Inquisitions
2 & 3 Philip and Mary (1555-6)

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

G.S. Fry (editor)

Year published

1896

Pages

135-144

Citation Show another format:

'Inquisitions: 2 & 3 Philip and Mary (1555-6)', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 1 (1896), pp. 135-144. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65874 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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Thomas Berthelett, citizen and Stationer.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 24 October, 2 and 3 Philip and Mary [1555], before John Lyon, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Berthelett, citizen and stationer of London, by the oath of Thomas Popelwell, Robert Johnson, Thomas Barnes, Hugh Davys, Thomas Preston, George S . . . . Thomas Hylton, Thomas Mychell, Thomas Mansey, Reginald Riversby, Richard Romesey, Michael Crosewayte, Thomas Woodhowse, William Baker and Simon Moore, who say that

Thomas Berthelett was seised of the manor of Hilhampton alias Ilhampton, lying in the parish of Lyvers Oculle(?), co. Hereford; 5 messuages in Fletestrete within the parish of St. Bride, in the several tenures of Anthony Philpott, Edward Halstide, John Deanes, Richard Pachett, and Richard Ebden; 2 messuages situate in Frydaystreate in the parish of St. Margaret Moyses, in the several tenures of John Howlande and William Dave; 2 other messuages in Fletestreate, in the several tenures of Anthony Androwes and Simon Lowe; 1 garden in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, in the tenure of Grace Hone; 1 tenement and garden in the said parish of St. Andrew in the tenure of John Ayer, gent.; 15 messuages and 1 garden in the said parish of St. Andrew, in the tenures of Robert Heper, John Johnson, John Byrde, William Borowe, Richard Barbor, John Rolleg, John Caryce, Thomas Evans, William Gebotte, John Burnett, Edmund Parton, Peter Le Graunde, John Starkey, Thomas Walker, and Dorothy Preston; 1 tenement and garden in Crokehorne Alley in the said parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, late in the occupation of the said Thomas Berthelett; 9 tenements and 6 gardens in Feterlane in the said parish of St. Andrew, in the several tenures of Richard Cheteley, Robert Sheppard, John Chaloner, . . . Lord Conyers, Thomas Wilbrounde, Thomas Riddle, John Robynson, William Hynde, Henry Garlyke, and Lewis Canveys; 8 tenements lying next Holborne Cross and in Snowhill in the parish of St. Sepulchre, in the several tenures of John Ryvell, John Rouver, Henry Palmer, Richard Henham, John Callowe, Simon Southwell, John Scarsdall, and Thomas Powell; 3 messuages in Breadestreate in the parish of St. Mildred in the City of London, in the several tenures of Robert Horner, Thomas Hall and William Hamersley; 2 messuages and 1 garden in Bishopsgate streate in the parish of St. Helen in the tenures of Thomas Luntley and Jasper Fisher; and 3 messuages in Distaff Lane, in the parish of St. Margaret Moyses, in the several tenures of John Fisher, John Sympson and John Grene.

The said Thomas Berthelett and Margery his wife, were seised of 2 messuages in Snowhill in the said parish of St. Sepulchre, now in the tenure of John Vaghan and Thomas Worme: which said messuages the said Thomas and Margery purchased to them and their heirs for ever of John Seymcr, esq., as by deed dated 21 March, 4 Edward VI [1550], appears.

So seised, the said Thomas Berthelett made his will the 23 September last past as follows: [Here given in English.]

My body to be buried in the parish Church of St. Bride in Fleetstreet, in the Lady Chapel there.

I give to Edward Berthelett my son and heir apparent and to his heirs for ever my manor of Hilhampton, my pastures in Mardon, co. Hereford, all my messuages in the said Parish of St. Bride, my messuages in Bishopsgate Street, and all my messuages in the parish of St. Margaret in Friday Street; which said premises amount to the full third part of all my lands.

To Anthony Berthelett my younger son and to his heirs for ever I give all my messuages in Distaff lane, my messuages in Bredestreate, my messuages and gardens in the parish of St. Sepulchre, and my garden and messuages in the parish of St. Andrew in Holborn. If the said Anthony die without issue then the said premises to remain to my said son Edward and his heirs; for default, to my nephew Thomas Powell and his heirs; and for default, to my right heirs for ever.

To Margery my wife for the term of her life all my messuages in the said parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, in the several tenures of William Borowe, Richard Barbor, John Rolles, etc., etc., my house, rooms and garden, with all the ways, walks and commodities which I kept for my own use within Crokehorne Alley in the said parish of St. Andrew, and my messuage in the parish of St. Sepulchre: after her decease I give all the said premises to my said sons Edward and Anthony and to their heirs: if they both die without issue, then I give the same to my said wife and her heirs for ever.

The manor of Hilhampton is held of the King and Queen in free socage, as of their manor of East Greenwich, co. Kent, by fealty only and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, £5 13s. 4d. The messuages in Fleetstreet in the tenures of Anthony Philpott, Edward Halstide, John Deanes, Richard Pachett and Richard Ebden, are held of the said King and Queen in chief by the service of the 40th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, £12 17s. 4d. The 2 messuages in Friday Street are held of the King and Queen in chief, by the service of the 30th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, £10. The other 2 messuages in Flete street, the garden in Holborn, the tenement and garden in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, in the tenure of John Ayer, the 15 messuages in the said parish of St. Andrew, the messuage and garden in Crokehorne Alley, the 9 messuages and 6 gardens in Fetter Lane, and the 9 messuages and gardens next Holborn Cross in Snowhill, are held of the King and Queen in free socage by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £72 0s. 8d. The 8 messuages situate next Holborn Cross, 3 messuages in Bredestreate, 2 messuages and garden in Bishopsgate street, and the 3 messuages in Dystaff Lane are held of the King and Queen by fealty only in free burgage and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £24 12s. 6d.

Thomas Berthelett died 26 September last past; Edward Berthelett is his son and next heir, and was aged 3 years on 24 July last past.

Inq. p.m., 2 and 3 Philip and Mary, p. 2, No. 8.

Thomas Clayton, baker.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 6 August, 2 and 3 Philip and Mary, before John Lyen, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Clayton, of London, baker, by the oath of Robert Alleyn, William Phillippes, Morgan Ricarde, George Forman, John Smith, Robert Freer, Thomas Barnam, Edward Slayter, Richard Beard, Barnard Kingesfe, Edward Layne, Blaze (Blasu) Whyte and Robert Moses (?), who say that

Thomas Cleyton was seised of 1 messuage called the "Sonne," and 1 shop and 1 large cellar, parcel of the same, and 1 messuage in the tenure of John Medcalf, parcel of the said messuage called the "Sonne," lying in the parish of St. Mary at hill next Billingsgate, to wit, between the lands and tenements called the Baskill, now or late in the tenure of the Fraternity of the Grocers on the east part, the lane called St. Mari Layne on the west, the bakehouse of the said Thomas Cleyton wherein he then dwelt, and sometime of the Abbot of the Monastery of Waltham on the north part, and the lands and tenements lately belonging to the College of Pumfret, now or late in the tenure of John Hayword, goldsmith, on the south.

So seised, the said Thomas Cleyton, by deed dated 25 July, 4 Edward VI [1550], enfeoffed Benedict Jacson and Richard Ayens, citizens and butchers of London, of the said premises: to hold to them and their heirs for ever to the use of the said Thomas Cleyton and Helen Sponer wife of the said Thomas, by the name of Helen Sponer, of London, widow, late the wife of John Sponer, citizen and butcher of London, for their lives; and after their decease, then to the use of Cecilia Tyens, widow, daughter of the said Helen and William Burnynchill, deceased, and the heirs of the said Cecilia for ever.

Afterwards the said Thomas married the said Helen, who survived him, and is still living in the said parish of St. Mary at Hill.

The said Cecilia still survives in the said parish.

The said Thomas Clayton was likewise seised of a bakehouse wherein he then dwelt with a yard, cellars, etc., thereto belonging, situate in St. Mary Hill Lane in the said parish; 2 messuages in the said parish in the tenures of Thomas Papworthe, citizen and draper of London, and Robert Saye, citizen and clerk of London; 1 messuage there in the tenure of Robert Hayes, citizen and barbersurgeon of London; 1 messuage there in the occupation of Thomas Fisher, citizen and barber-surgeon of London; and of 1 tenement there in the tenure of John Leonarde, citizen and barber-surgeon.

So seised, the said Thomas Clayton made his will in the said parish 30 March, 1 and 2 Philip and Mary [1555], as follows: [Here given in English.]

I give my messuage or bakehouse with the shops on the south side thereof, which I granted to Ellen my now wife on our marriage, and which I purchased of Thomas Alleyn, gent., to Thomas Stanere, citizen and baker of London, now Master of the Guild of Our Lady and St. Clement of the Craft of Whitebakers in the City of London, and to Richard Hodge, John Martin, John Beest and George Hoorde, wardens of the said Guild; and also my 2 messuages in the tenure of Thomas Papworth and Robert Say: to hold for ever on the following conditions: that is to say, that on my anniversary they shall solemnly by note in the parish church of St. Mary Hill say placebo and dirge on the eve, and mass of requiem on the morrow by the parson there, and also that they shall distribute the sum of 39s. 6d. in money at the said obit, to wit, to the Master of the said Craft 12d., to each of the 4 Wardens then being present in their liveries 6d., to the Clerk 12d., to the beadle 4d., to the parson 8d., to 6 priests 6d. each, to 6 clerks 6d. each, to the sexton 6d. for "pealles ringinge," for wax to burn at the said dirge and mass 12d., among the poor inhabitants in halfpenny whitebread 6s. 8d., in ale 3s. 4d., and in cheese 3s. 4d. I will that there be spent at the said dirge in spice bread and drink "for potac[i]on" of the said Master and Wardens and others of the Livery in Bakers Hall 10s., and to the 2 Churchwardens being present at the said mass 12d. each. If it should happen that by the laws of the land such obit should not be allowed by reason that of late years in the time of King Edward VI prayers for the dead and all ceremonies touching the same were disallowed, then I give the said money, except the said 13s. 4d. to be spent in bread, ale and cheese, and the 10s. for the potation of the said Master and Wardens, to the Governors and rulers of the House of the poor children within Newgate.

To Mr. Allen Pearci, Clerk, now parson of the said church of St. Mary Hill, and to Thomas Socham, merchant tailor, and Henry Smythe, draper, citizens of London, Churchwardens of the said church, my tenement in the said parish now in the tenure of Robert Hayes: to hold to them and their successors for ever for the repairing of the said church and for divine service to be held there.

To my cousin Thomas Clayton, citizen and grocer of London, and to his heirs for ever I give my tenement now in the tenure of Thomas Fishe.

To Ellen my wife I give my tenement wherein John Leonarde now dwells, for her life; after her decease the same to remain to William Brayfyeld, citizen and baker of London, and his heirs male; for default, to my cousin William Clayton, now servant to Sir Richard Southewell, knight, and to his heirs for ever.

Witnessed by Robert Yonge and William Paten, fishmongers, Stephen Skydmor, vintner, and Thomas Eyns and William Charnock, scrivener.

The messuage in the parish of St. Mary at Hill wherein John Leonarde dwelt is held of the King and Queen in free burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, £3 6s. 8d. The messuage called the "Sonne," the shops, large cellar and messuage in the tenure of John Medcalfe are held of the King and Queen by fealty only, and are worth per ann., clear, £5. The tenement wherein the said Thomas Clayton lived is held of the King and Queen in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee, and by the yearly rent of 5s. 4d., and is worth per ann., clear, 53s. 4d. The 2 tenements in the tenure of Thomas Papworthe and Robert Saye are held of the King and Queen in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £8. The tenement in the tenure of Robert Hayes is held of the King and Queen in free burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, 53s. 4d. The tenement in the occupation of Thomas Fysshe is held of the King and Queen in free burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, 66s. 8d.

Thomas Clayton died 30 March last past; Thomas Clayton is his kinsman and next heir, to wit, son and heir of Hugh Cleyton, brother of the said Thomas, and is now aged 40 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 and 3 Philip and Mary, p. 2, No. 9.

John Branche.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 20 March, 2 and 3 Philip and Mary [1556], before William Garrett, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Branche, by the oath of George Forman, George Brayfield, Thomas Warren, Nicholas Avenand, Thomas Mayott, William Dent, Walter Maykins, Alexander Beste, John Evans, Simon Ludforde, Thomas Cressey, Henry Clooker, William Eton, John Hayes, William Alday, John Harrys and Nicholas Smale, who say that

Before the death of Joan Branche one Christopher Campyon, citizen and mercer of London, was seised of 1 messuage and 2 shops lately demised to Ellen Wylkington, situate in the lane called grene lettyce in Candelwykestrete in the parish of St. Mary Abchurche, London, and late parcel of the lands and possessions of the late Priory or New Hospital of St. Mary without Bysshoppesgate, now dissolved.

He, being so seised, King Henry VIII by Letters Patent dated 25 January, in the 32nd year of his reign [1541], for the sum of 10s. paid into the Hanaper, gave licence to the said Christopher Campyon to grant the said premises, which are held of the King in chief, to the said John Branche and his heirs for ever.

Afterwards, the said Christopher by deed dated 27 January, 32 Henry VIII [1541], in fulfilment of certain agreements lately made between himself of the one part, and the said John Branche by the name of John Branche, senior, citizen and clothier (pannarium) of London, of the other part, and contained in certain indentures dated 17 November, 32 Henry VIII, granted the said premises to the said John Branche and his heirs for ever.

The said premises are held of the King and Queen in chief, by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, 30s.

John Branche died 5 May, 1 and 2 Philip and Mary [1555]; John Branche is his son and next heir, and was then aged 39 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 and 3 Philip and Mary, p. 2, No. 14.

Master Robert Holgate alias Halgate, clerk.

Archbishop of Canterbury.

Inquisition taken 11 May, 2 and 3 Philip and Mary [1556], before William Garret, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Master Robert Holgate alias Halgate, clerk, late Archbishop of Canterbury, by the oath of Robert Bellingham, William Jurden, Robert Dove, Robert Collins, William Myldenall, John Isham, Richard Langham, Thomas Reade, George Wymarke, Thomas Chapman, John Abbot, Edward Pressen, John Benlowes, Ralph Presson and James Moore, who say that

Robert Holgate was seised of 1 capital messuage called "Mayster of Sempringham Headhouse" and 1 garden situate in a lane called Cowlane in the parish of St. Sepulchre, London, late of the Monastery of Sempringham, co. Lincoln, now dissolved, and sometime belonging to the Master of the Order of St. Gilbert of Sempringham; also of 6 messuages and 6 gardens lying together in Cowlane aforesaid next to the said capital messuage on the east towards Smythfield; and 2 messuages and 2 gardens lying together in Cowelane next to the Master of Sempryngham's headhouse on the south towards Holborn Cross, to the said late Monastery belonging.

All the said premises are held of the King and Queen by fealty only in free burgage, and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £12.

Robert Holgate died 15 November last past at the said capital messuage in Cowelane; Thomas Holgate is his kinsman and next heir, to wit, son and heir of Henry Holgate, late of Clayton, senior, deceased, brother of the said Robert Holgate, and was then aged 40 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 and 3 Philip and Mary, p. 2, No. 30.

Alice Cornwaleis, widow.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 16 May, 2 and 3 Philip and Mary [1556], before William Garret, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Alice Cornwaleis, widow, by the oath of George Forman, George Brayfeld, Thomas Warren, Nicholas Avenon, Thomas Mayot, William Dent, Walter Meakyns, Alexander Beoost, John Evans, Thomas Crcssey, Henry Cloker, William Eton, John Harys, William Aldaye, John Harrys and Nicholas Small, who say that

Alice Cornwaleis was seised of 1 large messuage called "The Principall Place," and 1 large garden thereto adjoining, situate in the parish of St. Caterine Christchurch in London; and of 16 tenements or houses and 3 stables situate in Byllyter Lane within the said parish: which said premises are held of the King and Queen by knight's service, to wit, by the 20th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, £12 3s. 4d.

Alice Cornwaleis died 8 January last past; Thomas Cornwaleis, esq., is her son and next heir, and is now aged 24 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 and 3 Philip and Mary, p. 2, No. 31.

Richard Morgan, knight.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 17 December, 2 and 3 Philip and Mary [1555], before William Gerret, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Richard Morgan, knight, by the oath of Thomas Jennyns, Christopher Bussher, Robert Lyvers, William Aldaye, John Redman, Robert Hardyng, John Harrys, Thomas Thome, John Thome, William Robynson, Thomas Maye, Robert Braunche, Thomas Dycheffeld, Alexander Bankes and Robert Woode, who say that

Richard Morgan was of sound mind and memory from his birth up to 8 May, 1 Mary [1554], upon which day he became demented in the parish of St. Magnus the Martyr in Bridge ward in London, and has remained in that condition ever since, so that he is incapable of managing himself or his lands, etc., as he does not enjoy lucid intervals. When the said Richard became a lunatic he did not hold any lands or tenements in the City of London.

Thomas Morgan is the son and heir apparent of the said Richard Morgan, and was aged 15 years and no more on the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist next before the taking of this inquisition.

Inq. p.m., 2 and 3 Philip and Mary, p. 2, No. 32.