Inquisitions
Edward VI (part 3 of 3)

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

G.S. Fry (editor)

Year published

1896

Pages

110-126

Citation Show another format:

'Inquisitions: Edward VI (part 3 of 3)', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 1 (1896), pp. 110-126. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65872 Date accessed: 29 July 2014.


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Miles Eyer.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 8 (?) December, 5 Edward VI [1551], before Richard Dobbys, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Miles Eyer, citizen and vintner of London, by the oath of Thomas . . . . . . Christopher Jackson, William Kersaye, John Wast, Robert Shyrlocke (?), Lawrence Jackson, John Stokes, Robert Ipgrave, John Rodnye, John Trolle . . . . and Thomas Adoutt (?), who say that

Miles Eyer was seised of 1 messuage called the Three Tonnes in Thamystrete in the parish of St. James at Garlickhive, London, and of divers shops, cellars, etc., in Thamystrete, late in the tenure of Richard Sparr; 1 capital messuage in the parish of St. Nicholas Olave in the ward of Quenehith, London, abbutting towards Bredstreet there on the west part and Hoggan Lane alias Sporren Lane towards the east; 1 messuage with the shops, etc., thereto belonging in Bredstrete aforesaid, between the capital messuage in which the said Miles then lived on the east and north, the tenement of Thomas Lewen, late Alderman of London, wherein John Penryth of London, chandler, now dwells on the south part, and Bredstrete there on the west.

Nicholas Bacon, esq., and William Streton and Henry Ashefeld, gentlemen, were seised of 6 messuages in the parish of St. Botolph without Bushoppesgate, London, and of divers houses, buildings, etc., in the said parish to the same belonging.

So seised, they by charter dated 25 July, 36 Henry VIII [1544], granted the said premises to the said Miles Eyer and Mary, his wife: to hold to the use of themselves and their heirs for ever.

So seised, the said Miles made his will the 7th day of May, 5 Edward VI [1551], as follows: [here given at length in English] I will that Mary, my wife, shall during the minority of my sons hold all my lands, etc., as well within the City of London and the suburbs thereof as in the county of Derby, on condition that she keep the same in good repair, that she bring up all my children at school in knowledge and literature, and shall pay to my mother Avice Eyre, widow, now dwelling with me during the minority of my said sons, an annuity of £10, and to my brother Edmond Eyre during the same period an annuity of £20.

I will that within 3 months after my decease my said wife enter into bond with my overseers in the sum of 1000 marks to make the said repairs and payments; if she refuse, then I will that my said children shall be committed to the keeping of my wife's father, Christopher Eyre, during their nonage. I give to Myles Eyre, my son and heir, at his age of 21, all that my capital messuage wherein I now dwell in the parish of St. Nicholas Olave, with the tenement thereto adjoining called the Myter, all cellars, solars, etc., thereto appertaining, all the wainscotts, paving, glass, and other necessaries fixed within the said capital house, all my lands, tenements, etc., in the parishes of St. Nicholas Olave and St. Michael at Quenehithe; and all my messuages, lands, tenements, etc., within the county of Derby; to hold to the said Myles Eyre and the heirs male of his body; for default, the remainder thereof to Marten, my second son, and his heirs male; for default, the remainder thereof to my child unborn, if a man child, and to his heirs male; for default, to my daughters for the term of their natural lives; and after their deceases, the remainder thereof to Edmond Eyre, my brother, and his heirs male; for default, to my brother William, and his heirs male; for default, to Robert Eyre, my wife's brother, and his heirs male; for default, to Myles Eyre, my godson, son of Richard Eyre, late of London, grocer, deceased, and his heirs male; for default, to Steven Eire, of Hassop, in co. Derby, gentleman, and his heirs male; and lastly, for default, the remainder thereof to the right heirs of me, the said Miles Eyre, for ever.

To Marten, my second son, I give my tavern called the Three Tonnes, in the parish of St. James, at Garlickhithe, and all other my messuages, lands, etc., in the parishes of St. James at Garlickehithe and St. Marten in the vynytree; to hold to the said Marten and his heirs male; for default, the remainder thereof to my child unborn, if a son, and his heirs male; for default, to Miles, my eldest son, and his heirs male, with further remainders as above. To my child unborn, if a son, I give all my "Sope" house, situate in the parish of St. Botolph without Bishopsgate, London, with all the "fattes, pannes, cestornes," etc., thereto belonging, and all other my houses, gardens, etc., in the said parish of St. Botolph; to hold to the said child and his heirs male, immediately after the death of my said wife; for default of such issue, or "if it be no manne child," then the said premises to remain to my said son Myles, with remainders as above.

The messuage called the Three Tonnes and other the premises in the parish of St. James at Garlickhithe are held of the King in free burgage, by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £18. The capital messuage in the parish of St. Olave is held of the King in free burgage, by fealty only, and is worth per ann., clear, £13. The tenement in Bredstrete is held of the King in free burgage, by fealty only, and is worth per ann., clear, £7. The six messuages in the parish of St. Botolph, and other the premises there, are held of the King by fealty only, in free and common socage and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £13.

Miles Eyre died at London 14 August last past; Miles Eyre is his son and next heir, and was then aged 2 years and more.

The said Mary, late the wife of the said Miles, still survives.

Inq. p.m., 5 Edward VI, p. 2, No. 2.

[The beginning of this Inq. is almost illegible.]

John Leylonde, junior, clerk, lunatic.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall the last day of February, 5 Edward VI [1551], before Andrew Judde, knight, Mayor and escheator, to enquire into the lunacy of John Leylonde, junior, of the parish of St. Michael in the Querne within the Ward of Farringdon Within, clerk, by the oath of Benedict Burton, Thomas Jorden, Robert Mouldinge, Gilbert Penyngton, Thomas Pettytt, Thomas Dexell, Edward Tagge, John Morrice, Thomas Pecock, Thomas Mytchell, John Trolle, John Metheringham, Roger Tyndall and William Boxe, who say that John Leylonde, junior, clerk, from his youth up to the 21st day of February, 1 Edward VI [1547], was of sound mind and capable of governing himself and his lands, tenements, etc. Upon that day he became demented and has remained so ever since, though he enjoys lucid intervals.

The said John Leylonde is seised of and is incumbent of the rectory of Haseley, co. Oxford; of the rectory of Peperinge in the Marches of Calis; and of a Prebend called Est Knoll and West Knoll near Salisbury, co. Wilts, for his natural life.

By Letters Patent dated 12 July, 37 Henry VIII [1545], King Henry VIII granted to the said John Leylonde for his life an annuity of £26 13s. 4d.

The said Rectory of Haseley is worth per ann., clear, £18; the said Rectory of Pepering £14; the said prebend of East and West Knoll £10; and the said pension £18 6s. 8d.

All the said premises were granted to the said John Leylonde of the gift of King Henry VIII and King Edward VI.

John Leylonde, senior, of the said parish of St. Michael in the Querne is the brother and heir of the said John Leylond, junior, and is aged 50 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 5 Edward VI, p. 2, No. 20.

Anthony Bonvyse.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 8 May, 7 Edward VI [1553], before Roger Cholmeley and William Sharyngton, knights, John Cokkes, John Lucas and Robert Chydley, esquires, and William Chester, one of the Aldermen of the City of London, by the oath of John Rowse, John Machell, Thomas Pygotte, John Brydges, Thomas Acworthe, John Lute, George Forman, Christopher Harbottell, Henry Naylor, Robert Raynes, Jasper Fysher, John Wetherall, who say that

Anthony Bonvyse, on 25 September, 3 Edward VI [1549], was possessed of a capital messuage called Crosbyes place, situate in a street called Bysshopsgate street in London, 1 table with a frame of wainscott, a joined table with a frame, 4 joined tables, 1 little folding table, 4 old tables, 2 round tables, 1 square table of wainscott, 17 chairs, great and small, turned and plain, 4 joined chairs, 4 Spanish chairs, 1 little folding chair, 1 framed chair, 1 chair with a back of leather, 1 close chair, 1 old close chair, 7 joined stools, "oon cloose stoole," 3 old forms, 1 long form with a green cloth hanging upon it, 2 "trestelles," 8 other "trestelles," 1 old cushion, 6 old cushions, 4 old cushions stuffed with feathers, 1 cushion of Arras for a chair with a back of leather, 1 old cushion, 22 old cushions of leather, 2 old carpets, great and small, 17 old packing carpets, great and small, 1 "table carpet" of Turkey work, 1 carpet of green cloth, 3 old carpets to lay upon chests, 1 other table carpet, 2 old long carpets, 11 joined bedsteads, 3 "trundell" bedsteads, 1 joined bedstead, 4 "trussyng" bedsteads, testors, curtains and fringes of green, red, yellow and blue saye belonging all to the said bedsteads and "trussying" bedsteads, 1 other testor with a double valence with 4 curtains all of fine red and blue saye, belonging to 1 of the said "trussyng" beds, 13 feather beds, 13 bolsters, 4 flock beds, 2 wool beds, 16 mattresses, 12 pillows fine and coarse, 13 pillow bears, 10 pairs of fine linen sheets and 1 fine linen sheet, 12 pairs of plain and coarse linen sheets, 18 blankets of divers sorts and colours, great and small, 1 coverlet "of the colours of black and red of St. Thomas worsted" furred with white lamb, 1 coverlet of tawny "Chamblett" furred with the like fur, 1 coverlet of "fustyan apes," 1 red coverlet, 1 plain coverlet, 1 old coverlet, 4 long diaper table cloths, 4 diaper cloths for round tables, 12 plain table cloths for long tables, fine and coarse, 8 plain table cloths for round tables, 9 dozen and 5 diaper napkins, 5 dozen and 3 plain napkins, 8 long diaper towels, 5 plain towels, 3 other plain towels to hang upon a roller, 4 window cloths, 9 old chests great and small, whereof 1 is full of old books, 6 gardevyans chests, 3 "Cypres" chests, 2 iron chests, 1 whereof is small and the other large, 3 barred chests, 2 small chests, 7 pairs of iron tongs, 9 fire "sholves," 4 pair of "Awndyrons," great and small, 3 iron racks to roast meat with, 2 "Cobyrons," 2 iron "peeles," great and small, 5 "Shomers," 3 pothooks, great and small, 1 "gredyron," 1 "laver of latten," 8 bason of laten, 16 brass pans, great and small, 3 frying pans, 3 copper pans to cover the fire, 2 dripping pans of iron, 4 warming pans, 1 "pott lydd with a strayner of latten," 1 mustard "querne," 12 pots of brass and copper, great and small, 1 "possenett," 2 "skyllettes" of brass, 4 kettles of brass, 1 iron beam, 5 candlesticks of latten, 1 chafing dish with a foot of latten, 4 "chafers" of brass and copper, great and small, 1 great latten "Skyllett," 4 "trevettes" of iron, 10 iron spits, 6 buckets of copper, 2 great cisterns of copper, 1 "Combe case," 1 washing "lavor," 5 dozen "treen" trenchers, 1 joined cupboard, 2 pairs of old "vyrgynalles," 2 pair of playing tables, 1 old "Skrene," 3 old "Cartes" or maps, 1 "brushe of heare," 2 old "Styllatoryes" of brass, 3 pint wine pots of pewter, 2 "pottell" pots of pewter, 1 stone pot with a cover of pewter, 5 pewter chargers, 2 dozen and 2 platters of pewter, 5 dozen of pewter dishes, great and small, 16 porringers, 4 dozen and 7 pewter saucers, 3 dozen and 4 great pewter trenchers, 2 dozen and 2 small pewter trenchers, 2 lavers of pewter, 5 basons of pewter, 3 ewers of pewter, 2 collenders of pewter, 1 chamber pot of pewter, 4 score and 15 pairs of Brikenders, 26 pair of "Almayn Revettes" not complete, 4 "Almayn Revettes" furnished, 3 complete "harnesse," 3 jacks, 1 "Holbord," 3 bows, 6 sheaves of arrows, with their cases, 4 "bore" spears, 1 battle axe, 1 "Javelyn," 1 image of the birth of Christ, 11 pictures painted in "tabelles," 4 pictures painted in "tabelles," 4 other pictures painted in "tabelles," one "Stele" glass, 1 standing glass with a foot, 1 wire cage, 2 "wykker" hampers, 1 two-hand sword, 4 joined presses, whereof 1 is of wainscott, hangings for the great chamber next the hall in the said messuage, hanging of painted cloth (panno picturato) about the chamber above the back gate there, hangings of red and yellow saye about the chamber adjoining the door (porte) of St. Helen in the said messuage, hangings of red and green saye for the chamber over the kitchen there, old hangings of yellow and green saye for the small chamber next the back gate there, and hangings of old painted cloth for the chamber of Nicholas the "postemers."

So seised, the said Anthony Bonvyse, on 25 September, 3 Edward VI [1549], without licence from the King craftily and rebelliously took flight with all his family and went to parts beyond the seas, to wit, to Antwerp in Flanders, and lived under the power of the Emperor Charles.

Long before his departure the said Anthony was seised of the said capital messuage and of 9 tenements or buildings to the said messuage belonging, situate in Bishopsgate, and he, being so seised by indenture dated 1 April, 1 Edward VI [1547], demised the said premises to William Roper, esq., and William Rastell, gent., for the term of 99 years. They, being so seised, by indenture dated 2 August, 1 Edward VI [1547], surrendered the said messuage and tenements to Benedict Bonvyse and German Ceo alias Cyall: to hold for the whole term aforesaid, 1 year thereof nevertheless excepted, they paying yearly for the same to the said William Roper and William Rastell £11 16s. 8d., the remainder of the said premises after the said term to one Robert Forde, gent., for one year, the residue of the said term.

So seised, the said Benedict Bonwyse, on 5 April, 2 Edward VI [1548], departed from London with all his family, without licence from the King, and went to live in Antwerp under the protection of the Emperor Charles.

On 1 December, 3 Edward VI [1549], the said William Rastell left London with his whole family, and fled to Louvain in Flanders, where he lived under the power of the said Emperor. And on 20 October, 4 Edward VI [1550], the said German Ceo alias Cioll craftily withdrew himself and his whole family from London and took up his abode in Antwerp.

Thomas Darcy, knight, Lord Darcy of Chyche, Lord Chamberlain, holds all the goods above named, and has occupied the said messuage called Crosbyes place from 20 October, 4 Edward VI [1550], up to the present time: the said messuage is worth per ann., clear, besides the £11 16s. 8d. reserved by the said William Roper and William Rastell, 20 marks. Gregory Drinte or [Druite] held the first rent paying tenement (Rentar.) of the said 9 tenements in which he now dwells from the said 24 October up to the taking of this inquisition: the said rent is worth per ann., clear, 6s. 8d. Dominoco Prott had the second rent wherein he now lives for the same time, and it is worth per ann., clear, 13s. 4d. Ralph Skeyrs occupied the third rent wherein he now dwells for the same time, and it is worth per ann., clear, 13s. 4d. Richard Fortune held the fourth rent in which he now lives during the said period, and it is worth per ann., clear, 13s. 4d. William Meyse, grocer, possessed the fifth rent wherein he now lives during that time, and it is worth per ann., clear, 33s. 4d. Robert Ramsye had the sixth rent for the same time, and it is worth per ann., clear, 6s. 8d. William Stanton occupied the seventh rent from the said 20 October, and it is worth per ann., clear, 40s. Leonard Canley held the eighth rent, which is worth per ann., clear, 13s. 4d. Alice Baudwyne, widow, held the ninth rent, which is worth per ann., clear, 13s. 4d.

Inq. p.m., 7 Edward VI, p. 1, No. 35.

Philip Vanwylder, gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 10 May, 7 Edward VI [1553], before George Barnes, knight, Mayor of the City of London and escheator, after the death of Philip Vanwylder, gent., by the oath of Thomas Gune, Thomas Derelove, John Organe, Simon More, George Alayne, John Daye, William Androwes, Edmond Taylfyre, John Lewese, John Froston, William Lucas, Robert Smythe, William Gynkyns and Edward Rewe, who say that

Philip Vanwylder was seised of 1 messuage, late in the tenure of John Palmer situate in Hertestrete, within the parish of St. Olave next Marklayne, London, and of all the houses, buildings, gardens, shops, etc. to the same belonging.

Long before the death of the said Philip, King Henry VIII was seised of 4 messuages situate in the said parish of St. Olave next the Tower, now or late in the several tenures of Nicholas? Nevell, Roland Farlander, John Pettye and the said Philip Vanwylder, parcel of the possessions of the late monastery of the Holy Trinity commonly called Christchurch, London, now dissolved.

So seised, the said King by Letters Patent dated 12 November, in the 27th year of his reign [1535], granted inter alia to John Sivernake and Isabel his wife, the said 4 messuages: to hold from the feast of Easter then last past without rendering any account for the same.

So seised, the said Isabella died at the said parish of St. Olave; the said John still survives.

Afterwards his Majesty by other Letters Patent dated 8 February, in the 36th year of his reign [1545], granted to John Pope, gent., the reversion of the said premises: to hold to the use of himself and his heirs for ever.

So seised, the said John Pope by deed of bargain and sale dated 20 February, 3 Edward VI [1549], made between himself of the one part and the said Philip Vanwylder of the other part, granted to the said Philip the said reversion of the said premises: to hold to the use of him the said Philip and his heirs for ever.

Before the death of the said Philip, one Charles Tuke, deceased, late of Layer marnaye, co. Essex, esq., son and heir of Brian Tuke, knight, now also deceased, was seised of 1 garden in the parish of St. Katherine Colman within the City of London in the tenure of John Symondes.

And he, being so seised, by indenture dated 4 June, 38 Henry VIII [1546], made between himself of the one part and the said John Symondes of the other part, granted the said garden to the said John Symondes: to hold from the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist for 21 years, he paying yearly for the same 15s. sterling.

Afterwards the said Charles Tuke by his deed granted the reversion of the said garden to John Abyngton, citizen and mercer of London: to hold to the use of himself and his heirs for ever: which said estate in the reversion of the said garden the said Philip Vanwylder purchased and was thereof seised as of fee.

The said messuage is held of the King in free burgage by fealty only, and is worth per ann., clear, 26s. 8d. The said 4 messuages are held of the King in free socage by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, after the death of the said John Syvernake £4 13s. 4d. The said garden is held of the Earl of Rutland in free burgage by fealty only, and is worth per ann., clear, 15s.

So seised, the said Philip Vanwylder made his will on 18 January, 6 Edward VI [1553], whereby he bequeathed as follows: [here given in English] I will that Frances my wife shall have all the issues and yearly profits of all my lands, tenements and hereditaments during her natural life for the "kepyng, fyndyng and gud educac[i]on" of my children during their minority, with remainder thereof after her decease to my son Henry and his heirs; for default, to my son Edward and his heirs; for default, to my son William and his heirs; for default, to my son John and his heirs; and for default, to my daughter Katherine and her heirs; and lastly for default, the remainder thereof to my right heirs for ever. Provided always that my said wife pay all quit rents, rent charges and all other services chargeable upon the said premises and provided always that there be paid to my said son Edward, when he attain the age of 21 years, 20 marks yearly.

Philip Vanwylder died 24 January last past; Henry Vanwylder is his son and next heir, and on the 1st day of this present month of May was aged 15 years.

Inq. p.m., 7 Edward VI, p. 1, No. 36.

John Eccliston, citizen and grocer.

Inquisition taken in the parish of St. Lawrence in Old Jewry, London, the last day of February, 7 Edward VI [1553], before George Barne, Mayor and escheator, by writ de melius inquirend, after the death of John Eccliston, citizen and grocer of London, by the oath of Anthony Caltroppe, Thomas Aldersley, John Bartham, Alexander Neveson, Guy Wood, John Rychardson, Thomas Kyghtley, Richard Lamberd, Christopher Wootton, Richard Ridge, James Collens, Robert Lee, William Sutton, Elisha (Elizei) Dyall, Roger Yonge, Robert Cryppes and Richard Forde, who say that

John Eccliston and Margery his wife were seised of 1 messuage, and of the houses, shops, cellars and sollars thereto belonging, situate in Honylane in the parish of All Saints of Honylane in Westchepe between the lane called Honylane on the east past, the common street of Westchepe on the south, a certain messuage belonging to the Governors of London Bridge on the west and a messuage belonging to the said Church of All Saints on the north.

And they, being so seised, by charter dated 25 March, 3 Edward VI [1549], for the sum of £100 to them in hand paid by Thomas Gedney, citizen and mercer of London, bargained and sold to the said Thomas Gedney and Margery his wife the said messuage and premises: to hold to the use of themselves and their heirs for ever, of the King in chief by the rent and service thereof due and accustomed.

Afterwards the said Thomas and Margery by deed dated 3 April, 3 Edward VI [1549], demised the said messuage to the said John Eccliston: to hold to the use of himself and his heirs for ever, upon condition that the said John should pay to the said Thomas and Margery £15 yearly, at the mansion house of the said Thomas between the hours of 3 and 7 p.m.

The said messuage is held of the King in chief by the service of the 30th part of a knight's fee and by the rent of 8s.

[Date of death not given.]

Inq. p.m., 7 Edward VI, No. 37.

Guy Crayford, esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 7 March, 7 Edward VI [1553], before George Barons, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Guy Crayford, esq,, by the oath of James Altham, William Chambers, Robert Kytchyn, Matthew Harryson, John Grene, William Goodwyn, John Warren, John Brewer, Michael Haythwayte, John Arthur, Nicholas Creswell, Thomas Goughe, William Strete, Thomas Dale, John Bullock and Simon Burton, who say that

Guy Crayfford and Joan his wife were seised of 1 messuage, together with the houses, stables, gardens, etc. thereto belonging, situate in the parish of St. Helen within the City of London, and next to the close of the late Priory of St. Helen: which said messuage was sometime in the tenure of Thomas Benalt and afterwards in the tenure of Arthur Darcye, knight; also of 1 messuage in the tenure of George Taylor, gent., adjoining the above mentioned messuage on the south part; which said messuage lately belonged to the said late Priory of St. Helen.

The said premises are held of the King by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee and by the yearly rent of 6s. 8d., and are worth per ann., clear, £3 6s. 8d.

Guy Crayford died 31 January last past; Arthur Crayford is his son and next heir, and was then aged 17 years 11 months and 8 days.

The said Joan still survives in the said parish of St. Helen.

Inq. p.m., 7 Edward VI, No. 39.

John Eccleston, citizen and grocer.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 12 April, 6 Edward VI [1552], before Richard Dobbys, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Eccleston, citizen and grocer of London, by the oath of John Webbe, Richard Rogers, John Bullock, Robert Aleyne, William Davye, John Wysedome, John Firminger, Richard Whettyll, William Strete, John Dalton, John Lynsey, Lawrence Underwood, Edward Bright, Adam Wyntrop and Richard Leycrofte, who say that

John Eccleston was seised of 1 messuage called the Bores Hedde in Chepe, situate in the parish of All Saints in Honylane.

So seised, he by indenture dated 8 February, 4 Edward VI [1550], demised the said messuage to Christopher Payne, citizen and grocer of London, for 18 years [here set out in English], except 2 chambers within the said house, to wit, the chamber wherein the said John Eccleston then lay, with the Maydens Chamber within the same, and a little chamber lying at the head of the stairs called William Eccleston's chamber, with free egress and regress into and from the said rooms through the said house, entering the same by the back door opening into Honylane; also the "use, pleasure and commodity" of the hall there with the buttery and kitchen adjoining, and other rooms within the said buttery and kitchen, for the said John Eccleston and his wife and servants, for the space of 4 months in every year of the first 6 years of the said term. And forasmuch as the said John Eccleston has sold to the said Christopher "divers good grocerye wares and merchaundises extendinge to a great sum of money at reasonable pryses and for long dayes of payment," the said Christopher promises to pay to the said John every year of the said term of 18 years £26 13s. 4d., the said John agreeing to keep the said messuage "wyndtight and watertight." All the other repairs were to be done by the said Christopher, together with all the pavements to the said premises belonging, and all the "widraughtes or seages," with the "glased" windows thereto appertaining. It was also agreed that once or twice every year the said John should enter into every part of the said messuage to see whether it was kept in good repair.

By another indenture dated 22 May, 5 Edward VI [1551], made between the said John Eccleston of the one part, and the said Christopher Payne of the other part, it was witnessed that whereas the said Christopher, at the special instance and request and for the "mere debte" of the said John, stands bound with the said John to Hugh Losse, esq., by an "Escripte obligatorye" dated this same month of May, in the sum of £100 for the sure payment of £60, to be paid to the said Hugh at the feast of the Annunciation of Our Lady next coming; and whereas also the said Christopher in like manner stands bound with the said John to Sir William Laxton, knight, citizen and Alderman of London, for the payment of £108 at the feast of St. Bartholomew the Apostle, 1552, for the indemnity of the said Christopher Payne for the said bonds and sums of money, it is agreed that whereas the said John Eccleston has demised to the said Christopher his messuage called the Bores Hedde; and whereas the said John has delivered to the said Christopher divers grocery wares: now the said John releases to the said Christopher the said yearly rent of £26 13s. 4d.; provided always that if the said John Eccleston pay the said 2 several sums of money to the said Hugh Losse and Sir William Laxton, that then the said release and these present indentures shall be void.

Afterwards the said Christopher made his will and appointed Baldwin Payne and Daniel Payne his executors, but after his death they renounced the execution thereof, whereupon administration of all his goods was granted to Humphrey Spencer, citizen and grocer of London, by force whereof he entered into the said messuage and is still possessed thereof.

John Eccleston was seised of 1 garden lying in the parish of St. Giles without Criplegate, which is held of the King in free burgage and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, 8s.

The said messuage is held of the King in chief by the 30th part of a knight's fee and by the yearly rent of 8s., and is worth per ann., clear, £4.

John Eccleston died 11 December, 5 Edward VI [1551].

John Eccleston is his son and next heir, and is now aged 12 years and 7 months.

Inq. p.m., 6 Edward VI, p. 2, No. 5.

James Joskyn, gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 10 March, 6 Edward VI [1552], before Richard Dobbes, Mayor and escheator, after the death of James Joskyn, gent., by the oath of Robert Yonger, Thomas Shotesham, William Stephen, William Kelley, John Sykylmore, Henry Gardener, John Broke, Richard Hilles, Geoffrey Vauhan, Henry Clerke, John Daye, William Androwes and William Thurston, who say that

James Joskyn was seised of 1 messuage situate in the parish of St. Stephen in Walbroke.

So seised, he made his will on 29 August, 3 Edward VI [1549], and thereby declared that Joan his wife should have 2 parts of the said messuage, in 3 parts to be divided, during the minority of John Joskyns his younger son, and that when the said John attained the age of 21 he should have the said 2 parts, to him and his heirs for ever.

The said messuage is held of the King in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee, and is worth per ann., clear, £7.

James Joskyn died at London 30 August, 3 Edward VI [1549], leaving Robert Joskyn his son and heir and the said John Joskyn his younger son, who were then both of the age of 1 year and a half.

The said Robert Joskyn, junior, died 31 January, 6 Edward VI [1552], without issue, and the said John Joskyn his brother died 2 February in the same year, also without issue.

Katherine Joskyn is the daughter and next heir of the said James and at the time of her father's death she was aged 9 years and a half.

Inq. p.m., 6 Edward VI, p. 2, No. 16.

Stephen Wilford, gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 23 March, 2 Edward VI [1548], before John Gresham, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Stephen Wilford, gent., by the oath of Oswald Docwraye, William Robertes, Richard Kynwelmarsh, William Proctour, Roger Turnor, John Morres, John Leylond, Edward Tagges, John Fisher, George Stawker, John Trull, James Crosse, William Box, Thomas Roodes, and Robert Moldyng, who say that

Stephen Wilforde was seised of 2 messuages, situate in Aldrichegate strete in the parish of St. Botolph without Aldrichegate, London, in one of which the said Stephen lately dwelt, and in the other of which John Melsham, gent., now lives; and 2 other messuages and 1 cellar lying in the parish of St. Michael at Quenehith, London, whereof 1 was late in the tenure of John Welles, carman, and the other is now in the occupation of George Dawtrye "peynter steyner." The said cellar was late in the tenure of Richard Broke, salter.

So seised, the said Stephen by charter dated 2 April, 34 Henry VIII [1543], granted all the said premises to William Shene of Radley, co. Berks, husbandman, and John Shene of Abyndon, in the said county, innholder: to hold to the use of the said Stephen Wilford and Julian his wife and their heirs; and for default, to the use of the right heirs of the said Stephen for ever.

Afterwards, to wit, on 16 September, 1 Edward VI [1547], the said Stephen made his will at London, whereby he bequeathed as follows: I devise to my wife Julian all my messuages, lands, tenements and hereditaments lying within the City of London or the suburbs thereof: to hold for her life; and after her decease the same to remain to John Wylford my son and to his heirs; and for default, the remainder thereof to my said wife and her heirs for ever.

The messuages in Aldrichegate strete are held of the King in free burgage, to wit, by fealty and the yearly rent of 4s., and are worth per ann., clear, £8. The messuages in the said parish of St. Michael at Quenehith are held of the King in free burgage, to wit, by fealty only, and are worth per ann., clear, 40s.

Stephen Wilforde died 26 September, 1 Edward VI [1547]; John Wilforde is his son and next heir, and was then aged 3 years and more.

The said Julian still survives.

Inq. p.m., 2 Edward VI, p. 2, No. 17.

Richard Townesende.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 9 March, 2 Edward VI [1548], before John Gresham, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Richard Townsende, by the oath of Oswald Dokerey, William Robertes, Richard Kinwelmarshe, William Proctour, William Bodwell, Roger Turnor, John Morris, Bartholomew Cleving, Edward Tagge, Robert Molding, John Sampson, John Fisher, George Stawker and James Crosse, who say that

Ciriacus Petit, of Canterbury, gent., was seised of all that messuage and wharf situate in the parish of St. Michael at Quenehithe, lately belonging to the House or Priory of the Charthusians near London, now dissolved; with divers rooms, shops, cellars, gardens, entries, etc., thereto belonging; and all that tenement situate in the said parish of St. Michael sometime belonging to the late Master or Chaplain of the free Chapel or College of St. Martin the "Graunt," with divers rooms, shops, cellars, etc., thereto belonging.

So seised, the said Ciriacus, by charter dated 8 September, 36 Henry VIII [1544], demised all the said premises to Richard Townesende and Juliana his wife and their heirs.

Robert Curson, of Barmondesey, co. Surrey, esq., and John Pope, of London, gent., were seised of all that messuage called the White Harte; 1 other tenement to the said messuage annexed; 5 small tenements with 1 stable thereto adjoining, lying in the said parish of St. Michael; and of divers stables, houses, buildings, lands, etc., to the said messuages or tenements belonging.

And the said Robert and John being so seised, by charter dated 18 March, 36 Henry VIII, surrendered all the said premises to the said Richard Townesende and his heirs for ever.

John Pope and Anthony Forster, of London, gentlemen, were seised of all those 11 tenements lying in Debbes Lane in the said parish of St. Michael, now or late in the tenure of Richard Broke; and of divers houses, shops, rooms, grounds, etc., to the same belonging.

So seised, the said John and Anthony, by charter dated 20 July, 37 Henry VIII [1545], granted all the said tenements to the said Richard Townesende and his heirs.

By charter dated 26 July, 1 Edward VI [1547], and enrolled in the Court of Hustings held on Monday in the feast of the Translation of St. Erkenwald Bishop, the said Richard Townesende and Juliana his wife gave to Nicholas Brigham, of London, esq., Robert Smith, brewer, Nicholas Harrys, fruiterer, and Robert Rosse, brewer, citizens of London, all the said premises: to hold to the use of the said Richard Townesende for his natural life; and after his decease to the use of Anthony Brigham and Margaret his wife and their heirs; and for default, to the use of Anthony Brigham and his heirs for ever.

All the said messuages and other the premises are held of the King in free burgage, to wit, by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £26 13s. 4d.

Richard Townesende died in the said parish of St. Michael, 2 August, 1 Edward VI [1547]; after whose death the said Anthony and Margaret Brigham entered into the said premises and are still seised of the same.

Inq. p.m., 2 Edward VI, p. 2, No. 25.

Robert Nicholles, brewer.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 27 June, 2 Edward VI [1548], before John Gresham, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Robert Nicolles, brewer of London, by the oath of Oswald Dockerey, William Robartes, Richard Foord, John Underhill, Roger Turner, William Persall, William Robynson, John Morres, Bartholomew Clevyng, Robert Meldynge, John Sampson, John Fyssher, John Trulle, James Crosse and Nicholas Russell, who say that

Robert Nicholles was seised of 1 messuage, with a garden, cellar, sollar, and 7 cottages, situate in a certain alley called Trystrams Alley alias Hames Alley in the parish of St. Stephen in Colman street in the ward of Colman strete.

So seised, the said Robert by his will bequeathed all the said premises to Isabelle Nicolles his wife for her life, and after her decease to Thomas Nicolles, junior, his third son: to hold to him and his heirs for ever.

All the said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, 100s.

Robert Nicolles died 5 May last past; Thomas Nicolles, junior, was then aged 24 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 Edward VI, p. 2, No. 32.