollects that on the said 6 October, 9 Edward IV, he told Thomas Snell, his servant, to carry a light to the said church to light the candles for the administering of the said sacrament of baptism.

Inq. p. m., 6 Hen. VII, No. 92.

Richard Peverell.

Inquisition taken in the City of London on Monday, 30 July, 7 Henry VII. [1492], before Hugh Clopton, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of John Wolfette, William Nele, Richard Pountfrette, Hugh Hebbys, William Jele, Thomas Somer, Thomas Serle, Ralph Clerk, Thomas Glover, William Kirkham, Edmund Engleger, John Harryson, William Clyff, Richard Spycer, and Thomas Bowman, who say that

Richard Peverell was seised of 9 messuages in the said city, 7 whereof are situate in Tourestrete, in the parish of St. Dunstan in the East, and the other 2 in Fanchirchestrete, in the parish of the Blessed Mary of Fanchirche.

All the said messuages are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, 27 marks and 4s.

Richard Peverell died 25 May, 2 Henry VII. [1487]; Humphrey Peverell is his son and next heir, and is aged 29 years and more.

John Colard and Margery his wife occupied all the said messuages, and took the profits thereof, from the death of the said Richard until the taking of this Inquisition, but by what title the jurors know not.

Inq.p. m., 7 Henry VII, No. 69.

Edward Greene.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 23 March, 8 Henry VII [1493], before William Martyn, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Edward Greene, by the oath of John Machyn, Thomas Outlawe, John Gage, Thomas Couper, William Wodestok, Henry Calvar, Thomas Rayner, Thomas Lybbys, Nicholas Jefray, William Cambre, Richard Spycer, John Broune, John Knyght, Thomas Chamberleyn, and Richard William, who say that

Cecilia, who was the wife of Robert Grene, knight, and late the wife of John Acton, was seised of a tenement called the Bell, situate in the parish of the Blessed Mary de Arcubus, which was late the property of the said Robert Grene, who held it in free burgage: it is worth perann., clear, £6.

Elizabeth Grene, late the wife of Walter Grene, esq., John Pemberton, clerk, John Gayesford, John Catesby, and John Ardern were seised of a tenement situate in the parish of St. Thomas the Apostle in the ward of Vintrie, and so seised they demised the said tenement to John Doune, senior, citizen and mercer of London, for the term of 20 years from Michaelmas, 38 Henry VI [1460], at the yearly rent, for the 2 first years of the said term, of 5 marks, and for the other 18 years 10 marks. Afterwards, the said Elizabeth, John Pemberton, John Gaynesford, and John Ardern died, and John Catesby was alone seised of the said tenement: he had issue Humphrey Catesby, who after his father's death entered into the same tenement as his son and heir.

The said tenement is held in free burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, £4.

No other lands came into the hands of the King by the death of the said Cecilia, neither on account of the minority of Edward Grene, her son and heir.

Edward Grene died 14 January last past; Cecilia, now the wife of William Burbage, is his sister and heir, and is aged 26 years and more.

Inq. p. m., 8 Hen. VII, No. 21.

Ellen Woodward.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 23 March, 8 Henry VII [1493], before William Martyn, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Ellen Wodeward, widow, by the oath of John Machyn, Thomas Outlawe, John Gage, Thomas Couper, William Wodestok, Henry Calvore, Thomas Reyner, Thomas Lybbys, Nicholas Jeffrey, William Cambre, Richard Spicer, John Broune, John Kngyht, Thomas Chamberleyn, and Richard William, who say that

John Wodeward and the said Ellen, his wife, were seised of 24 messuages situate within the parish of All Saints of Berkyng, and so seised they enfeoffed thereof Thomas Chicheley, son of the said Ellen: to hold to him and his heirs for ever. The said Thomas Chicheley still survives, and is seised of the premises as of freehold.

The said premises are held of James Underwode, Master of Whitingdon College in the City of London, but by what service the jurors know not; they are worth per ann., clear, 5 marks.

Ellen Wodeward died 1 July, 6 Henry VII [1491]; John Chicheley is her son and next heir, and is aged 40 years and more.

Inq. p. m., 8 Henry VII, No. 103.

The name of Ellen Woodward's former husband is not given in the inquisition, but from the calendar it appears to have been Simon Checheley.

Joan, wife of John Stanford. (fn. 3)

Inquisition taken at London, 15 October, 9 Henry VII [1493], before William Martyn, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of William Tetworth, John Spelowe, William Grene, Thomas Yonge, Robert Aleyn, Nicholas Lynche, Henry Dauson, John Malton, John Durgyn, Richard Derby, John Asshwyn, Thomas Benet, William Utworth, William Whelpdale, Thomas Hobard, . . . and John Boys, who say that

Joan, wife of John Stanford, was seised of the moiety of 5 tenements in the parish of St. Bartholomew next Billyngysgate, 3 whereof are situated in Tamestrete and the other 2 in Botoulfslane, and of the 6th part of the 16th part of another tenement called Oldwolkey in the parish of the Blessed Mary of Barking.

So seised, the said Joan married John Stanford, and they had issue John, Elizabeth, now the wife of William Cornwaleys, and Margaret, now the wife of George Herny. After the death of the said Joan, the said John Stanford (the father) was seized of the said premises as of freehold.

John Berdfeld and William Butsyd were seised of 3 messuages in West Smithfield to the use of the said John Stanford (father) and his heirs.

John Stanford, the son, died without heirs.

John Stanford, the father, died 26 (?) September, 9 Henry VII [1493], after whose death the said John Berdfeld and William Butsyd were seised of the premises to the use of the said William and Elizabeth, George and Margaret.

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage: the moiety of the three messuages in Thamestrete is worth per ann., clear, 66s. 8d., and of the other 2 tenements 13s. 4d.; the said 6th part is worth per ann., clear, 26s. 8d., and the messuage in Smithfield, 13s. 4d.

Thomas Leventhorp, son of John Leventhorp, is the son and next heir of the said Joan, and is aged 33 years and more.

Elizabeth Cornwaleys and Margaret Herny are the daughters and next heirs of the said John Stanford: the said Elizabeth is aged 20 years and more, and the said Margaret 18 years and more.

Inq. p. m., 9 Henry VII, No. 21.

Henry Astell.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, before John Aleyn and John Shelley, sheriffs of the City of London, 12 June, 12 Edward IV [1472], to enquire about certain articles specified in the writ, by the oath of John Simond, John Jacob, Thomas Hewet, John Abury, Leonard Milward, William Kyng, Thomas Mouse, William Busshop, Stephen Sampson, William Aleyn, John Stonam, John Cok and Richard Roger, who say that

Henry Astell, on the day named in the writ, was seised of a messuage, situate within the Hornalley in the parish of St. Botolph without Aldriggate, in the suburbs of London, which is worth per ann., clear, 33s. 4d.; 14 messuages in Hornealley, which are worth per ann., clear, £3; a messuage in the said parish in which Robert Grey . . . now lives, which is worth per ann., clear, 6s.; a messuage in the said parish worth per ann., clear, 9s.; 1 messuage in Gutterlane, in the parish of St. Vedast, worth per ann., clear, 12s.; one other messuage in Gutterlane, worth per ann., clear, 12s.; 2 messuages in Westchepe, in said parish of St. Vedast, in which John Aston, sadler, now dwells, which are worth per ann., clear, 10 marks; 3 messuages in Westchepe, which are worth per ann., clear, 18s.; and a garden lying in Westchepe, which is worth per ann., clear, 2s.

Inq. p. m., 10 Henry VII [12 Edward IV], No. 21.

The preceding inquisition is not one of those post-mortem, but in the absence of the writ, in virtue of which it was taken, it is impossible to say what may have been its object. It may have been that the property of Henry Astell, on account of criminal proceedings, had become forfeited to the Crown. Although taken in the reign of Edward IV., it is recorded amongst those of Henry VII., and for that reason is printed here, although in strictness it appears somewhat out of place.

John Druell.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 1 August, 11 Henry VII [1496], before Henry Colett, knight, Mayor and escheator, [after the death of John Druell], by the oath of Reginald Oclesfeld, John Haltman, Robert Benet, John Sympson, Hugh Davy, Richard Payntor, John Stanwey, John Cony, George Gryll, William Couper, John Sutton, Thomas Brayn, John Cayllour and William Nightyngale who say that

John Druell was seised of a tenement situate in Oldfish Street, in the parish of St. Nicholas Goldenabbey, between the tenement of the Dean of St. Martin-le-Grand on the one part, and the tenement of the wardens of the said church of St. Nicholas on the other part; which said tenement is held of the King in free burgage as the whole city of London is held, and is worth per ann., clear, 20s.

John Druell died 7 December last past; Richard Druell is his brother and next heir, and is aged 14 years and more.

George Dalyson, gent., took all the profits of the said tenement from the death of the said John Druell until the taking of this inquisition.

Inq. p. m., 11 and 12 Henry VII, No. 48.

Richard Chamberlayne, esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 4 March, 12 Henry VII [1497], before John Tate, Mayor and escheator [after the death of Richard Chamberleyn], by the oath of Richard Jones, John Conwey, William Chirch, William Wode, John Grisley, John Osburn, Thomas Pryour, Richard Wales, Edmund Meryfeld, John Mason, William Deberose, Thomas Outlawe, John Hancok, Richard Hotofte, Walter Webbe, and John Mall, who say that

Richard Chamberleyn held no lands of the King in the city of London, but he was seised of a wharf called Heywharf, and of 13 tenements in a lane called Battyslane, in the ward of Dowegate, and held the same of the King in free burgage; they are worth per ann., clear, £13 6s. 8d.

Richard Chamberleyn died 28 August last past; Edward Chamberleyn is his son and next heir, and is now aged 16 years and more.

Sibilla, late the wife of the said Richard Chamberleyn, took the issues of the premises from the death of the said Richard until the taking of this inquisition.

Inq. p. m., 11 and 12 Henry VII, No. 100.

Edward Babynton.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 23 July, 13 Henry VII [1498], before William Purches, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of John Malton, Richard Baron, John Cornewe, Maurice Patenson, Thomas Chamberleyne, William Broun, John Lancaster, Thomas Yonge, John Broke, John Reynolds, John Wyks, Oliver Hilton, Thomas James and Richard Harryson, who say that

John Makworth, clerk, William Cheyne, knight, William Babyngton, knight, Peter de la Pole, and William Fyndern were seised of a messuage and a garden within the King's close of Fleet [claus' d'ni Regis de Flete], and of the office of keeper of all the prisoners sent there; of a yearly rent of £6 14s. 5d. issuing out of divers lands and tenements within the City of London and the suburbs thereof; and also of £7 11s. 1d. yearly to be taken for the custody of the said Fleet gaol, and by their charter dated 7 July, 12 Henry VI [1434], demised to William Venour and Elizabeth, his wife, daughter and heiress of Roger Saburton, and to their heirs the said premises and rents, together with the fees and profits of the said office. If the said William and Elizabeth should die without heirs, then the said premises and rents were to remain to the heirs of the said Elizabeth, and if she should die without heirs, then the said premises were to remain to Robert Babyngton, kinsman of the said Roger, and to the heirs of the said Robert for ever.

After the death of the said William and Elizabeth, who died without heirs, the said lands and rent remained to William Babyngton, as son and heir of the said Robert Babyngton. The said William had issue, Richard, Edward and William Babyngton; after his death the said premises descended to the said Richard, who died without heirs. After his death they descended to the said Edward Babyngton as brother and heir of the said Richard, who also died without heirs.

The premises, wardship and rent are held of the King in chief, but by what service the jurors know not, and are worth per ann., clear, £14.

Edward Babyngton died 30 June last past; William Babyngton is his brother and heir, and is aged 22 years and more.

Inq. p. m., 13 Henry VII, No. 28.

John Pickering.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 27th June, 14 Henry VII [1499], before John Percyvale, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Pykeryng, citizen and mercer of London, by the oath of William Colby, Richard Baxster, William Pulney, John Payntour, Robert Martyn, John Benet, Robert Wodwose, Richard Chevyr, William Cawmbre, William Bray, John Busshop, Thomas Lather, William Wilson, John Skayff, John Salcok, and John Goldyngton, who say that

John Pykeryng, together with Master William Wylde, clerk, Thomas Feldyng, gent., John Pykton, citizen and mercer of London, and Robert Southwood, citizen and mercer, now deceased, was seised of 5 messuages and 1 garden lying together in the parish of St. Margaret, Lothbury, to the use of the said John Pykeryng and his heirs. After the death of the said John Pykering, the said William, Thomas and John were seised of the premises to the use of the heirs of the said John. All the premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £8.

John Pykering died on the vigil of St. Andrew the Apostle, 14 Henry VII; Roger Thorney, of London, mercer, is his right and next heir, to wit, son of Joan, sister of Joan, mother of the said John, and is now aged 5 years and more.

Inq. p. m., 14 Henry VII, No. 87.

Richard Lee.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 7 September, 15 Henry VII [1499], before Nicholas Alwyn, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Richard Lee, by the oath of William Colby, Richard Baxter, William Pulney, John Payntour, Robert Marten, John Benett, Robert Wodwose, Richard Chener, William Caumbre, William Bray, John Bushop, Thomas Lather, William Wilson, John Skayff, John Salcoks, and John Goldyngton, who say that

Richard Lee did not hold any lands of the King, but he was seised of 6 messuages in Temmystrete, and 1 wharf with 11 solars, and of 6 other tenements lying in the parish of All Saints and Fenam, in Grantam lane, and so seised in the 21st year of Edward IV, he enfeoffed thereof John Foge, esq., John Lee, clerk, William Fysher, gent., and Alan Hunnes, gent., to the use of the said Richard Lee and his heirs. The said John Lee, William Fysher, and Alan Hunnes afterwards died, and the said John Foge became alone seised of the premises.

The said wharf is held of the King in free burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, £27. The 6 messuages in Temmysstrete are held of the Bishop of Winchester as of his manor of Southwark by the service and rent of 27s. 8d., and are worth per ann., clear, £20.

Richard Lee died 26 September, 14 Henry VII [1498]; Richard Lee is his son and next heir, and is aged 24 years and more.

Inq. p. m., 15 Henry VII, No. 5.

John Mathew.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 9 October, 15 Henry VII [1499], before John Percyvale, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Mathew, by the oath of William Colby, Richard Baxter, William Pulney, John Payntour, Robert Martyn, John Benett, Robert Wodwose, Richard Chenes, William Caumbre, William Bray, John Busshopp, Thomas Lather, William Wilson, John Scaiff, John Salcok, and John Goldyngton, who say that

John Mathew was seised of 9 messuages situate in the parishes of St. Martin le Organs and St. Michael in Crokydlane, in the wards of Temmysstrete and Canwykstreet, which are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £16 6s. 4d.

John Mathew died 6 February, 14 Henry VII. [1499]; Robert Mathew is his son and next heir, and is aged 26 years.

Inq. p. m., 15 Henry VII, No. 26.

Richard Coke.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, in the City of London, 17 August, 17 Henry VII [1502], before John Shaa, Mayor and escheator, by virtue of a writ de melius inquirendum [after the death of Richard Coke], by the oath of John Middleton, John North, John Sall Plumer, Richard Cromwell, John Scrace, John Lake, Thome Awode, Philip Cosyn, Lancelot Holme, John Fygge, Hugh Maderson, John Smyth, John Bisshop, and Thomas Capax, who say that

The reversion of those 14 messuages (in the parish of All Saints, Stanyngs, London), named in the writ, by the will of Richard Cok, should revert to his right heirs after the death of Joan. The said Richard Cok had issue, Richard, which said Richard afterwards died in the lifetime of the said Joan, without heirs general or special, so that the said reversion, after the death of the said Joan, belongs to the King as his escheat, because the said messuages are held of the King as in the first inquisition appears.

Inq. p. m., 17 Henry VII, No. 42.

Joan Couper.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, in the City of London, 18 June, 17 Henry VII [1502], before John Shaa, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Joan Couper, (fn. 4) widow, late the wife of Richard Cok, deceased, by the oath of John Scrace, John Middleton, John North, William Tanner, John Sallplomer, George Irland, Richard Wodlake, Richard Cromwell, John Luke, John Magson, Thomas Woode, John Fygge, Hugh Maderson, John Smyth, and Thomas Capax, who say that

Richard Cok was seised of 14 messuages lying in the parish of All Saints, Stanyngs, London, long before the said Joan had any interest in the same.

So seised, the said Richard, by his will, bequeathed the said messuages to the said Joan for life: he died 16 June, 35 Henry VI [1457].

The said messuages are worth per ann., clear, £6.

The said Joan died without heirs, 18 February, 11 Henry VII [1496]. Immediately after her death Peter Curteys entered into the said premises, and took.the profits thereof up to 10 May, 13 Henry VII [1498], but by what title the jurors know not. John Mason entered into the premises and took the issues thereof from the said 10 May up to 20 February, 14 Henry VII [1499]: by what title the jurors know not. John Morton, late Archbishop of Canterbury, entered into the said 14 messuages and took the issues thereof from the said 20 February up to the 11 September, 16 Henry VII [1500]: by what title the jurors know not. John Morton, kinsman of the said Archbishop, and John Colop entered into the said premises and took the issues thereof from the said 11 September up to the taking of this inquisition: by what title the jurors know not.

The said 14 messuages are held of the King by the free service of 1d. per annum.

Inq. p. m., 17 Henry VII, No. 43.

Geoffry Byrd.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 9 June, 17 Henry VII [1502], before John Shaa, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Geoffry Byrd, by the oath of Ralph Austyn, Thomas Grave, Bartholomew Watson, John Payn, Thomas Hatton, Thomas Chamberleyn, John Overton, William Nundy, William Gryffyn, John Lylly, John Maggeson, Laurence Bardney, William Pulney, John Benet, Richard Atfeld, William Aylward, John Wayte, and John Gurry, who say that

Geoffry Byrd did not hold any lands or tenements of the King in chief or in any other way within the City of London and the liberties of the same; but he was seised of 2 messuages and 2 shops with a garden, one whereof is called the Belhous and the other the Scomer; also of 8 curtilages lying together in Hundesdich in the parish of St. Botolph without Algate, within the ward of Portsoken: all which premises are held of the Prior of Cristchurch next the Tower of London as in right of his church, by the yearly rent of 8s. 6d., and are worth per annum, clear, 5 marks.

Geoffry Byrd died 21 July, 34 Henry VI [1456]; Matilda Lambart, widow, is his daughter and next heir, and is now aged 65 years and more. Immediately after the death of the said Geoffry, Margaret, his widow, entered into the said premises and took the issues thereof from the suid 21 July until the 17 May, 7 Henry VII [1492]. After her death Thomas Asshe entered into the premises and took the issues thereof from the said 17 May up to 20 March last past, but by what title the jurors know not.

Inq. p. m., 17 Henry VII, No. 44.

William Clopton.

Proof of age of William Clopton, son and heir of William Clopton, esq., deceased, taken at the Guildhall in the ward of Bassynghawe in the City of London, 17 May, 18 Henry VIII [sic] [1526], before John Aleyn, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of Robert Warter, Edmund Wheler, James Pegge, Christopher Ward, Robert Aleyn, John Smyth, Richard Holland, Andrew Frauncis, Richard Harrys, Edmund Briggs, William Davis, Ambrose Bekwith, Edward Steward, and Andrew Chesham, who say that

William Clopton is of the full age of 21 years and more, because he was born in the parish of St. Brigide in the ward of Farringdon without the City on the 2nd day of March, 20 Henry VII [1505], and was baptized in the parish church of St. Brigide.

The said Robert Warter and Edmund Wheler, who were present at the baptism, say that William Barons, late Bishop of London, and Thomas Bethell, clerk, then secretary to King Henry VII, and afterwards Bishop of Durham, were the godfathers of the said William Clopton, and Lady Katherine Haddon, late the wife of Sir Robert Haddon, knight, was his godmother 'et ipsum lavaverunt ad fontem'. Joan Bas, widow, then the wife of William Bas, was with Cose Clopton, mother of the said William, when the said William was born.

Inq. p. m., 18 Henry VII, No. 1.

Henry Somer.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 1 June, 18 Henry VII [1503], before Bartholomew Rede, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Henry Somer, late of the City of London, merchanthaberdasher, by the oath of Ralph Austen, Lawrence B[ard]ney, John Overton, Robert Sylver, John Welford, Thomas Pecok, Thomas Grave, William Wood, John Knarr, Richard Baxster, Richard Harryson, Thomas Capeherste, and John Snowdon, who say that

Henry Somer was seised together with Thomas Knesworth, fishmonger, Thomas Bower, baker, Stephen Lyne, and Thomas Dagles, deceased, to the use of the said Henry Somer, and for the fulfilment of his will of one messuage or tenement and garden lying in the parish of St. Dunstan in the East in the City of London: which said messuage is held of the King in chief in socage, to wit, by the service of paying to the King yearly 1d., and is worth per ann., clear, 20s.

Henry Somer died 10 August, 17 Henry VII [1502]; John Gybson is his kinsman and heir, and is aged 40 years and more.

Inq. p. m., 18 Henry VII, No. 109.

Sir John Percivale, knight.

Inquisition taken in the City of London, 8 October, 19 Henry VII [1503], before Bartholomew Rede, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Percivale, knight, citizen, and alderman, and late Mayor of London, by the oath of John Welford, Thomas Capehurst, Thomas Pecoke, Robert Sylver, Ralph Austyn, Robert Pyerson, William Gryffyn, Richard Baxter, John Jakson, Richard Herryson, John Knarre and John Borstall, who say that John Percyvale was seised of 12 messuages in the City, 6 whereof lye together in Lumbardstreet, in the parish of St. Mary, Wolnoth in the ward of Langbourne, on the north side of the said street; 1 other messuage wherein the said John Percivale used to live on the north part of Lumbardstreet, and 1 other messuage to the same annexed are in the said parish of St. Mary, Wolnoth, and in the parish of St. Michael, Cornhill, in the ward of Cornhill; and the 4 other messuages lye together in the street of Cornhill in the said parish of St. Michael, on the south part of the said street. The said messuages in Lumbardstreet extend from the tenements late of Hugh Brice, knight, on the east up to the tenement late of John Bohun, esq., adjoining the 'Popes Hedes Entre' on the west; the 4 messuages in the street of Cornhill extend from the tenements of the Prior of St. Mary, Spytell, on the east up to the tenements of the said John Bohun on the west.

By his will dated 21 February, 1502, 18 Henry VII, the said John Percivale bequeathed all the said tenements to the Master and Wardens of the Tailors' Fraternity of St. John Baptist and to their successors, to the intent that the said Master and Wardens out of the profits thereof should find for ever after the death of the said John two fit priests daily to say masses and celebrate divine service in the parish church of St. Mary, Wolnoth, for the souls of the said John, of Thomasine, his wife, when she should depart this life, of their parents, friends, benefactors, and of all christians. The said Master and Wardens were also to keep yearly for ever in the said church the obit of the said John; they also yearly to distribute in alms among the poor tenants of the house of the said parish of St. Mary, Wolnoth, and of other parishes in the said ward who shall come to the said obit, 10s.; they shall also yearly expend 30s. in coals to be distributed upon certain days mentioned in the said will amongst the poor tenants of the houses of the said parish.

All the said messuages are held of the King in free burgage by the yearly rent of 1d., and are worth per ann., clear, £26.

John Percyvale died 19 April last past, Richard Percyvale is his next heir, and is aged 28 years and more.

After the death of the said John the said Master and Wardens entered into the said premises and took the profits thereof.

Inq. p. m., 19 Henry VII, No. 42.

Eleanor, Duchess of Somerset.

Inquisition taken at St. Martin de Graunt (?) in the City of London, 15 September, 21 Henry VII [1505], before Thomas Kneseworth, Mayor, and others, by the oath of Anthony Burgh, Thomas Blake, Thomas Emery, Henry Sturgeon, Richard Charles, John S . . ., John Russell, John Grobbe, Nicholas Darrell, John Regnold, Richard Smyth, Nicholas Punchon, Richard Jones, and Richard Yong, who say that

Eleanor, late Duchess of Somerset, daughter of Richard Beauchamp, formerly Earl of Warwick, was seised of 1 tenement called Warwick Inne, and of 1 tenement called Somerset Inn, next Baynard Castle, in the City of London, which she held of King Edward IV in free burgage. Warwick Inne is worth per ann., clear, £24 13s. 4d., and Somerset Inne is worth per ann., £9 6s. 8d.

The said Duchess died 4 March, 7 Edward IV [1467], after her death the said tenements descended to Edmund Lord Roos, as her kinsman and heir, to wit, son of Thomas, who was son of the said Eleanor.

Edward, Duke of Buckingham, Henry, Earl of Northumberland Mary, Countess of Ryvers, Joan, Lady Howyth, Edward Burgh, knight, John Savell, knight, and Gilbert Talbot, esq., after the death of the said Duchess entered into the said premises and took the profits thereof, by what title or for what cause the jurors know not.

Inq. p. m., 21 Henry VII, No. 24.

Sir Henry Colet, Knight.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 16 January, 21 Henry VII [1506], before Thomas Kneseworth, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Henry Colet, knight, by the oath of John Bristall, John Household, . . . Bamburgh, Robert Walby, Nicholas Gwyn, Simon Symondson, Thomas Latter, John Walshe, John Herdman, John Jakson, Robert Silver, John Hems, . . . John Ludby, Edward John Johnys, Robert Bardisley, Philip Cowper, Edward Drakes, Robert Cademan, and Thomas Gybbons, who say that

John Martyn . . . and Thomas . . . writer, citizens of London, were seised of 3 messuages in the parish of St. George, in Puddinglane, next Eastchepe. So seised, they by charter granted the same to Henry Colet, Reginald . . ., Nicholas Alewyn, Thomas Wynedeoute, and John Colet, citizens and mercers of London: to hold to them and their heirs to the use of the said Henry Colet and his heirs. Afterwards the said Reginald, Thomas Wyndeoute, John and Henry died, and the said Nicholas Alewyn was alone seised of the premises.

Alice Porthale was seised of 3 messuages in the parish of St. Magnus the Martyr, in Bridge ward. So seised, she by charter granted the same to Henry Colet, John Pellam, Thomas Burgoyne, and Robert Colet, citizens and mercers of London: to hold to them and their heirs to the use of the said Henry Colot and his heirs for ever. Afterwards the said John Pellam, Thomas Burgoyne and Robert Colet died, and the said Henry Colet was alone seised of the premises. After his death the same descended to John Colet, S.T.P., as son and heir of the said Henry.

The said messuages are held of the King by free burgage, but by what other services the jurors know not: they are worth per ann., clear, £10.

Alvered Corneburgh, esq., and Beatrice, his wife, were seised of 1 messuage in Soperlane. So seised, they by their charter granted the same to Henry Colet, . . . and mercer of London, William Knyvet, esq., and Ralph Tykhull, citizen of London, to the use of the said Henry Colet and his heirs. Afterwards the said Ralph and Henry Colet died, and the said William is alone seised of the said messuage, which is held of the King in free burgage, and is worth per annum, clear, £4. Henry Colet was seised of 1 tenement in Nederslane and Soperlane, containing in length 42 feet, and in breadth 12 feet, with a void space of land thereto belonging, formerly of John . . ., and Isabella his wife, now enclosed with a stone wall, and annexed to the said messuage. After the death of the said Henry Colet, the use of the said tenement descended to the said John Colet, as his son and heir. The said premises are held of the King by free burgage, and the rent of 13s.

Henry Colet died 1 October last past; the said John Colet is his son and next heir, and is aged 38 years and more.

[Inq. p. m., 21 Henry VII, No. 34.

[One side of this document is almost illegible.]

Thomas Marrowe.

The calendar records the name of Thomas Marrowe in the 21st year of Henry VII., but this inquisition appears to be no longer extant.

Sir Thomas Frowyk, Knight.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 3 February, 22 Henry VII [1507], before Richard Haddon, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Frowyk, knight, by the oath of John Bristall, Robert Bardisley, John Household, John Cokks, John Overy, Philip Couper, Robert Pierson, Nicholas Gwen, Robert Gustard Oliver Holynbrigge, Robert Cademan, Thomas Lather, and Thomas Gybbons, who say that

Thomas Frowyk held no lands of the King or of others within the City of London, but Lady Joan Fowyk, widow, late the wife of Thomas Frowyk, knight, mother of the said Thomas Frowyk, was seised of 1 tenement, or hospice, called Ipres-Inne, in the parish of St. Thomas the Apostle, in the ward of Vintry, and of 4 messuages to the same adjoining. So seised, the said Joan enfeoffed thereof Thomas Wodde, late one of the Justices of the King's Bench, Thomas Kebell, serjeant-at-Law, the said Thomas Frowyk, John Kyngesmyll, serjeant-at-Law, Thomas Jakes and John Scott, to the use of the said Thomas Frowyk: to hold to them and their heirs. Afterwards the said Thomas Wode, Thomas Kebell, and Thomas Frowyk, died, and John Kyngesmyll, Thomas Jakes, and John Scott survived them, and are still seised of the premises.

By his will, the said Thomas Frowyk ordained that the said premises should be sold, and that his wife Lady Elizabeth, should have the 3rd part of the money received for the same: the other 2 parts to be applied to the payment of his debts and legacies. The said Lady Elizabeth was to have the issues of the said premises until they were sold.

The hospice called Ipres Inne is held in free burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, 10s. The 4 messuages are likewise held in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £4.

Thomas Frowyk died 7 October last past; Frideswide Frowyk is his daughter and next heir: she was 9 years old on the day of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary last past.

Inq. p. m., 22 Henry VII, No. 55.

Henry Frowyk.

Inquisition taken at the Guidhall, 14 February, 23 Henry VII [1508], before William Broun, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Henry Frowyk, by the oath of Robert Johnson, John Houshold, John Cokks, Oliver Holynbrigge, John Knarre, Philip Cowper, Robert Harryson, Robert Pyerson, Nicolas Gwen, Robert A Lygh, John Herdman, Thomas Lather, and Thomas Pykill, who say that

Thomas Frowyk, son of Henry Frowyk, late alderman, citizen, and mercer of London, and Joan, wife of the said Thomas, were seised of 5 messuages in London, 3 whereof are situated in the parish of St. Pancras, in the ward of Chepe, and the other 2 in the parish of St. Benedict, Shorhogge, in the ward of Cordwainer Street. So seised, by their charter enrolled in the Court of Hustings, they granted to Henry Frowyk, their son (named in the writ), all the said messuages, with all the houses, shops, cellers, etc., which they had in Soperlane, in the said parish of St. Pancras; and also all their lands and tenements which were late of Richard Osbarn, citizen of London, and which John Cadman held to farm in the said parish of St. Benedict: to hold to the said Henry and Joan (now deceased) and their heirs. If the said Henry and Joan should die without heirs, then all the said premises should revert to the right heirs of the said Thomas Frowyk for ever.

The said Joan died 20 November, 3 Henry VII [1487], after whose death the said Henry was alone seised of the premises. By writ of right patent in the Court of Hustings, dated 8 May, 8 Henry VII [1493], Edmund Denny, and Ralph Legh recovered all the said premises against the said Henry Frowyk: which recovery was to the use of the said Henry Frowyk and his heirs by the said Joan, and for default, then to the use of the heirs of the said Thomas Frowyk.

All the said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £9.

Henry Frowyk died 3 October, 21 Henry VII [1505]. After his death the use of all the premises descended to Margaret Fyssher wife of Michael Fyssher, gent., as the daughter and heir of the said Henry and Joan. The said Margaret is now aged 23 years and more.

Inq. p. m., 23 Henry VII, No. 71.

Henry Frowyk.

Inquisition taken at the Guidhall, 20 May, 23 Henry VII [1508], before Laurence Aylmer, knight, mayor and escheator, after the death of Henry Frowyk, by the oath of John Brystall, Robert Gustard, John Knarr, John Robynson, John Condall, John Godwyn, Richard Tabeler, Thomas Coldale, John Vyncent, Brian Jeffreyson, Thomas Outlawe, and Thomas Gybbons, who say that

Henry Frowyk did not hold any lands of the King or of others within the City of London, but that long before the death of the said Henry one John Saddeler was seised of 7 messuages and 14 gardens within the parish of St. Giles, without Criplegate. So seised, he by charter gave the said premises to the said Henry Frowyk, and to Margaret his wife, John Legh, of Stokwell, now knight, by the name of John Legh, of Stokwell, esq., Thomas Frowyk, Edmund Denny, Ralph Legh, Thomas Butteshide and William Melborn, and their heirs for ever, by the name of all those lands and tenements in the Barbican, in the parish of St. Giles, which he lately had of the enfeoffment of Henry Frowyk, son and heir of Thomas Frowyk, knight. The said enfeoffment was to the use of the said Henry Frowyk and Margaret, his wife, sister of the said John Legh, and of the heirs of the said Henry, and to fulfil his last will.

Afterwards the said Henry and Margaret, Thomas Frowyk, Thomas Butteshide and William Melborn died, and the said John Legh, Edmund Denny and Ralph Legh survived them and are still seised of the said premises.

The said Henry Frowyk was seised of 2 messuages within the said City, one whereof lies within the parish of St. Mary Magdalene in Milkestrete, and the other within the parish of All Saints in Honylane, and so seised, he enfeoffed thereof John Legh, of Stokwell, Edmund Denny and Ralph Legh (still surviving): to hold to them and their heirs to the use of the said Henry and Margaret, and their heirs.

The said Henry was also seised of 5 messuages and 4 shops within the said City, whereof 3 messuages and 2 shops are situated in Soperlane, in the parish of St. Pancras, and the other 2 messuages and 2 shops are in the parish of St. Benedict, Shorhogge. Afterwards in the Court of Hustings, by writ of right patent dated 7th May, 8 Henry VII [1493], Edmund Denny and Ralph Legh recovered the said messuages and shops against the said Henry: which said recovery was to the use of the said Henry and Margaret and their heirs.

All the premises aforesaid are held of the King in free burgage only, and are worth per ann., clear, £12 9s. 0d.

Henry Frowyk died 3 October, 21 Henry VII [1505], Thomas Frowyk is his son and next heir, and is in the wardship of the King: he was 14 years old on the 20th May last past.

Inq. p. m., 23 Henry VII, No. 93.

Richard Jaye.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 25 February, 9 Henry VII [1494], before Ralph Astry, knight, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of William Nightyngale, John Taillour, Henry Bromborugh, William Reynford, Thomas Hutton, John Carden, John Sprott, William Leman, Richard Puttok, John Burre, Luke Wilson and John Alboo, who say that

Richard Jay and Joan his wife, in right of the said Joan, were seised of one capital messuage called the Bell in Birchinlane; 4 other messuages on the north part of the said messuage which William Lewes long held; 3 other messuages on the south part, and one corner tenement and 2 other messuages in Lombard Street on the west part, lying together in the parish of St. Edmund's in Lombard Street in the ward of Langbourn.

They had issue between them William Jay, who afterwards died without heirs.

On the 26 August, 4 Henry VII [1488], the said Joan died without heirs.

All the said premises are held of the King in free burgage, whereby they accrued to the King as his escheats: they are worth per ann., clear, £20.

Richard Jaye died 18 January, 9 Henry VII [1494]: he occupied the said premises, and took the profits thereof from the death of the said Joan up to his own death. Afterwards Peter Corffe, chaplain, occupied the said premises from the said 18 January until the taking of this inquisition.

Inq. p. m. v. o., Richard III and Henry VII, No. 130.

John Gourney and Nicholas Browne.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 7 October, 10 Henry VII [1494], before Ralph Astry, knight, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of John Taillour, William Castell, Richard Pomfrey, William Reynford, Edmund Parfey, Thomas Grevys, William Boyland, Robert Ferne, William Randes, Peter Clerk, Thomas Tayllor, and John Cornelys, who say that

Whereas a chapel was built and dedicated next Preston Richard in the parish of Burton in the county of Westmorland in honor of St. George by John Preston, late one of the Justices of the Bench, and a certain perpetual chantry was founded in the said chapel by the said John for two chaplains constantly to celebrate divine service there for the souls of the said John and his ancestors, licence from King Henry VI first being obtained: and whereas long after the said foundation the said John was seized of one messuage called the Great Belle next the Barbican in the parish of St. Botolph without Aldrichgate Street, and of 14 tenements to the said messuage annexed, he by charter enfeoffed thereof John Ursewyke, Thomas Barburn, Nicholas Preston, clerk, and Robert Preston: to hold to them and their heirs, to the use of Rodger Casterton and Henry Preston the then chaplains of the said chantry and their successors. The said Roger and Henry took the profits of the said premises to their own proper uses and to the use of the said chantry by virtue of the said enfeoffment. The said John Ursewyk, Thomas Barburn, Nicholas Preston and Robert Preston continued their estate in the said premises con trary to the form of the statutes of mortmain.

Afterwards the King being seised in right of his Crown of the premises aforesaid by virtue of an inquisition taken upon the occasion of putting the same into mortmain without the royal licence, granted the same to John Gourney, Nicholas Browne for services they had rendered to him: to hold to them and to the survivor of them for life without rendering anything therefor to the King or his heirs, provided that after the death of the said John and Nicholas the said premises should revert to the King.

The said John and Nicholas are dead, but the Jurors know not when they died, nor who occupied the said premises from the time of their death until the 14th day of April, 9 Henry VII.

Henry Colet, knight, occupied the same from that date until the taking of this inquisition, but by what title the jurors know not.

The said premises are worth per ann., clear, 7 marks.

Inq. p. m. v. o., Richard III and Henry VII, No. 312.

Footnotes

1 See also a second inquisition, post, after the death of Joan Stanford, doubtless held in pursuance of a writ of melius inquirendum.
2 Teringham in the calendar.
3 See also former Inquisition, p. 7, taken four years earlier.
4 In the calendar she is entered as Joan Coweper, late wife of Richard Coke.