Inquisitions
Henry VIII (part 1 of 3)

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

G.S. Fry (editor)

Year published

1896

Pages

28-43

Citation Show another format:

'Inquisitions: Henry VIII (part 1 of 3)', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 1 (1896), pp. 28-43. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65867 Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


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INQUISITIONS OF THE REIGN OF KING HENRY THE EIGHTH.

William Coope, Esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 15 June, 5 Henry VIII [1513], before Richard Haddon, knight, Mayor and Escheator, after the death of William Coope, esq., by the oath of Robert Bardesley, Philip Cowper, John Herdman, William Burton, Thomas Gybbons, Oliver Holyngbryg, Richard Lynde, Thomas Pykkyll, Henry Nortryche, Hugh Byrde, William Hethe, and Edward Byllyng, who say that

Long before the death of the said William Coope, one Humphrey Conyngesby, Justice of the Pleas, was seised, to the use of the said William Coope, of 4 messuages and 1 garden situate in the parishes of St. Benedict and St. Peter in Thames Street next Powleswharf, London.

So seised, he, at the request of the said William Coope, enfeoffed thereof Richard Fowler, knight, Edward Chamberleyn, esq., John Horn, esq., John Spencer, esq., Thomas Langson, esq., Thomas Haydocke, esq., Gilbert Stoughton, gent., John Bustard, Thomas Barker, of Stene, and Thomas Bellat, to hold to them and their heirs, to the use of the said William Coope and to fulfil his last will, as appear by charter dated 4 January, 3 Henry VIII [1512].

The said William Coope by his will declared that Stephan Coope, his son, should have the said premises: to him and his heirs, and that the said feoffees when asked by the said Stephen should make him a lawful estate in the same.

The said premises are held of the King in free buggage, and are worth per ann., clear, £6.

William Coope died 7 April last past; Stephen Coope is his son and heir, and is aged 40 years and more.

Inq. p. m., 5 Henry VIII, No. 59.

Robert Fabian.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 16 April, 4 Henry VIII [1513], before Richard Haddon, knight, Mayor and escheator [after the death of Robert Fabian], by the oath of John Condall, Robert Bardeslay, Alan Fyllynson, John Herdman, William Burton, Thomas Gibbons, Oliver Holynbrigge, William Molle, Thomas Pykhill, Henry Nortriche, Hugh Byrde, and Edmund Wheler, who say that

John Tolle and William Games, citizens and clothiers of London, were seised of 7 messuage with shops, sollars, cellars, and gardens, situate together in the parish of St. Benedict Fynkys in the ward of Brodestrete, London; one other tenement situate in the said parish next to the tenement of the Abbot and Convent of the Blessed Mary of Grace next the Tower of London; and of part of a house called the great W . . . hews in the said parish, to the use of Robert Fabian and his heirs.

So seised, the said John Tolle and William Games, by charter dated at London 21 August, 20 Henry VII [1505], demised all the said premises to the said Robert Fabian and Elizabeth his wife, Roger Acheley, citizen and alderman of London, Richard Hawkyns, John Milbourn, Thomas Hardwell, Anthony Burrowe, Edmund Burton, and John Paynter, citizens of London: to hold to them and their heirs, to the use of the said Robert Fabian and Elizabeth for their lives; and after their decease, to the use of the heirs of the said Robert Fabian.

All the said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £40.

Robert Fabian died the last day of February last past; John Fabian is his son and next heir, and is aged 21 years and more.

Inq. p. m., 5 Henry VIII, No. 60.

Robert Imbar.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 21 June, 5 Henry VIII [1513], before Richard Haddon, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Robert Imbar, by the oath of Robert Bardesley, John Hardman, Philip Cowper, William Burton, Oliver Hollynbryge, Thomas Gybons, William Molle, Richard Lynge, Thomas Pykhill, Hugh Byrde, William Heth, and Edward Byllyng, who say that Robert Imbar was seised of one corner tenement situate in the parish of St. Mary Magdalen in Milkstrete in the ward of Crepulgate, London.

So seised, by his last will he declared that Katherine, one of his daughters and heirs, should have the said tenement immediately after his death: to hold to her and her heirs lawfully begotten; with remainder for default of such issue to Alice Imbar, another of his daughters and heirs, to hold to her and her heirs.

The said tenement is held of the King in free burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, 5 marks.

Robert Imber died 7 November, 4 Henry VIII [1512]; Katherine Imbar and Alice Imbar are his daughters and next heirs, and are now aged respectively, the said Katherine 14 years and more, and the said Alice 12 years and more.

Inq. p. m., 5 Henry VIII, No. 61.

John, Earl of Oxford.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 21 June, 5 Henry VIII [1513], before Richard Haddon, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John, Earl of Oxford, by the oath of Robert Bardesley, Philip Couper, William Burton, Thomas Gibbons, Oliver Hollyngbrige, Thomas Pykhill, Henry Nortriche, Hugh Bride, Edward Byllyng, Edmund Wheler, George Galyson, Robert Garland, and William Jones, who say that

John, Earl of Oxford, was seised of a messuage with a garden adjoining, and with shops, sollars, cellars, etc., thereto belonging, called Bevesmarkes, situate in the parish of St. Ethelburge within Bishopsgate in the ward of Lime Street: all which premises were held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £6.

The said earl died the 10th day of March, 4 Henry VIII [1513]; John Veer is his kinsman and next heir, to wit, son and heir of George Veer, knight, brother of the said earl, and was aged 13 years and more on the 15 August next before the death of the said earl.

Inq. p. m., 5 Henry VIII, No. 63.

Humphrey Cokayn.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 23 September, 8 Henry VIII [1516], before William Boteler, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Humphrey Cokayn, by the oath of Hugh Bride, Edmund Wheler, William Molle, John Misselbroke, William Hulle, Richard Gylyott, Stephen Rose, James Peye, Robert Rede, John Lewes, William Burton, William Mosseman, and John Welles, who say that

John Cokayn, the "vncle," was seised of a certain yearly and quitrent of 6½ marks issuing out of a certain tenement late of Richard Cully in the parish of the Church of St. Mildred in the Poultry: which said tenement is situate between the said church and the course of the bank of Walbroke on the east, the tenement sometime of Robert Moton on the west, the tenement late of the heirs of Hugh Blont, knight, on the north, and the high way on the south, now being built upon parcels of a belfry and of the west end of the said Church.

So seized, by charter dated at London in the feast of St. George, 3 Henry V, the said John Cokayn granted the said rent to Reginald Cokayn his son, and Beatrice his wife, daughter of John Waleyr, esq., and of Joan his wife, daughter of Robert Turke: to hold to them and their heirs. By virtue of this grant the free tenants of the said tenement atturned the said rent to the said Reginald and Beatrice. After their death the said rent descended to the said Humphrey Cokayn as their kinsman and heir, to wit, son of Edmund son of John, son of the said Reginald and Beatrice.

The said Humphrey had issue Frances Cokayn, to whom the said rent descended after his death.

The said tenement out of which the said rent issued is held of the King in free burgage.

Humphrey Cokayn died 26 March, 6 Henry VIII [1515]; Frances Cokayn is his daughter and heir, and was aged 1 year on Christmas eve, 7 Henry VIII.

Thomas Leventhorpe.

Inquisition taken at the Guilhall 23 September, 8 Henry VIII [1516], before William Boteler, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Leventhorpe, by the oath of Hugh Bride, Edmund Wheler, William Molle, John Misselbroke, William Hulle, Richard Gylyott, Stephen Rose, James Pege, Robert Rede, John Lewes, William Burton, William Mosseman, and John Welles, who say that Whereas by an inquisition taken at the Guildhall 14 February, 21 Henry VII [1506], before Thomas Knesworth, then Mayor and escheator, it was found that William Mordaunt, William Gascoign, and Bartholomew Westby, were seized of 1 messuage and 1 room, situate in the parish of St. Botolph next Bishopsgate, to the use of Thomas Leventhorp and his heirs, and to fulfil his last will, whereby, inter alia, he willed that the said feoffees should suffer his executors to take the rent of the said premises for 19 years next after his death, and to pay with it and with the issues and profits of his manor of Pullanger in Meperteshale in the counties of Bedford and Hertford, and of all his lands and tenements in Meperteshale and Stondon, testator's debts and legacies. The residue of the said profits to be given to his issue, his heir only excepted. He appointed Agnes his wife, John Brakes, esq., and John Leventhorp, clerk, his executors.

The said Thomas Leventhorp died 20 July, 13 Henry VII [1498]; John Leventhorp was his son and heir, and was aged 10 years on the feast of All Souls, to wit, 2 November, 21 Henry VII [1505].

The said messuage and room were held of the King in free burgage, and were worth per ann., clear, 26s. 8d.

The said Thomas Leventhorp mentioned in the inquisition taken before the said Thomas Kneseworth and in the above writ are one and the same person, and it is true that the said William Mordaunt, William Gascoign and Bartholomew Westby, were seised of the said premises to his use of his last will. By his will the said Thomas Leventhorp willed that John Leventhorp, his firstborn son, should have 6 silver spoons, etc., and £96 13s 4d., which were to be delivered to the Abbess of Elvestowe for safe keeping, the said money to be delivered to the said John at his age of 21 years. If the said John happened to die, then the said money was to go to Thomas Leventhorp, his (testator's) son, at his age of 21 years. If he die, then it shall go to testator's heir.

The said Thomas Leventhorp, the father, further willed that his feoffees should permit his executors to take the rent of the said tenement and room for 19 years [as above].

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, 26s. 8d.

Thomas Leventhorp died 20 July, 13 Henry VII [1498]; John Leventhorp is his son and next heir, and was aged 20 years on the feast of All Souls, to wit, 2 November next before taking this inquisition.

Inq. p. m., 8 Henry VIII, No. 42.

Henry Clophill als. Kelsey.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 19 February, 8 Henry VIII [1517], before John Reest, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of Hugh Birde, Edmund Wheler, William Gate, Richard Holland, John Wellys, Robert Rede, John Lewes, William Molle, John Mistolbroke, John Avencell, Walter Baldry, William Hull, Thomas Holland, John Tokar, and James. egge, who say that

Henry Clophill als. Kelsey was not seised of any lands or tenements within the City of London.

The said Henry died 6 July, 13 Henry VII [1498], who was his next heir the jurors know not.

Inq. p. m. 8 Henry VIII, No. 67.

Sir John Cutte, Knight.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 11 April, 13 Henry VIII [1522], before John Mylborn, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Cutte, knight, by the oath of George Osborne, William Tyllysworth, William Gedney, John Crankes, William Coker, Thomas Spencer, skinner, Robert Melyche, John Grene, fishmonger, William Ledys, William Starre, Edward Leyton, William Molle, and Thomas Horner, who say that

Long before the death of the said John Cutte, John Barnes, junior, and Anne his wife, were seised of the moiety of a messuage called the Marten in the Vintry, and of 14 tenements and 7 cellars situate in Brodelane in the parish of St. Martin in the Vintrey and in the ward of Vintrey. So seised, by charter enrolled in the Guildhall and dated 26 June, 6 Henry VIII [1514], they granted to Henry Wyatte, knight, Richard Broke, serjeant-at-law, Hugh Fuller, Richard Cholmeley, knight, and Miles Jerarde, citizen and fishmonger of London, all the said premises which the said John Barnes and Anna had of the demise of George Dalyson, Richard Druett, Thomas Leventhorp, esquires, and John Bolles, gent.: to hold to them and their heirs to the use of the said John Cutte, knight, and his heirs.

So seised, the said John Cutte made his last will on 3 April, 12 Henry VIII [1521], and by the same declared that Elizabeth Cutte, his wife, should have all the said premises for 10 years immediately after the decease of the said John, with remainder successively to the said Elizabeth for life, to John Cutte, son of the said John Cutte, knight, and to his heirs, and for default of such issue to Henry Cutte and his heirs. Testator appointed the said Elizabeth Cutte, Henry Wyat, Richard Cholmeley, and Robert Blagge, one of the Barons of the Exchequer, to be his executors. After his death the said feoffees were seised of the premises to the use of the said Elizabeth.

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £7.

John Cutte, knight, died 4 April, 12 Henry VIII [1521]; John Cutte is his son and next heir, and is now aged 14 years and more.

Inq. p. m. 14 Henry VIII, No. 72.

Thomas, Earl of Derby.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 28 January, 13 Henry VIII [1522], before Andrew Wyndesore, knight, and John Hale, commissioners, by the oath of Henry Nortriche, Hugh Church, Thomas Harryson, Edmund Hudson, Thomas Geffrey, John Langrake, Thomas Love, Richard Blakgrave, Robert Lun (?), William Thornton, William Boldon, John Maydenwell, Thomas Knapp, Roger Newce, and Laurence Unthank, who say that

Long before the death of Thomas, Earl of Derby, Joan Stanley, Lady Lestrange, his mother, was seised of the manor of Holbourne and of 12 messuages, 40 gardens, and 1 acre of land in Holbourn and Fleet Street.

So seised, she by charter dated 26 May, 21 Henry VII [1506], granted all the said premises in London to Robert Brudnell, William Grevyll, William Fayrefax, serjeant-at-law, Richard Sutton, Thomas Pygott, John Cheyne, Richard Croke, Anthony Fitzherbert, Thomas Stanley, and George Herberne, and their heirs, to the uses specified in certain indentures dated 26 May, 21 Henry VII, and made between the said Lady Lestrange of the one part, and John Pynner, and Parme his wife, of the other part.

The said Robert Brudnell and the other cofeoffees being so seised by charter dated 27 May, 21 Henry VII [1506], at the instance of the said Lady Lestrange, granted to the said John Pynner, and Parme his wife, an annuity of 10 marks issuing out of the said premises for the term of 20 years from Lady day then last past.

Afterwards the said Lady Lestrange by charter dated 20 October, 2 Henry VIII [1510], granted to Thomas Stanley, one of the sons of Peter Stanley, esq., and Margery his wife, formerly of Ewlowe in the county of Flint, all the said manor of Holborn and other the premises for his life.

By bill indented dated 6 November, 8 Henry VIII [1516], made between the said late Earl of the one part, and the said Thomas Stanley of the other part, it was agreed between them that the said Earl before Easter then next following should demise to the said Thomas Sianley all the rents and profits of the courts of his manors of Milton in the county of Cambridge, and Sturmynster Marshall in the county of Dorset, reserving the advowson of the Church of Milton to the said Earl and his heirs. And the said Thomas Stanley before the said feast, or whenever requested so to do, should release to the said Earl such right and title as he had in the said manor of Holborn.

All the said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £10.

The said Earl was also seised of one messuage in the parishes of St. Benedict and St. Peter the Apostle next Powles Wharf, and of the moiety of another messuage called the Legge, and of the moiety of 7 shops to the same belonging in the parish of the Blessed Mary of the Arches in Chepe, London: which said premises are held of the King in socage, and are worth per ann., clear, £4 13s. 4d.

The said Earl died 24 May last past; Edward Stanley is his son and next heir, and was then aged 12 years and 14 days.

Inq. p. m. 13 Henry VIII, No. 95.

Thomas Buck.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall before Thomas Balldrey, Mayor and escheator, 14 March, 15 Henry VIII [1524], after the death of Thomas Buck, merchant tailor of London, by the oath of John Wallshe, Thomas Sutton, William Sherwyn, Thomas Knyght, Robert Hide, Humfrey Cordall, Robert Tumlinson, John Adams, Arthur Holme, Thomas Wanles, John Tyler, William Molle, Thomas, and Pakyngton, who say that

Thomas Buck was not seised of any lands or tenements within the City of London, but that George Rolle, John Oliver, John Cowlerde, and Nicholas Trotter, were seised of a capital messuage, with gardens, cellars, solars, conduits, and other houses and easements to the same belonging, in the parish of the Blessed Mary in Aldermanbury, of 4 other tenements adjoining the said capital messuage, and of a parcel of land with a chapel thereupon built in the said parish, to the use of the said Thomas Buck and his heirs.

So seised, the said Thomas by his will declared that the said George Rolle, John Oliver, John Cowlerde, and Nicholas Trotter, should be seised of £10 of the issues and profits of the said premises to the use of Matthew Buck, his brother, for his life in part payment of an annuity of £20 which the said Thomas was bound to pay to the said Matthew. As to the residue of the issues and profits, to the use of Alice Buck, wife of the said Thomas, during her life. If the said Matthew happen to die during the lifetime of the said Alice, then the said £10 shall remain to her for life. After the death of the said Matthew and Alice, all the said premises shall remain to Richard Buck, son of the said Thomas, and to his heirs; for default, then to the heirs of the said Thomas. If he die without heirs, then the said premises to remain to the said George Rolle and Robert Dacres and their heirs.

The capital messuage and the 4 tenements aforesaid are held of the Prior of the Monastery of Holy Trinity next Aldgate, London, by fealty and the yearly rent of 13s. 4d., to be paid at the feast of St. Michael. The said parcel of land is held of the Chamber of London by 1 lb. of wax to be paid yearly to the Vice-Chamberlain of the Church of St. Paul's in the feast of Pentecost, and by 1 rose fashioned upon a rod which shall be carried every year before the Mayor of London when he goes to the church of St. Pauls on Monday next after the feast of Pentecost.

All the said premises are worth per ann., clear, £19.

Thomas Buck died 20 November, 15 Henry VIII [1523]: Richard Buck is his son and next heir, and is aged 2½ years.

Inq. p. m. 15 Henry VIII, No. 116.

Henry Capell.

Proof of age taken at the Guildhall on Friday, 23 November, 18 Henry VIII [1526], before Thomas Seymour, knight, Mayor and escheator, of Henry Capell, kinsman and one of the heirs of Richard Newton, to wit, son and heir of Jatbelle Capell, deceased, late the wife of Giles Capell, knight, and one of the daughters and heirs of the said Richard, who held of the King in chief, by the oath of Thomas Carter, John Wylford, John Plesaunce (?), William Rogers (?), Thomas Ben, John Baxter, Nicholas Milles, John Coke, William Bowrynge, John Creke, Walter Lambert, Thomas Howell, and John. enston, who say that

Henry Capell was aged 21 years on the feast of SS. Crispin and Crispian last past.

William Smyth, of the parish of St. Bartholomew the Less, London, salter, aged 70 years and more, and Richard Harris, of the Guildhall College, chaplain, and John Sale, servant to the said escheator, aged 61 years and more, provers (probatores), examined before the said escheator, say that Henry Capell was born on the 25 October, 21 Henry VII [1505], in the City of London, in the said parish of St. Bartholomew, in the house of William Capell, knight, deceased, late Mayor of the said City, and was aged 21 years on the said feast of SS. Crispin and Crispian, to wit, the 12th October, 18 Henry VIII [1526].

The said Richard further says that he was conversing with the said William Capell every day, and on that day there was snow and rain.

John Sale was in the church of the parish aforesaid with the said Henry when he was baptized: Thomas, Marquis of Dorset, was his godfather. And on that day there was snow and rain.

The said William Smyth says that he went with the said William Capell to the manor of the Bishop of London at Fulham to ask the said Bishop—Richard Fitzjames—to be godfather to the said Henry. The snow continued some time, and then changed into frost and water.

Inq. p. m. 18 Henry VIII, No. 92.

Thomas Rogers.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 3 September, 20 Henry VIII [1528], before James Spencer, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of Richard Sheryngton, John Saxsey, Henry Ketylwode, John Hardy, John Hill, Philip Doe, Thomas Wotton, Robert Johnson, William Molle, Robert Hogges, William Mosseman, John Nicolson, Alan Cresswell, Edward Pennard, Stephen Benet, and Hugh Tregose, who say that

Thomas Rogers, citizen and vintner of London, was seised of inter alia 3 messuages, with solars, cellars and shops, situate in the parish of All Saints the Less, in Thames Street.

After the death of the said Thomas, the said messuages descended to Thomas Rogers, alias Beket as his kinsman and heir, to wit, son and heir of William Rogers, brother and heir of the said Thomas Rogers, senior, who died without heirs of his body.

So seised, the said Thomas by deed dated 5 .March, 5 Henry VIII [1514], sold the said 3 messuages to George Hatclyff, citizen and mercer of London, for 200 marks. The said George died without heirs of his body, after whose death the use of the premises descended to Edward Hatclyff as his brother and heir.

The said Edward by deed dated 8 June, 18 Henry VIII [1526], sold the said premises to John More, gent., for 200 marks. The said Thomas Rogers, vintner, died in the parish of St. Andrew Hubert in the ward of Byllengesgate, 21 February, 3 Henry VII [1488], after whose death Joan Rogers, his relict, under colour of a fictitious will, took the issues of the premises for her life by usurpation. After her death John Mone in the same way took the said profits during his whole life, and after his death Anne, his relict and executrix, had the issues of the said messuages until she married John Quylter, who from that time took the said profits during the life of the said Anne, and after her death continued to take the same. After the death of the said John, John Spicer as executor, and by colour of a fictitious will, had the said issues until William Compton, knight, entered into the said 3 messuages and unjustly dis-seised the said Thomas Rogers, alias Beket, who made continual claim for the same.

The said Sir William Compton died 28 June, 20 Henry VIII [1528], after whose death the said Thomas Rogers on 18th day of July, 20 Henry VIII, re-entered the said premises, and was thereof seised to the use of the said John More and his heirs.

At the special request of the said John More, the said Thomas Rogers by deed enfeoffed Thomas Turpyn, gent., Richard Lynde of London, wax-chandler, and John Kelett of Westminster, yeoman of the said premises, to the use of the said John More and his heirs.

The said messuages are held of the King in free burgage by the service of 1d. by the year, and are worth per ann., clear, £12.

The said John More is aged 45 years, and the said Thomas Rogers is aged 60 years and more.

Inq. p. m. 20 Henry VIII, No. 115.

Elizabeth, Wife of George Guldeford, and Daughter and heir of Robert Mortymer.

Proof of age taken at the Guildhall, 11 February, 13 Henry VIII [1522], before John Mylbourne, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of Thomas Abraham, junior, Thomas Marbury, John Smyth, haberdasher, William Marland, John Walshe, James Stirley, William Appys, Robert Colyar, John Duffeld, Richard Rawlyns, John Warren, and Thomas Lynton, who say that

Elizabeth, wife of George Guldeford, and daughter and heir of Robert Mortymer, is of the full age of 20 years and more. The said Elizabeth, and the Elizabeth whose wardship and marriage King Henry VII by letters patent dated 31 October in the 2nd year of his reign, granted to his faithful counsellor, Richard Guldeford, knight, are one and the same person.

Master Thomas Larke of Westminster, clerk, one of the prebendaries of the Royal Free Chapel of St. Stephen's, Westminster, aged 66 years and more, John Heles of Canterbury, esq., AttorneyGeneral for the Duchy of Lancaster, aged 50 years and more, William Deryng of Glyndam in the county of Sussex, esq., aged 52 years and more, George Mercer of Hawkeherst in the county of Kent, gent., aged 56 years and more, John Tyrell of the King's Household, aged 46 years and more, Richard Benden of the King's Household, aged 58 years and more, Peter Veldon of Westminster, yeoman, servant of the said Thomas Larke, aged 50 years and more, and Thomas Small, servant of Henry Guldeford, knight, Comptroller of the King's Household, aged 50 years and more, appeared to testify to the age of the said Elizabeth.

The said Master Thomas Larke affirms that in the 11th year of King Henry VII he was chaplain to the said Richard Guldeford, knight, and that in the same year during his illness, which lasted several months, he had a room in the house of the said Sir Richard at Halden in the parish of Rolvenden in the county of Kent, where the said Elizabeth was then living. Before that year she was married to the said George Guldeford, son of the said Sir Richard. Deponent used to converse with her every day sitting at table and elsewhere, and well knew that she was then aged 16 years and more. He has read the said letters patent dated 31 December [sic], 2 Henry VII.

John Hales deposes that on the feast of St. Margaret the Virgin, 16 Henry VII, he held a court at the manor of Great Bromley in the county of Essex, which manor was late of the said Robert Mortimer, and is now the inheritance of the said Elizabeth, and that the said George and Elizabeth with the assent of the said Richard Guldeford, in whose wardship the said manor then remained, took the issues and profits of the said court. Therefore the said John Hales knows that the said Elizabeth is now 20 years and more. William Deryng says that he was in the service of Sir Richard Guldeford in the 9th year of Henry VII, and that the said Sir Richard gave him the custody of the park at Halden, which he retained until after the battle of Blakheth, 12 Henry VII, to which battle he rode with his said master. During all the said time, and before he entered into the said service, the said Elizabeth was in the house of the said Sir Richard at Halden, and was married to the said George Guldeford.

George Mercer says that in the 8th year of Henry VII he was servant to John Guldeford, knight, father of the said Sir Richard, and attended upon him as his clerk. The said Sir John died in the said year, and was buried in the nave of Christ's Church, Canterbury, on the feast of St. Margaret the Virgin. The said Elizabeth was married to the said George Guldeford before the death of the said Sir John.

James Tyrell affirms that in the 12th year of Henry VII he was servant to the said Sir Richard Guldeford, Comptroller of the King's Household, and rode with him to the battle of Blackheath. He well knows that the said Elizabeth is aged 20 years and more.

Richard Benden deposes that in 11 Henry VII he was in the service of the said Sir Richard Guldeford, attending upon the gentlemen who were then in the house of the said Sir Richard at Halden, at which time the said Elizabeth was married. About the end of the said 11th year deponent left the service of the said Sir Richard for that of his son Henry Guldeford, now called Sir Henry Guldeford, knight, who was then servant of the King that now is, then being Duke of York.

Peter Velden says that in 12 Henry VII he was servant to the said Sir Richard Guldeford, the said Elizabeth being then 16 years old and more.

Inq. p. m. 13 Henry VIII, No. 96.

Thomas Griffyn.

Proof of age of Thomas Griffyn, esq., son and heir of Nicholas Griffyn, knight, late of Braybroke, in the county of Northampton, deceased, who held of the King in chief, taken at London, in the parish of St. Brigide the Virgin, in the ward of Faryngton Without, 10 February, 9 Henry VIII [1518], before Thomas Exmen, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of Hugh Birde, Edmund Wheler, Stephen Rose, James Pegge, Richard Holand, William Gate, William Mosman, William Robynson, Robert Rede, John Lewys, Richard Holmes, Simon Adee, Thomas Pykhill, John Margetson, and John Wakefeld, who say that

Thomas Griffyn, on the Sunday next before the feast of the Nativity of Our Lord, 9 Henry VIII [1517] was of the full age of 21 years because they say that he was born on the said Sunday, 12 Henry VII [1496], and was baptized in the Church of the said parish, at which time they lived in the said parish. John Hoxson, gent., aged 70 years and more, affirmed to the said escheator and jurors that the said Thomas was born on the said Sunday 21 years ago: this he knows because he lived in Salysbury aley in the said parish near the house of John Thornbourgh, gent., in which house the said Thomas was born, to wit, in a room there next adjoining the room of the said John Hexson, who at the time of the birth of the said Thomas prayed to Christ for the well-being (bona expedic'oe) of the lady Alice, his mother. Joan Basse, wife of William Basse, swore to the said escheator that the said Thomas is aged 21 years and more, and that he was born on the said Sunday, because 6 days before he was born she gave birth to a son called John Basse, who, if he had lived, would now have been 21 years old. John Smyth, skinner, aged 60 years, and Richard Clerk, hosier, aged 56 years, saw the said Thomas baptized in the said Church. The said Richard Clerk deposes that he made a pair of hose (caligarū) for the said Nicholas, father of the said Thomas, for the purification of the said lady Alice, mother of the said Thomas.

Inq. p. m. 9 Henry VIII, No. 105.

Edward Grene.

Inquisition taken at London, 2 March, 19 Henry VIII [1528], before James Spencer, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of John Saxsey, Richard Cheryngton, John Hardy, William Molle, Thomas Pagyngton, John Hylle, Stephen Benett, Thomas Wotton, William Case, John Stokley, Alan Creswell, William Myssynger, William Mosman, Robert Hodge, Robert Johnson, Philipp Dee, Edward Pennard, Thomas Mowyer, Henry Ketylwode, and Edward Myllett, who say that

Edward Grene, citizen and mercer of London, was seised of 10 tenements situate in Bassyngeshawe Street, in the parish of St. Michael Bassyngeshawe in a certain alley there called Moundevile Aley, and of the moiety of the said alley.

So seised, the said Edward Grene, by charter dated 4 September, 10 Henry VIII [1518], granted to Robert Codnam, mercer, John Hussey, vintner, William Hythe cutler, and Richard Lynde, wax chandler, all the said premises, together with free ingress and egress to and from the same by the said alley: to hold to them and their heirs to the use of the said Robert Codnam and his heirs for ever.

The said Robert Codnam has taken all the issues and profits of the said premises from the said 4 September up to the present time.

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage by fealty only, and are worth per ann., clear, £3 19s 4d. Edward Grene died 10 June, 15 Henry VIII [1523]: who is his next heir the jurors know not.

Inq. p. m. 19 Henry VIII, No. 51.

George Kirkeham.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 22 October, 20 Henry VIII [1528], before James Spenser, Mayor and escheator, after the death of George Kyrkham, esq., by the oath of Richard Sheryngton, John Saxsey, Hugh Tregose, John Nicolson, Edward Melet, William Mosseman, William Molle, William Case, Thomas Corneby, Robert Hogges, Thomas Pagyngton, Thomas Wotton, Philip Dee and Alan Cresswell, who say that

John Bannaster, citizen and clothier of London, and Margaret, his wife, John Rowden, Sergeant-at-Arms, Edmund Denny, and Richard Banaster long before the death of the said George were seised of 1 messuage called the Ledon porche, situate in the parishes of St. Michael in Crokyd Lane, and of St. Martin Orgayne, and of one other messuage to the said messuage annexed in the said parish of St. Michael. They being so seised, King Henry VII by letters patent, dated 28 February in the 22nd year of his reign for the sum of 20s. paid into the hanaper gave licence to the said John Banaster, and Margaret, his wife, John Rowden, Edmund Denny and Richard Banaster, that they might grant the said premises which are held of the King in chief to Robert Barnerd, clerk, William Malhom, clerk, George Kerkham, John Anstrop and Robert Kyrkham: to hold to them and their heirs from the said King and his heirs by the services thereof due and of right accustomed for ever. By the said letters patent the King also gave licence to the said Robert Barnerd, etc., to receive the said premises from the said John Banaster, etc.

By virtue of the said letters patent the said John Banaster and Margaret, John Rowden, Edmund Denny and Richard Banaster by charter dated 9 June, 4 Henry VIII [1512], granted the said premises to the said Robert Barnerd, William Molhom, George Kyrkham, John Anstrop and Robert Kyrkham: to hold to them and their heirs for ever to the use of the said George Kyrkham and his heirs for ever. The said Robert Barnard, William Molhom, George Kyrkham and John Anstrop died, and the said Robert Kyrkham survived them and is still seised of the said premises, which are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £4.

George Kyrkham died 10 March last past; Robert Kyrkham is his son and next heir, and is now aged 28 years and more.

Inq. p. m. 20 Henry VIII, No. 38.