Inquisitions
4 & 5 Philip and Mary (1557-8)

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

G.S. Fry (editor)

Year published

1896

Pages

149-165

Citation Show another format:

'Inquisitions: 4 & 5 Philip and Mary (1557-8)', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 1 (1896), pp. 149-165. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65876 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Thomas Alsop.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 8 March, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1558], before Thomas Curteys, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Alsop, citizen and grocer of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Ralph Davis, John Haddon, Robert Lee, Henry Roberts, William Smyth, John Jakson, Thomas Dewxell, Robert Davis, Thomas Warren, William Dent, Walter Mekyns, George Pert, Thomas Kendall, John Vady, Edmund Style, Henry Calleis and Francis Kelke, who say that

Before the death of Thomas Alsope, King Henry VIII was seised in right of his crown of England of the tenement then in the tenure of Stephen Billesden, and afterwards in the tenure of Robert Colte, situate in the parish of St. Stephen in Walbroke, London; the tenement late in the tenure of Leonard Hopkyn, and afterwards of William Adam, in the said parish; a tenement late in the tenure of Edward Noble, in the said parish; the 3 tenements lately demised to William Normevyle, in the several tenures of Robert Byas, "Tyler," Thomas Babham and William Cheke, in the said parish; 1 tenement then or late in the tenure of Thomas Hamond, parcel of the Barge, in the said parish; 1 tenement late in the tenure of Thomas Asshe, parcel of the said Barge, in the said parish.

So seised, his Majesty by Letters Patent, dated 18 November, in the 31st year of his reign [1539], as well in consideration of the faithful service rendered to him by the said Thomas Alsop as also for the sum of £285 to him in hand paid, granted to the said Thomas and Anne his wife all the said premises: to hold to them and the heirs of the said Thomas for ever of the said King by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee and the yearly rent of 55s.

The said Anne survived the said Thomas and is seised of the said premises for her life, with reversion to the right heirs of the said Thomas for ever.

The said Thomas Alsope was seised of all that tenement called the Angell, with all the shops, cellars, etc., thereto adjoining, situate in Buckelersbury, in the parish of the Blessed Mary of Wolchurch, London; the messuage, with all the shops, cellars, etc., thereto belonging, late in the tenure of Christopher Askewe, situate in Watlingstreet, London, in the parish of St. John the Evangelist; a messuage, with shops, etc., late in the tenure of John Stutesbury, lately demised to Christopher Askewe, situate in the said parish, adjoining the said messuage in Watlingstreet on the west; 2 messuages and 1 garden, with all the houses, buildings, etc., thereto belonging, in the several tenures of William Copland, stationer, and Dionisius Bayly, "Spurryer," situate in the parish of St. Bridget in Fleetstreet, London, to wit, between the tenements of John Conyngham and Thomas Jacson on the east, the tenements of George James and Thomas Pole on the west, the tenement in the tenure of Sir Thomas Grey on the south and the highway of Fleet Street on the north; 2 messuages in the said parish of St. Stephen Walbroke, late in the several tenures of Anthony Burley and Nicholas Scratcher, sometime belonging to the late College of Acon within the said City of London, now dissolved, and late parcel of the possessions of the said College; and of all the houses, etc., to the same belonging.

So seised, the said Thomas Alsope made his will 16 January, 1557 [here given in English as follows]:

To Anne my wife I give all my lands, tenements and hereditaments in London and in Deptford and Grenewyche, co. Kent: to hold for her life, on condition that she keep the same in good repair: the reversion thereof after her death to my nephews Richard Andelebie and John Andelebie, sons of my sister Margery Andelebie, to William Gyllyat, son of my said wife, to Robert Alsoppe and John Alsoppe, sons of my brother Robert Alsoppe, to Robert Alsoppe and Thomas Alsoppe, sons of my brother Reynold Alsoppe, and to Lyne Taylor and John Taylor, sons of my sister Joan Taylor, and to their heirs for ever.

The said premises in the parish of St. Stephens Walbroke, granted to the said Thomas and Anne as aforesaid, are held of the King and Queen in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per annum, clear, £27 18s. 4d. The tenement called the Angel in Buckelesbury with the shops, etc., and the 2 messuages in Watlingstreet, are held of the King and Queen by fealty in free burgage, and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £11 13s. 4d. The messuages and garden in the parish of St. Bridget, Fleetstreet, are held of the King and Queen in free burgage by fealty only, and are worth per ann., clear, £7 18s. 0d. The messuages in the said parish of St. Stephen, Walbroke, in the tenures of Anthony Burley and Nicholas Scratcher, are held of the said King and Queen in free burgage by fealty only, and are worth per ann., clear, £8.

Thomas Alsoppe died 16 January, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1558]; Robert Alsoppe is his kinsman and next heir, and was then aged 13 years and more.

The said Anne, late the wife of the said Thomas, still survives at London.

Inq. p.m., 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, p. 1, No. 94.

William Rest.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 20 May, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1558], before Thomas Curtys, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of William Rest, late citizen and grocer of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Ralph Davy, John Haddon, Robert Lee, William Smyth, John Jacson, Thomas Dewxall, Robert Davys, William Dent, Walter Mekyns, George Pert, Thomas Kendall, Francis Kelke and Henry Callice, who say that

William Rest was seised of 7 messuages situate in the parish of the Blessed Mary of Wolnothe, London, now in the several tenures of George Basforde, leatherseller, . . . Payne, widow, William Brice, clothworker, William Handforde, haberdasher, Innocent Locale, foreign merchant, Thomas Watts, haberdasher, and . . . Parkyns, widow; and 7 other messuages lying in the parish of the Blessed Mary of Wolchurche Hawe, London, now in the several tenures of Richard Harris, tallow chandler, Richard Garter, butcher, Christopher Vaghan, Anthony Payne, broker, Alice Harcot, widow, and Robert Codner.

So seised, the said William Rest made his will 8 February, 37 Henry VIII [1546], and thereby gave all the said premises to Katherine Rest his daughter and her heirs.

After the death of the said William the said Katherine entered into the said premises and took the profits thereof until the 10th day of October, 1 Edward VI [1547], upon which day she married Thomas Pynchester, gent., by pretext whereof they were both seised of the same.

Afterwards, to wit, on 10 April, 3 and 4 Philip and Mary, the said Thomas and Katherine granted to the said George Basforde and his heirs for ever the messuage now in the tenure of the said George, sometime called a back house, wherein Roland Oker lately dwelt, situate in Lombard Street in the parish of the Blessed Mary Wolnothe; all the shops, rooms, and the great yard to the said backhouse belonging, 1 warehouse with a small house adjoining wherein an oven was formerly built, being parcel of the large messuage wherein Elizabeth Pynchester lately dwelt, and afterwards Innocent Lokellowe, foreign merchant, lying in the said parish, between the said large messuage on the east part, the tenement in the tenure of Anthony Payne on the west, the kitchen of the said large messuage on the north, and the tenement wherein Christopher Vaghan lived on the south.

Afterwards the said Thomas and Katherine Pynchester, by charter dated 9 October, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557], made between themselves of the one part, and Roland Heywarde of London, clothworker, of the other part, granted to the said Roland and his heirs for ever those two messuages in the parish of the Blessed Mary Wolchurch Hawe, London, now in the tenures of the said Christopher Vaghan and Anthony Payne, by the name of those 2 messuages then made into 3 tenements, in the said parish, one whereof was in the tenure of John Tracye, another in the occupation of Edward Streate, and the third in the tenure of Christopher Vaghan.

The said Thomas and Katherine by another indenture dated 24 September, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557], made between themselves of the one part, and Thomas Allen of London, pewterer, and Margaret his wife of the other part, granted to the said Thomas Allen and Margaret those 2 messuages situate in the said parish, now in the several tenures of the said Alice Haycott, widow, and Richard Codner, and then in the occupations of Constance David alias Oker, widow, and Alice Harkine, widow, lying between the messuage of the said Thomas Allen and Margaret on the north part and the porch (porticum) of the said George Basford on the south.

The said messuages in the tenures of the said . . . Payne, widow, William Brice, William Handford, Innocent Locallowe, Thomas Wattes, Elizabeth Parkyns, Richard Harrye and Richard Carter are held of the Queen by the free service of 1d. per ann., and are worth per ann., clear, £25 5s. 4d. The premises granted to the said George Basforde are held of the Queen by the free service of 1d. per ann., and are worth per ann., clear, £6 10s. 0d.

The premises granted to Roland Haywarde are held of the Queen by the free service of 1d. per ann., and are worth per ann., clear, £7 6s. 8d. The 2 messuages granted to the said Thomas and Margaret Allen are held of the Queen by the like service, and are worth per ann., clear, 40s.

William Rest died 12 February, 37 Henry VIII [1546]; Katherine, now the wife of Thomas Pynchester, is his daughter and next heir, and was then aged 7 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, p. 1, No. 95.

William Lambert, gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 23 November, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557], before Thomas Curies, Mayor and escheator, to prove the age of William Lambert, gent., son and heir of John Lambert, late citizen and Alderman of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Ralph Davys, John Haddon, Henry Roberts, William Smythe, John Jakson, Thomas Dewxell, Robert Davis, Thomas Warren, William Dent, Walter Mekins, George Perte, Thomas Kendall, Francis Kelke, William Gyfforde, Edmund Style, Richard Lambarte and Henry Calles, who say that

William Lambert was born in the parish of St. Nicholas Acon, London, and baptized in the parish Church of St. Nicholas Acon, 18 October, 28 Henry VIII [1536]; and that the said William was of the full age of 21 years on the 18th day of October last past.

Lnq. p.m., 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, p. 1, No. 100.

Henry Mershe.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 14 December, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557], before Thomas Curtes, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Henry Mershe, citizen and mercer of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Ralph Davis, Henry Roberts, William Smyth, John Jackson, Thomas Dewxell, Robert Davis, Thomas Warren, William Dent, Walter Mekyns, Thomas Kendall, Francis Kelke, Edmund Stile, Richard Lambart and Henry Callice, who say that

Henry Mershe was seised of 1 messuage in the street commonly called Mylkestreet, within the parish of St. Mary Magdalene in the City of London.

So seised, the said Henry made his will on 28 April, 1556, whereby he bequeathed the said messuage to Margaret his wife for her life, upon condition that she should keep the same in good repair; and after her decease, to Thomas Mershe his son and to his heirs for ever; for default of such heirs, the said messuage to come to the youngest son of his cousin John Mershe.

The said messuage is held of the King and Queen in free burgage and by the yearly rent of 8d., and is worth per ann., clear, £4.

[Date of death not given.] Thomas Mershe is the only son and next heir of the said Henry Mershe, and is now aged 6 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, p. 1, No. 102.

Richard Ive.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 12 May, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1558], before Thomas Curies, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Richard Ive, citizen and tallow chandler of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Ralph Davys, John Haddon, Robert Lee, Henry Roberts, William Smyth, John Jackson, Thomas Dewexell, Robert Davys, Thomas Warren, William Dent, Walter Mekins, George Perte, Thomas Kendall, Edmund Stile and Henry Calleis, who say that

Richard Ive was seised of 1 messuage or corner tenement wherein he lived, and 10 messuages lying together and adjoining the said corner tenement, in the several tenures of John Reynoldes, John Nonnynges, William Love, the Porters of the Salters Company, John Holte, Guy Palmer, John Wilkinson, David ap Thomas, Walter Russe and John Purseleyn, situate in the parish of St. Dunstans in the East, London, sometime belonging to the Monastery of Evesham, co. Worcester, now dissolved.

So seised, the said Richard made his will 6 February, 1557 [here given in English] as follows:

I bequeath to Elizabeth my wife all my lands and tenements in the said parish of St. Dunstan in the East, and also in the parishes of Rayleigh and Thundersley, co. Essex, for her life, except the third part thereof which I will shall descend to my son Thomas Ive, and 1 tenement and 10 acres of land which I have given to my daughter "Roose"; after the death of the said Elizabeth all the said premises to remain to my said son Thomas and his heirs for ever; for default, to my right heirs for ever. To Margaret Ive my daughter a silver pot parcel gilt and 2 silver spoons. To "Roose" Ive my youngest daughter 2 silver spoons and a bedstead in the chamber where my brother Agmondesham lies; also a tenement with 10 acres of land, called Drakes, lying in Rayleigh, co. Essex: to hold to her and her heirs for ever; for default, then the same to remain to my right heirs for ever.

All the said premises are held of the King and Queen in chief by knight's service, to wit, by the 20th part of a knight's fee, and by the yearly rent of 16s., and are worth per ann., clear, £12.

Richard Ive died 8 February, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1558]; Thomas Ive is his son and next heir, and was then aged 23 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, p. 1, No. 105.

George Baron, knight.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 1 April, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1558], before Thomas Curtis, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of George Baron, knight, citizen and Alderman of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Ralph Davye, John Haddon, Robert Lee, Henry Roberts, William Smythe, John Jackson, Thomas Dewxell, Robert Davys, Thomas Warren, Walter Mekyns, Thomas Kendale, Francis Kelke, Edmund Style and William Dent, who say that

George Baron was seised of 1 building and the shedd, 1 weir (gurgite) and the gutter, late in the tenure of the Wardens of the Clothiers of London, situate in the parish of All Saints in Honey Lane, London; 1 weir and the gutter, late in the tenure of the Wardens of the Church of All Saints in the said parish, running from and beyond the Bullhead in Trump Alley there; 1 messuage in the tenure of William White, leatherseller, situate in the said parish, to wit, in Trump Alley; 1 small messuage in the tenure of the said William Whit in Trump Alley; 2 "seddis" and buildings and the sheddes in Trump Alley, in the tenure of William Scarolyff; 1 messuage and tenement and 2 shops, 1 "conclavi," 1 room over the said parlour ("super idem le parloi"), 1 kitchen, 1 curtilage and the yard, in the tenure of William Hancok, vintner, situate in the upper part of Trump Alley; 2 messuages and tenements, 1 curtilage and the yard, in the tenure of Thomas Craye, in Trump Alley; 1 messuage and tenement called the Bere and 1 other messuage thereto adjoining, in the tenure of Matthew Dale, situate in the east part of Trump Alley; and 1 messuage, in the tenure of Henry Marre, citizen and girdler of London, situate at the upper part of Trump Alley in the said parish of All Saints.

So seised, the said George Baron made his will 15 February, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1558], whereby he bequeathed all the said premises to Alice his wife for her life; and after her death to George Baron his son and heir apparent, and to John Baron his son and to their heirs for ever, equally between them.

All the said premises are held of the King and Queen by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £41.

George Baron died 19 February, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1558]; George Baron is his son and next heir, and was then aged 25 years and more.

The said Alice still survives.

Inq. p.m., 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, p. 1, No. 106.

Ralph Clarvaur alias Claroys.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 23 October, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557], before Thomas Offeley, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Ralph Clarvaux alias Claroys, citizen and grocer of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Simon Smyth, John Jackson, Robert Shurlock, Edmund Browne, Henry Malarye, Thomas Castell, Laurence Jackson, William James, Lancelot Strynger, William Smyth, Robert Lee, Richard Williams and George Smyth, who say that

Ralph Clarvys was seised of 1 messuage and tenement in the tenure of William Chamber, lying within the parish of St. Benedict Grace Church, London; 1 messuage or inn called the Sarsons Hedd, late in the tenure of Richard Hudson, situate within the said parish; 1 messuage there in the tenure of Barteramus (Barterami) Jackson; 1 messuage there, late in the tenure of Avis Bankes, widow, sometime belonging to the late Monastery of Marten, co. Surrey, now dissolved.

So seised, the said Ralph, by deed dated 19 June, 33 Henry VIII [1541], granted all the said premises to James Hall and his heirs for ever, and the said James Hall, by deed dated 20 June in the same year, gave all the said premises to the said Ralph Clarvys and Agnes his wife and their heirs for ever.

Before the death of the said Ralph one James Morley, citizen and ironmonger of London, was seised of the messuage called the Belhouse, and all the shops, cellars, rooms, etc., thereto belonging, sometime in the tenure of Thomas Wate, situate in the parish of All Saints Lombard Street, late in the tenure of Robert Bowyer, citizen and merchant tailor, and abutting upon the highway called Gracyonstrete on the east, on the messuage of John Baker, citizen and mercer of London, and the curtilage and messuage of the Mystery or Art of the Drapers London, late in the occupation of the foreign merchants (Mercatorum extraneorum), on the south part, on the messuage or inn called the Whyt Hart of the Mystery or Art of the Fishmongers, London, late in the occupation of John Harrys, citizen and leatherseller of London, on the west part, and on the said inn in part and on the messuage late of James Nedeham, esq., deceased, on the north part.

So seised, the said James Morley, by deed dated 23 March, 1549, granted the said messuage to the said Ralph Clarvaux and Agnes his wife, and to the heirs of the said Ralph for ever.

The said Ralph, being so seised, made his will 2 August, 1551, as follows:

To the poor of Gracechurch parish 40s. to be delivered yearly in "cooles" during the life of my wife, and after her death for ever, at the discretion of the parson and churchwardens of the said parish, to be paid out of my house called Belhouse.

After the death of my said wife 50s. a year for ever to be paid out of the said Belhouse, "towardes the fynding of one poore man's chylde at Saint Nycolas Hospytall in Cambrydge at lernyng, I mean to be a precher of god's word."

I will that Edward Clarvaux and John Clarvaux, my younger brother's sons, "be found of my goods and lands" until they are old enough to be apprenticed.

I will that "one Thomas Grene, chyld, which I kepe of charytye," be found in like manner.

All the rest of my goods to "Annes" my wife, whom I make sole executrix; after her death I give all my lands, free or copy, to the said Edward and John Clarvaux and their heirs for ever; for default, to the heirs male of my elder brother's body; and for default, then to my next of kin.

All the said premises, except the said Belhouse, are held of the King and Queen in chief, by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, £18. The said Belhouse is held of the said King and Queen by fealty only in free burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, £8.

Ralph Clarvaux died in the said parish of St. Benedict de Gracestrete, 27 June, 3 and 4 Philip and Mary [1557]; Charles Clarvaux alias Clarvys, son of Harbard Clarvys, deceased, elder brother of the said Ralph, is his kinsman and next heir, because the said Ralph died without issue, and was then aged 23 years and more.

The said Agnes still survives.

Inq. p.m., 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, p. 1, No. 107.

Robert Downe.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 6 August, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557], before Thomas Offeley, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Robert Downe, citizen and ironmonger of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Simon Smyth, John Jakson, Robert Shurlocke, Edmund Broune, Henry Malerye, Thomas Castell, Laurence Jakson, John Spyttie, William Jamys, Lancelot Stryngar, Laurence Shirreiff, William Smyth, Robert Lee and Richard Jeakynson, who say that

Robert Downe was seised of 20 messuages, 10 cottages, 30 shops, 10 cellars, and 6 gardens situate in the parish of St. Anne in the ward of Aldrichegate within the City of London: which said premises the said Robert lately had to him and his heirs for ever of the grant of Humphrey Radclyff, knight, as by an indenture dated 28 June, 32 Henry VIII [1540], made to the said Robert by the said Humphrey more fully appears.

The said Robert Downe was likewise seised of all that messuage called the Shippe, with all the shops, cellars, etc. thereto belonging, lying in the parish of St. Mildred the Virgin in the Poultry in the ward of Weschepe, London, late in the tenure of Richard Wadyngton, citizen and merchant tailor of London; 1 capital messuage called the Horsehedd in the parish of St. Sepulchre without Newgate, London, and 2 houses commonly called the two Storehouses to the same adjoining in the said parish; 10 small tenements or cottages, with all the shops, warehouses, curtilages, etc. thereto belonging, lying in the said parish: which said last mentioned premises the said Robert Downe had to him and his heirs for ever of the grant of the Master, Wardens and Communalty of the Mystery or Art of the Ironmongers of London, as by their deed made to the said Robert and dated 29 March, 1550, more fully appears.

Also of 1 tenement with the shops, etc. situate in Brodehaw-alley in the parish of St. Mary the Virgin of Colchurche, London, which the said Robert had to him and his heirs of the gift of Barnard Jenys, late Master of the Guild or Mystery of Corpus Christi of the Furriers of London, and of Richard Bewe, William Flelchar, Henry Fyssher and Richard Castell, Wardens of the said Mystery, as by their deed dated 20 December, 3 Edward VI [1549], may appear.

Also of 1 tenement or toft or parcel of waste land, sometime built in two several parts lying together and being only 1 whole curtilage in Borthelane alias Bordhawlane in the said parish of St. Mary Colchurch, which the said Robert Downe late had to him and his heirs for ever of the gift of John Roodes of Stansted, co. Herts, gent., as by indenture dated 5 June, 24. Henry VIII [1532], may appear.

Also of 1 messuage or corner tenement situate within Newgate in the said parish of St. Sepulchre in the ward of Faringdon, London, which the said Robert Downe had to him and his heirs for ever of the grant of Alveredus Randolfe of B . . lesmore, co. Kent, gent., son and heir of John Randolfe, deceased, late citizen and mercer of London, as by charter dated 31 May, 22 Henry VIII [1530], appears.

Also of 3 small messuages, 2 curtilages, 1 kitchen, and 1 room lying together in Aldrichegate Street in the parish of St. Botolph without Aldrichegate and in the ward of Aldrichegate in the suburbs of London, which the said Robert Downe had to him and his heirs for ever of the gift of John Wyndesland, as by indenture dated 11 March, 22 Henry VIII [1531], appears.

Also of 2 messuages, with shops, etc. late in the several tenures of Thomas Barret and Robert Bynlowes situate in Bordhallane in the said parish of St. Mary of Colchurch, sometime belonging to the House or College of Acon, London, now dissolved and suppressed, which the said Richard Downe lately purchased to him and his heirs for ever of the grant of Bartholomew Baron, citizen and mercer of London.

So seised, the said Robert Downe made his will 4 August, 1556, as follows [part given in English]:

To the Master, Wardens and communalty of the Company of Ironmongers in London and to their successors for ever "to Godes pleasure" my messuage, called the sign of the Horsehedd, lying in the said parish of St. Sepulchres, "benethe" the inn called the Sarsons Hedd, together with the alley called the Horsehedd Alley, and all the houses and tenements thereto belonging; also my tenement called the sign of the Shippe in the said parish of St. Mildred in the Poultry, which premises are of the clear yearly value £10: to hold to the said Master and Wardens for ever on condition that they keep yearly for ever an obit or solemn dirge "oon the yerlye day of my decease," and a mass on the morning following within the parish Church of Colchurch out of the said revenues. I will that £3 6s. 8d. be bestowed as follows: the said Master being present to have 20d., the Wardens 12d. each, and the livery of the said Company extending to 30 persons 8d. each, the beadle of the said Company 20d., to every one of them to offer at the said mass 1d., to the wax chandler for the waste of 4 tapers and lights every year 3s. 4d., for the ringing of bells 2s., to the Curate of Colchurch 12d., to the clerk and sexton of the said Church 12d. each, to 6 other priests and clerks 8d. each, to the Churchwardens of the said Church for the trouble in "providing of a drynkyng" for the parishioners there assembled 12d. each. I will that there be bestowed upon the said drinking in bread, ale, cheese, and wine, 11s. 4d. The residue of the said £3 6s. 8d., if any, to be given to the poorest of the said Company of Ironmongers.

All the rest of my lands and tenements I give to Margerie my wife for her life if she remain unmarried; if she marry or die, then the same to remain to my son-in-law, Richard Chamberleyn, and to my daughter, his wife, for their lives; after their decease then to their children and to the heirs of the said children for ever.

All the said premises except the said 2 messuages in Bordhallane are held of the King and Queen by fealty only in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £70. The said 2 messuages in Bordhallane are held of the King and Queen in chief, to wit, by the service of the 40th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, £4 13s. 4d.

Robert Downe died 30 November, 3 and 4 Philip and Mary [1556], in the said parish of St. Mary Colchurch; Anna Chamberleyn, wife of the said Richard Chamberleyn, is his daughter and next heir, and was then aged 33 years and more.

The said Margery, late the wife of the said Robert, has taken the profits of all the said premises up to the present time.

Inq. p.m., 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, p. 2, No. 61.

Lady Anne Cleve.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 21 October, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557], before the escheator of the City of London, after the death of Lady Anne Cleve, daughter of John late Duke of Cleve, Guligh, Gelder and Barri, and sister of William Duke of Cleve, Earl of Mark, Ravensborough and Sutsyn, and Lord of Ravenstene, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Simon Smyth, John Jakson, Robert Shurlock, Edmund Browne, Henry Malory, Thomas Castell, William James, Lancelot Strynger, William Smyth, Robert Lee, Richard Jenkynson and George Smyth, who say that

King Henry VIII was seised of all that wharf called Sondaye Wharf, and of divers houses, tenements, buildings, etc., late in the tenure of Thomas Sterre, situate in the parish of St. Andrew at Baynard's Castle, London, sometime belonging to the late Monastery of Bastlesham, co. Berks, and so seised, by Letters Patent dated 20 January, in the 32nd year of his reign granted the said premises to the said Lady Anne Cleve for her life, if she should so long remain within the Kingdom of England, she paying yearly for the same £93 13sd. sterling.

After the death of King Henry VIII the reversion of the said premises descended to King Edward VI as his son and heir, and after his death to Queen Mary as his sister and heir, who afterwards married Prince Philip, now King of England, and who together are now seised of the said reversion in right of their Crown of England. The said wharf and other the premises are worth per ann., clear, £9.

The said Lady Anne Cleve died at Chelsea, co. Middlesex, 15 July, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1558].

Inq. p.m., 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, p. 2, No. 64.

Thomas Collie, esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 21 October, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557], before Thomas Offeley, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Collie, esq., by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Simon Smyth, John Jackson, Robert Surlock, Edmund Browne, Henry Malorie, Thomas Castle, Laurence Jackson, William James, Lancelot Stringer, William Smythe, Robert Lee, Richard Jenkinson and George Smythe, who say that

King Henry VIII was seised of 1 messuage, 1 yard, 1 parcel of waste ground and i house and garden to the said messuage adjoining, late in the tenure of George King, citizen and woodsmith of London, lying within the City of London in a street commonly called Silverstrete, sometime belonging to the late Priory of Christchurch, London, lately dissolved.

So seised, his Majesty, by Letters Patent dated 4 May, in the 34th year of his reign [1542], in consideration of the faithful service rendered by the said Thomas Collie, granted to him and to Magdalene, his wife, all the said premises for their lives.

By Letters Patent dated 5 April, in the 35th year of his reign [1544], the said King granted the reversion of the said premises to Roland Hill, knight, and his heirs for ever; and so seised, the said Roland Hill, by deed dated 12 February, 1 Edward VI, granted the said reversion to the said Thomas Collie and his heirs for ever.

Afterwards the said Thomas Collie built upon the said piece of waste ground a small tenement, wherein he lived, and 9 stables.

John Ayliff, of London, esq., was seised of 2 messuages, lying in the parish of St. Olave, commonly called St. Towles parish, in Silverstreet, London, sometime belonging to the late Monastery or Priory of Holy Trinity, commonly called Christchurch, London, in the several tenures of William Reynham and Owen Graner, and so seised, by charter dated 2 March, 37 Henry VIII [1546], granted the said messuages to the said Thomas Collye and his heirs for ever.

William Austyn, citizen and clothworker of London, was seised of 1 tenement lying in the said parish of St. Olave, late in the tenure of William Norteriche, and so seised, by charter dated 21 July, 4 Edward VI [1550], granted the same to the said Thomas Collie and his heirs for ever.

So seised, the said Thomas Collie made his will 5 August, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557], as follows:—

I give to my wife the house wherein I dwell, with the stables, etc., in Silverstreet, for her life, with remainder to my daughter Alice Collie; also my house and land at Woodgrene in the parish of Cheston, co. Herts, during her widowhood, but if she marry again, the same shall go to my said daughter Alice and her heirs, and if she (Alice) die without heirs she may bestow the same at her discretion.

The premises in Silverstreet are held of the King and Queen in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee and by the yearly rent of 4s., and are worth per ann., clear, £12 10s.

The premises purchased of the said John Ayliff are held of the said King and Queen by fealty only, in free burgage and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, 40s. The tenement purchased of William Austyn is held of the said King and Queen in free burgage and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, 40s.

Thomas Collie died 6 August, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557]; Alice Collie is his daughter and only next heir, and is now aged 12 years and 11 weeks.

The said Magdalen, late the wife of the said Thomas Collie, still survives in London.

Inq. p.m., 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, p. 2, No. 65.

Richard Dauntesey, esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 23 October, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557], before Thomas Offeley, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Richard Dauntesey, esq., by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Simon Smythe, John Jackeson, Robert Shurlocke, Edmund Browne, Henry Malory, Thomas Castell, Laurence Jackeson, William James, Lancelot Stringer, William Smythe, Robert Lee, Richard Jenkinson and George Smithe, who say that

King Henry VIII was seised of 1 messuage and tenement situate in the street called Whitcrosse Street, in the suburbs of the City of London, to wit, in the parish of St. Giles without Crepulgate, sometime in the tenure of John Poynter, and afterwards of Richard Cull; 1 messuage and tenement called the Sopehowse, 1 house called a Mille house and 1 stable thereto adjoining, sometime in the tenure of the said Richard Cull, situate in the street called Grubstrete in the said parish of St. Giles; 1 messuage sometime in the tenure of William Myrfyn and afterwards in that of Richard Cull, situate in the said street called Whitcrosse Street; 1 large messuage sometime in the tenure of George Robinson, late citizen and mercer of London; 1 messuage sometime in the tenure of Thomas Apulforthe in the parish of Aldermary; and 3 messuages sometime in the tenure of Thomas Gittons, situate in the Olde Change, in the parish of St. Mary Magdalene in old Fisshestrete.

So seised, his Majesty, by Letters Patent dated 20 July, 34 Henry VIII [1542], granted to the said Richard Dauntesey and to Mary, then his wife, all the said premises for their lives, with reversion to the said King.

The said Mary survived the said Richard.

The said Richard Dauntesey was seised of 2 messuages and 6 cottages thereto adjoining, sometime in the tenure of Philip Comvey, situate in Whitcrosse Street.

So seised, the said Richard made his will 8 August, 1557, and thereby bequeathed to his son Robert Dauntesey £6 13s. 4d. yearly, issuing out of his said lands and tenements. The residue of the premises to go towards performing his will.

The said 2 messuages and 6 cottages, together with divers other tenements specified in certain Letters Patent of the said King Henry VIII, dated 12 December, 34 Henry VIII [1542], granted to the said Richard Dauntesey, are held of the King and Queen in chief by the service of the 100th part of a knight's fee and the yearly rent of 7s. 4d.; the said 2 messuages and 6 cottages are worth per ann., clear, £6.

Richard Dauntesey died 8 August, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557]; William Dauntesey is his son and next heir, and was then aged 15 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, p. 2, No. 68.

Richard Leversham.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 27 October, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557], before Thomas Offeley, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Richard Leversham, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Simon Smythe, John Jackson, Robert Shurlock, Edmund Browne, Henry Malorye, Thomas Castell, Laurence Jackson, William James, Lancellot Strynger, William Smyth, Robert Lee and Richard Jenkynson, who say that

Richard Leversham was seised of 6 tenements or cottages and 6 gardens, lying together in the parish of St. Botolph without Algatt, one whereof is called by the sign of the Catheryne Whele.

The said premises are held of the King and Queen in chief by knight's service, and are worth per ann., clear, £9.

Richard Leversham died 22 July, 3 and 4 Philip and Mary [1556]; Thomas Leversham is his son and next heir, and is now aged 19 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, p. 2, No. 81.

David Robinson.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 20 February, 3 and 4 Philip and Mary [1557], before Thomas Offeley, knight, Mayor and escheator by virtue of his office, after the death of David Robinson, citizen and skinner (pelliparius) of London, by the oath of Robert Rose, Robert Ussher, Thomas Blunte, Thomas Bullok, Lawrence Willyams, John Kettlewode, George Forman, Robert Dunkyn, Thomas Maye, Simon Burton, William Androes, Thomas Howe, Henry Smythe and John Febrige, who say that

Long before the death of the said David Robinson one Edward Cornewallys of London, esq., and Alice, his wife, were seised of 5 tenements, and all the cellars, solars, buildings, etc., thereto belonging, situate in the parish of St. Andrew Undershafte, London, late in the several tenures of Richard Curson, John Lambe, Laurence Heathe and Robert Browne.

So seised, the said Edward and Alice, having first obtained the licence of King Edward VI, by Letters Patent dated 13 March, in the 4th year of his reign [1550], enfeoffed the said David Robinson of the said premises, to hold to him and his heirs for ever.

The said David Robinson was seised of one other tenement, situate in the parish of St. John in Walbroke, in the tenure of Brian Gardener.

The premises in the said parish of St. Andrew Undershafte are held of the King and Queen in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, 50s. The tenement in the parish of St. John in Walbroke is held of the said King and Queen in free burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, 26s. 8d.

David Robinson died 20 July, 5 Edward VI [1551]; Thomas Robinson is his son and next heir, and was then aged 6 years and 3 months and more.

Robert Bates, citizen and skinner of London, took the profits of the said premises in the said parish of St. Andrew from the death of the said David Robinson up to the taking of this inquisition, by what title the jurors know not.

Margaret Burnell, now the wife of William Burnell, and late the relict of the said David, took the issues of the tenement in the said parish of St. John during the said period.

Inq. p.m., 5 and 6 Philip and Mary, p. 2, No. 31, v.o.