Inquisitions
2 Elizabeth I (1559-60)

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

G.S. Fry (editor)

Year published

1896

Pages

191-211

Citation Show another format:

'Inquisitions: 2 Elizabeth I (1559-60)', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 1 (1896), pp. 191-211. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65879 Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


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Thomas Cawerden, knight.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 3 May, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewett, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Cawerden, knight, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Robert Shurlock, Robert Danbye, Robert Davye, Henry Callis, John Jakson, Guy Woode, Michael Smyth, William Swa . . . Ty . . . Robert Dunkyns, Andrew Kemp and Robert Lee, who say that

Before the death of Thomas Cawerden, King Edward VI was seised of the house, site, and precinct sometime the house of the Black Friars of London; the soil and land of the Church and belfry of the said house, whereupon are situated 9 messuages and shops, now or late in the several tenures of Richard Frithe, John Bradford, Bonaventure Enowe, Thomas Rabone, Nicholas Morley, Adam Ronagasse, John Gregory, Garet [Garetti] Nice and Rowland Havye; the close of the said house and the land and soil thereof, now being a garden late in the tenure of the said Thomas Cawerden; the cemetery called the North Churchyard of the said house, now being a waste piece of land, whereupon there are now built 9 messuages and shops in the several tenures of Katherine Pryce, George Richardson, Philip Lovell, John Water, Adam Ronagasse, Elizabeth Arthure, Herman Cusshey and Richard Lothye; 1 waste piece of land within the site aforesaid, whereupon are situated 3 tenements in the several tenures of James Arcue, Giles Goderd and Thomas Gemyng; 1 gallery [galeria] and the soil thereof within the same site, now being 7 messuages in the several tenures of Peter Bonavaile, Peter Calewe, Gabriel Mertell, Peter Forest, Hugh Burton and John de Horse; 1 house or old kitchen, now in the tenure of the said Thomas Cawerden; 1 house called the old "promptuario" and the entry and passage in the same; 1 cellar under the said "promptuario," late in the tenure of the said Thomas; 1 house called the upper fratre within the said site; 1 waste place or entry there towards the small kitchen; 1 house there called the Duchye Chambre, and 1 house under the same; 1 messuage there called the Aukershouse; 1 messuage there sometime in the tenure of John Bernett, now in that of William Tanner; 2 gardens there late in the tenure of Philip Hobby, knight; 1 small tenement there towards the tenement late of Thomas Cheney, knight; and divers other messuages there, parcel of the said house, late in the tenure of the said Thomas Cawerden.

So seised, his Majesty, by Letters Patent dated 12 March, in the 4th year of his reign [1550], granted to the said Thomas Cawerden, being then one of the Gentlemen of his Privy Chamber, all the said premises, by the name of all that house, site, precinct, Church, belfry, cemetery, close, "capitre" house, 2 "les Iles" of the chancel and chapel to the said Church belonging, containing in breadth from the cemetery called the north Churchyard up to the south cloister 66 feet, and in length from the house of John Bernett, gent., on the west part of the said Church, up to the garden belonging to the mansion of Anthony Agar, knight, at the east end of the said Church, 220 feet; which said cemetery on the north part of the said Church contains in breadth from the said Church up to the brick wall and the tenement and gardens in the tenure of Peter Hosyer and — Holte, 90 feet, and in length from the houses and tenements of — Partrich and — Southcote and from the Aukers house from the west part up to the wall [parietem] adjoining the highway on the east, 200 feet; and the ground and soil of the said close lying on the south part of the said Church contains in breadth from the said Church up to the mansion or "lodging" of Lady Kyngeston on the south part of the said close, 110 feet, and in length from the wall [pariete] belonging to the mansion or lodging sometime of Francis Bryan, knight, and late of Anthony Agar, knight, and — Walsingham, on the east, up to the mansion or "lodging" of Lord Cobham and John Barnett on the west, 100 feet; the Chapterhouse, lying at the east end of the said close, contains in length 44 feet and in breadth 22 feet; also by the name of 1 waste piece of land with a gallery now in ruins and other waste places called "void Romes," containing in length 98 feet, and abutting towards Bridwell Dyche on the west part and in breadth to the same end 64 feet, abutting upon the common way and the lane which led to the "comon Staires" of the Thames on the east, being in breadth to that end 94 feet, and abutting upon the garden of Lucy Harper and Frances Gardiner on the north and to the garden of Christopher More, knight, on the south; also by the name of the old kitchen and kitchenyard and the entry and passage adjoining the same, containing in length 84 feet, abutting upon the said lane on the west, being in breadth at that end 74 feet, and abutting upon the "parlore" of John Portynarye next to the lane on the south and upon the brickwall and garden of Lord Cobham on the north; and by the name of all that old "promptuarii" and the entry and passage thereof and of the great Stayer, the hall called the Halle place at the upper end of the said Stayers and the entry which led to the "fratre" upon the same promptuar', containing in length 95 feet and in breadth 36 feet, and abutting upon the said close on the east, the said kitchen on the west, the house of the said Lord Cobham on the north, and the parlor called the "blynde parlour" on the south; the house called the upper frater, containing in length 107 feet and in breadth 52 feet, abutting upon the house and garden of the said Lady Kyngeston on the south and east, the hall where the revels of the King were held on the north, and towards the Duchye Chamber and the house of John Portynarye on the west; 1 waste place or entry towards the small kitchen and the "Colehouse," containing in length 30 feet and in breadth 17 feet; the Duchy Chambre and 1 lodging under the same, containing in length 50 feet and in breadth 16 feet, and abutting eastward towards the north end of the said "frater," and westward upon the said parlour of John Portynarye; the messuage called the Ankershouse in the tenure of Maurice Griffith, clerk, the messuage in the tenure of John Barnett, gent., 2 gardens in the tenure of Philip Hobby, knight, and the small tenement towards the tenement of Thomas Cheyney, knight, Lord of the Cinque portes, in the tenure of Robert Kyrkham, knight.

So seised, the said Thomas Cawerden, by the name of Thomas Cawerden, knight, of the parish of Blechingligh, co. Surrey, made his will on St. Bartholomew's day, 1559 [here given in English as follows]:—

I give my body to be buried in the Church of Blechingleigh.

I give to John Browne, gent., my servant, to Alice, now his wife, and to their heirs, my manor of Willey alias Willye, co. Surrey, with remainder to John Cawerden, late servant to Master Bayle, of London, fishmonger, and his heirs, for ever.

To Bryan Dodmer, late son of Thomas Dodmer, gent., an annuity of 20 marks, issuing out of my lands within the circuit of the late Black Friars in London.

To Richard Lee, of London, £20 yearly, going out of the said Black Friars.

To the poor of Blechingligh and Home £15, and to the poor of Katheram £5.

To my servants, Barthilmewe Scott, — Scott, his brother, Thomas Bouch, Davy —, Thomas Vaughan, Otto Willicke, and — Duffeld, a gelding each.

To William Moore, esq., 3 stoned colts and 3 geldings.

To Thomas Hawes, my late servant, 3 "corslettes, 6 almayne ryvettes, 6 blacke billes, 6 bowes, 12 sheffe of arrowes, 2 geldings, and 1 colte."

To Thomas Blagrave, my late servant, 3 corslettes, etc.

The residue of all my goods I give to Elizabeth, my wife, whom with William More, esq., of Loseley, co. Surrey, I make executor.

I ordain Thomas Blagrave and Thomas Hawe overseers.

If there should be any imperfection or doubt in this my will by reason of "mispenning or wante of wordes or skill in making thereof," my will is that Anthony Browne, Justice of the Common Pleas, Gilbert Gerrard, Attorney General, and Richard Goodridge, esq., shall have full power to "reforme" such defects, and from time to time to expound the same according to my meaning.

All my said premises within the precinct of the Black Friars to be sold for the performance of this my will.

To the honourable Lord Clynton, my "verrey frend and especiall good lord," a cup of the value of £10 as a remembrance of my poor good will, and to the Lady his wife a gold ring with a "turkys." To Mistress Wade a gown of black damask and a "hode furnyshed according to a widdowes estate."

Witnesses: Thomas Hawe, Richard Lee, James Calfhill, Barthilmewe Scott, Otto Wylley and Thomas Browne, esq.

After the death of the said Thomas Cawerden, to wit, 20 December, 2 Eliz. [1559], the said Elizabeth and William More sold the said premises to John Byrch, gent., John Austyn, and Richard Chapman: to hold to them and their heirs for ever. On 22 December in the same year the said John Birch, John Austyn, and Richard Chapman resold all the said premises to the said Elizabeth Cawerden and William More.

All the said premises are held of the Queen in free burgage, and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £70.

Thomas Cawerden died 29 August, 1 Eliz. [1559]; William Cawerden, esq., is his kinsman and next heir, to wit, son of Anthony Cawerden, brother of the said Thomas, deceased, and is now aged 27 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 90.

Marcellus Harper, gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 18 October, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewett, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Marcellus Harper, gent., by the oath of Robert Shurlocke, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Danby, Robert Davy, Henry Callis, Guy Awood, Michael Smith, Lawrence Jacson, Stephen Walden, Thomas Ebden, Robert Dunkin, William Swaunson and John Benson, who say that

Before the death of the said Marcellus, Lucy Harper, late the wife of George Harper, knight, deceased, was seised of 2 messuages and 2 gardens, lying within the precinct of the late Priory sometime belonging to the Black Friars within the City of London.

So seised, the said Lucy had issue by the said George, Marcellus Harper (named in the writ), Frances, now the wife of William Patrickson, gent., Mary, now the wife of Bartholomew Hales, gent., and Anne Harper, and died 31 July, 6 Edward VI [1552], the said Marcellus, her son and next heir, being then aged 7 years and more.

The said George Harper survived the said Lucy, and died 12 December, 1 Eliz. [1558]; after his death Audrey (Audria) Harper, late the wife of the said George, took the profits of the said premises up to 5 February, 1 Eliz. [1559].

The said premises are held of the Queen in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, £4 6s. 8d.

Marcellus Harper died 5 February, 1 Eliz. [1559], before any inquisition had been taken after the deaths of the said Lucy and George; the said Frances Patrickson, Mary Hales, and Anne Harper are the sisters and next heirs of the said Marcellus, and were then aged respectively, the said Frances 24 years and more, the said Mary 17 years and more, and the said Anne 13 years. The said Anne died unmarried before the taking of this inquisition. (See page 202.)

After the death of the said Marcellus, the said Audrey (Audria), afterwards the wife of George Carleton, gent., took the profits of the said premises until 25 March last past.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 91.

Thomas Shaa.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 18 November, 2 Eliz. [1559], before William Hewet, esq., Mayor and escheator, to prove the age of Thomas Shaa, esq., son and next heir of Thomas Shaa, esq., deceased: which said Thomas Shaa, the father, held of King Henry VIII, as of his honor of Rayleghe, co. Essex, by knight's service: by the oath of Henry Calis, Robert Shurlocke, Thomas Dwexell, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davye, Robert Danbye, Andrew Kempe, Thomas Popyllwell, Michael Smith, William Swenson, Walter Meakyns and Lawrence Jackson, who say that

Thomas Shaa, the son, was of the full age of 21 years and more on 24 April last past: he was born in the parish of St. Brigide, within the suburbs of London, 24 April, 1538, and was baptized in the parish church of St. Brigide at the same time, as is witnessed by many worthy persons, in the presence of Thomas Barbor, gent., who had the wardship of the body and marriage of the said Thomas Shaa.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 92.

Matthew Loocke.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 1 February, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewit, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Matthew Loocke, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Robert Shurlocke, Andrew Kempe, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davie, Robert Danbye, Henry Callis, Guy Awood, Michael Smith, William Swanson, Lawrence Jackson, Stephen Walden, Robert Dunkin and John Benson, who say that

Matthew Loocke was not seised of any lands, tenements, or hereditaments within the City of London, in fee simple or otherwise.

The said Matthew died 26 February, 1551; Elizabeth Loocke is his daughter and next heir, and was then aged 6 months and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 93.

Henry Bushe.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 12 July, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewit, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Henry Bushe, citizen of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Robert Shurloke, Thomas Deuxell, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davy, Andrew Kempe, Henry Callis, Guy Awood, Michael . ., . . Walden, Thomas Ebden, Robert Dunkins and John Benson, who say that

Henry Bushe was seised of 1 messuage and all the buildings, shops, etc. thereto belonging, now or late in the tenure of Walter Millet and lately demised, inter alia, to William Werner, son of Richard Werner, situate in the parish of St. Margaret Moyzes in Friday Street, London; 2 messuages in the tenure of Michael Fox, lying in the said parish and street, as by charter thereof made dated 28 September, 2 Edward VI [1548], more fully appears; and 2 messuages in the said parish in the several tenures of John Bannister and Hugh Hodges, as by another charter thereof made, dated 9 July, 3 Edward VI [1549], it may appear.

So seised, the said Henry Bushe made his will 6 January, 1559, as follows:—

I will that Joan, my wife, shall have all my messuages, lands, etc., as well within the City of London as elsewhere, for her natural life; after her decease the same to come to Richard, my son, except my two messuages, with all the lands, etc. thereto belonging, situate in Eltham, co. Kent: to hold to him and his heirs for ever.

All the said premises are held of the Queen by fealty only, in free burgage and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £6.

Henry Bushe died 26 January, 1559; Richard Bushe is his son and next heir, and was then aged 18 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 94.

Thomas Cuttell.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 16 February, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewit, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Cuttell, citizen and tallow-chandler of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Robert Shurlocke, Thomas Deuxell, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davie, Robert Danbye, Henry Callis, Guy Awood, Michael Smith, William Swanson, Stephen . ., . . Ebden and Robert Dunkin, who say that

Thomas Cuttell was seised of 2 messuages and 2 tenements, together with shops, cellars, etc., lying together in Thames street, in the parish of St. Dunstan in the East, London, adjoining a capital messuage wherein Richard Sparre lately dwelt, to wit, 1 messuage in which the said Thomas Cuttell lived, called the Ankers, another messuage wherein Thomas Cunstable lately dwelt, now in the occupation of Christopher Draper, Alderman of London, 1 tenement next adjoining the said messuages, late in the tenure of Richard Yeoman and now in the occupation of George Badcocke, and 1 other tenement, lately inhabited by John Legin and now in the tenure of John Broke.

So seised, the said Thomas Cuttell, being a freeman of the City of London, made his will 17 March, 1556, as follows:—

I will that Rose, my wife, shall occupy the messuage wherein I now dwell during such time as she pleases, and after she leaves or dies then Richard Bell, late my apprentice, and Joan Cuttell, my brother's daughter, "they maryenge togither," shall have the same: to hold to them and their heirs for ever.

I desire my executrix to sell my messuage now in the tenure of Christopher Draper.

If my wife choose she may, after leaving the house in which I now live, occupy the messuage which George Badcocke now holds, for her life, without paying any rent for the same; after her death I desire that out of the profits thereof £5 4s. may be taken every year by the wardens of the said parish church of St. Dunstans, and they to distribute amongst the poor of the said parish 2s. 2d. every week, to wit, 13d. in wheaten bread and 13d. in money. And further, I will that at the end of every quarter of the year, with 16s. parcel of the issues of the said tenement, the said Churchwardens shall provide 1 quarter of beef and 1 peck of oatmeal, and shall distribute the same in turn amongst the poor prisoners of Newgate, Ludgate, the King's Bench, and the Marshalsey in Southwark, to the intent that they may be comforted by my said gift. And I desire that 34s. 8d., another parcel of the profits of the said messuage, shall be taken yearly by the said Churchwardens, and by them distributed every week to 2 of the poorest women, being inhabitants and householders of the said parish and of good name and fame.

I make the said Rose, my wife, sole executrix.

The said Joan married the said Richard Bell in the lifetime of the said Thomas Cuttell.

The said premises are held of the Queen in free burgage, to wit, by fealty only, and are worth per ann., clear, 40 marks.

Thomas Cuttell died 14 December last past; Margaret and Joan Cuttell are his next heirs, to wit, daughters of Robert Cuttell, brother of the said Thomas, and were then aged respectively, the said Margaret 20 years and more, and the said Joan 18 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 95.

Nicholas Russell.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 15 October, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewit, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Nicholas Russell, citizen and haberdasher of London, by the oath of Thomas Litton, Robert Shurlock, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davy, Henry Callis, Guy Awood, Thomas Poplewell, Michael Smith, William Swanson, Lawrence Jackson, Stephen Walden, Robert Dunkins and John Benson, who say that

Nicholas Russell was seised of 1 messuage situate in Friday street, in the parish of St. Matthew in the ward of Bredstrete, London; 1 messuage now or late in the tenure of James Kettell, lying in the parish of St. Michael at Queenhith, London; 1 messuage called the sign of the Pauntor in the said parish of St. Michael, now in the tenure of Thomas Bekingsalt, citizen and salter of London; 2 messuages in Bredstrete in the tenures of James Couper, salter, and William Scott, fishmonger; and 3 messuages in the several tenures of Edward Bray, knight, Lord Bray, John Bussher, and George Hawley, situate in the parish of St. Andrew near Bernard's Castle, London.

So seised, the said Nicholas Russell made his will 10 April, 1556, as follows:—

I give to my eldest son, John Russell, my house in Friday street wherein I now dwell.

To Nicholas Russell, my second son, all my houses and tenements in the Wardroppe, in the parish of St. Andrew by Castell Beinard.

To Richard Russell, my youngest son, my house at Queenhith, in the parish of St. Michael, wherein my cousin Rame (?) Scott now dwells.

Also all the houses and tenements I have bought of Thomas Bekingsale and which will come to me or mine after his death— all the said premises to come to my said 3 sons at their ages of 20: if they all die without issue, then the same shall come to my 2 daughters; if they die leaving no children, then the said premises to remain to Richard Russell, son of my brother Thomas, and to his children; if he die without issue, then I give the same to the Company and Fellowship of the Haberdashers for ever, upon condition that they bestow every quarter 40s. upon the poorest of the said Company either in meat, drink, or money.

One of the said messuages in Friday street is held of the Queen as of her manor of East Greenwich, co. Kent, in free socage, to wit, by fealty only and not in chief. The messuage in the tenure of James Kettell is held of the Queen as of her said manor, by fealty only, in free socage and not in chief. Of whom the residue of the said premises is held the jurors know not: they are worth per ann., clear, £12.

Nicholas Russell died 30 January, 1559; John Russell is his son and next heir, and was then aged 16 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 2, No. 96.

John Francke.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 21 March, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewet, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Francke, citizen and brewer of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Robert Shurlock, Thomas Deuxell, John Jakson, Robert Davye, Andrew Kemp, Henry Callys, Guy Wood, William Swanson, Lawrence Jakson, Stephen Walden, Robert Dunkyns and John Benson, who say that

John Francke was seised of the messuage called the Three Kinges, lying in East Smithfild, between the small bank [ripa] called the little wharf, belonging to a tenement called the Lyon, wherein Giles Harrison dwells, and between the tenement called the Katheryn Whele, in which John Donfield now lives, together with the said wharf to the said messuage called the Three Kinges belonging; 1 large house called a garner house, adjoining the said tenement called the Katheryn Wheale; and 1 tenement, curtilage, and garden, situate near the tenement of the said John Franke, called the Stonehouse, in the parish of St. Botolph, wherein John Jewer, cooper, sometime lived.

So seised, the said John Franke made his will 3 November, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557], as follows:—

I give all my lands, tenements, beerhouses, leases, etc. to Agnes Francke, my wife, for her natural life, on condition that she pay to my daughter Elizabeth Francke, when she attains her full age or marries, £15 yearly; after the death of my said wife the said Elizabeth shall have all the said premises "for to doo her pleasure with all" for ever; if my said daughter die without issue before my said wife, then I will that the children of my cousin Marke Adams shall have equal portions of my said lands, etc. for ever.

The messuages called the Three Kinges and the Garner House are held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, and are worth per ann., clear, £34. All other the premises are held of the Queen in common socage, by fealty and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £4 6s. 8d.

John Francke died 22 June, 1559; Elizabeth Francke is his daughter and next heir, and is now aged 13 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 97.

Anne Harper.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 8 October, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewett, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Anne Harper, by the oath of Robert Shurlock, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davie, Robert Danby, Henry Callis, Guy Awood, Michael Smith, Lawrence Jacson, Stephen Walden, Thomas Ebden, Robert Dunkin, William Swainson and John Benson, who say that

Anne Harper was seised of the third part of 2 messuages and 2 gardens lying within the precincts of the late Priory sometime of the Blackfriars within the City of London.

Another inquisition was before this time taken of these premises after the death of Marcellus Harper, brother of the said Anne. (See page 195.)

The said third part of the messuages and gardens is held of the Queen in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee, and is worth per ann., clear, 28s. 11d.

Anne Harper died 22 September last past. Frances, the wife of William Patrickson, gent., and Mary, the wife of Bartholomew Hales, gent., are her sisters and next heirs; the said Frances was then aged 25 years and more, and the said Mary 18 years and more.

Inq. p m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 98.

Thomas Hewes, doctor of medicine.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 15 March, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewit, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Hewes, doctor of medicine, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Robert Shurlocke, Thomas Deuxill, Robert Lee, Robert Davy, Henry Callis, Guy Awood, Michael Smith, William Swainson, Laurence Jackson, Stephen Walden, Thomas Ebden, Robert Dunkins, John Benson and John Jakson, who say that

Thomas Hewes was seised of 9 messuages now or late in the several tenures of Robert Hutton, William Baynton, Thomas Patenson, Gregory Richardson, William Walker, Joan Sparrowe, widow, John Harbiche, John Appowell and John Colson, lying together in Adlane alias Adellane and Woodstret, in the parish of St. Albans in Woodstret, in the ward of Crepelgate, London.

So seised, the said Thomas made his will 5 August, 1588, whereby he bequeathed all his messuages, lands, etc. in the City of London, co. Middlesex, or elsewhere, to Margaret, his wife, for her natural life, and after her death to Thomas Hewis, his son, and his heirs for ever.

The said premises are held of the Queen in free burgage, by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £10.

Thomas Hewis died 5 August, 1588; Thomas Hewis is his son and next heir, and is now aged 2 years 3 months and more.

The said Margaret still survives in London.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. qq.

William Watson.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 15 March, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewit, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of William Watson, citizen and clothworker of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Robert Shurlocke, Thomas Deuxill, Robert Lee, Robert Davye, Henry Callis, Guy Awood, Michael Smith, William Swainson, Laurence Jackson, Stephen Walden, Thomas Ebden, Robert Dunkins, John Benson and John Jackson, who say that

Before the death of the said William Watson, John Jaques and Roger Coyes were seised of all that capital messuage with a garden adjoining, and all the buildings, cellars, etc. thereto belonging, then in the tenure of the said William Watson, lying in Markelane alias Martlane, in the parishes of St. Olave and All Saints, Barking, next the Tower of London, in the ward of the Tower of London.

So seised, they for divers considerations demised to the said William Watson and to Anne, his wife, the said premises, which they, in the Court of Hustings held on Monday next before the feast of St. Martin the Bishop, 5 Edw. VI [1551], recovered against him: to hold to them and their heirs; and for default, the remainder thereof to the right heirs of the said William Watson for ever, as by the said charter, dated 20 November, 5 Edw. VI [1551], more fully appears.

The said capital messuage is held of the Queen in free burgage, by fealty only and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, £6.

William Watson died 20 November, 1559; William Watson is his son and next heir, and was then aged 6 years 6 months and more.

The said Anne still survives in the said parish.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 100.

Richard Maunsell.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 23 March, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewytt, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Richard Maunsell, citizen and writer [scriptor] of the City of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Robert Shurlocke, Thomas Dewxell, Robert Davy, Henry Callys, John Jakson, Guy Wood, Michael Smith, William Swaynson, Lawrence Jackson, Stephen Walden and Thomas Ebden, who say that

Richard Maunsell was seised of 9 messuages lying in the parish of Newyngton, in the tenure of Thomas Dixson; 1 messuage and 1 large garden in the tenure of Philip Innys; 12 messuages in Pursers Alley, in the parish of St. Olave in Southwarke, late in the tenure of Robert Grygg, deceased; 4 messuages in Sherborne Lane and Abchurche, within the City of London; and 2 messuages lying in the parish of St. Michael at Quenehyth, in the parish of St. Saviours, Southwark.

So seised, the said Richard Maunsell made his will 13 October, 1558, as follows [here given in English]:—

I will that Elynor Maunsell, my wife, have all my messuages, lands, etc. within the City of London and in the suburbs thereof; also in Southwark and in the town, parish, and fields of Newyngton, co. Surrey, for her natural life; and immediately after her decease I will that George, my son, have to him and his heirs for ever my said 9 tenements in the said parish of Newington, and my said messuage and large garden in the tenure of Philip Innys.

At the death of my said wife Robert Maunsell, my son, shall have to him and his heirs for ever all my messuages in Pursers Alley.

William Maunsell, my son, shall have to him and his heirs for ever all my messuages in Sherborne lane and Abchurche.

Emanuel Maunsell, my son, shall have to him and his heirs for ever all my messuages in the parish of St. Michael at Quenehith, in the said parish of St. Saviour, which were now or late in the tenure of Thomas Sole.

All the said premises are held of the Queen in free socage, as of her manor of Wendover Forrom, co. Bucks, by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £18.

Richard Maunsell died 17 October, 1558; George Maunsell is his son and next heir, and was then aged 19 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 101.

Nicholas Spackman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 15 October, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewit, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Nicholas Spackman, citizen and haberdasher of London, by the oath of . . . John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davie, Henry Calles, Guy Awood, Thomas Poplewell, Michael Smith, William Swainson, Lawrence Jackson, Stephen Walden, Thomas Ebden and Robert Dunkins, who say that

Nicholas Spackman was seised of 2 messuages and tenements . . . St. Martin within Ludgate, London, now or late in the tenure of John Jardley, citizen and haberdasher of London, sometime belonging to the late free Chapel of St. Martins le Grand; 1 messuage late in the tenure of the said Nicholas Spackman, in the said parish of St. Martin; 5 messuages in Pater Noster Row, sometime belonging to the late House of the Carthusians . . . now dissolved; 1 messuage in the tenure of George Allein, in the parish . . . Ludgate; 5 messuages in the tenure of William Petingall, in Pater Noster Row, in the parish of St. Faiths, London, formerly belonging to the late Chantry . . . Treworth Chantry, founded in the Cathedral Church of St. Pauls, London; all the lands, tenements, and hereditaments lying within the parish of St. Sepulchre without Newgate in the suburbs of London, which sometime were of William Celon, formerly of London, cutler; and 6 tenements lying together in the parish of St. Andrew next Beinard's Castell, London.

So seised, the said Nicholas Spackman made his will, 18 March, 1557, as follows:—

I give to Thomas, my son, all my messuages, lands, etc. in the parishes of St. Andrew next Beinard's Castle, and St. Sepulchre without Newgate, and my messuage in the parish of St. Martins next Ludgate: to hold to him and his heirs for ever, on condition that out of the issues thereof he pay yearly to his brother John Spackman, for his life, an annuity of £15, and to John Daniell and Agnes, his wife, for their lives, an annuity of 40s.

I give my 5 houses in the several tenures of Robert Greene, "cobler," William Seyforth, "Shum," Lewis Lloid, cloth worker, John Hasilwood, clothworker, and William Bonifante, haberdasher, in . . . parish of St. Gregory, London, to Joan, my wife, for her life; after her death, the same to remain to Stephen Spackman and his heirs, and for default, the remainder thereof to my right heirs for ever.

I give to Margaret Herbottell, my sister, for her life, my other 5 houses in the several tenures of John Knight . . . John Ditton, John Silvester, John Chambers and Hugh Patrike, clothworker, in Pater Noster Row, and after her decease to remain to Mary Pendted and her heirs; for default, to remain to Alice Pendred and her heirs; and for default, to revert to my right heirs for ever.

I give my tenement in the tenure of George Allein, in the said parish of St. Martin, to George Daniell for his life; and after his decease to remain to Alice Pendred, daughter of my daughter Katherine, and to her heirs; for default, to remain to my nephew Nicholas Spackman and his heirs; and in default, to revert to my right heirs for ever.

I will that Joan, the wife of my son Thomas, shall have for the term of her life my 2 houses in Fleetstreet, in the several tenures of John Austen and Robert Hall, cutler; after her decease, the same to go to the said Alice Pendred and to her heirs; for default, to remain to the said Mary Pendred and her heirs; for default, to remain to Thomas, my son, and his heirs; and for default, to revert to my right heirs for ever.

Two of the said messuages in the parish of St. Martin within Ludgate are held of the Queen in free burgage. The messuages in the tenure of the said Nicholas, in the said parish, are held of the Queen as of her manor of East Greenwich, co. Kent, by fealty only, in free socage and not in chief. The 5 messuages in the parish of St. Gregory in Pater Noster Row are held of the Queen in free socage, to wit, by fealty only and not in chief. The messuage in the tenure of George Allein is held of the Queen by fealty only, in free burgage and not in chief. The 5 messuages in the tenure of William Petingall are held of the Queen in free burgage, and not in chief. Of whom the residue of the premises is held the jurors know not: they are worth per ann., clear, £39 4s. 8d.

Nicholas Spackman died 3 July, 1560; John Spackman is his son and next heir, and was then aged 40 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 102.

Richard Tull.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 19 January, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewett, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Richard Tull, citizen and clothworker of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Robert Shurlock, Thomas Dtwxall, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davys, Robert Danby, Andrew Kempe, Henry Callys, Guy Awood, Thomas Poplewell, Michael Smith, William Swanson, Lawrence Jackson, Stephen Walden, Thomas Ebden and Robert Dunkyn, who say that

Before the death of the said Richard Tull, Jasper Fesaunte, of London, merchant, son and heir of Stephen Fesaunte, deceased, merchant of London, was seised of 1 messuage called Pykes Place, with all the buildings, etc. thereto belonging lying in the parish of St. Bartholomew the Less in the ward of Bradstrete.

So seised, the said Jasper, by charter dated 11 July, 33 Henry VIII [1541], granted the said premises to the said Richard Tull and his heirs for ever.

The said Richard made his will 30 June, 1559, as follows:—

I give all my lands, tenements, and hereditaments in the City of London, in Newington Grene in the parish of Islington, co. Middlesex, and in Newberye, co. Berkshire, as well freehold as copyhold, to Jane Shorter, my daughter, and to the heirs of her body; for default, the same to remain to the heirs of Robert Tull, my brother; for default, to Francis Tull, son of my brother John Tull, and to his heirs; and for default, the said premises to be sold by my executor, and the money therefrom arising to be distributed amongst the children of James Lynne and John Tull, late citizen and draper of London, deceased, and other my poor kinsfolk.

Of whom the said premises are held the jurors know not: they are worth per ann., clear, £10.

Richard Tull died 11 November, 1559; Jane, the wife of William Shorter, is his only daughter and next heir, and was then aged 16 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 103.

Thomas Whitlock.

Inqilisition taken at the Guildhall, 19 January, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewett, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Whitlock, citizen and merchant-tailor of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Robert Shurlock, John Jackson, Thomas Dewxall, Robert Lee, Robert Davys, Robert Danby, Andrew Kempe, Henry Callys, Guy Awood, Thomas Poplewell, Michael Smith, William Swanson, Lawrence Jackson, Stephen Walden, Thomas Ebden and Robert Dunkyn, who say that

Before the death of Thomas Whitlock, John Edlyn, citizen and innholder of London, now of Ardyngworth, co. Northampton, was seised of 1 messuage called the George, with the shops, cellars, etc. thereto belonging, late in the tenure of Anthony Silver, lying in Westsmythfelde, in the parish of St. Sepulchre without Newgate, in the suburbs of London, to wit, between the tenement or inn there called the Ramme on the west, the high street of Smythfeld on the south, the tenement in the tenure of Rowland Twedall, sadler, on the east, and the tenement belonging to the Chamber [Cam'e] of London, in the tenure of Nicholas Cooke, innholder, in part, and the tenement of the said Thomas Whitlok in part, on the north.

So seised, the said John Edlyn, by charter dated 29 April, 5 Edward VI [1551], in consideration of £50 to him in hand paid by the said Thomas Whitlok, granted to him and his heirs for ever all the said premises.

Thomas Whitlok made his will 8 December, 1558, as follows:—

I bequeath all my lands, etc. within the City of London, in Northamptonshire and elsewhere, to Joan, my wife, for her life; after her decease the same to remain to my son, "yf God send me any," and to his heirs; if I have no son, or if he die without heirs, the said premises shall remain to my daughters, to be equally divided amongst them.

The said premises are held of the Queen in free socage, and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £14 10s. 8d.

Thomas Whitlok died 10 October, 1559; Isabella, Katherine, and Sarah Whitlok are his daughters and next heirs, and were then aged respectively, the said Isabella 4 years and more, the said Katherine 3 years and more, and the said Sara 9 months and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 104.

John Swingfild.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 15 October, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewitt, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Swingfild, citizen and "stok" fishmonger of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Robert Shurlock, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davy, Henry Callis, Guy Awood, Thomas Poplewell, Michael Smith, William Swainson, Lawrence Jakson, Stephen Walden, Thomas Ebden, Robert Dunkins and John Benson, who say that

John Swingfeld was seised of 21 tenements called the Alley, now or late in the tenure of William Daniell, situate in Southwarke; 1 other tenement there in the tenure of John Millor; 1 tenement there in the tenure of William Daye; 2 gardens there in the tenure of William Emerson; 2 tenements there in the tenure of John Piggion; 1 garden there in the tenure of William Holden; 1 other garden there in the tenure of Cuthbert Foxe; 1 other garden there in the tenure of James Draufilde; 1 other garden there in the tenure of Richard Diplige; 1 garden there in the tenure of Christopher Hampton; 1 other garden there in the tenure of Robert Woodwarde; 1 small house called a Coole house there in the tenure of — Holden, widow; and 1 garden there lying on the west part of the highway there called Kentishestrete, in the tenure of Hugh Currant, as by deed thereof made by Richard Horton and Richard Liners, citizens and fishmongers of London, to the said John Swingfeld, dated 14 March, 7 Edward VI [1553], more fully appears; all those messuages, lands, and tenements lying in the parishes of St. Olave and St. Mildred, within the City of London, now or late in the tenures of Richard Tompson, Peter Moone, Nicholas Harison and George Conyer; and 1 shop with all cellars, etc. in the several tenures of John Bromesgrave, fishmonger, and Alice Brokwell, widow, lying in the parish of St. Nicholas Coldably in Old Fishstrete, to wit, between the shop now in the tenure of John Wrighte on the west, south and north.

So seised, the said John Swingfild made his will 30 September, 1558, as follows:—

I will that one half of my lands, tenements, etc., lying within the City of London, and in Southwark and Holborn, chiefly the half which is let out with reparations, and wherewith least trouble will be had in receiving the rents, shall remain to Edith, my wife, during her natural life. The other moiety, together with the reversion of the first moiety, I give to my son Stephen Swingfild and to his heirs for ever; for default, all the said premises shall remain to the children of my son Thomas Edmundes, and of my daughter Alice, his wife, and to their heirs for ever.

Of whom the said premises are held the jurors know not: they are worth per ann., clear, £40.

John Swingfeld died 10 October, 1558; Stephen Swingfeld is his son and next heir, and is now aged 30 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 105.

Thomas Curtys, Knight.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 16 February, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Hewyt, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Curtys, knight, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Robert Shurlock, Thomas Dewxall, John Jackson, Robert Lee . . . Michael Smith, William Swainson, Thomas Ebden . . . Robert Dunkin, Robert Danbie, Andrew Kempe and John Benson, who say that

Thomas Curtys was seised of 8 messuages, 1 garden, and 1 orchard in Lymestrete, within the parish of St. Dionisius Barkchurch, London, which he purchased to him and his heirs of John Heyth, citizen and cooper of London; 1 capital messuage and 2 small messuages thereto adjoining in Lymestrete, now in the several tenures of Francis Luckadale and Bastian Sulcher: which the said Thomas Curtys purchased to him and his heirs of Charles Tuke, son and heir of Brian Tuke, knight, deceased; 8 messuages and 2 gardens in Lymestrete in the several tenures of Henry Maye, Katherine Frauncis, Anthony Tut hill, Henry Martin, Thomas Smyth, William Huser, Anne Horten and John Gates; 1 messuage in Fanch Churchstrete, within the said parish of St. Dionisius Backchurche, in the tenure of William Curtys; 3 messuages within the parish of St. Gabriel Fanchurch, in the several tenures of Claudius (Cladii) Pareson, Lewis Davye and Francis Cassidonye; 1 messuage and 1 garden in Marklane; and 4 messuages in Lumberdstrete within the parish of St. Edmund: all which said premises are held of Thomas duke of Norfolk, but by what services the jurors know not, and are worth per ann., clear, £155 13s. 4d.

The said Thomas Curtys was likewise seised of 2 messuages, 30 acres of land, 6 acres of meadow, 20 acres of pasture, and 5 acres of wood in Walthamstowe Tonie and Highambensted, co. Essex, which are held of John Heron, esq., as of his manor of Highinhill, and are worth per ann., clear, £12.

Thomas Curtys died 27 November last past; Anne Stucley, now the wife of Thomas Stucley, esq., is his kinswoman and next heir, to wit, daughter and heir of Thomas Curtys, son and heir of the said Thomas, and is now aged 21 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 106.

Thomas Mayott.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 8 February, 2 Eliz. [1560], before William Huytt, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Mayott, citizen and merchant tailor of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, Robert Shurlocke, Thomas Deuxell, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davye, Robert Danbye, Andrew Kempe, Henry Callys, Guy Awood, Michael Smith, William Swainson, Lawrence Jackson, Stephen Walden, Robert Dunkin and John Benson, who say that

Thomas Mayott was seised of 1 messuage, with all the shops, etc., thereto belonging, situate in Budgrowe in the parish of St. Anthony London, sometime in the tenure of Cuthbert Warcoppe, mercer, and late in that of the said Thomas.

So seised, the said Thomas Mayott made his will 24 September last past, and thereby bequeathed the said messuage to Elizabeth his wife until his children came to the age of 21 years.

The said messuage is held of the Queen in chief by the service of the 10th part of a knight's fee, and is worth per ann., clear, £4 10s.

Thomas Mayott died 30 September last past; John Mayott is his son and next heir, and was then aged 1 year and more.

Inq. p.m., 2 Elizabeth, p. 2, No. 20.